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Publication numberUS638887 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 12, 1899
Filing dateOct 19, 1898
Priority dateOct 19, 1898
Publication numberUS 638887 A, US 638887A, US-A-638887, US638887 A, US638887A
InventorsEdward I Root
Original AssigneeEdward I Root
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cigarette-making device.
US 638887 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

No. 638,887. Patented Dec: [2, I899.

E. l. BOOT;

CIGARETTE MAKING DEVICE.

(Application filed Oct. 19, 1898.)

(No Model.)

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EDlVARD I. ROOT, OF DENVER, COLORADO.

CIGARETTE-MAKING DEVICE.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 638,887, dated December 12, 1899. Application filed October 19,1898. Serial No. 694,055. (No model.)

T0 a/ZZ when z it may concern.-

Be it known that I, EDWARD I. ROOT, a citizen of the United States of America, residing at Denver,in the county of Arapahoe and State of Colorado, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Cigarette Making Devices; and I do declare the following to be a full, clear, and exact description of the invention, such as will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertains to make and use the same, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, and to the letters and figures of reference marked thereon, which form a part of this specification.

My invention relates to improvements in cigarette-making devices adapted for individual use; and it consists of the features hereinafter described and claimed, all of which will be fully understood by referenceto the accompanying drawings, in which is illustrated an embodiment thereof.

In the drawings, Figure 1 is a longitudinal section taken through the magazine case. Fig. 2 is an underneath view of the same, the cap being turned on its hinge to a position at right angles to the body of the magazine-case. Fig. 8 is a section taken through the magazinecase at right angles to-the section shown in Fig. 1. Fig. 4 is an edge view of the magazinecase with its cap removed, its position when turned on its hinge being indicated in dotted lines. Fig. 5 shows the cap detached. Fig. 6 is a detail view of the plunger. Fig. 7 shows the combined spoon and former. Fig. 8 illustrates a single cigarette tube or case. Fig. 9 shows the plunger, former, and tube in position for use.

Similar reference characters indicating corresponding parts in the views, let the numeral 5 designate the magazine-case, in which is located and made fast a number of distinct circular open-ended tubes 6. To one extrem ity, which for convenience I will term the top of the case, is hinged a cap 7, having V-shaped grooves or cavities 7, adapted to receive the extremities of the tubes 6, which protrude from the body of the case. These tube extremities are cut away on their opposite sides, forming openings for the thumb and finger to grasp the cigarette extremity when it is desired to remove it from the tube or case. The walls of the l-shaped cavity taper the mouth end of the cigarettes and prevent the granulated tobacco from escaping into the mouth of the user while smoking. This cap 7 is provided with two arms 7 adapted to embrace the edges or narrower sides of the magazine, which are provided with slots 5, in which two pins 7 and 7 attached to each arm, are adapted to travel as the cap is moved back and forth. At the outer extremity of each slot 5 is formed a semicircular slot 5, communicating with the slot 5 and in which the pin 7 is adapted to travel after the cap is drawn to its outer limit of movement in order to turn the cap to the position shown in Fig. 2 for the purpose of removing the cigarettes from the magazine-case. During this operation the cap turns on the pins 7, which are longer than the pins 7 and form a stop against the further outward movement of the cap when the pins 7 have reached a position to travel in the slots 5. The extremities of the semicircular slots 5 limit the turning movement of the cap. As shown in the drawings, the cap is locked in the closed position by two springs 8 and 9, located on opposite sides of the device. The spring Sis attached to one of the arms 7 of the cap and is provided with a pin 8, adapted to enter an opening formed in the magazine-case. The spring 9 is attached to the case of the magazine and is provided with an opening which the pin '7 on the adjacent arm 7 of the cap engages. In order to release or unlock the cap, it is only necessary to press inwardly on the two springs 8 and 9 until the pins 8 and 9 are removed from engagement with the case. The cap may then be moved outwardly and turned to the position shown in Fig. 2, as heretofore explained.

When the magazinecase is filled with cigarettes, its lower extremity or bottom is closed by a detachable stirrup-shaped plate l0,which may be constructed in any suitable manner.

"As shown in the drawings, the two arms 10 are each provided with a projection or pin 10, adapted to enter an aperture in the case. The plate is formed of spring metal, and its arms yield sufficiently to permit the ready re moval thereof when it is desired to recharge or load the magazine-case.

In using the device a tube 20, termed the former, is employed. To this is attached a spoon 20, adapted to hold enough tobacco to make one cigarette at least. The paper 13, forming the wrapper, is first rolled around the former and fastened, as by moistening its edges, in theusual manner. The former,with the wrapper applied, is then inserted in one of the tubes 6, the plate 10 being first removed. The wrapper is made of sufficient length to project beyond the former-tube. This projecting portion is pressed together, forming a tip adapted to enter the extremity of the tube 6,which projects into the V-shaped cavity 7. The spoon 20 is then dipped into the tobacco and filled. The plunger 12 is used to pack the tobacco into the wrapper, the former-tube being gradually removed during the operation. This operation is repeated until the magazinecase is filled with cigarettes. The plate 10 is then replaced and the cigarettes are ready for use. They may be removed by opening the cap 7 in the manner heretofore explained, whereby the slotted extremities of the tubes 6, occupying the V- shaped grooves of the cap, are left protruding. A cigarette may then be easily removed by grasping its tapered tip between the thumb and finger. This is accomplished by virtue of the slots in the extremity of the tube 6, as heretofore explained.

The plunger 12 consists of a sort of diminutive ramrod, preferably composed of wood, its outer extremity being slightly bent to conform to the shape of the former and spoon for convenience of carryingin the pocket. The plunger is notched near the extremity of its bent portion, as shown at 12, to engage the end wall of the spoon when carried in the pocket, whereby the two parts are temporarily locked together when not in use.

I may also use a single tube 6 (see Figs. 8 and 9) without a magazine-case, the tube extremity being cut away on the opposite sides, as shown at 6 to allow the cigarette to be grasped by the thumb and finger for purposes of removal, substantially the same as the tubes 6 of the magazine-case.

To one side of the tubes 6 in the magazinecase is formed a compartment A, adapted to hold matches.

In further explanation of the utility of my improved device I desire to state that by virtue of the V-shaped sockets in the cap of the magazine-case the tips or mouth extremities of the cigarettes are tapered, somewhat resembling the pointed extremities of cigars, and thereby closing the wrappers in such a manner as to prevent the escape of the tobacco, but at the same time not interfering with the draft of air through the article. This is a very important feature where cigarettes are made of granulated tobacco. The ordinar'y cigarettes on the market are made from stringy tobacco, which makes it practicable to have both ends of the wrapper open; but hand-made cigarettes are generally made from granulated tobacco. Hence the necested on opposite sides at one extremity, a

hinged cap containing cavities adapted to register with the slotted ends of the tubes, in combination with a tubular former adapted to enter the said tubes, the former being provided with a spoon for the purpose set forth.

In a cigarette-making device, the combination of a case provided with a number of tubes adapted to hold cigarettes and slotted on opposite sides at one extremity, a cap containing sockets in alinement with the tubes in the case, a suitable connection for attaching the cap to the case, whereby the cap is allowed both longitudinal and turning movement, and a former adapted to enter the tubes in the case.

4. In a cigarette-making device, the combination of a case provided with a number of tubes adapted to hold cigarettes slotted on opposite sides at one extremity, a cap containing cavities in alinement with the tubes in the case, a suitable connection for attaching the cap to the case, whereby the cap is allowed both longitudinal and turning move men t, and a former adapted to enter the tubes in the case, said former being provided with a spoon for the purpose set forth.

5. The combination of a magazine-case containing openings adapted to hold cigarettes, and a cap containing cavities in alinement with said openings, the cap having arms embracing the case and provided with projections, the case being provided with straight and curved grooves or slots which the projections on the embracing-arms are adapted to engage, whereby the cap is allowed a longitudinal and turning movement for the purpose set forth.

6. The combination ofa magazine-case containing openings adapted to hold cigarettes, the said tubes being slotted on opposite sides at one extremity tofacilitate the removal of the cigarettes, and a cap containing cavities in alinement with the tubes, and suitable means for locking the cap in position on the case.

7. In a cigarette-making device, the combination of a case provided with a number of tubes adapted to hold cigarettes, a cap containing a socket in alinement with the tubes in the case, the cap having arms rigidly attached thereto, and embracing the case on opposite sides, means for locking the arms adapted to enter the former for the purpose 10 against movement on the case, and a connecset forth.

tion between the arms and the case, whereby In testimony whereof I affix my signature the arms, when unlocked, are allowed both in presence of two witnesses.

longitudinal and turning movement, for the purpose set forth. EDWVARD ROOT 8. The combination of a tube having one WVitnesse's:

extremity slotted on opposite sides, a former A. J. OBRIEN,

EDITH HIMsWoRTH.

adapted to enter the tube, and a plunger

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7325382Jun 1, 2005Feb 5, 2008R. J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyMethod and apparatus for loading finished cigarettes into package
US7537013Jun 1, 2005May 26, 2009R.J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyApparatus for manufacturing cigarettes
US7565818Mar 14, 2006Jul 28, 2009R.J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyApparatus and methods for manufacturing cigarettes
US7597105Jun 1, 2005Oct 6, 2009R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.Apparatus for manufacturing cigarettes
US7677251Jul 7, 2006Mar 16, 2010R.J. Reynolds Tobacco CompanyApparatus and methods for manufacturing cigarettes
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA24C5/42