Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS631531 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 22, 1899
Filing dateJan 20, 1898
Priority dateJan 20, 1898
Publication numberUS 631531 A, US 631531A, US-A-631531, US631531 A, US631531A
InventorsDudley A Sargent
Original AssigneeDudley A Sargent
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mechanism for applying muscular strength of the human body.
US 631531 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented Aug. 22, I899.

No. 63l,53l.

D. A. SARGENT. HEOHANISM FOB APPLYING MUSCULAB STRENGTH OF THE HUMAN BOD Y.

W/TNE55EE Q; I.

T i kph/ENTER- T ag 5%, W

Patented Aug. 22, I899.

No. 63!,53l.

D. A. S ARGENT. MECHANISM FOR APPLYING MUSCULAR STRENGTH OF THE HUMAN BODY.

(Application filed Jan. 20. 1898.;

3 Sheets-Sheet 2,

'No Model.)

W/ TNEEEEE- m: yonms PETERS co, womuma, WASHINGTON. u, c.

No. 63l,53|. Patented Aug. 22, I899.

,DLA. SARGENT. MECHANISM FOR APPLYlNG MUSBULAB STRENGTH OF THE HUMAN BODY.

(Application filed Jan. 20, 1898.) (No Model.) 3 SheetsSheet 3.

WIT-M55555- h W GfQ/M 2M4 Q.JMW

Tm: norms Prrzns co. wo'rou'mo" vusumuwu, w. c.

UNITED STATES.

PATENT ()FFI IE.

DUDLEY. A. SARGENT, or CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS.

MECHANlSM FOR APPLYING MUSCULAR STRENGTH OF THE HUMAN BODY.

SPECIFICATION formingpart of Letters Patent No. 631,531, dated August 22, 1899. Applinati'onfiled.TanuaryZO,1898- Serial No. 667,290. (No model.)

To all whmn it may concern:

Be it known thatL'DUDLEY A. SARGENT, a citizen of the United States, residing at Cambridge, in the county of Middlesex and State of Massachusetts, have invented certain new and useful improvements in mechanism for applying the muscular strength of the human body as a motive power to the operation of stationary exercising-machines and to the propulsion of Vehicles on land or water for exercise, pleasure, or other purpose, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to the use of the body for either exercise or propulsion; and it consists in the mechanism therefor.

I am aware that in some kinds of land-vehicles the power of both arms and legs has been simultaneously applied and that'in row ing boats and shells the power of the arms has been obtained and supplemented by the feet being braced and in the case of sliding seats by the flexing of the legs, which permits of a more extended stroke; but my purpose is, primarily, to utilize the entire muscular strength by applying or communicating to various sorts of power-applying levers-Isuch as the wheels of vehicles,balance-Wheels, oars, sculls, paddles, paddle} wheels, propeller shafts, &c.the power of the trunk, arms, legs, and feet simultaneously by bringing all these parts of the body to bear upon the power-applyinglever or levers at the same time. Even if no power be taken from one of these three parts of the body2'. e., trunk, arms, and legs and feetyetthe simultaneous application of the powerof the remaining two according to my plan will cause the passive movement of the unemployed part, and so assist the returning circulation, and so will be, so far as I know, novel in the mechanism described by me therefor. p

I attain my objects by aid of the mechan ism illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in Which- I Figure 1 is a side elevation of a tricycle: vehicle provided with said mechanism, and Fig. 2is a plan "of the same. Fig. 3 is a sectional elevation of a 'sing'le-scull'boat, provided with said mechanism, and Fig. 4 isa plan of the same. Fig. 5 is a plan view of a boat, showing the application of power to one oar. Figs. 6, 7, and 8 are details to be re-' ferred to later on.

Fig. 9 is an elevationof a bicycle provided with said mechanism. Fig. 10 is a detail of the clutch mechanism. Fig. 11 is a section on line 11 11 of Fig. 10.

The framework and the supported mechanism will vary according to the variety of vehicle or stationary structure proposed.

In Figs. 1 and 2, A is a supporting framework or truss. Traveling structure B is a seat having the seat-truck G, shown as double, to hold it upon the track, and the adjust- 7 able seat-back 15. Traveling structure 0 is a foot-rest having the truck H, like that of the seat-truck, and strap c D D, hand-levers; E, the running-wheel or power-applying lever; F, the steering-wheel; J, the steering-rod, having a segment K; L, the steeringhead, having the pinion M. The traveling structures composed of a seat and truck and of a foot-rest and truck are shown mounted upon rollers on the track on the framework. Of course the track might be double and single rollers used. The back 15 is strong enough to brace against, so as to apply the power of the trunk to the seat. The hand-levers D D are loosely pivoted to the framework. To the hand-levers are loosely pivoted in a proper location the connecting-rods c 0, running to the traveling foot-rest, and the connecting-rods (1d, running to the traveling seat. The connect-ing-rod a runs from said seat to one crank 61, and the connecting-rod b from said footrest to the other crank -q upon the gear 0,

which meshes with the pinion r on the axle of the power-applying lever or wheelE, which is tight on the axle. A clutch or chain-andsprocket mechanism could be used instead of the described gears O and 7. Intermediate between the feet the steering-rodJ plays between rollsj. The segment K connects with the pinion M on the steering-head L, which' is socketed in the forked standard carrying the forward and steering wheel F. The seat should have a strengthening-brace b and the back 15, to brace against, is adjustable verticallyand horizontally. The operation of this apparatus is as follows: The occupant grasps the hand-levers and, the feet being confined upon the foot-rest-by strap a and the body braced against the seat-back 15 as he leans back, exerts the strength of the arms, legs, and body to carry the hand-levers with him and push the foot-rest forward and the seat backward at the same time, thus straightening the body backward, flexing the arms, andstraighteningthelegs. Atthenextmovement the occupant straightens the arms,bends forward the body, and flexes the legs, whereby the hand-levers are pushed forward, the seat, which is hollowed, is drawn forward, and the foot rest is drawn backward, the entire strength of the body being exerted upon the hand-levers, the seat, and the foot-rest. The connecting-rods c 0 (Z (Z connect the hand-levers, seat, and foot-rest. As the connectingrod 11 runs from the foot-rest to one crank q and the connecting-rod a from the seat to another crank q upon the gear 0, which connects with the running or power-applying lever-wheel E, this forward-and-backward motion will apply the entire muscular force of the trunk, legs, and arms to the revolution of the lever-wheel and thereby propel the vehicle. Of course one of the traveling structures may be made immovable; but this will subtract so much from the power applied. The steering is accomplished by the rod J, whose segment K gears with a segment on the steering-rod L and plays between rollers j in such a position as to come normally between the feet of the occupant. The foot-rest O is so constructed and arranged as to be capable of a vibratory movement, so as to move the rod J by the feet, as desired. )Vith a different vehicle the foot-rest may be divided, as shown later on.

In Figs. 3 and 4 my invention isapplied to a single scull and in Fig. 5 is applied to one oar. The framework A is placed on or part of the boat 20, having the outriggers X X. The oar-handles are D D, and the blades or power-applyinglevers E. (Notshown.) To these handles at 3 are attached two cordsa connecting the oars with the foot-rest and seat by playing around rollers 1, and Z) connecting the oars with the foot-rest and playing around rollers 2. Straps S, (not shown;) Fig. 5, limit the distance which the seat and foot-rest can travel. The seat, seat-back, foot-rest, and rollers are so substantially like those of Figs. 1 and 2 as to require no further description. The operation employing the body, arms, and legs will be understood from the description of Figs. 1 and 2. Figs. 3and 4 show the boat and oars in a position to make a stroke, the legs being flexed and the arms being straight and the body bent forward. The oarsman leans back as he makes his stroke, thus pushing the seat toward the bow and the foot-rest toward the stern. On the recovery as he leans forward the seat is pulled toward the stern and the foot-rest toward the bow, while the arms are straightened and the legs and body are flexed to enable repetition of the stroke. The application of the power of the frame, the foot-rest, and seat to the oars or lever-handles through the cords will be evident, and it will be seen that the power of the body and legs applied to and through these traveling structures contributes to returning the oar to position, as well as to moving the blades or power-applying levers E on making the stroke, and also that the movement of the foot-rest controlled by the cords is such as toavoid the tendency to drive the boat astern, which occurs when the ordinary stationary foot-rest is used. In Fig. 5 the boat 20 constitutes or supports the framework A, having outrigger X, supporting the handle of the oar D with its lever-blade E. (Not shown.) Cord a, attached at 3, connects the handle of the oar with the seat by running around rollers 1 on the framework and footrest and being fastened to the sides of the seat, and the cord 11, fastened to the oarhandle at 3,1'uns around rollers 2 on the framework and foot-rest and is fastenedto the framework at 4. The seat and foot-rest are substantially as already described, and the operation will be understood without further description.

I show in details 6, 7, and 8 some additional and sllghtly-dilferent adaptations of my invention to difierent power-applying levers. Thus in Fig. 6, E the power-applying lever, is a paddle-wheel having the pinion F, which meshes with the gear 0, having the cranks q, to which run the connecting-rods a b, as described in describing Figs. land 2. In Figs. 7 and 8 I show the same levers, cranks, and gear 0, meshingwith pinion F, and two beveled gears F and F which turn the propellershaft E as the power-applying lever and balance-wheels E to carry the cranks by the dead-centers. In Figs. 7 and 8 the connecting-rods a b, cranks q q, and gear 0 may be applied simply to the turning of heavy balance-wheels E, (the remaining parts F, F and F being omitted,) thus furnishing a stationary exercising gymnasium apparatus which as a whole is substantially like the mechanism shown in Figs. 1 and 2 except that balance-wheels (or, if preferred,frictionwheels) replace power-applying lever-wheels. Figs. 7 and 8 both show the adaptation of the mechanism to a propeller and also to a stationary exercising-machine by omitting the parts F, F and F.

It will be seen that fora shell,paddle-wheel, or propeller boat the required steering apparatus may be substantially like that of Figs. 1 and 2 by simply adding a cross-bar and cords to run from it back to the rudder-bar.

The application of my invention to bicycles is shownin Fig. 9. The principle is the same. The mechanical differences arise only from a two-wheeled vehicle being used. The chief differences are in the connecting mechanism for applying the power of the handles and cords to the lever-wheel; but mechanicallythe general mechanism therefor is equally well known. The seat 13 is shown as stationary (but may be movable, as hereinafter explained) upon the upper part of truss A and the foot-rest as traveling upon the upper and lower truss. The ordinary bicycle-pedals enable the rider to mount and start the bi cycle, as usual, the pedals being connected, as shown, by an intermediate gearing with the driving or lever wheel. The bicycle having been started, however, the rider can grasp the handles D on cords b which are fastened at the arms 5 on the steering-bar socketed in the forward standard, play over a pulley 6 on the foot-rest and a pulley 7 on an arm from the forward standard, while cords b fastened at pins 8 on the foot-rest, run around and are fastened to the free pulleys O O at 12, Fig. 11, and then run over pulleys 9 on the forward standard and are fastened at pins 10 on the foot-rest. The clutch N has the gear 0 and ratchetQ solid on shaft 13, the revolving disks or pulleys O O'free to move in one direction to turn the shaft and in the other without turning the shaft, and cylinder-rolls R. In operation, when the bicycle is propelled through the pulleys, the rider, drawing back upon the pulleys, pushes the foot-rest forward. As he bends forward the foot-rest is pulled backward and pulls the cords and handles forward, and thus the rider takes a position to repeat the stroke. The steering is accomplished by adjusting the pull upon the arms 5.

The foot-rest in Fig. 9 may be (although not so shown) constructed in two parts, and then the movements of the arms and legs may both alternate-that is, asthe right leg goes forward the right arm is drawn back, and

vice versa. In such case there must be two cords 1) upon two pulleys O 0, Fig. 11. Figs. 10 and 11 show the bicycle-clutch and ratchet mechanism, by which'when the rider bends forward and the foot-rest is drawn backward (or half the foot-rest is drawn backward, if it be constructed Qlll two parts) the free pulley is allowed to revolve in the opposite direction without affecting the gear. The plate let is omitted in Fig. 10 to show the rollerclutch.

The seat B in Fig. 9 may, as above said, be m ade movable by attaching a cord (not shown) to seat 13. to run over a pulley on the headbar and be attached to the foot-rest, or such cord may be fastened to the seat and footrest, as in the apparatus of Fig. 5. In such case the back 15 should be adjustable'and part of the seat, in order to brace against it; but such arrangement will be readily understood from the seat and seat-back of Figs. 1 and 2.

It will now be seen that my invention enables accoinplishingthe proposed purposes by the means described and indicated, which are of course capable of modification. The apparatus as I' have shown and described the same, with such equivalents or modifications as will be within the scope of mechanical skill, is fitted to carry out my purpose to enable the simultaneous application of the muscular power of the trunk, arms, and legs and feet, or of the trunk and arms, or of the trunk and legs, or of the legs and arms, as I propose, either in stationary exercising-machines or in vehicles of various sorts for land and Water navigation, including sculling, paddling, and also ice and snow navigation, to which my invention can be readily applied by adapting the power-applying-lever mechanism to the nature of the particular surface which is to he traveled or navigated. I

Having described my invention, what I claim is 1. In apparatus for applying the muscular force of the body to exercise or locomotion, operating hand-levers, power-applying lever or levers, a traveling foot-rest, and connections running therefrom to the operating hand-levers and to the power-applying lever or levers; substantially as described.

2. In apparatus for applying the muscular force of' the body to exercise or locomotion, the combination of a framework adapted to receive the operator and to sustain the connected mechanism; a traveling seat provided with a back, running upon and normallyundetachable from said framework; a traveling foot-rest provided with a foot-holding strap,

running upon and normally undetachable from said framework; hand-levers fulcrumed upon said framework and adapted to be grasped by thehands of the operator; apowerapplying lover or levers; and connections running from said traveling seat to the handlevers and to the power-applying levers, and connections running from the foot-rest to the hand-levers and to the power-applyinglever or levers; substantially as described and shown.

3. In apparatus for applying the muscular force of the body to exercise or locomotion,

in combination with a supporting-framework, a seat traveling upon and normally undetachable from saidv framework; operating handlevers fulcrumed upon said framework; a power-applying lever or levers; and connections running from said seat to said operating hand-levers and to said power-applying lever orlevers; substantially as described and shown.

4. In apparatus for-applying the muscular force of the body to exercise or locomotion, in combination with a supporting-framework and a seat thereon, a foot-rest traveling upon and normally undetachable from said frame Work operating hand-levers fulcrumed upon said framework; apower-applying lever or levers; and connections running from said traveling foot-rest to said operating hand-levers and to said power-applying lever or levers; substantially as described and shown.

5. In an apparatus for applying the muscular force of the body to exercise or locomotion, the combination of the steering-wheel F; two running wheels, on one of which, the powerapplying wheel E, is the pinion r; the gear 0 and cranks q q; the framework A; the traveling foot-rest O, truck H, whose double rollers normally hold the same upon the track, and foot-retaining strap 0 the traveling seat B, double rollers G, and adjustable back 15; the hand-levers D fulcrumed upon the frameworkA the connecting-rods (Z loosely pivoted to said seat and to said hand-levers; the conmeeting-rod a loosely pivoted to said seat and to a crank q; the connecting-rod b loosely pivoted to said traveling foot-rest and to a crank q; connecting-rods c loosely pivoted to said footrest and to said hand-levers; the standard L carrying the wheel F; the pinion M and quadrant K gearing with said pinion; and the steeringbar J j adapted to be oscillated through the foot-restO; all substantially as described.

(3. In apparatus for applying the muscular force of the body to exercise or locomotion, in combination with the framework A, the traveling seat 15, normally undetaohable rollers G, and adjustable back 15; the traveling foot-rest O, normally undetaohable rollers, and the foot-holding strap the hand-levers D fulcrumed upon the framework A; the power-applyin g lever-wheel E; the small gear 9* and the gear 0, to which is attached the cranks q q; the rod a running from said traveling seat to one of said cranks q; the rods (Z running from said seat to the handle-lever D; the rod b running from said traveling footrest to one of said cranks q; and the rods 0 running from said foot-rest to said handlelevers D; all substantially as described and shown.

7. In apparatus for applying the muscular force of the body to exercise or locomotion, in combination with the framework A, the traveling seat B, normally undetachable rollers G, and adjustable back 15; the hand-levers D fulcrumed upon the framework A; the power-applying lever-wheel E; gear 7; gear 0, and a crank q attached to gear 0; a rod a running from said traveling seat to crank q; and the rods (1 running from said seat to the operating hand-levers D; substantially as described and shown.

8. In apparatus for applying the muscular force of the body to exercise or locomotion, in combination with a framework and a seat, the traveling foot-rest C and rollers G there for normally undetachable from the framework; the hand-levers D; the lever-wheel E, pinion 0', gear 0, and a crank q; the rod b connecting said foot-rest with crank q; and rods 0 0 connecting said traveling foot-rest with said operating-levers D; substantially as described.

In witness whereof I hereunto subscribe my name, in presence of two witnesses, this 15th day of January, 1898.

DUDLEY A. SARGENT.

Witnesses:

L. O. SARGENT, CHARLES II. HANSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4563000 *Oct 26, 1984Jan 7, 1986Sears, Roebuck And Co.Rowing apparatus
US5354083 *Dec 18, 1990Oct 11, 1994Qingshan LiuDrive system for muscle-powered equipment and vehicles, in particular bicycles
US5601301 *Sep 30, 1994Feb 11, 1997Liu; QingshanDrive system for muscle-powered equipment and vehicles, in particular bicycles
US6764089Mar 20, 2002Jul 20, 2004Robert DrymalskiManually powered drive mechanism and vehicle employing same
US7195264Jul 2, 2004Mar 27, 2007Robert DrymalskiManually powered vehicle having improved steering
US7654545 *Dec 4, 2006Feb 2, 2010Millirans Mathew SVehicle for exercising
US7731637May 9, 2008Jun 8, 2010D Eredita MichaelSimulated rowing machine
US7753386Jul 13, 2010Robert DrymalskiSteering mechanism and method for a manually powered vehicle
US8157280Apr 17, 2012Morse Cycle Company LlcManually powered drive mechanism with steering member and vehicle employing same
US9079061Sep 24, 2013Jul 14, 2015Matthew S. MilliransVehicle for exercising
US20050087952 *Jul 2, 2004Apr 28, 2005Robert DrymalskiManually powered vehicle having improved steering
US20050179233 *Feb 17, 2005Aug 18, 2005Hogan Larry R.Locking device for gooseneck trailers
US20070114086 *Sep 22, 2005May 24, 2007Robert GlessnerVehicle propulsion system and vehicles adapted to include propulsion system
US20070246905 *Mar 26, 2007Oct 25, 2007Robert DrymalskiSteering mechanism and method for a manually powered vehicle
US20080280736 *May 9, 2008Nov 13, 2008D Eredita Michael ASimulated Rowing Machine
US20100264621 *Jun 29, 2010Oct 21, 2010Robert DrymalskiManually powered drive mechanism with steering member and vehicle employing same
US20120061938 *May 22, 2009Mar 15, 2012Luciano LilloVehicle at Contemporary Stretching and Contraction Action of the Lower and Upper Limbs
WO2008141160A2 *May 9, 2008Nov 20, 2008D Eredita MichaelSimulated rowing machine
WO2008141160A3 *May 9, 2008Feb 12, 2009Eredita Michael DSimulated rowing machine
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationB62M1/12