Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS636508 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 7, 1899
Filing dateApr 21, 1899
Priority dateApr 21, 1899
Publication numberUS 636508 A, US 636508A, US-A-636508, US636508 A, US636508A
InventorsJohn H Eickershoff
Original AssigneeJohn H Eickershoff
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game-board.
US 636508 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

No. 636,508. Patented Nov. 7, [899.

' J. H. EICKERSHUFF.

GAME BOARD.

(Application filed Apr. 21, 1899.) A (No Model.) 2 Sheets-Sheet l.

me Nonms Ferias co. PHOTO-umu.. wAsHlNr-mm r:A c.

UNITED STATES PATENT ErrcE.

JOHN II. EIOKERSI-IOFF, OF CINCINNATI, OHIO.

GAME-BOARD.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 636,508, dated November 7, 1899.

Application led April 21, 1899. Serial No. 713,918. (N0 mdel T0 @ZZ whom it may concern: l

Be it known that I, JOHN H. EIoKEEsHoEF, a citizen of the United States, residing at Oincinnati, in the county of Hamilton and State of Ohio, haveinvented certain new and useful Improvements in Game-Boards, of which the following is a specication.

The object of my invention is to produce a mechanical game-board by means of-which a great variety of games may be played with the same apparatus, by which many of the old and well-known in door games may be played by different means and with variations of method which render them more attractive, by which novel and amusing combinations of questions and answers, quotations, or the like may be produced, and by which the variety of such combinations may be multiplied at will; and my invention consists in the mechanism and combinations and arrangements of parts hereinafter described and claimed.

In the drawings, Figure l is a plan view of a game-board embodying my invention; Fig.

v2, a section on line 2 2 of Fig. 1; Fig. 3, a plan View of a modification embodying my invention; Fig. 4, a section on line 4 4 of Fig. 3. Figs. 5 and 6 show in plan disks selected to illustrate the method of arrangement for some of the games.

The reference-letter A denotes a box or case adapted to contain my device, and B a plate mounted to rotate in the box A.

C, C', O2, and O3 represent game-disks mounted to rotate on the plate B, D a flat spring adapted to contact with the peripheries of the disks, and E an indicator.

The containing-box A and plate B may be of any desired form and are preferably made of light wood or heavy cardboard, t-he plate being mounted to rotate freelyin the box. This rotatable mounting may be accomplished in various ways, two of which are illustrated in the drawings.-' In Figs. l and 2 the plate is shown as carried by a central knob b, which is pivoted to the bottom of the box by means of pivot-screw b. At the base of the pivot the bottom is preferably reinforced by av plate a, which also serves as the bearing for the knob b. In Figs. 3 and 4 the knob b is hung upon the pivot b2 and swings clear of the reinforcing-plate a, thus avoiding friction. At

intervals on the plate B are pivoted disks C Ov', dac., preferably with their peripheries pro jecting beyond the periphery of the plate, so that upon rotation thereof they contact with the flexible spring D, which may be secured to the side of the box A, as at d. This pivoted mounting may also be accomplished in various ways, two of which I have illustrated in the drawings.

In Figs. l and 2 I have shown each disk as provided with a central hub c, adapted to take over pivot-pins c on the plate B and rotate thereon, with the upper surface of the plate as a bearing. The hub c is open at both ends, so that either face of the disks may be exposed.

In Figs. 3 and 4 I have shown the plate B as provided with pivoted disks c2, permanently mounted thereon, each of which is provided with a square or other polygonal projection c3. The disks C C', duc., are provided with corresponding polygonal-shaped central openings adapted to take over projections c3 and hold their disks in position on disks c2 with either face exposed. The upper faces of disks o2 when not covered by disks O O', dac., may also be used. The latter method is preferable, as it is not necessary to provide each disk with a separate hub, one set of disks c2 serving as mounting for all the disks C O, dac. The faces of the disks O O', doc., are provided with various configurations characteristic of the game to be played, and an indicator E is mounted on knob b, with a hand e pointing to the periphery of each disk.

In Fig. l I have shown disks adapted for a game of question and answer, in which each disk is divided into a number of sectors, each containing a printed answer to some general question relating, for instance, to one of the important factors in human life and the disks named in accordance with the factors selected. Thus the four disks in Fig. l are named, respectively, Business, Pleasure, Love,7 and Hate and each provided with its appropriate answers. The operator asks,silently or otherwise, a question relating to the subject-matter indicated by the name given to one of the disks and then whirls the plate B by means of the knob b. As the disks O are carried around by the plate their peripheries IOO contact with the spring D, which imparts to them a rapid rotary movement, which continues foi-some time after the contact has ceased. Then all movement has ceased, the hands e point to an answer on the selected disk.

In Fig. 3 I have illustrated the application of my invention to another form of game, which, so far as I am aware, is in itself new. In this case there are iive disks C C', tbc., each divided into ten sectors, in each of which is placed one of the numbers from l to 50, there being in all fifty sectors, one for each number up to fifty. In this case also I have shown the spring D of a slightlydiierent form from spring D of Fig. l, but performing the same function in the same way. The object is to count from one to a selected number-fifty, for instance-by successive operations of the device, and the game is adapted for any number of players. The first player, if there be more than one, turns the knob, and it when the disks stop either hand registers with the iigure l one is counted. If at the same operation another hand happens to register at the figure 2, two is also counted, and the player may add the l and 2, thereby counting three. If a third lhand happens to register with the iigure 4, four is counted, and by adding the l live, by adding the 2 six, by adding the 3 seven, the., the plan being to count any successive numbers when indicated by the hand or obtained by addition of the numbers indicated by all the hands, it being required, however, that-at each operation one hand must point to the players starting-number for that operation. If the starting-number is not indicated, the players turn is at an end. In Fig. 3 I have shown the hands registering with the numbers 1, 2, 4, S, and 16. This combination permits counting thirty-one by one rotation. This game affords both amusement and intellectual training, as the great number of permutations obtainable from the iive indicated numbers requires no little exercise of the mathematical faculty to detect those required on the spur of the moment. This game may be varied indefinitely by changes in the n umber of disks or number of sectors on each disk or numbers to be obtained or the method of counting without affecting in any degree the mechanical principles upon which it depends.

In Figs. and G I have illustrated stillother configurations of disks adapted to use in other games. Fig. 5 shows a disk adapted for use in spelling matches, which is divided into ten sectors, each labeled with a different letter, either capitalorsmall. The Jand I being made identical, the fifty sectors provided by iive such disks accommodate all the letters of the alphabet, both capital and small. In this game the letters indicated by the hands e after successive whirlin gs of the plate B are to be used in their proper order in spelling a selected word. Fig. 6 shows a disk adapted for use in playing dominees, thus providing for the twenty-eight different colnbinations. A number of counters or markers are placed on the table, and a certain number are given to each of the players, who endeavor to get rid of them in accordance with the ordinary rules of dominees, the playing-hand of each player at each turn consisting of the four doniinoes indicated by the four indicatorhands after his operation of the device.

The form of my invention illustrated and described in this specification is capable of many modifications without departing from its spirit, and I do not Wish to limit myself to any specific form of mechanism or its application to any specific kind of game; but

What I claim as my invention is f l. The combination, in a game-board, of a revoluble plate; one or more rotatable disks mounted on the plate bearing insignia characteristic of the game to be played; an indicator adapted to designate sectors of they disks corresponding with the individual elements of the groups of insignia; means for rotating the plate; and a contact-piece adapted to engage with the peripheries of the disks as the plate rotates.

2. The combination, in a game-board, ot' a revoluble plate; one or more rotatable disks mounted on the plate bearing insignia characteristic of the game to be played; an indicator adapted to designate sectors of the disks corresponding with the individual elements of the group of insignia; a knob on the plate whereby it may be revolved; and a contact-piece adapted to engage with the peripheries of the disks as the plate rotates.

3. The combination, in a game-board, of a revoluble plate; one or more rotatable disks mounted on the plate bearing insignia characteristic of the gaine to be played; an indicator mounted on the plate and adapted to designate sectors on the disks corresponding with the individual elements of the groups of insignia; a knob on the plate whereby it may be revolved; and a spring adapted t-o contact with the peripheries of the disks as the plate rotates.

4. The combination, in a game-board, of a revoluble plate; one or more pivots arranged at intervals on the plate; one or more disks bearing insignia characteristic of the game to be played and adapted to rotate on the pivots; an indicator mounted on the plate and adapted to designate characters on the disks; means for 'revolving the plate; and a spring adapted to contact with the peripheries of the disks as the plate rotates.

5. The combination in a toy, of a revoluble plate; one or more supporting-disks pivoted at intervals on the plate and provided with central polygonal projections; one or more disks bearing insignia characteristic ot' the game to be played and central polygonalshaped openings adapted to take over the projections on the supporting-disks; an indicator mounted on the plate and adapted to designate characters on the disks; means for IOO IIO

revolving the plate; and a spring adapted to Contact with the peripheries of the disks as the plate rotates.

6. The combination, in a game-board, of a plate; a series of disks pivotally mounted on said4 plate, each disk bearing a differing series of numbers arranged in sectors on the disk, and means for imparting an independent rotation to the disks.

7. The combination, in a game-board, of a plate; a series of disks pivotally mounted on said plate, each disk bearing a differing series of numbers arranged in sectors on the disk, the numbers on the several disks, when combined, constituting an unbroken series and means for imparting an independent rotation to the disks.

JOHN I-I. EICKERSHOFF.

Witnesses:

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3046018 *Nov 20, 1959Jul 24, 1962Serpico Sebastian JMagnetic letter spinning game
US3152414 *Dec 28, 1962Oct 13, 1964Frank G JordanDisplay devices
US3243185 *Mar 30, 1964Mar 29, 1966Miller Henry AChance device with sequentially indexing rotatable discs
US4291881 *Nov 5, 1979Sep 29, 1981Klamer R BKaleidoscopic game device
US5184821 *Jan 7, 1992Feb 9, 1993Korenek Raymond EGame apparatus for poker and similar card games
US6719290Feb 11, 2002Apr 13, 2004Kristina KershnerStorytelling and idea generation game
US6905405 *Dec 3, 2001Jun 14, 2005IgtMethod and apparatus for gaming using symbols movable in the plane of a display
US7021624 *Apr 25, 2003Apr 4, 2006Sierra Design GroupGaming device with multiple spinning wheels and method
US7216867Aug 29, 2005May 15, 2007Sierra Design GroupGaming device with multiple spinning wheels and method
US7287755Apr 8, 2004Oct 30, 2007Kristina KershnerMethod of playing a storytelling and idea generation game
US7326112 *Jun 13, 2005Feb 5, 2008IgtGaming device having display with interacting multiple rotating members and indicator
US7601061Feb 11, 2005Oct 13, 2009IgtGaming machine having independent spinning forms and multiple pay lines
US8241105May 14, 2007Aug 14, 2012Bally Gaming, Inc.Gaming device with multiple spinning wheels and method
US20030104855 *Dec 3, 2001Jun 5, 2003Mcclintic Monica A.Method and apparatus for gaming using symbols movable in the plane of a display
US20030178768 *Apr 25, 2003Sep 25, 2003Sierra Design GroupGaming device with multiple spinning whells and method
US20050227755 *Jun 13, 2005Oct 13, 2005Dennis NordmanGaming device having display with interacting multiple rotating members and indicator
EP0380114A1 *Jan 25, 1990Aug 1, 1990Reuben B. KlamerRotator game device
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA63F2011/0016