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Publication numberUS6328417 B1
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 09/575,176
Publication dateDec 11, 2001
Filing dateMay 23, 2000
Priority dateMay 23, 2000
Fee statusPaid
Publication number09575176, 575176, US 6328417 B1, US 6328417B1, US-B1-6328417, US6328417 B1, US6328417B1
InventorsKia Silverbrook
Original AssigneeSilverbrook Research Pty Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ink jet printhead nozzle array
US 6328417 B1
Abstract
An ink jet printhead nozzle array 14 includes a plurality of nozzle assemblies 10. Each nozzle assembly 10 comprises an ink ejection nozzle 22, an actuator 28 and a connecting member 26 interconnecting the nozzle 22 with its actuator 28. The nozzle assemblies 10 are arranged in rows 72, 74. The nozzles 22 of the assemblies 10 of one row 72 nest between the connecting members 26 of adjacent nozzle assemblies 10 of the other rows 74. The actuators 28 of the assemblies 10 of both rows 72, 74 are arranged on the same side of the rows 72, 74.
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Claims(7)
I claim:
1. An ink jet printhead nozzle array which includes a plurality of nozzle assemblies, each nozzle assembly comprising an ink ejection nozzle, an actuator and a connecting member interconnecting the nozzle with its actuator, the nozzle assemblies being arranged in rows with the nozzles of the assemblies of one row nesting between the connecting members of adjacent nozzle assemblies of the other row and the actuators of the assemblies of both rows being arranged on the same side of the rows.
2. The array of claim 1 in which the nozzle of each assembly is moveable and is displaced by means of its associated actuator for effecting ink ejection.
3. The array of claim 2 in which the actuator of each assembly is a thermal bend actuator, the connecting member being in the form of an arm having one end connected to, and extending from, the actuator and having the moveable nozzle fast with an opposed end.
4. The array of claim 1 in which the actuators of said other row are received between the connecting members of said one row.
5. The array of claim 1 in which the nozzles of the assemblies are shaped to facilitate close packing of the nozzles.
6. The array of claim 5 in which the nozzles are substantially hexagonally shaped.
7. The array of claim 1 in which the printhead is a multi-color printhead, each color having two rows of nozzle assemblies associated with it and the actuators of all of the rows extending in the same direction.
Description
CO-PENDING APPLICATIONS

Various methods, systems and apparatus relating to the present invention are disclosed in the following co-pending applications filed by the applicant or assignee of the present invention simultaneously with the present application: 09/575,197 09/575,195 09/575,159 09/575,132 09/575,123 09/575,148 09/575,130 09/575,165 09/575,153 09/575,118 09/575,131 09/575,116 09/575,144 09/575,139 09/575,186 09/575,185 09/575,191 09/575,145 09/575,192 09/575,181 09/575,193 09/575,156 09/575,183 09/575,160 09/575,150 09/575,169 09/575,184 09/575,128 09/575,180 09/575,149 09/575,179 09/575,133 09/575,143 09/575,187 09/575,155 09/575,196 09/575,198 09/575,178 09/575,164 09/575,146 09/575,174 09/575,163 09/575,168 09/575,154 09/575,129 09/575,124 09/575,188 091575,189 09/575,162 09/575,172 09/575,170 09/575,171 09/575,161 09/575,141 09/575,125 09/575,142 09/575,140 09/575,190 09/575,138 09/575,126 09/575,127 09/575,158 09/575,117 09/575,147 09/575,152 09/575,176 09/575,151 09/575,177 09/575,175 09/575,115 09/575,114 09/575,113 09/575,112 09/575,111 09/575,108 09/575,109 09/575,110 09/575,182 09/575,173 09/575,194 09/575,136 09/575,119 09/575,135 09/575,157 09/575,166 09/575,134 09/575,121 09/575,137 09/575,167 09/575,120 09/575,122.

The disclosures of these co-pending applications are incorporated herein by cross-reference.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to an ink jet printhead. More particularly, the invention relates to an ink jet printhead nozzle array.

BACKGROUND TO THE INVENTION

In ink jet printheads, the more closely packed the nozzles of an array are, the better the print quality.

Further, where a nozzle is stationery and an actuator is used to eject ink from the nozzle, such ink is ejected substantially normal to the substrate. However, where the nozzle is displaceable, ink is ejected from the nozzle at a slight angle. If nozzles in the array are directed to be displaced in opposite directions, i.e. as mirror images of one another, the ink droplets ejected from such nozzles are offset with respect to the perpendicular to a greater extent. This may result in a degradation of the print quality.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

According to the invention, there is provided an ink jet printhead nozzle array which includes a plurality of nozzle assemblies, each nozzle assembly comprising an ink ejection nozzle, an actuator and a connecting member interconnecting the nozzle with its actuator, the nozzle assemblies being arranged in rows with the nozzles of the assemblies of one row nesting between connecting members of adjacent nozzle assemblies of the other row and the actuators of the assemblies of both rows being arranged on the same side of the rows.

In this specification the term “nozzle” is to be understood as an element defining an opening and not the opening itself.

The nozzle of each assembly may be moveable and may be displaced by means of its associated actuator for effecting ink ejection.

The actuator of each assembly may be a thermal bend actuator, the connecting member being in the form of an arm having one end connected to, and extending from, the actuator and having the moveable nozzle fast with an opposed end.

The actuators of said other row may be received between the connecting member of said one row.

The nozzles of the assemblies may be shaped further to facilitate close packing of the nozzles. Preferably, the nozzles are substantially hexagonally shaped.

The printhead may be a multi-color printhead, each color having two rows of nozzle assemblies associated with it and the actuators of all of the rows may extend in the same direction.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The invention is now described by way of example with reference to the accompanying diagrammatic drawings in which:

FIG. 1 shows a three dimensional, schematic view of a nozzle assembly for an ink jet printhead;

FIGS. 2 to 4 show a three dimensional, schematic illustration of an operation of the nozzle assembly of FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 shows a three dimensional view of a nozzle array, in accordance with the invention, constituting an ink jet printhead;

FIG. 6 shows an enlarged scale, part of the array of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 shows a three dimensional view of an ink jet printhead including a nozzle guard;

FIGS. 8a to 8 r show three dimensional views of steps in the manufacture of a nozzle assembly jet printhead;

FIGS. 9a to 9 r show sectional side views of the manufacturing steps;

FIGS. 10a to 10 k show layouts of masks used in various steps in the manufacturing process;

FIGS. 11a to 11 c show three dimensional views of an operation of the nozzle assembly manufactured according to the method of FIGS. 8 and 9; and

FIGS. 12a to 12 c show sectional side views of an operation of the nozzle assembly manufactured according to the method of FIGS. 8 and 9.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Referring initially to FIG. 1 of the drawings, a nozzle assembly, in accordance with the invention is designated generally by the reference numeral 10. An ink jet printhead has a plurality of nozzle assemblies 10 arranged in an ink array 14 (FIGS. 5 and 6) on a silicon substrate 16. The array 14 will be described in greater detail below.

The assembly 10 includes a silicon substrate or wafer 16 on which a dielectric layer 18 is deposited. A CMOS passivation layer 20 is deposited on the dielectric layer 18.

Each nozzle assembly 12 includes a nozzle 22 defining a nozzle opening 24, a connecting member in the form of a lever arm 26 and an actuator 28. The lever arm 26 connects the actuator 28 to the nozzle 22.

As shown in greater detail in FIGS. 2 to 4 of the drawings, the nozzle 22 comprises a crown portion 30 with a skirt portion 32 depending from the crown portion 30. The skirt portion 32 forms part of a peripheral wall of a nozzle chamber 34 (FIGS. 2 to 4 of the drawings). The nozzle opening 24 is in fluid communication with the nozzle chamber 34. It is to be noted that the nozzle opening 24 is surrounded by a raised rim 36 which “pins” a meniscus 38 (FIG. 2) of a body of ink 40 in the nozzle chamber 34.

An ink inlet aperture 42 (shown most clearly in FIG. 6 of the drawing) is defined in a floor 46 of the nozzle chamber 34. The aperture 42 is in fluid communication with an ink inlet channel 48 defined through the substrate 16.

A wall portion 50 bounds the aperture 42 and extends upwardly from the floor portion 46. The skirt portion 32, as indicated above, of the nozzle 22 defines a first part of a peripheral wall of the nozzle chamber 34 and the wall portion 50 defines a second part of the peripheral wall of the nozzle chamber 34.

The wall 50 has an inwardly directed lip 52 at its free end which serves as a fluidic seal which inhibits the escape of ink when the nozzle 22 is displaced, as will be described in greater detail below. It will be appreciated that, due to the viscosity of the ink 40 and the small dimensions of the spacing between the lip 52 and the skirt portion 32, the inwardly directed lip 52 and surface tension function as an effective seal for inhibiting the escape of ink from the nozzle chamber 34.

The actuator 28 is a thermal bend actuator and is connected to an anchor 54 extending upwardly from the substrate 16 or, more particularly from the CMOS passivation layer 20. The anchor 54 is mounted on conductive pads 56 which form an electrical connection with the actuator 28.

The actuator 28 comprises a first, active beam 58 arranged above a second, passive beam 60. In a preferred embodiment, both beams 58 and 60 are of, or include, a conductive ceramic material such as titanium nitride (TiN).

Both beams 58 and 60 have their first ends anchored to the anchor 54 and their opposed ends connected to the arm 26. When a current is caused to flow through the active beam 58 thermal expansion of the beam 58 results. As the passive beam 60, through which there is no current flow, does not expand at the same rate, a bending moment is created causing the arm 26 and, hence, the nozzle 22 to be displaced downwardly towards the substrate 16 as shown in FIG. 3 of the drawings. This causes an ejection of ink through the nozzle opening 24 as shown at 62 in FIG. 3 of the drawings. When the source of heat is removed from the active beam 58, i.e. by stopping current flow, the nozzle 22 returns to its quiescent position as shown in FIG. 4 of the drawings. When the nozzle 22 returns to its quiescent position, an ink droplet 64 is formed as a result of the breaking of an ink droplet neck as illustrated at 66 in FIG. 4 of the drawings. The ink droplet 64 then travels on to the print media such as a sheet of paper. As a result of the formation of the ink droplet 64, a “negative” meniscus is formed as shown at 68 in FIG. 4 of the drawings. This “negative” meniscus 68 results in an inflow of ink 40 into the nozzle chamber 34 such that a new meniscus 38 (FIG. 2) is formed in readiness for the next ink drop ejection from the nozzle assembly 10.

Referring now to FIGS. 5 and 6 of the drawings, the nozzle array 14 is described in greater detail. The array 14 is for a four color printhead. Accordingly, the array 14 includes four groups 70 of nozzle assemblies, one for each color. Each group 70 has its nozzle assemblies 10 arranged in two rows 72 and 74. One of the groups 70 is shown in greater detail in FIG. 6 of the drawings.

To facilitate close packing of the nozzle assemblies 10 in the rows 72 and 74, the nozzle assemblies 10 in the row 74 are offset or staggered with respect to the nozzle assemblies 10 in the row 72. Also, the nozzle assemblies 10 in the row 72 are spaced apart sufficiently far from each other to enable the lever arms 26 of the nozzle assemblies 10 in the row 74 to pass between adjacent nozzles 22 of the assemblies 10 in the row 72. It is to be noted that each nozzle assembly 10 is substantially dumbbell shaped so that the nozzles 22 in the row 72 nest between the nozzles 22 and the actuators 28 of adjacent nozzle assemblies 10 in the row 74.

Further, to facilitate close packing of the nozzles 22 in the rows 72 and 74, each nozzle 22 is substantially hexagonally shaped.

It will be appreciated by those skilled in the art that, when the nozzles 22 are displaced towards the substrate 16, in use, due to the nozzle opening 24 being at a slight angle with respect to the nozzle chamber 34 ink is ejected slightly off the perpendicular. It is an advantage of the arrangement shown in FIGS. 5 and 6 of the drawings that the actuators 28 of the nozzle assemblies 10 in the rows 72 and 74 extend in the same direction to one side of the rows 72 and 74. Hence, the ink ejected from the nozzles 22 in the row 72 and the ink ejected from the nozzles 22 in the row 74 are offset with respect to each other by the same angle resulting in an improved print quality.

Also, as shown in FIG. 5 of the drawings, the substrate 16 has bond pads 76 arranged thereon which provide the electrical connections, via the pads 56, to the actuators 28 of the nozzle assemblies 10. These electrical connections are formed via the CMOS layer (not shown).

Referring to FIG. 7 of the drawings, a development of the invention is shown. With reference to the previous drawings, like reference numerals refer to like parts, unless otherwise specified.

In this development, a nozzle guard 80 is mounted on the substrate 16 of the array 14. The nozzle guard 80 includes a body member 82 having a plurality of passages 84 defined therethrough. The passages 84 are in register with the nozzle openings 24 of the nozzle assemblies 10 of the array 14 such that, when ink is ejected from any one of the nozzle openings 24, the ink passes through the associated passage before striking the print media.

The body member 82 is mounted in spaced relationship relative to the nozzle assemblies 10 by limbs or struts 86. One of the struts 86 has air inlet openings 88 defined therein.

In use, when the array 14 is in operation, air is charged through the inlet openings 88 to be forced through the passages 84 together with ink travelling through the passages 84.

The ink is not entrained in the air as the air is charged through the passages 84 at a different velocity from that of the ink droplets 64. For example, the ink droplets 64 are ejected from the nozzles 22 at a velocity of approximately 3 m/s. The air is charged through the passages 84 at a velocity of approximately 1 m/s.

The purpose of the air is to maintain the passages 84 clear of foreign particles. A danger exists that these foreign particles, such as dust particles, could fall onto the nozzle assemblies 10 adversely affecting their operation. With the provision of the air inlet openings 88 in the nozzle guard 80 this problem is, to a large extent, obviated.

Referring now to FIGS. 8 to 10 of the drawings, a process for manufacturing the nozzle assemblies 10 is described.

Starting with the silicon substrate or wafer 16, the dielectric layer 18 is deposited on a surface of the wafer 16. The dielectric layer 18 is in the form of approximately 1.5 microns of CVD oxide. Resist is spun on to the layer 18 and the layer 18 is exposed to mask 100 and is subsequently developed.

After being developed, the layer 18 is plasma etched down to the silicon layer 16. The resist is then stripped and the layer 18 is cleaned. This step defines the ink inlet aperture 42.

In FIG. 8b of the drawings, approximately 0.8 microns of aluminum 102 is deposited on the layer 18. Resist is spun on and the aluminum 102 is exposed to mask 104 and developed. The aluminum 102 is plasma etched down to the oxide layer 18, the resist is stripped and the device is cleaned. This step provides the bond pads and interconnects to the ink jet actuator 28. This interconnect is to an NMOS drive transistor and a power plane with connections made in the CMOS layer (not shown).

Approximately 0.5 microns of PECVD nitride is deposited as the CMOS passivation layer 20. Resist is spun on and the layer 20 is exposed to mask 106 whereafter it is developed. After development, the nitride is plasma etched down to the aluminum layer 102 and the silicon layer 16 in the region of the inlet aperture 42. The resist is stripped and the device cleaned.

A layer 108 of a sacrificial material is spun on to the layer 20. The layer 108 is 6 microns of photo-sensitive polyimide or approximately 4 μm of high temperature resist. The layer 108 is softbaked and is then exposed to mask 110 whereafter it is developed. The layer 108 is then hardbaked at 400° C. for one hour where the layer 108 is comprised of polyimide or at greater than 300° C. where the layer 108 is high temperature resist. It is to be noted in the drawings that the pattern-dependent distortion of the polyimide layer 108 caused by shrinkage is taken into account in the design of the mask 110.

In the next step, shown in FIG. 8e of the drawings, a second sacrificial layer 112 is applied. The layer 112 is either 2 μm of photo-sensitive polyimide which is spun on or approximately 1.3 μm of high temperature resist. The layer 112 is softbaked and exposed to mask 114. After exposure to the mask 114, the layer 112 is developed. In the case of the layer 112 being polyimide, the layer 112 is hardbaked at 400° C. for approximately one hour. Where the layer 112 is resist, it is hardbaked at greater than 300° C. for approximately one hour.

A 0.2 micron multi-layer metal layer 116 is then deposited. Part of this layer 116 forms the passive beam 60 of the actuator 28.

The layer 116 is formed by sputtering 1,000 Å of titanium nitride (TiN) at around 300° C. followed by sputtering 50 Å of tantalum nitride (TaN). A further 1,00 Å of TiN is sputtered on followed by 50 Å of TaN and a further 1,000 Å of TiN.

Other materials which can be used instead of TiN are TiB2, MoSi2 or (Ti, Al)N.

The layer 116 is then exposed to mask 118, developed and plasma etched down to the layer 112 whereafter resist, applied for the layer 116, is wet stripped taking care not to remove the cured layers 108 or 112.

A third sacrificial layer 120 is applied by spinning on 4 μm of photo-sensitive polyimide or approximately 2.6 μm high temperature resist. The layer 120 is softbaked whereafter it is exposed to mask 122. The exposed layer is then developed followed by hard baking. In the case of polyimide, the layer 120 is hardbaked at 400° C. for approximately one hour or at greater than 300° C. where the layer 120 comprises resist.

A second multi-layer metal layer 124 is applied to the layer 120. The constituents of the layer 124 are the same as the layer 116 and are applied in the same manner. It will be appreciated that both layers 116 and 124 are electrically conductive layers.

The layer 124 is exposed to mask 126 and is then developed. The layer 124 is plasma etched down to the polyimide or resist layer 120 whereafter resist applied for the layer 124 is wet stripped taking care not to remove the cured layers 108, 112 or 120. It will be noted that the remaining part of the layer 124 defines the active beam 58 of the actuator 28.

A fourth sacrificial layer 128 is applied by spinning on 4 μm of photo-sensitive polyimide or approximately 2.6 μm of high temperature resist. The layer 128 is softbaked, exposed to the mask 130 and is then developed to leave the island portions as shown in FIG. 9k of the drawings. The remaining portions of the layer 128 are hardbaked at 400° C. for approximately one hour in the case of polyimide or at greater than 300° C. for resist.

As shown in FIG. 81 of the drawing a high Young's modulus dielectric layer 132 is deposited. The layer 132 is constituted by approximately 1 μm of silicon nitride or aluminum oxide. The layer 132 is deposited at a temperature below the hardbaked temperature of the sacrificial layers 108, 112, 120, 128. The primary characteristics required for this dielectric layer 132 are a high elastic modulus, chemical inertness and good adhesion to TiN.

A fifth sacrificial layer 134 is applied by spinning on 2 μm of photo-sensitive polyimide or approximately 1.3 μm of high temperature resist. The layer 134 is softbaked, exposed to mask 136 and developed. The remaining portion of the layer 134 is then hardbaked at 400° C. for one hour in the case of the polyimide or at greater than 300° C. for the resist.

The dielectric layer 132 is plasma etched down to the sacrificial layer 128 taking care not to remove any of the sacrificial layer 134.

This step defines the nozzle opening 24, the lever arm 26 and the anchor 54 of the nozzle assembly 10.

A high Young's modulus dielectric layer 138 is deposited. This layer 138 is formed by depositing 0.2 μm of silicon nitride or aluminum nitride at a temperature below the hardbaked temperature of the sacrificial layers 108, 112, 120 and 128.

Then, as shown in FIG. 8p of the drawings, the layer 138 is anisotropically plasma etched to a depth of 0.35 microns. This etch is intended to clear the dielectric from all of the surface except the side walls of the dielectric layer 132 and the sacrificial layer 134. This step creates the nozzle rim 36 around the nozzle opening 24 which “pins” the meniscus of ink, as described above.

An ultraviolet (UV) release tape 140 is applied. 4 μm of resist is spun on to a rear of the silicon wafer 16. The wafer 16 is exposed to mask 142 to back etch the wafer 16 to define the ink inlet channel 48. The resist is then stripped from the wafer 16.

A further UV release tape (not shown) is applied to a rear of the wafer 16 and the tape 140 is removed. The sacrificial layers 108, 112, 120, 128 and 134 are stripped in oxygen plasma to provide the final nozzle assembly 10 as shown in FIGS. 8r and 9 r of the drawings. For ease of reference, the reference numerals illustrated in these two drawings are the same as those in FIG. 1 of the drawings to indicate the relevant parts of the nozzle assembly 10. FIGS. 11 and 12 show the operation of the nozzle assembly 10, manufactured in accordance with the process described above with reference to FIGS. 8 and 9 and these figures correspond to FIGS. 2 to 4 of the drawings.

It will be appreciated by persons skilled in the art that numerous variations and/or modifications may be made to the invention as shown in the specific embodiments without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention as broadly described. The present embodiments are, therefore, to be considered in all respects as illustrative and not restrictive.

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6991321 *Jan 3, 2005Jan 31, 2006Silverbrook Research Pty LtdPrinthead chip that incorporates a nozzle guard with containment structures
US7021744 *Feb 25, 2005Apr 4, 2006Silverbrook Research Pty LtdPrinthead assembly having nozzle guard
US7146281 *Mar 31, 2003Dec 5, 2006Silverbrook Research Pty LtdStackable printer system
US7232203Jan 11, 2006Jun 19, 2007Silverbrook Research Pty LtdLiquid-ejection integrated circuit device that incorporates a nozzle guard with containment structures
US7237873Jan 11, 2006Jul 3, 2007Silverbrook Research Pty LtdInkjet printhead having low pressure ink ejection zone
US7303262Aug 29, 2002Dec 4, 2007Silverbrook Research Pty LtdInk jet printhead chip with predetermined micro-electromechanical systems height
US7347952Aug 8, 2003Mar 25, 2008Balmain, New South Wales, AustraliaMethod of fabricating an ink jet printhead
US7380905 *May 24, 2000Jun 3, 2008Silverbrook Research Pty LtdInk jet printhead nozzle array
US7407265May 24, 2007Aug 5, 2008Kia SilverbrookNozzle assembly with variable volume nozzle chamber
US7461918 *Aug 12, 2005Dec 9, 2008Silverbrook Research Pty LtdMicro-electromechanical integrated circuit device for fluid ejection
US7470003May 30, 2006Dec 30, 2008Silverbrook Research Pty LtdInk jet printhead with active and passive nozzle chamber structures arrayed on a substrate
US7481518Nov 5, 2007Jan 27, 2009Silverbrook Research Pty LtdInk jet printhead integrated circuit with surface-processed thermal actuators
US7556348May 24, 2007Jul 7, 2009Silverbrook Research Pty LtdInkjet printhead incorporating nozzles which, together with endless walls, define nozzle chambers
US7556357 *Dec 16, 2007Jul 7, 2009Silverbrook Research Pty LtdInk jet printhead with nozzle assemblies having fluidic seals
US7568791Jan 21, 2008Aug 4, 2009Silverbrook Research Pty LtdNozzle arrangement with a top wall portion having etchant holes therein
US7641315Aug 22, 2008Jan 5, 2010Silverbrook Research Pty LtdPrinthead with reciprocating cantilevered thermal actuators
US7654643May 7, 2008Feb 2, 2010Silverbrook Research Pty LtdInkjet printhead nozzle assembly having a raised rim to support an ink meniscus
US7819521Apr 13, 2009Oct 26, 2010Silverbrook Research Pty LtdModular printer system and print media dispenser
US7891779Jul 9, 2009Feb 22, 2011Silverbrook Research Pty LtdInkjet printhead with nozzle layer defining etchant holes
US7914118Nov 26, 2008Mar 29, 2011Silverbrook Research Pty LtdIntegrated circuit (IC) incorporating rows of proximal ink ejection ports
US7922298Nov 3, 2008Apr 12, 2011Silverbrok Research Pty LtdInk jet printhead with displaceable nozzle crown
US7976129Nov 30, 2009Jul 12, 2011Silverbrook Research Pty LtdNozzle structure with reciprocating cantilevered thermal actuator
US7984968 *Dec 29, 2009Jul 26, 2011Silverbrook Research Pty LtdInkjet printhead nozzle assembly having a raised rim to support an ink meniscus
US8061807Jun 26, 2008Nov 22, 2011Silverbrook Research Pty LtdInkjet printhead with nozzle assemblies having fluidic seals
US8075095Jun 4, 2009Dec 13, 2011Silverbrook Research Pty LtdInkjet printhead with moving nozzle openings
Classifications
U.S. Classification347/40, 347/58, 347/50
International ClassificationB41J2/14
Cooperative ClassificationB41J2/14427, B41J2002/14459, B41J2002/14435
European ClassificationB41J2/14S
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Jun 25, 2014ASAssignment
Owner name: MEMJET TECHNOLOGY LIMITED, IRELAND
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Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:SILVERBROOK RESEARCH PTY. LIMITED AND CLAMATE PTY LIMITED;REEL/FRAME:028536/0233
Owner name: ZAMTEC LIMITED, IRELAND
Jun 2, 2009FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
Jul 21, 2005SULPSurcharge for late payment
Jul 21, 2005FPAYFee payment
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Jun 29, 2005REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed
May 23, 2000ASAssignment
Owner name: SILVERBROOK RESEARCH PTY. LTD., AUSTRALIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:SILVERBROOK, KIA;REEL/FRAME:010819/0714
Effective date: 20000516
Owner name: SILVERBROOK RESEARCH PTY. LTD. 393 DARLING STREET