Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS6340879 B1
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 09/497,186
Publication dateJan 22, 2002
Filing dateFeb 3, 2000
Priority dateFeb 3, 1999
Fee statusPaid
Publication number09497186, 497186, US 6340879 B1, US 6340879B1, US-B1-6340879, US6340879 B1, US6340879B1
InventorsBernhard Blńcker
Original AssigneeNokia Mobile Phones Ltd.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Device for reactivating an electric battery
US 6340879 B1
Abstract
The invention concerns a device for reactivating an electric battery (B) which is no longer able to supply the required minimum amount of electrical power to a connected consumer unit because it was supercooled by frost. The object of the invention is to create a solution, at a justifiable cost of time and energy, which enables the consumer unit to operate as soon as possible or keep it operating after the effect of extremely low temperatures on the battery. According to the invention, the reactivation of the battery takes place by internally heating the electrolyte, which is achieved with the help of its own time-controlled current via the battery contacts, whereby a negligibly small electric output is transformed in the external circuit. To that end the high internal resistance during supercooling is utilized and works as an internal heating element. A reactive load (X) is advantageously connected to at least one inductive and/or capacitive element through the battery contacts (+,−). During the reactivation a control circuit (CC) periodically switches the reactive load (X) via at least one switch (S1, S2, S3, S4) so that an alternating reactive current (IL) flows through the battery (B).
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(25)
What is claimed is:
1. A device for reactivating an electrical battery which because of the effect of frost on the inside of the battery is unable to supply the required minimum amount of electric power through battery contacts to a connected consumer unit comprising:
an electronic control circuit which is connected to the battery contacts for heating the inside of the battery by its own battery current through the battery contacts, causing a direct internal heating of the electrolyte such that a minimum of electric output is provided by an external circuit without regard to availability of battery voltage.
2. A device as claimed in claim 1, wherein the external circuit contains at least one switch which is periodically switched by the control circuit during reactivation so that a pulsating battery current flows through the battery, and a capacitor can store battery voltage during blocking.
3. A device as claimed in claim 1, wherein the external circuit contains a reactive load with at least one inductive and/or capacitive element, whose connectors are periodically switched by the control circuit during reactivation by at least one switch, so that an alternating reactive current flows through the battery.
4. A device as claimed in claim 3, wherein the reactive load is an inductance with a parallel resonance capacity, which is periodically switched to the battery contacts by a series switch, where a diode lies parallel to the switch and is located in a blocking direction of the battery voltage.
5. A device as claimed in claim 3, wherein the switches form a push-pull bridge circuit which connects the reactive load connectors crosswise to the battery contacts with alternating current, so that a sawtooth-shaped alternating current flows through them, where its current peaks are at least below the short circuit current of the battery when it is not supercooled.
6. A device as claimed in claim 5, wherein the reactive load (X) is an inductance.
7. A device as claimed in claim 1, wherein to protect an operative battery against too high a load caused by current peaks, the size of an inductance in relation to the pulse frequency and/or keying ratio is chosen so that the current peaks are at least below the short-circuit current of the battery when it is not supercooled.
8. A device as claimed in claim 4, wherein a size of the inductance in relation to the pulse frequency and/or keying ratio is chosen so that a supercooled battery is charged with current peaks at or near the level of the short-circuit current.
9. A device as claimed in claim 1, wherein the electronic control circuit adjusts the pulse frequency and/or the keying ratio as a function of the temperature of battery, so as to adapt the intensity of the direct internal heating to the actual conditions without any delay.
10. A device as claimed in claim 3, the electronic control circuit evaluates the battery voltage during the current peaks and also monitors heating by a temperature sensor in order to end the reactivation or prevent an operative battery from being reactivated.
11. A device as claimed in claim 6, wherein to protect an operative battery against too high a load caused by current peaks, the size of an inductance in relation to the pulse frequency and/or keying ratio is chosen so that the current peaks are at least below the short-circuit current of the battery when it is not supercooled.
12. A device as claimed in claim 4, wherein the electronic control circuit evaluates the battery voltage during the current peaks and also monitors heating by a temperature sensor in order to end the reactivation or prevent an operative battery from being reactivated.
13. A device as claimed in claim 5, wherein the electronic control circuit evaluates the battery voltage during the current peaks and also monitors heating by a temperature sensor in order to end the reactivation or prevent an operative battery from being reactivated.
14. A device as claimed in claim 6, wherein the electronic control circuit evaluates the battery voltage during the current peaks and also monitors heating by means of a temperature sensor (TS) in order to end the reactivation or prevent an operative battery from being reactivated.
15. A device as claimed in claim 7, wherein the electronic control circuit evaluates the battery voltage during the current peaks and also monitors heating by a temperature sensor in order to end the reactivation or prevent an operative battery from being reactivated.
16. A device as claimed in claim 8, wherein the electronic control circuit evaluates the battery voltage during the current peaks and also monitors heating by a temperature sensor (TS) in order to end the reactivation or prevent an operative battery from being reactivated.
17. A device as claimed in claim 9, wherein the electronic control circuit evaluates the battery voltage during the current peaks and also monitors heating by a temperature sensor in order to end the reactivation or prevent an operative battery from being reactivated.
18. A device as claimed in claim 6, wherein a size of the inductance in relation to the pulse frequency and/or keying ratio is chosen so that a supercooled battery is charged with current peaks at or near the level of the short-circuit current.
19. A device as claimed in claim 2, wherein the electronic control circuit adjusts the pulse frequency and/or the keying ratio as a function of the temperature of battery, so as to adapt the intensity of the direct internal heating to the actual conditions without any delay.
20. A device as claimed in claim 3, wherein the electronic control circuit adjusts the pulse frequency and/or the keying ratio as a function of the temperature of battery, so as to adapt the intensity of the direct internal heating to the actual conditions without any delay.
21. A device as claimed in claim 4, wherein the electronic control circuit adjusts the pulse frequency and/or the keying ratio as a function of the temperature of battery, so as to adapt the intensity of the direct internal heating to the actual conditions without any delay.
22. A device as claimed in claim 5, wherein the electronic control circuit adjusts the pulse frequency and/or the keying ratio as a function of the temperature of battery, so as to adapt the intensity of the direct internal heating to the actual conditions without any delay.
23. A device as claimed in claim 6, wherein the electronic control circuit adjusts the pulse frequency and/or the keying ratio as a function of the temperature of battery, so as to adapt the intensity of the direct internal heating to the actual conditions without any delay.
24. A device as claimed in claim 7, wherein the electronic control circuit adjusts the pulse frequency and/or the keying ratio as a function of the temperature of battery, so as to adapt the intensity of the direct internal heating to the actual conditions without any delay.
25. A device as claimed in claim 8, wherein the electronic control circuit adjusts the pulse frequency and/or the keying ratio as a function of the temperature of battery, so as to adapt the intensity of the direct internal heating to the actual conditions without any delay.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

A known disadvantage in batteries of all types is that their internal electrochemical reaction, and thus the maximum utilizable output, basically depends very heavily on the battery's internal temperature. When the temperature drops, the speed of the chemical reaction in the electrons decreases. This lowers the maximum electrical current which the battery is able to supply during constant no-load voltage, and thus the battery's output. Furthermore the speed of the mass transfer within the electrolyte and within the porous battery electrodes decreases. Both factors considerably increase the internal resistance of the cold battery. This means that in a supercooled condition of the cells even a fully charged battery is unable to supply all of its nominal electrical output because of its high internal resistance. However the nominal output can be obtained again without adding any charging energy as soon as the battery warms up to normal temperature.

The temperature dependence is also especially disadvantageous for example when the battery has to supply a D.C. voltage transformer where a predetermined electrical output is obtained from the secondary side, regardless of the voltage at the battery contacts. The transmission operation of a radio telephone for example requires an electrical output of a few watts for the power amplifier. Because of the high internal resistance, the voltage at the battery contacts is low and the transformer control causes an increase in current consumption in order to provide the required output. This in turn causes a further voltage reduction at the contacts. Since the transformer does not receive sufficient output, its control is interrupted and goes into an uncontrolled operating mode which corresponds to a total battery discharge.

For example if the transformer is used for a radio telephone, its control perceives this operating condition as a discharged battery and switches the radio telephone to the stand-by mode to protect it from becoming fully discharged. Although the battery is still sufficiently charged, it is impossible in this mode to establish a connection to the network. This situation represents a considerable safety risk for the emergency call function of the radio telephone.

It is known for example to protect motor vehicle starter batteries as long as possible against supercooling by adding a casing of a good thermal insulation material. Various sellers offer such a casing as a car accessory. However, on the one hand this requires a large additional volume and on the other it only provides a time-limited effect. The solution is especially unsatisfactory for a radio telephone because an additional casing undesirably increases the volume of the telephone.

To extend this effect, electronically controlled heating plates can be found in the auto accessories market. They are cemented to the surface of the starter battery housing and have electrical connectors which must be connected to the battery contacts. Such a heating plate prevents cooling of the battery by using its own power, so that its internal temperature remains in a range where the internal resistance is low enough so that the desired output can be obtained at any time.

For reasons of electrical insulation however, the cells of a battery are encased in a material which is also a good heat insulator. This causes a high thermal resistance between the inside of the battery and the heating plate and the battery's environment is kept warm at a considerable cost of electric power to prevent a decrease in its internal temperature. Due to the high thermal resistance however, it is not possible to reactivate a supercooled battery with justifiable cost of time and energy. At low temperatures therefore the heating plate always supplies a significantly higher amount of power to the environment than is required by the inside. This can overtax the battery's capacity. There is the danger that so much power has already been used to maintain the normal temperature that it is no longer possible to establish a connection because the battery is discharged.

It is also known from applicable safety provisions for the safe handling of batteries, such as the IEC recommendations for example, that an external short circuit of the connections of a battery must be strictly avoided. As can be found on the Varta Company internet site: “Basics on the subject of batteries. Additional questions for advanced students, “http//www.varta.de/knowhow/100quest/100-003.html 7”, an external short circuit can have serious consequences if high gas pressure builds up inside the battery.

To carefully charge a radio telephone's battery it is known to place a temperature sensor in the battery between the insulating external skin and the metallic cell body. The radio telephone's control circuit uses this sensor to determine the battery's temperature with a relatively small delay because of the metallic contact, and then interrupts the charging if the battery has been heated to a predetermined degree. This protects against overcharging.

In the area of video technology, compare for example Philips' correspondence lessons: Electrical technology and Electronics, Volume 2, Technique and Application, the heavily reworked 8th. issue, section “Horizontal Deflection Steps”, pages 231 ff, Heidelberg: HŘthig, which describes a simple functional principle for producing a sawtooth-shaped alternating current for horizontal deflection, from a direct current source such as a battery. In principle the direct current source has an inductance in series with a switch, which is bridged by a diode and conducts and blocks with alternating current. A capacitance is in parallel with the inductance. With the appropriate choice of component values in relation to the switching times of the switch, the following takes place: During the time the switch is conducting, a current from the battery builds a magnetic field in the inductance. It collapses after the switch blocks the current, which reverses its direction and the battery power oscillates in the form of a resonance vibration half-wave between the inductance and the capacitance and back. During this half-wave the voltage amplitude is still positive. The subsequent negative half-wave opens the diode and with ideal, namely loss-free components, the battery power flows back into the battery. The process is therefore also called “power recovery”.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

One advantage of the present invention is that it can be used regardless of cell type, cell size and the battery's structural form. The invention is particularly suited for batteries which are used to supply power to mobile devices suc as radio telephones or radio device, since the device can operate again after a few minutes. This makes it possible, for example, to make an emergency call with a radio telephone in dangerous situations, even under the effect of extreme cold such as takes place in polar regions or in Alpine areas. The content “radio telephone” is used in the present case as a generic term for all types of devices for wireless communication, particularly mobile telephones, car telephones, satellite telephones, mobile fax machines and mobile computers which can communicate with a network.

Starting with the defects of the known solutions for reactivating a battery, the object of the invention is to create a solution for a radio telephone which, with a justifiable expense of time and energy enables the use of the radio telephone as fast as possible after the effect of extremely low temperatures, or keeps the telephone in operating condition.

The reactivation of the battery takes place according to the invention through the internal heating of the electrolyte, which is done with the aid of a time-controlled intrinsic current via the battery contacts, where the external circuit transforms a negligibly small electrical power. The high internal resistance, which operates as an internal heating element, is used against supercooling. The amount of electrical power drawn from the battery for that purpose is directly converted into heat inside the battery. The result is the significantly faster heating of the internal battery structure than with the known solutions, with minimum loss of power to the environment.

A short time after the start of the reactivation, the internal resistance decreases due to the rising temperature of the electrolyte. Therefore a control circuit can intelligently monitor this process and optimally control the current for reactivating the battery in accordance with its present condition.

The internal resistance of a supercooled battery is relatively large. Its battery contacts could therefore be continuously loaded by a short circuit during the reactivation, without suffering any damage. Because of the safety provisions, this supposedly simple solution is neither permissible nor suitable in practice, since during the short circuit there is no voltage at the battery connectors to operate a control circuit, which would interrupt the process in the presence of heat. This precludes any time control of the process.

It is therefore a further object of the invention to indicate a possibility of heating the inside of the battery without causing power losses that are worth mentioning in the external circuit, so that the battery contacts can supply a voltage for operating the control circuit.

The invention achieves this in that the external circuit periodically loads the battery with short-term current peaks at or near the level of the short-circuit current. In the simplest case this is done with a switch that bridges the battery connectors in accordance with a pulse frequency which advantageously has a load ratio that depends on the internal temperature. Outside of the switch's conducting time, the battery loads a charging capacitor in order to provide operating voltage for the control circuit.

Investigations have shown however that an alternating current, which flows through the battery contacts during the reactivation, speeds up the process. For that reason and according to a first advantageous configuration of the invention, the external circuit for charging the battery is designed so that the electrical power from the battery oscillates periodically in both directions, thus like an alternating current, between the battery and an energy store in the external circuit. With this configuration as well, any active power is essentially only converted into heat inside the battery. To that end the external circuit contains a reactive (wattless) load with at least one inductive and/or capacitive element, whose connections are periodically switched by the control circuit via at least one switch, so that the reactive load is charged and discharged with alternating current.

According to another advantageous configuration of the invention, the control circuit utilizes the circumstance that the amplitude of the momentary battery voltage depends directly on the internal temperature, even during the time-limited consumption of a current. It must however be remembered that a measurement of the battery voltage while the battery contacts are under load does not provide any sure information about the battery's internal temperature. A mostly discharged battery as well as a supercooled battery has a high internal resistance and can therefore not be distinguished from a supercooled but still fully charged battery. According to the invention however the control circuit reliably distinguishes a supercooled battery from one with a low charge, by evaluating the voltage at the battery contacts in conjunction with a signal provided by the above mentioned temperature sensor. This provides the control circuit with an additional indication of the battery's temperature status during the reactivation. Since it indicates the result of the reactivation without any time delay, the reactivation ends as soon as the amplitude of the battery voltage exceeds a minimum value during the current peaks. In this way a supercooled battery can begin to be reactivated at a high load without causing any lasting damage and without violating relevant safety provisions. As soon as the internal resistance drops, the load can be reduced without any time delay.

Since in addition the time delay between the supply of power and the heating of the electrolyte is shorter than with the known solutions, the control circuit ensures that only as much power as needed to operate a radio telephone is taken from the battery.

In the following the invention will be explained by means of embodiments. The corresponding drawings show:

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 illustrates the basic principle of the device according to the invention;

FIG. 2 illustrates a first advantageous configuration of the device according to the invention;

FIG. 3 illustrates a second advantageous configuration of the device according to the invention;

FIG. 4 illustrates the current IL=f(t) in the reactive load of the second advantageous configuration as a function of time t;

FIG. 5 illustrates the current IB=f(t) at the battery contacts as controlled by the control circuit according to the second advantageous configuration, for the direct internal heating of the battery's electrolyte as a function of time t; and

FIG. 6 illustrates another configuration of the invention without inductance.

The device shown in FIG. 1 contains a battery B which contains n galvanic cells E1, E2, En with a total cell voltage UE, an internal resistance RI and battery contacts (+) and (−) whereby a battery voltage UB can be taken from the battery B. Like all batteries, the internal resistance RI depends on its internal temperature and increases considerably with heavy supercooling, for example at an internal temperature of −20░ C. or lower. A battery for a radio telephone for example may have an internal resistance RI of five ohms and more so that with a current consumption on the order of one ampere the battery voltage UB at the battery contacts (+) and (−) is considerably smaller than the total cell voltage UE. A radio telephone with a voltage converter supplied by the battery B would not receive sufficient power and as described earlier would fail, as if the battery B had been fully discharged. It would no longer be possible to operate the radio telephone, e.g. to make an emergency call.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

FIG. 1 shows a switch S1 according to the basic principle of the invention, which bridges the battery connectors (+) and (−) in accordance with a pulse frequency fp produced by a control circuit CC. The control circuit CC advantageously changes the keying ratio of the pulse frequency fp as a function of the internal temperature. Outside of the conducting time, the battery B charges a charging capacitor CL in order to provide operating voltage for the control circuit CC. A diode D1 prevents the discharging of capacitor CL into the battery B while the switch is conducting. A comparator in the control circuit CC is connected through a first comparator input INCOMP1 to the above described temperature sensor TS in order to distinguish a supercooled battery from a discharge one. Since the battery voltage UB always tends to go toward zero during the periodic short circuit regardless of the internal temperature, an evaluation during the conducting time is not possible.

For that reason the illustrated basic principle is very critical in regard to a time control. As soon as any sign of heating appears the control circuit CC must increase the ratio between the blocking and conducting time to prevent damage to the battery. It is furthermore a disadvantage to use a pulsating direct current for the reactivation.

In the following solutions it is always desirable to determine at least the need of a reactivation by means of the temperature sensor TS. Such solutions, which utilize current peaks at or near the short-circuit current, also require a charging capacitor to keep the control circuit CC operational. In the interest of clarity, the illustrations and descriptions of these details are omitted in the following.

The following solutions charge the battery B with an alternating current. The result is an advantageous reactivation speed which can apparently be ascribed to a better distribution of the power supply by the alternating current at the electrodes. Accordingly the battery current IB flows twice in succession through the internal resistance RI. First when the electrical energy is converted into magnetic energy, and second when this energy conversion is reversed.

FIG. 2 shows a solution which corresponds to the functional principle described earlier for producing a sawtooth-shaped alternating current for the horizontal deflection of a television set. In that case the battery has an inductance L1 in series with a switch S1, which is bridged by a diode D2 and conducts and blocks through an alternating pulse frequency fP. A capacitance CR lies parallel to the inductance L1. When the inductance L1 and capacitance CR values are appropriately selected in relation to the pulse frequency fP or the keying ratio, the above described effect between inductance L1 and capacitance CR takes place, whereby most of the battery power flows back into the battery.

FIG. 3 shows another solution for producing a sawtooth-shaped alternating current for the direct internal heating of battery B. Electronically controllable switches S1, S2, S3 and S4 are arranged in a push-pull bridge circuit and are connected to the battery contacts (+), (−). The switches S1, S2, S3, S4 may be conventional field-effect transistors, bipolar transistors or similar. A reactive load X, which advantageously is an inductance L2, is located in the bridge branch between the push-pull branches S1 and S3 or S2 and S4.

Upon detecting a supercooled battery, the control circuit CC periodically switches the push-pull bridge circuit in accordance with the pulse frequency fP, so that the inductance L2 is alternatingly charged with electric power and discharged. At that point the control circuit CC activates switches S1 and S4 directly, and switches S2 and S3 via an inverter INV. Of course the switches S1 and S3 or S2 and S4 of each push-pull branch can be designed as complementary push-pull output stages. In that case the control circuit CC directly controls all switches S1-S4 and the inverter INV is omitted. To activate the switches S1-S4, the control circuit CC advantageously produces a square-wave voltage, for example with a pulse frequency fP on the order of about 100 kHz. The control circuit CC advantageously changes the pulse frequency fP and/or the keying ratio of the switches S1 to S4 as a function of the battery's internal temperature, in order to immediately adapt the heating intensity to the current conditions.

FIG. 4 shows the course in time of the reactive current IL in the reactive load X. Due to the inductance L2 the latter rises almost linearly during the time TI and the battery current IB builds a magnetic field in the inductance L2. The time T1 ends at points t1-t4 respectively when the switches S1 to S4 change over. In that case switches S1 to S4 connect the connectors O1 and O2 of the reactive load X with the respective opposite battery contact, which starts the breakdown of the magnetic field in the inductance L2. This breakdown ends after time D2. Because of the change-over to the respective other battery contact a corresponding course of the reactive current IL starts after the breakdown at the same times T1 and T2 and with the same amplitude, but in the opposite direction of the reactive current IL.

The battery current IB shown in FIG. 5 is taken from the battery B. During the time T1 the battery current IB rises linearly. After the switches S1-S4 change over, the power stored in the inductance L2 decreases during the time T2. An inductive back-voltage causes a strong current surge in the opposite direction, namely back into the battery B, so that the desired alternating current flows through it. Since due to the appropriate selection of switches S1-S4 and the size of the inductance L the external circuit only has very small active impedances, most of the alternating power affects the internal resistance RI.

To protect an operating battery B against excessive load caused by current peaks in the battery current IB, another feature of the invention advantageously selects the size of the inductance L in relation to the pulse frequency fP, so that the current peaks ╬L,—╬L in the reactive current IL can only reach a maximum peak value ╬LMAX. In this way the reactive current IL follows the curve shown by an unbroken line in FIG. 2, at least in all batteries B with an internal resistance RI that is below a predetermined value due to normal internal temperature, regardless of the actual size of the internal resistance RI. The inductance L2 thus limits the peak value of the battery current 113 to a value that is below the possible short-circuit value and thus provides a protection, since this value can be very high due to the low internal resistance RI.

However, according to another feature of the invention the maximum peak value ╬LMAX can be set so high, that in a supercooled battery the high internal resistance RI limits the peak value ╬LO of the reactive current IL to a value below the ╬LMAX value. In such a battery the course of the reactive current IL corresponds to the broken line curve, where the peak value of the reactive current ╬LO corresponds to the degree of supercooling. In this case the short-circuit value of the supercooled battery B is periodically available as a maximum peak current during the time T3. This means that during the time T3 the battery voltage UB drops to a minimum, namely the residual voltage in the conducting switch S1. An operative battery B however does not reach this minimum because the inductance L limits the possible short-circuit value of the battery current IB.

According to a special configuration feature of the invention, the control circuit CC advantageously uses this dependence of the battery voltage +UB on the internal temperature of battery B to recognize the successful termination. A simple comparator in the control circuit CC, via the comparator input Incorn,2 in the example, detects that during the reactivation the minimum value UB MIN falls below a reference value and recognizes that this can be continued. However, if the minimum value UB MIN is above the reference value, the battery has a suitable temperature for operation and the reactivation is ended.

To keep the power losses in the external circuit small, the switches S1, S2, S3, S4 advantageously use semiconductor components which exhibit low voltage drops in the switched condition.

The reactive load X contains a blocking capacitor CK. It is primarily used to prevent a direct battery current IB during the reactivation. This would occur if the control circuit detects an operative battery and stops controlling the push-pull bridge circuit. In that case one of the pairs of switches S1/S4 or S2/S3 is continuously conductive and a short-circuit direct current which is able to destroy the battery, flows to the reactive load through the continuous connection. An alternative to the capacitor CK is to simultaneously switch off all switches S1 to S4.

During reactivation the circuit in FIG. 6 also produces an alternating current IB. In a first signal condition of the pulse frequency fP, the switches S1 and S3 are closed and switch S2 is open. A current IB flows from the battery and charges the capacitors Cl and C2 which lie parallel in this signal condition. They attain a charging voltage UC1, UC2, which should be advantageously close to the total cell voltage UE. Switches S1 and S3 open and switch S2 closes when the signal condition of the pulse frequency fP changes. As a result the capacitors C1 and C2 are in series. Since the charging voltages UC1, UC2 are additive, the sum is greater than the total cell voltage UE and a charging current −IB flows into the battery until it discharges.

If the circuit in FIG. 3 uses only one capacitor C as the reactive load X, the desired limitation of the current peaks does not take place. Instead, after the switches S1 to S4 change over, a larger peak current ╬B flows through the internal resistance RI due to the voltage addition in capacitor C. Since the reactive load X has a pulsating direct current IB flowing through the battery instead of an alternating current, this reactive load is especially suited for batteries which do not contain any rechargeable primary elements.

A significant advantage of the invention is that for only a small additional cost, the device for reactivating an electric battery B can be incorporated into the known management of a radio telephone for monitoring or the operational readiness of the battery B. Also, since the charged condition of the battery is continuously controlled in a radio telephone, the solution of the invention can be used to regularly check at predetermined time intervals whether a reactivation is required because of low ambient temperatures.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5362942 *Aug 24, 1993Nov 8, 1994Interdigital Technology CorporationBattery heating system using internal battery resistance
US6078163 *May 14, 1999Jun 20, 2000Nissan Motor Co., Ltd.Battery temperature increasing device and method
US6163135 *Aug 26, 1999Dec 19, 2000Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki KaishaApparatus for controlling state of charge/discharge of hybrid car and method for controlling state of charge/discharge of hybrid car
DE1817832A1Dec 17, 1968Mar 30, 1972Roeder & Spengler OhgVorrichtung zum Vereinzeln und Zusammenstellen eines Stanzpaketes einer Rollenstanze
DE4142628A Title not available
Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1G. Loocke, et al, Induktive Beheizung von KraftfahrzeugStar terbatterien, In: etz, Bd. 106, 1985, H.11, S. 552-558;Zusammenf,. S. 557, linke Spalte.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6801015 *Jan 16, 2003Oct 5, 2004Miele & Cie. Kg.Method and circuit arrangement for preventing the stand-by discharge of a battery-powered signal evaluation circuit of a sensor
US7295450Apr 5, 2005Nov 13, 2007Friwo Mobile Power GmbhPrimary-controlled SMPS with adjustable switching frequency for output voltage and current control
US7362075Jun 7, 2005Apr 22, 2008Friwo Geraetebau GmbhBattery charger with charge state detection on the primary side
US8125188Apr 8, 2004Feb 28, 2012Cochlear LimitedPower management system
US8268465Dec 21, 2006Sep 18, 2012Sagem Defense SecuriteBattery, electrical equipment, and a powering method implementing means for short-circuiting the battery
US8461042Dec 1, 2009Jun 11, 2013Cochlear LimitedElectrode contact contaminate removal
US8624553Jan 14, 2013Jan 7, 2014Lg Chem, Ltd.Battery temperature adjusting system and operating method thereof
US8763244May 26, 2009Jul 1, 2014Cochlear LimitedMethod of forming conductive elements
US8782884Dec 1, 2009Jul 22, 2014Cochlear LimitedManufacturing an electrode assembly having contoured electrode contact surfaces
US8797040 *Jan 14, 2010Aug 5, 2014Robert Bosch GmbhMethod, electric circuit arrangement and electric memory unit for determining a characteristic status parameter of the memory unit
US8816634Jun 22, 2011Aug 26, 2014Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuits and methods using resonance components in series
US8816647Jun 22, 2011Aug 26, 2014Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuits and methods using resonance components in series based on current limiting and voltage inversion with bi-directionality
US8823317Jul 22, 2011Sep 2, 2014Byd Company LimitedCircuits and methods for heating batteries in series using resonance components in series
US8829856Jul 21, 2011Sep 9, 2014Byd Company LimitedCircuits and methods for heating batteries in parallel using resonance components in series
US8836277Jun 27, 2011Sep 16, 2014Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuits and methods using resonance components in series based on current limiting and voltage inversion with bi-directionality and common inductance
US8836288Jul 22, 2011Sep 16, 2014Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuits and methods using transformers
US8841883Jun 27, 2011Sep 23, 2014Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuits and methods with resonance components in series using energy transfer and voltage inversion
US8941356Jun 24, 2011Jan 27, 2015Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuits and methods with resonance components in series using energy transfer
US8941357Jul 18, 2011Jan 27, 2015Byd Company LimitedHeating circuits and methods based on battery discharging and charging using resonance components in series and freewheeling circuit components
US8941358Jul 3, 2012Jan 27, 2015Byd Company LimitedHeating circuits and methods based on battery discharging and charging using resonance components in series and freewheeling circuit components
US8947049Jan 24, 2013Feb 3, 2015Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuits and methods using voltage inversion and freewheeling circuit components
US8970172Jul 21, 2011Mar 3, 2015Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuits and methods with resonance components in series using voltage inversion and freewheeling circuit components
US8975872Jul 20, 2011Mar 10, 2015Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuits and methods with resonance components in series using voltage inversion based on predetermined conditions
US8994332Jan 23, 2013Mar 31, 2015Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuits and methods using voltage inversion based on predetermined conditions
US20100102627 *Oct 23, 2009Apr 29, 2010Sanyo Electric Co., Ltd.Power Supply Device And Electric Vehicle Incorporating Said Device
US20110279122 *Jan 14, 2010Nov 17, 2011Robert Bosch GmbhMethod, electric circuit arrangement and electric memory unit for determining a characteristic status parameter of the memory unit
US20120176082 *Feb 27, 2012Jul 12, 2012Lg Chem, Ltd.Battery pack system of improving operating performance using internal resistance of cell
US20130141032 *Jan 22, 2013Jun 6, 2013Byd Company LimitedCircuits and methods for heating batteries in parallel using resonance components in series
US20140197778 *Jul 3, 2013Jul 17, 2014Samsung Sdi Co., Ltd.Temperature controlling system and method for battery
CN101685971B *Sep 27, 2008Jan 14, 2015比亚迪股份有限公司车载磷酸铁锂锂电池的低温激活装置及方法
CN102074753A *Dec 23, 2010May 25, 2011比亚迪股份有限公司Heating circuit of battery
CN102074753BDec 23, 2010Jul 4, 2012比亚迪股份有限公司Heating circuit of battery
CN102074754A *Dec 23, 2010May 25, 2011比亚迪股份有限公司Heating circuit for batteries
CN102074759A *Dec 23, 2010May 25, 2011比亚迪股份有限公司Heating circuit of battery
CN102074759BDec 23, 2010Jun 6, 2012比亚迪股份有限公司Heating circuit of battery
CN102074760A *Dec 23, 2010May 25, 2011比亚迪股份有限公司Heating circuit of battery
CN102074760BDec 23, 2010Jul 18, 2012比亚迪股份有限公司Heating circuit of battery
CN102074762A *Dec 23, 2010May 25, 2011比亚迪股份有限公司Heating circuit of battery
CN102074762BDec 23, 2010Jul 4, 2012比亚迪股份有限公司Heating circuit of battery
CN102082306A *Dec 23, 2010Jun 1, 2011比亚迪股份有限公司Heating circuit of battery
CN102082306BDec 23, 2010Nov 21, 2012比亚迪股份有限公司Heating circuit of battery
CN102088116A *Dec 23, 2010Jun 8, 2011比亚迪股份有限公司Heating circuit of battery
CN102088116BDec 23, 2010Nov 21, 2012比亚迪股份有限公司Heating circuit of battery
CN102088117A *Dec 23, 2010Jun 8, 2011比亚迪股份有限公司Battery heating circuit
CN102170030A *Mar 31, 2011Aug 31, 2011比亚迪股份有限公司Heating circuit for battery
CN102170030BMar 31, 2011Dec 19, 2012比亚迪股份有限公司Heating circuit for battery
CN102170031A *Mar 31, 2011Aug 31, 2011比亚迪股份有限公司Heating circuit for battery
CN102170031BMar 31, 2011Nov 21, 2012比亚迪股份有限公司Heating circuit for battery
CN102255108A *Mar 31, 2011Nov 23, 2011比亚迪股份有限公司Heating circuit for battery
CN102255108BMar 31, 2011Dec 12, 2012比亚迪股份有限公司Heating circuit for battery
CN102255111A *May 23, 2011Nov 23, 2011比亚迪股份有限公司Heating circuit for battery
CN102306849A *May 23, 2011Jan 4, 2012比亚迪股份有限公司Heating circuit for battery
CN102306849BMay 23, 2011Jan 2, 2013比亚迪股份有限公司Heating circuit for battery
EP1605572A1Jun 6, 2005Dec 14, 2005Friwo Geraetebau GmbHBattery charger with state of charge determination on the primary side
EP1801949A2 *Dec 18, 2006Jun 27, 2007Sagem DÚfense SÚcuritÚBattery, electrical equipment and supply method implementing means of short-circuiting the battery
EP2413454A1 *May 20, 2011Feb 1, 2012Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuit
EP2413455A1 *May 20, 2011Feb 1, 2012Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuit
EP2413456A1 *May 20, 2011Feb 1, 2012Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuit
EP2413457A1 *May 20, 2011Feb 1, 2012Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuit
EP2413458A1 *May 20, 2011Feb 1, 2012Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuit
EP2413459A1 *May 20, 2011Feb 1, 2012Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuit
EP2413460A1 *May 20, 2011Feb 1, 2012Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuit
EP2413461A1 *May 20, 2011Feb 1, 2012Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuit
EP2413462A1 *May 20, 2011Feb 1, 2012BYD Company LimitedBattery heating circuit
EP2413463A1 *May 20, 2011Feb 1, 2012BYD Company LimitedBattery heating circuit
EP2413464A1 *May 20, 2011Feb 1, 2012Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuit
EP2413465A1 *May 20, 2011Feb 1, 2012Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuit
EP2413466A1 *May 20, 2011Feb 1, 2012Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuit
EP2413467A1 *May 20, 2011Feb 1, 2012BYD Company CircuitBattery heating circuit
EP2413468A1 *May 23, 2011Feb 1, 2012Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuit
EP2413469A1 *May 23, 2011Feb 1, 2012Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuit
EP2421114A1 *May 20, 2011Feb 22, 2012Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuit
EP2469683A1 *May 20, 2011Jun 27, 2012Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuit
EP2571095A1 *Sep 14, 2011Mar 20, 2013V2 Plug-in Hybrid Vehicle Partnership HandelsbolagDevice and method for protecting a battery
EP2579419A1 *Oct 5, 2011Apr 10, 2013Research In Motion LimitedSystem and method for wirelessly charging a rechargeable battery
WO2010034260A1 *Sep 27, 2009Apr 1, 2010Byd Company LimitedDevice and method for activating vehicle-mounted lithium battery of iron lithium phosphate at low temperature
WO2011069729A1 *Oct 18, 2010Jun 16, 2011Sb Limotive Company Ltd.Battery heater for motor vehicles with an electric drive motor
WO2012013066A1 *May 20, 2011Feb 2, 2012Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuit
WO2012013067A1 *May 20, 2011Feb 2, 2012Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuit
WO2012013068A1 *May 20, 2011Feb 2, 2012Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuit
WO2012013069A1 *May 20, 2011Feb 2, 2012Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuit
WO2012013070A1 *May 20, 2011Feb 2, 2012Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuit
WO2012013071A1 *May 20, 2011Feb 2, 2012Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuit
WO2012013073A1 *May 20, 2011Feb 2, 2012Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuit
WO2012013074A1 *May 20, 2011Feb 2, 2012Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuit
WO2012013075A1 *May 20, 2011Feb 2, 2012Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuit
WO2012013076A1 *May 20, 2011Feb 2, 2012Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuit
WO2012013077A1 *May 20, 2011Feb 2, 2012Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuit
WO2012013078A1 *May 20, 2011Feb 2, 2012Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuit
WO2012013081A1 *May 23, 2011Feb 2, 2012Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuit
WO2012013082A1 *May 23, 2011Feb 2, 2012Byd Company LimitedBattery heating circuit
WO2013107371A1 *Jan 18, 2013Jul 25, 2013Shenzhen Byd Auto R&D Company LimitedElectric vehicle running control system
WO2013107373A1 *Jan 18, 2013Jul 25, 2013Shenzhen Byd Auto R&D Company LimitedElectric vehicle running control system
Classifications
U.S. Classification320/153, 219/201, 320/130
International ClassificationH01M10/42, H01M10/50, H02J7/00
Cooperative ClassificationH01M10/615, H01M10/633, H01M10/486, H01M10/623, H01M10/637, H01M10/48
European ClassificationH01M10/50F6, H01M10/50D2, H01M10/50F2, H01M10/50C4, H01M10/48D, H01M10/48
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Mar 18, 2013FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 12
Jul 22, 2011ASAssignment
Owner name: INTELLECTUAL VENTURES I LLC, DELAWARE
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNOR:SPYDER NAVIGATIONS L.L.C.;REEL/FRAME:026637/0611
Effective date: 20110718
Dec 29, 2009CCCertificate of correction
Jun 22, 2009FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
Aug 8, 2008ASAssignment
Owner name: SPYDER NAVIGATIONS L.L.C., DELAWARE
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:NOKIA CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:021363/0307
Effective date: 20070322
Aug 6, 2008ASAssignment
Owner name: NOKIA CORPORATION, FINLAND
Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNOR:NOKIA MOBILE PHONES LTD.;REEL/FRAME:021349/0727
Effective date: 20010130
Jun 28, 2005FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
Feb 3, 2000ASAssignment
Owner name: NOKIA MOBILE PHONES LIMITED, FINLAND
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:BLACKER, BERNHARD;REEL/FRAME:010548/0375
Effective date: 20000119
Owner name: NOKIA MOBILE PHONES LIMITED KEILALAHDENTIE 4 FIN-0
Owner name: NOKIA MOBILE PHONES LIMITED KEILALAHDENTIE 4 FIN-0
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:BLACKER, BERNHARD;REEL/FRAME:010548/0375
Effective date: 20000119