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Publication numberUS634556 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 10, 1899
Filing dateJul 22, 1898
Priority dateJul 22, 1898
Publication numberUS 634556 A, US 634556A, US-A-634556, US634556 A, US634556A
InventorsJames White Hale
Original AssigneeJames White Hale
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Water-still.
US 634556 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

m. 634,556. Patent ed Oct. I0, I899.

.1. w. HALE.

WATER STILL.

(Applientiq'n filed July 22, 1898.) (No Model.) 2 Sheets-Sheet I.

N James WZZZEEZB Y! mums mus co. mare-Lam W101i. 0. a

No. 634,556. Patented Oct. 10, I899.

' J. W1; WATER; sum

7 A nmion filed 221,, 1308. No Model.) 2 Sheets-Sheet 2.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

JAMES WHITE HALE, or NEWBURYPORT, MASSACHUSETTS."

WATVE a SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Iatent No. 634,556, dated October 10,1899.

Application filed July 2 Z, 1898.

To all whom it may concern." Be it known that I, JAMES WHITE HALE, of Newburyport, in the county of Essex and State of Massachusetts, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Water- Stills, of which the followingis a specification.

The principal object of the present invention is to providea still for domestic purposes for the distillation of water.

By means of the improved still distilled water aerated by sterilized air is obtained by means of an apparatus which can be placed upon an ordinary cooking-stove and which can be safely and efficiently used by household servants who possess no mechanical or scientific attainments.

Generally speaking, the im proved still comprises three'independent and separable vessels, which when united and properly supplied with water are ready for use.

The still comprises a boiler in which the water to be distilled is placed, a collector communicatingwith the boiler for collecting the distilled water, and a condenser containing cold water which condenses the steam arising from the boiler and permits the same to drop into the collector. These three vessels are provided with means for supplying sterilized air to the distilled water with means for securing the proper relative positions of the three vessels, with means for facilitating their separation from each other, with means for supplying water to the boiler and removing it from the collector, and with means for permitting the escape at will of any volatile s ubstances which may be contained within the water treated. The improved still is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein Figure 1 is a central vertical longitudinal section of the improved stillwhen in condition for use. Fig. 2 is a central vertical crosssection of the still in condition for use, the plane in which this section is taken being at right angles to that'in which Fig. l is taken.

Fig. 3 is a top view of the condenser. Fig; 4 is a bottom view of the collector. Fig. 5 is a top view'of' the boiler. The section on which Fig. 1- istaken is indicated by'the lines 1 1, which appearin Figs. 3, 4, and 5, and the section on which'Fig;2 is taken is indicated by the lines 2 2, which also appear in Figs. 3, 4, and 5.

gerial No. 686,5 9 8. (No model.)

The upper vessel A is the condenser, the intermediate vessel B is the collector, and the steam-passage a. The boiler carrying the collectorand condenser is adapted to be placed upon an ordinary cooking-stove, a gas-stove, or an oil-stove, or to be otherwise heated. The water to be heated is placed within the boiler, and the steam arising therefrom passes through the steam-passage a into the collector, where it comes in contact with the outer surface of the condenser, which is filled with cold water. The steam is thus condensed, and flowing down the outersur'faceof the condenser drops into thecollector.

Each of the several vessels A, B, and C is preferably made of sheet metal.

The boilerC is a cylindrical vessel having an open top. At what may be termed its back it has rigidly secured to its exterior a filling-spout b, whichcommunicates with the interior of the boiler by means of a filling-aperture 0, located near the bottom of both the spout and the boiler. When the still is in operation, the filling-spout?) is closed by a cap or cover 61. 'By means of this filling spoutb the boiler may be kept supplied with water without removing the collector from the boiler. At the front of the boiler and diametrically opposite from the fillingspout b is the air-supply. This air supply is formed by means of a flue 6, located within the boiler, the outer wall of which is formed bythe exterior of the boiler itself, while the inner wall is formed by a separate piece of sheet metal secured within the boiler.' The air-flue e opens into the boiler nearthe top thereof, so that the water-holding capacity of the boiler is not materially lessened by reason of the air-supply. 'The air-inlet to the air-flue is constituted by an outwardly-projecting nozzle f, which opens into the air-flue above the bottom thereof, thus leaving a catch-basin g at the bottom of the air-flue to catch and retain any drops of water which may enter the top of the air-flue from the boiler on account of the agitation of the water in the boiler and which if allowed to flow out through the nozzle f would drip onto the stove and give the impression that the still was leaking. The air-inlet nozzle f is screwthreaded to. receive an air-supply pipe h in case of need. If the still is used on an ordinary cooking-stove when the latter is in use for culinary purposes, the air in the immediate vicinity of the. stove is very apt to be contaminated by coal-gas, smoke, or other sources, due to the carrying on of the ordinary domestic operations, so that the air thus contaminated entering the still might unfavorably affect the distilled water. In such cases the air-supply pipe h is employed, which can be of sufficient length either in itself or by means of sections coupled thereto to lead to a point sufliciently remote to secure pure air. such as to give rise to no objectionable gases and the like the air-supply pipe it need not be employed. .Diametrically opposite from the air-flue the boiler is provided with a positioning-guide 2', fastened thereto and projecting above the rimof the boiler, the office of which will hereinafter appear when particular reference is made to the collector. The boiler has on its opposite sides and near its top rim rests jj, whichalso serve as handies to facilitate the handling of the boiler.

The collector B is a cylindrical vessel open at the top and having at'its bottom a substam tially horizontal floor 70. Beneath the floor 7c the collector has a depending annular flange Z, which fits snugly within the top rim of the I boiler C. The collector likewise has an external annular flange m, which rests upon the top rim of the boiler. The flanges Z and m make a snug fit with the boiler, so that the joint thus formed practically prevents the leakage of steam through it during the normal operation of the still. The collector communicates with the boiler by means of the passage a, which is located at the extreme back of the collector. The floor 7t of the collector has a suitable opening to constitute the bottom of the steam-passage a, and the steam-passage is otherwise constituted by means of the exterior of the collector and a separate piece of sheet metal, the lower and outer edges of which are securely fastened to the collector. The capacity of the collector for holding water is determined by the height of the upper margin of the steam-passage a above the floor 7c, and this capacity is preferably less, as shown, than the water-holding capacity of the boiler C, so that the collector will be filled before all of the water in the boileris evaporated, and hence furtherevaporation of the water in the boiler and its sub sequent condensation and accumulation in the collector simply cause the collector to overflow into the boiler. The steam-passage a cooperates with the projecting positioningguide 2', carried by the boiler, so as to always insure the location of the steam-passage when the still is in use as remote as possible from the air-flue c. It will be noted that the collector cannot be inserted in place upon the boiler except when the positioninguide t t: registers with the steam-passage a, since oth- In case the source of heat employed is erwise the upwardly-projecting guide i would encounter the floor of the collector, and consequently since the guide 1' is diametrically opposite the air-flue c it follows that when the collector is in its operative position the steam-passage is as remote as possible from the air-flue. Owing to this construction and arrangement it follows that the air passing from the discharge-mouth of the air-flue into the collector for the purpose of aerating the distilled water is compelled to traverse a long path in association with the steam rising from the boiler, and hence the air becomes thoroughly sterilized before entering the collector. Since the water-level within the boiler cannot rise above the discharge-mouth of the air-flue e, there always exists a chamber between the water-level in the boiler and the floor of the collector extending from the dischargemouth of the air-flue to the steam passage a, which constitutes a sterilizingchamber forsterilizing the air. Consequently the distilled water is aerated. with pure and sterilized air, the passage a being hence an air, as well as a steam, passage. The sterilizing-chamber (thus constituted by the side walls of the boiler, the bottom of thecol- .lector, and the level of the boiling water in the boiler) has a horizontal area equal to the incoming air to be sterilized in passing across said chamber from the air-inlet to the steam and sterilized-air passage leading to the collector passes over the entire surface of the boiling water in the boiler and through the entire rising \mass of steam, so that a thorough incorporation of the air with the steam and consequent complete sterilization are insured before the air passes into the collector. Surrounding the lower margin of the steam-passage CL and secured to the floor 7c of the collector is a guard-wire n, which protects the portion of the floor surrounding the air-flue and prevents the injury of the floor by its accidentally encountering the positioning-guide 2' while the collector is being placed upon the boiler. Preferably, as shown in Fig. 4, the guard-wire 07. does not conform to that portion of the contour of the inner is circular, but is arranged as shown in said figure. The guard-wire also constitutes a drip edge to insure the immediate drop? ping back into the boiler of any overflow from the collector, thus preventing its backing under and collecting on the under side of the floor of the collector. The upper end of the guide 2' is curved, as shown, to prevent injury to the floor of the collector in .case they are brought in contact through awkward or careless handling. On its front and diametrically opposite to the steam-passage the collector is provided with a dischargeaperture 0, located near its bottom, which communicates with an exterior outlet-nose 1), carried by the collector, whereby the distilled water stored within the collector may and identical with that of the boiler, so that portion of the aperture in the door 7c whichbe pouredoff. The mouth of the nose 1) is normally covered by a snugly-fitting cap q. The top of the discharge-nose p is above the level of the top of the steam-passage a, so that water collecting in the collector cannot overflow through the nose 19. By placing the outlet 0, with the discharge-nose p, diametrically opposite the steam-passage a the distilled water can be readily poured out without spilling any of it into the boiler 0,.even when the level of the distilled water is flush with the top of the steam-passage a. Located within the nose p, on the outside of the wallof the collector, is a visual full water-mark '7, conveniently formed by a wire soldered in place. This is located just below or at the overflow-level of the passage or. By removing the cap q the full water-mark is in full view, and the progress of the distillation is ascertained.

The collector has near its top and directly above the steam-passage a a vent r, which, if desired, is adapted to be closed at will by a screw-stopper 8. When the still is started in operation, the stopper 3, if employed, is removed and any volatile impurities contained within the water willpass off through the vent r. The location of the ventimmediately in line with the steam-passage Ct facilitates the escape of such vapors. When steam is seen issuing from the vent, it can be closed by inserting the stopper 3. Since the vent is small, however, it can be left constantly open without materially lessening the capacity of the still. This vent being located at substantially the highest portion of the interior of the still permits the air originally within the still to be readily driven out, and if the vent is then stopped the circulation of steam within the still and the indrawing of air from the air-flue by the condensation of the steam are facilitated. Near its bottom and on opposite sides the collector is provided with two handles 15 If, by means of which the collector is handled. Owing to the positioning-guide i, when the collector is in place these handles 1 t are directly above the rests jj of the boiler and in close proximity thereto. The handles t tof the collector are preferably skeleton handles, as shown in Figs. 2 and 4, and consequently the upper portions of the boilerrests jj are accessible throughthe collectorhandles t i when the collector is in place on the boiler. This relative arrangement of the handles and rests greatly facilitates the separation of the collector and boiler when desired.

. As heretofore stated, there is preferably a snug fit between the collector and boiler, so.

as to prevent leakage of steam through the joint between them during the ordinary operation'of the still, and consequently some little force is required to separate the two. This is readily effected by reason of the relative location of the handles 25 t and rests j j, since by grasping the handles ttwith the fingers of both hands and pressing down with the thumbs upon the rests jij of the boiler the collector is lifted free from the boiler without difficulty and without danger of tilting the collector or disturbing the boiler. Near its top and preferably directly over the handles t t the collector is provided on opposite sides and at its exterior with two outwardlyprojecting rests u a, which serve the same office in connection with the separation of i the condenser from the collector which the restsj j of the boiler serve in connection with the handles 15 tof the collector, as will hereinafter appear in considering the construction of the condenser.

The condenser A is an open-mouthed vessel, which is adapted to nest within the collector and to be supported upon the upper rim thereof and which is filled with cold water for the purpose of facilitating the condensationof the steam circulating within the collector. The upper portion a; of the condenser is cylindrical, the lower portion 10 is spherical, and the intermediate section w thereof is conical, substantially as shown, and at its extreme bottom it has a depending flange y, which serves as a foot. upon which to stand the condenser when removed from the still, affording a fiat resting edge. The entire in terior of the condenser is wholly unobstructed, and the shape of its interior at the bottom facilitates the emptying of the condenser by means of a dipper. In domestic stills of this character where there is no connection with a cold-water supply, a single filling of the condenser with cold water may not always suffice to condense all of the steam, thus requiring the removal of the heated Water within the condenser and its replacement by cold water when the still is in operation. It is not desirable to remove the condenserfor this purpose, since when filled with water it is heavyand much of the steam would thereby escape and the temperature of the still be lowered, and consequently the construction is preferably such thatthe condenser may be readily emptied by means of a dipper. The unobstructed interior of the condenser herein set forthand its interior shape are especially designed for this purpose. The condenser fits snugly within .the upper open mouth of the collector and is supported upon the upper rim of the collector by means of aprojecting annular flange 2, carried by the condenser. A joint substantially preventing leakage of steam during the ordinary operation of the still is thus formed. For the purpose of handling the condenser it is provided at opposite sides near its top with outwardly-proj'ecting handles 6 6, and when the condenser is'put in place within the collector these handles'should come directly over the rests u it, carried by the collector. The condenser-handles 6 6 are preferably skeleton handles, so that the collector-rests u u are accessible through them. Consequently the condenser is readily detachable from the collector by simply pressing down upon the rests u u with the thumbs when the condenser is pressed upwardly by the fingers grasping the handles 6 6. The distilled water condensing on the outer surface of the condenser trickles down the same until it reaches the foot 'y, from which it drops off into the storage-chainber of the collector. This foot y is wholly nearer the vertical center of the still than any portion of the steam-passage a, so that none of the condensed water is lost through trickling back into the boiler through the steampassage a, and consequently the location of the steam-passage at one side of the collector is a desirable one therefor. The lowest portion of'the condenser does not extend down as far as the overflow-level of the water in the collector, as shown.

In order to operate the still, the boiler is filled nearly but not quite to the top of the air-flue. It is then set over the fire and the collector placed upon it and the condenser placed Within the collector. The cover d and cap q are also put in their places, and, it necessary, the air-supply pipe 7b is screwed on to the air-inlet nozzle f and the stopper 5 is removed from the vent r. If the water treated is supposed to contain any volatile substances,

the condenser should be allowed to remain empty until the steam begins to pour out through the vent r, whereupon the condenser should be immediately filled with cold water and the vent closed by means of thestopper s. In case the still works normally it will require no more attention until the collector is full of dstilled water, in which case the water in the nose 19 will have risen above and have submerged the full Watermark 7. Hence it is only necessary to remove the cap q to as certain how the process of distillation is progressing. If the still is not attended to for some time after the collector is full, no harm would ordinarily result from such neglect, since the water in the condenserwould overflow into the boiler; but if the still were neglected for so long a time that the water in the condenser would no longer condense the steam properly the steam would then escape down the air-flue and after a time the boiler would become dry. The issuing of steam from the air-supply nozzle give notice that the still requires attention. When the collector is emptied, the boiler must be refilled and the condenser emptied and refilled with cold water in order to continue the still in action. If the boiler is refilled with hot water from the condenser, it is not necessary to open the vent 7', since the volatile substances have already been expelled therefrom.

On account of the dii'ficulty of securing a faucet which will not be attacked by distilled water it is preferred not to use a faucet for the purpose of drawing oif the distilled Water from the collector, and hence the outlet-nose p is provided for this purpose. When the collector is to be emptied, the con denseris first re1noved,-and the collector is then tilted so that the distilled water is poured off through the outlet-nose 1). By reason of the loca tion of the outlet-nose diametrically opposite from the steam-passage a there is no danger of any portion of the distilled water being lost by flowing back through said steam-passage into the boiler when the collector is tilted to discharge the distilled water through the outlet-nose p. This affords aconvenient way of obtaining the distilled water from the collector. It of course involves the lifting off of the condenser; but it is ordinarily desirable to do this anyway, since at the completion of the distilling operation the water in the condenser is ordinarily hot, and it is desirable to pour off this hot water from the condenser in order that it may be supplied with cold water preparatory to further distillation.

It will be obvious on a consideration of the still as a whole thatit can be very readily managed by household servants or by any one having no special mechanical attainments. The three vessels of which the still is composed are easily separated, so that every part is rendered accessible for purposes of cleaning or otherwise. This is highly important, since the boiler should be frequently cleaned and anything which interferes with the ready accessibility of the boiler would prevent its proper cleaning. The provision of the sterilizing-chamber is effected in the simplest possible manner, since it is constituted by simply placing the collector in position, and it always has ample capacity for supplying the necessary air, and the relative positions of the air-flue and steam-passage insure the proper sterilization of the air.

It will be noticed that While this still is designed more particularly for domestic purposes some of its characteristic features are applicable to the larger and more intricate stills which are used in manufacturing and industrial establishments.

I claim as my invention- 1. A still having, in combination, a cylindrical boiler with an open top, a positioningguide projecting above its top, an air-flue diametrically opposite to said positioning-guide and opening into said boiler near the top thereof, an air-inlet nozzle communicating with said air-flue above the bottom thereof whereby a catch-basin is formed at the bottom of said air-flue, a water-inlet aperture near its bottom, an exterior filling-nose communicating with said water-inlet, and a cap for said nose; a detachable air-supply pipe connected with said air-inlet nozzle; a cylindrical openmouthed collector fitting snugly within the top of said boiler and supported thereupon, said collector having a flat floor which in connection with thewater-level within the boiler forms a sterilizing-chamber communicating with said air-flue, a steam-passage connecting said boiler and collector, said steam-passage being located at one side of said collector and being adapted to register with the positioning-guide carried by said boiler so that when the collector is in position the steampassage is as remote as possible from the airfiue, the said steam-passage terminating at its top Within the collector and constituting an overflow for said collector so that the storage capacity of said collector is less than the water-holding capacity of the boiler, a wateroutlet at the bottom of said collector diamet rically opposite said steam-passage, an exterior discharge-nose communicating with said water-outlet and extending above the top of said steam-passage, a cover for said outlet, a,

2. Astill having, in combination, a boiler with an open top, a positioninguide projecting above its top, an air-fine diametrically opposite to said positioning-guide and opening into said boiler near the top thereof, an-airinlet communicating with said air-flue above the bottom thereof whereby a catch-basin is formed at the bottom of said air-fine, a waterinlet aperture near its bottom, and an exterior filling-nose communicating with said water-inlet; an open-mouthed collector fitting snugly within the top of said boiler and supported thereupon, saidcollector having a flat floor which in connection with the waterlevel within the boiler forms a sterilizingchamber communicating with said air-fine, a steam-passage connecting said boiler and collector, said steam-passage being located at one side of said collector and being adapted to register with the positioning-guide carried by said boiler so that when the collector is in position the steam-passage is as remote as possible from the air-flue, the said steampassage terminating at its top within the collector and constituting an overflow for said collector so that the storage capacity of said collector is less than the water-holding capacity of the boiler, a water-outlet at the bottom of said collector diametrically opposite said steam-passage, an exterior dischargenose communicating with said water-outlet and extending above the top of said steampassage, and a vent near the top of the collector directly above the steam-passage, and a removable" stopper for said vent; and an open-mouthed condenser fitting snugly with in the top of the collector and supported there upon, substantially as set forth.

3. A still having, in combination, a boiler with an open top, a positioning-guide projecting above its top, and an air-supply flue diametrically opposite to said positioning-guide and opening into said boiler near the top thereof; an openmouthed collector fitting snugly within the top of said boiler and supported thereupon, said collector having a flat floor which in connection with the water-level within the boiler forms asterilizing-chamber communicating with said air-flue, a steampassage connecting said boiler and collector, said steam-passage being located at one side of said collector and being adapted to register with the positioning-guide carried by said boiler so that when the collector is inposition the steam-passage is as remote as possible from the air-flue, and a vent near the top of the collector directly above the steam-passage; and an open-mouthed condenser fitting snugly within the top of the collector and supported thereupon, substantially as set forth.

4. l A still having, in combination, a boiler with an open top, a positioning-guide projecting above its top, and an air-flue diametrically'opposite to said positioning-guide and opening into said boiler near the top thereof 5 an open-mouthed collector fitting snugly within the top of said boiler and supported thereupon, said collector having a fiat floor Whichin connection with the water-level within the boiler forms a sterilizing-chamber coininunicating with said air-fine, and astea'mpassage connecting said boiler and collector, said steam-passage being located at one side of said collector and being adapted to register with the positioning-guide carried by said boiler so that when the collector is in position the steam-passage is as remote as possible from the air-fine; and an open-mouthed condenser fitting snugly within the top of the collector and supported thereupon, substantially as set forth.

5. A still having, in combination, a boiler with an open top, apositioning-guide projecting above its top, and an air-fine diametrically opposite to said positioning-gnide'and opening into said boiler near thetop thereof; an open-mouthed collector fitting within the top of said boiler and supported thereupon, said collector having a floor which in connection with the water-level within the boiler forms a sterilizing-chamber communicating with said air-fine, a steam-passage connecting said boiler and collector, saidsteam-passage being located at one side of said collec-. tor and being adapted to register with the positioning-guide carried by said boiler so that when the collector is in position the steampassage is as remote as possible from the air= fine; and an open-mouthed condenser fitting within the top of the collector and supported thereupon, substantially as set forth.

, 6. A still having, in combination, a boiler with an open top, a positioning-guide projecting above its top, and an air-fine diametrically opposite to said positioning-guide and opening into said boiler near the top thereof; an open-mouthed collector fitting Within the top of said boiler and supported thereupon, said collector having a fioorwhich in connection with the water-level within the boiler forms a sterilizing-chamber communicating being located at one side of said collector and being adapted to register with the positioningguide carried by said boiler so that when the collector is in position the steam-passage is as remote as possible from the air-flue; and a condenser, substantially as set forth.

7. A still having, in combination, a boiler having an air-inlet at one side and nearits top; a collector having a floor which in connection with the water-level within the boiler and the side walls of said boiler forms a sterilizingchamber communicating with said air-inlet, and a steam-passage connecting said boiler and collector, said steam-passage being located at the side of said collector remote from the air-inlet; and a condenser; said boiler, collector, and condenserbeing separable from each other, substantially as set forth.

8. A still having, in combination, a boiler havingan air-inletatonesideand near itstop; a collector having a floor which in connection with the water-level within the boiler and the side walls of said boiler forms a sterilizingchamber communicating with said air-inlet, and a steam-passage connecting said boiler and collector, said steam-passage being. located at the side of said collector remote from the air-inlet; and a condenser, substantially as set forth.

9. A still having, in combination, a boiler having an air-inlet near its top; a collector separably connected with said boiler, said collector having a floor which in connection with the water-level within the boiler and the side walls of said boiler forms a sterilizing-chamber communicating with said air-inlet, and a steam-passage connecting said boiler and collector; and a condenser, substantially as set forth.

10. A still having, in combination, a boiler;

connecting said boiler and collector through which steam and sterilized air enter the collector, substantially as set forth.

11. A still having, in combination, a boiler having an air-flue opening into it near the top, and an air-inlet communicating with said air-flue above the bottom thereof whereby a catch-basin is formed at the bottom of said air-flue; a collector having a steam-passage connecting it with said boiler; and a condenser, substantially as set forth.

12. A still having, in combination, a boiler, a condenser, and a collector, said collector having at one side a steam-passage with which it communicates with the boiler, and having on its diametrically opposite side a dischargeoutlet, whereby the water in the collector can be turned out through the discharge-outlet without flowing into said steam-passage, substantially as set forth.

13. A still having, in combination, a boiler, a condenser, and a collector, said collector having at opposite sides a passage with which it communicates with said boiler, and a discharge-outlet, the mouth of said dischargeoutlet being above that of said passage so that the collector overflows into the boiler but can never overflow through said discharge when the still is in its normal operative position, and a cover for said discharge-outlet, substantially as set forth.

14. A s till having, in combination, a boiler, a condenser and a collector, said collector having a steam-pas sagejat one side, a floor having an aperture registering with said steam-passage, and a guard-wire secured to the under side of said floor andsurrounding said aperture, substantially as set forth.

In Witness whereof I have hereunto signed my name in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

JAMES "WHITE HALE. Witnesses:

ELLA XV. MACE, A. W. WooDMAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6428656Feb 17, 2000Aug 6, 2002Psi-Ets, A North Dakota PartnershipWater-cooled distilling apparatus
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationY10S203/18, B01D5/0066