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Publication numberUS6391605 B1
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 09/044,718
Publication dateMay 21, 2002
Filing dateMar 19, 1998
Priority dateMar 25, 1997
Fee statusPaid
Also published asCA2231948A1, CA2231948C, CN1146658C, CN1194305A, DE69840617D1, EP0897010A2, EP0897010A3, EP0897010B1, US6734004, US7078183, US20030092155, US20040142424
Publication number044718, 09044718, US 6391605 B1, US 6391605B1, US-B1-6391605, US6391605 B1, US6391605B1
InventorsDirk Kostrewa, Luis Pasamontes, Andrea Tomschy, Adolphus van Loon, Kurt Vogel, Markus Wyss
Original AssigneeRoche Vitamins Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Modified phytases
US 6391605 B1
Abstract
A process for the production of a modified phytase with a desired property improved over the property of the corresponding unmodified phytase is disclosed, as well as modified phytases, polynucleotides encoding modified phytases, and animal feed including modified phytases.
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Claims(24)
What is claimed is:
1. A modified Aspergillus fumigatus phytase with a specific activity improved over the specific activity of the corresponding unmodified Aspergillus fumigatus phytase wherein the amino acid sequence of the unmodified phytase has been changed at a position corresponding to position 27 of the phytase of Aspergillus niger (SEQ ID NO:1), as identified by PILEUP version 8 amino acid sequence alignment program, to an amino acid selected from the group consisting of Ala, Val, Leu, Ile, Thr, Gly, and Asn.
2. A modified Aspergillus fumigatus phytase according to claim 1, further comprising an additional mutation selected from the group consisting of S66D, S140Y, D141G, A205E, Q274L, G277D, G277K, Y282H, and N340S.
3. A modified Aspergillus fumigatis phytase with a specific activity improved over the specific activity of the corresponding unmodified Aspergillus fumigatus phytase wherein the amino acid sequence of the modified Aspergillus fumigatus phytase has a mutation selected from the group consisting of S66D, S140Y, D141G, A205E, Q274L, G277D, G277K, Y282H, N340S, and combinations therof, wherein the respective amino acid position of each mutation corresponds to the amino acid position of an Aspergillus niger phytase (SEQ ID NO:1) as identified by PILEUP version 8 amino acid alignment program.
4. A modified phytase according to claim 1 wherein the unmodified phytase has the sequence of SEQ ID NO:3.
5. A modified phytase according to claim 4 wherein the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:3 has been changed at a position corresponding to position 27 of the phytase of Aspergillus niger to the amino acid Ala.
6. A modified phytase according to claim 4 wherein the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:3 has been changed at a position corresponding to position 27 of the phytase of Aspergillus niger to the amino acid Val.
7. A modified phytase according to claim 4 wherein the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:3 has been changed at a position corresponding to position 27 of the phytase of Aspergillus niger to the amino acid Leu.
8. A modified phytase according to claim 4 wherein the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:3 has been changed at a position corresponding to position 27 of the phytase of Aspergillus niger to the amino acid Ile.
9. A modified phytase according to claim 4 wherein the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:3 has been changed at a position corresponding to position 27 of the phytase of Aspergillus niger to the amino acid Thr.
10. A modified phytase according to claim 4 wherein the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:3 has been changed at a position corresponding to position 27 of the phytase of Aspergillus niger to the amino acid Asn.
11. A modified phytase according to claim 4 wherein the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:3 has been changed at a position corresponding to position 27 of the phytase of Aspergillus niger to the amino acid Gly.
12. A modified phytase according to claim 4 wherein the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:3 has been modified as follows: Q23L and S62D.
13. A modified phytase according to claim 4 wherein the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:3 has been modified as follows: Q23L, S136Y, and D137G.
14. A modified phytase according to claim 3 wherein the unmodified phytase has the sequence of SEQ ID NO:3.
15. A modified phytase according to claim 14 wherein the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:3 has been modified as follows: S62D.
16. A modified phytase according to claim 14 wherein the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:3 has been modified as follows: S136Y.
17. A modified phytase according to claim 14 wherein the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:3 has been modified as follows: D137G.
18. A modified phytase according to claim 14 wherein the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:3 has been modified as follows: A200E.
19. A modified phytase according to claim 3 wherein the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:3 has been modified as follows: Q269L.
20. A modified phytase according to claim 14 wherein the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:3 has been modified as follows: G272D.
21. A modified phytase according to claim 14 wherein the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:3 has been modified as follows: G272K.
22. A modified phytase according to claim 14 wherein the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:3 has been modified as follows: Y277H.
23. A modified phytase according to claim 14 wherein the amino acid sequence of SEQ ID NO:3 has been modified as follows: N335S.
24. A food or feed composition comprising a modified phytase of claim 1.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Phytases (myo-inositol hexakisphosphate phosphohydrolases; EC 3.1.3.8) are enzymes that hydrolyze phytate (myo-inositol hexakisphosphate) to myo-inositol and inorganic phosphate and are known to be valuable feed additives.

A phytase was first described in rice bran in 1907 [Suzuki et al., Bull. Coll. Agr. Tokio Imp. Univ. 7, 495 (1907)] and phytases from Aspergillus species in 1911 [Dox and Golden, J. Biol. Chem. 10, 183-186 (1911)]. Phytases have also been found in wheat bran, plant seeds, animal intestines and in microorganisms [Howsen and Davis, Enzyme Microb. Technol. 5, 377-382 (1983), Lambrechts et al., Biotech. Lett. 14, 61-66 (1992), Shieh and Ware, Appl. Microbiol. 16, 1348-1351 (1968)].

The cloning and expression of the phytase from Aspergillus niger (ficuum) has been described by Van Hartingsveldt et al., in Gene, 127, 87-94 (1993) and in European Patent Application, Publication No. (EP) 420 358 and from Aspergillus niger var. awamori by Piddington et al., in Gene 133, 55-62 (1993).

Cloning, expression and purification of phytases with improved properties have been disclosed in EP 684 313. However, since there is a still ongoing need for further improved phytases, especially with respect to the activity properties, it is an object of the present invention to provide such improvements.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Accordingly, this invention is directed to a process for the production of a modified phytase with a desired property improved over the property of the corresponding unmodified phytase which comprises:

(a)determining the three dimensional structure of the unmodified phytase and of a second phytase which has the desired property by aligning the amino acid sequences of said phytases with the amino acid sequence of a third phytase which is the phytase of Aspergillus niger and using the three dimensional structure of the phytase of Aspergillus niger as a template based on the alignment to determine said three dimensional structures;

(b)determining from the structures of step (a) the amino acids of the active sites of the unmodified phytase and of the second phytase having the desired property which active site provides the desired property and comparing the amino acids which form the active sites to identify which amino acids are different in the active site of the second phytase from the amino acids in the active site of the unmodified phytase;

(c)constructing a DNA sequence coding for the modified phytase by obtaining the DNA sequence of the unmodified phytase and changing the nucleotides coding for the active site which provides the desired property for said unmodified phytase so that at least one of the amino acids in the active site which provides the desired property is substituted by one of the amino acids which was identified as being different in step (b);

(d)integrating such a DNA sequence into a vector capable of expression in a suitable host cell; and

(e)transforming the suitable host cell by the DNA sequence of step (c) or the vector of step (d), growing said host cell under suitable growth conditions and isolating the modified phytase from the host cell or the culture medium.

Either or both of the unmodified phytase and the phytase with the desired property may be of eukaryotic origin, especially of fungal origin. Such phytases are preferably of Aspergillus origin, for example phytase from Aspergillus fumigatus. In a preferred process, the phytase with the desired property is a phytase from Aspergillus terreus. In another preferred process, the unmodified phytase is a phytase of Aspergillus fumigatus and the phytase with the desired property is the Aspergillus niger phytase. In yet another preferred process, the unmodified phytase is a phytase of Aspergillus fumigatus and the phytase with the desired property is the Aspergillus terreus phytase.

Also part of this invention is a modified phytase with a specific activity improved over the specific activity of the corresponding unmodified phytase (for example Aspergillus fumigatus) wherein the amino acid sequence of the corresponding unmodified phytase has been changed by one or more of deletion, substitution and addition by one or more amino acids to obtain the amino acid sequence of the modified phytase. A preferred phytase has an amino acid sequence homologous to that of the phytase of Aspergillus niger (SEQ ID NO. 1 and has an amino acid sequence that has been changed in at least one amino acid position selected from the following amino acid positions which correspond to positions of the amino acid sequence of the phytase of Aspergillus niger: 27, 66, 71, 103, 140, 141, 188, 205, 234, 235, 238, 274, 277, 282, 340 and 424, in particular wherein the amino acid position is selected from 27, 66, 140, 205, 274, 277, 282, and 340.

A preferred modified phytase has an amino acid sequence which has been changed at position 27 alone or in addition to other of the above positions, in particular at least at position 66 and/or position 140. Thus preferred phytases are modified at position 27 and 66 or 27 and 140.

For any such phytase, the amino acid at position 27 may be replaced by a specific amino acid selected from one of the following groups:

a) Ala, Val, Leu, Ile; or b)Thr; or c) Asn.

Particular modified phytases of this invention are characterized by at least one of the following changes in amino acids at positions: Q27L, Q27N, Q27T, Q27I, Q27V, Q27A, Q27G, S66D, S140Y, D141G, A205E, Q274L, G277D, G277K, Y282H and/or N340S.

Also part of this invention are polynucleotides comprising a DNA sequence coding for the modified phytases produced by the above method. Polynucleotides comprising DNA sequences coding for the phytases described above which are modified at particular amino acid positions are included.

Also included are vectors, especially expression vectors, which contain the polynucleotides of this invention, and host cells which contain these polynucleotides directly or within a vector.

Another aspect of this invention is a food or feed composition which contains modified phytases described above.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES

FIG. 1: Primary sequence alignment of A. niger (ficuum), (SEQ ID NO:1) A. terreus cbs116.46 (SEQ ID NO:2) and A. fumigatus [ATCC 13073] (SEQ ID NO:3) phytase. Stars show identical residues within the active site and rectangles, non-identical residues within the active site.

FIG. 2: pH optima curves. Specific activity of wild-type and mutant A. fumigatus phytases is plotted against pH of incubation. Filled squares represent A. fumigatus wild-type phytase; Open triangles represent A. fumigatus Q27L mutant; Filled circles represent A. fumigatus Q27L, Q274L mutant; Open squares represent A. fumigatus Q27L, Q274L, G277D mutant.

FIG. 3: Substrate specificities of wild-type and mutant A. fumigatus phytases. (A) wild-type; (B) Q27L single mutant; (C) Q27L, Q274L, G277D triple mutant. The following substrates were used: (1) phytic acid; (2) p-nitrophenyl phosphate; (3) fructose-1,6-bisphosphate; (4) fructose-6-phosphate; (5) glucose-6-phosphate; (6) ribose-5-phosphate; (7) α-glycerophosphate; (8) β-glycerophosphate; (9) 3-phosphoglycerate; (10) phosphoenolpyruvate; (11) AMP; (12) ADP; (13) ATP.

FIG. 4: Complete coding sequence and encoded amino acid sequence of the Aspergillus nidulans phytase (SEQ ID NOS:4-6).

FIG. 5: Complete coding sequence (SEQ ID NO:7) and encoded amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NOs:8-9) of Talaromyces thermophilus phytase.

FIG. 6: Complete coding sequence (SEQ ID NO:10) and encoded amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NOs:11-12) of Aspergillus fumigatus [ATCC 13073] phytase.

FIG. 7: Complete coding sequence (SEQ ID NO:13) and encoded amino acid sequence (SEQ ID NOs:14-15) of Aspergillus terreus CBS 116.46 phytase.

FIG. 8: Crystallographic data of the structure of the Aspergillus niger phytase.

FIG. 9: Substrate specificities of wild-type and mutant A. fumigatus phytase (N1-N6). Substrates 1 to 13 are as indicated for FIG. 3.

FIG. 10: pH optima curves of further mutant A. fumigatus phytases (N1-N6). All activity values were standardized (maximum activity=1.0).

FIG. 11a: Stereo picture of the three-dimensional fold of A. niger (A. ficuum; NRRL 3135) phytase. The active site is indicated with a circle and the catalytically essential amino acid residues Arg 58 and His 59 are shown in ball-and-stick representation. This figure was prepared with the programs “MOLSCRIPT” [Kraulis, P. J., J. Appl. Cryst. 24, 946-950 (1991)] and “RASTER3D” [Merritt, E. A. & Murphy, M. E. P., Acta Cryst., 869-873 (1994)].

FIG. 11b: Topological sketch, using the same scheme as in (a). The five disulphide bridges are shown as black zigzag lines together with the sequence numbers of the cysteine residues involved. The β-strands are defined with the sequence numbers A:48-58, B:134-138, C: 173-177, D: 332-337, E: 383-391, and F: 398-403. The α-helices are defined with the sequence numbers a: 66-82, b: 88-95, c: 107-123, d: 141-159, e: 193-197, f: 200-210, g: 213-223, h: 231-246, i: 257-261, 264-281, k: 290-305,l: 339-348, m: 423-429, and n: 439-443. The asterisk at the C-terminal end of β-strand A marks the location of the catalytically essential amino acid residues Arg 58 and His 59.

FIG. 12: Stereo picture of the active site of A. ficuum (ATCC 13073) phytase with a hypothetical binding mode of the substrate phytate. In this model, the bound crystal water molecules were removed and the protein atom positions were held fixed, except for small adaptations of the side chain torsion angles of Lys 68 in order to interact with the substrate. All the conserved amino acid residues Arg 58, His 59, Arg 62, Arg 142, His 338 and Asp 339 form hydrogen bonds to the scissile 3-phosphate group of phytate, as indicated with lines of small dots. His 59 is in a favorable position to make a nucleophilic attack at the scissile phosphorous, indicated with a line of larger dots, and Asp 339 is in a position to protonate the leaving group.

FIG. 13: Construction of the basic plasmids pUC18-AfumgDNA and pUC18-AfumcDNA for site directed mutagenesis.

FIG. 14a: Primer sets A-N (SEQ ID NOs:24-65)used for site directed mutagenesis.

FIG. 14b: Primer sets O-T (SEQ ID NOs:66-77) used for site directed mutagenesis.

FIG. 15: Construction of plasmids pgDNAT1-pgDNAT7.

FIG. 16: Construction of plasmids pgDNAN1-pgDNAN6.

FIG. 17a: Construction of plasmids pcT1-pcT7.

FIG. 17b: Construction of plasmids pcT1-AvrII, pcT1-S66D and pcT1-S140Y-D141G

FIG. 17c: Construction of plasmids pcDNA-N27, -T27, -I27, -V27, -A27, -G27 .

FIG. 18: Construction of plasmids pcN1-pcN6.

FIG. 19: Plasmid pAfum-T1 for the expression of mutein T1 in Aspergillus niger.

FIG. 20: pH optima curves. Specific activity of wild-type and mutant A. fumigatus phytases is plotted against pH of incubation.

Open triangles: A. fumigatus [ATCC 13073] wild-type phytase; Open rhombs: A. fumigatus Q27G phytase; Filled squares: A. fumigatus Q27N phytase; Filled triangles: A. fumigatus Q27V phytase; Open squares: A. fumigatus Q27A phytase; Filled circles: A. fumigatus Q27I phytase; Open circles: A. fumigatus Q27T phytase; Dashed line: A. fumigatus Q27L phytase.

FIG. 21: Substrate specificities of wild-type and mutant A. fumigatus [ATCC 13073] phytases. The used substrates 1-13 are the same as mentioned in FIG. 3.

The specific activities of the different phytases with any one of the 13 substrates tested are given in the following order (from left to right): A. fumigatus wild-type phytase, A. fumigatus Q27N phytase, A. fumigatus Q27T phytase, A. fumigatus Q27L phytase, A. fumigatus Q27I phytase, A. fumigatus Q27V phytase, A. fumigatus Q27A phytase, A. fumigatus Q27G phytase.

FIG. 22: pH optima curves. Specific activity of wild-type and mutant A. fumigatus [ATCC 13073] phytases is plotted against pH of incubation.

Filled rhombs: A. fumigatus wild-type phytase; Filled squares: A. fumigatus Q27L single mutant; Open circles: A. fumigatus Q27L-S66D double mutant; Filled triangles: A. fumigatus Q27L-S14OY-D141G triple mutant.

FIG. 23: Natural variation of phytases in different isolates of A. fumigatus [ATCC 13073]. The predicted protein sequences (SEQ ID NO:78-82) are shown and compared to that of the phytase from A. fumigatus strain ATCC 13073. Only the amino acids which differ from those in #13073 are shown.

FIG. 24: pH dependent specific activity of phytases isolated from two different A. fumigatus wildtype strains. Open squares: wild-type strain ATCC 13073; Filled circles: strain ATCC 32239.

FIG. 25: Substrate specificities of phytases isolated from two different A. fumigatus wildtype strains. Black bars: wild-type strain ATCC 13073; White bars: strain ATCC 32239.

FIG. 26: Construction of plasmids pc-S13ON, pc-R129L-S13ON, pc-K167G-R168Q.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The process of this invention allows the production of a modified phytase with improved activity by using structural information about phytases to design the improvement. First, the three dimensional structure of the phytase to be modified and, optionally of another phytase with activity properties which are more favorable than the ones of the phytase to be modified is/are computer modelled on the basis of the three dimensional structure of the phytase of Aspergillus niger (ficuum). Then, the structure of the active sites of the phytase to be modified and of the phytase with the more favorable activity properties are compared and those amino acid residues in both active sites which are different are identified, after which a DNA sequence coding for a modified phytase is constructed by changing the nucleotides coding for at least one of the amino acids by which both active sites differ. The modified phytase is then obtained by integrating such a DNA sequence into a vector capable of expression in a suitable host cell, transforming a suitable host cell by the DNA sequence or the vector, growing the host cell under suitable growth conditions and isolating the modified phytase from the host cell or the culture medium by methods known in the state of the art.

As stated above, this process is particularly useful where the phytase to be modified is of eukaryotic, preferably fungal, more preferably Aspergillus, e.g. Aspergillus fumigatus origin and the phytase with more favorable activity properties is of eukaryotic, preferably fungal, more preferably Aspergillus, e.g. Aspergillus niger or Aspergillus terreus (Aspergillus terreus cbs 116.46 or 9A1) origin, or the phytase to be modified is a phytase of Aspergillus fumigatus and the phytase with the more favorable activity properties is the Aspergillus terre us phytase or the phytase of Aspergillus niger.

Thus, the unmodified phytase (for example a wild-type phytase) which has a property to be improved, and the phytase which has that property in an improved version (i.e. the desired property which the modified phytase will be designed to possess) may be derived from any known source of phytases. Various plants and microorganisms are known to produce phytases [e.g. reviewed in Wodzinski, R. J. and Ullah, H. J., Advances in Applied Microbiology 42, 263 (1996)]. Thus any enzyme which may be isolated by conventional methods and determined to be a phytase by standard assays (see e.g. EP 420 358) is a suitable phytase for this invention. Sequence and structure information for such phytases may be obtained by conventional techniques or from publicly available databases.

Preferred phytases are those isolated from fungi such as Aspergillus species [Shieh, T. R. and Ware, J. H. Appl. Microbiology 16, 1348 (1968); Yamada et al., Agr. Biol. Chem. 32, 1275 (1968);Van Hartingsveldt et al., in Gene, 127, 87-94 (1993), European Patent Application, Publication No. (EP) 420 358, Piddington et al., in Gene 133, 55-62 (1993); Wodzinski, R. J. and Ullah, H. J. (s.a.) and Mitchell et al., Microbiology 143, 245 (1997)]. Aspergillus are well known fungi commonly isolated from natural sources by conventional methods. In addition, Aspergillus species may be obtained from depositories.

Once such a fungus is obtained, DNA expressing its phytase can be isolated by conventional methods [see Mitchell et al., Microbiology 143:245 (1997) Van Hartingsweldt et al. (s.a.); Dox and Golden (s.a.); EP 420 358; Piddington et al (s.a.) and WO 94/03612] (for example cloned, expressed, and assayed by phytase activity assays to obtain a clone expressing the phytase) for use in this invention. Specifically, the phytase DNA can be used to isolat the phytase, whose amino acid sequence and three-dimensional structures can also be obtained by known methods, such as crystallography or computer modelling. Alternatively, the phytase may be isolated by conventional methods for isolating proteins such as enzymes, and analyzed as described. Also, DNA and amino acid sequences may be obtained from publicly available databases.

Although other three-dimensional phytase structures may be obtained and used, it is preferred to use the three-dimensional of the Aspergillus niger phytase in the process of this invention (see Kostrewa et al., Nature Structural Biology 4:185 (1997) or of Aspergillus fumigatus. A useful strain of Aspergillus niger may be obtained from the American Type Culture Collection [address] under accession number ATCC 9142. Like any three-dimensional phytase structure useful in this invention, the three-dimensional structure of the A. niger phytase is obtained by techniques known to a skilled practitioner. Based on an amino acid sequence such as the A. niger amino acid sequence provided herein, (SEQ ID NO:1) computer programs can provide theoretical structures. Crystal structures can also be obtained, as in Example 1 below. From these three-dimensional structures, active sites can be defined, such as the part of the phytase which interacts with substrate. This active site can then be localized to the segment or segments of the amino acid sequence which together form the active site, which segment or segments can then be modified, the whole sequence expressed as a modified phytase which is then tested to see if the activity has been improved. By this means a desired property can be designed into an unmodified phytase, using the three dimensional structure of the A. niger phytase as a template based on the alignment.

Specifically, the structure of A. niger is analyzed to find out which amino acid residues form the active site which determines specific activity. Then, the amino acid sequence of an unmodified phytase with a given specific activity and that of a phytase which has a desired property, e.g. a higher specific activity, are aligned homologous (as defined below) to that of A. niger to provide a best fit, and the amino acid residues which correspond to the A. niger active site in the other phytases are determined and compared, to identify which amino acids are different in the active site of the phytase with the desired property. The active site amino acid residues of the unmodified phytase may then be changed by known methods to duplicate some or all of the active site amino acid residues of the phytase with the desired property. The modified phytase is then obtained by known methods (for example determining the DNA sequence, mutating the sequence to provide the desired amino acid sequence, and expressing the resulting protein), and is tested by assays for the desired property, e.g. specific activity, to confirm that the desired property is present.

In this context it should be mentioned that another possibility for producing phytases with improved properties is by isolating phytases from the same organism, like for example the Aspergillus ficuum, but different strains which can be found in nature and have been deposited by any of the known depository authorities. Their amino acid sequences can be determined by cloning their corresponding DNA sequences by methods as described, e.g. in European Patent Application No. (EP) 684 313. Once such sequences have been defined they can be modeled on the basis of the three-dimensional structure of the A. niger phytase and the active sites of both sequences can be compared to find out whether such phytase should have improved activity properties (see Example 8) or both active site sequences can be compared directly and than tested for increased and/or improved activity by the assays described in the present application.

It is furthermore an object of the present invention to provide a modified phytase which is obtainable by a process as described above.

It is in general an object of the present invention to provide a phytase which has been modified in a way that its activity property is more favorable than the one of the non-modified phytase, specifically such a phytase characterized therein that the amino acid sequence of the non-modified phytase has been changed by deletion, substitution and/or addition of one or more amino acids, more specifically such a phytase wherein changes have been made at at least one position which is homologous to one of the following positions of the amino acid sequence of the phytase of Aspergillus (A.) niger (see FIG. 1): 27, 66, 71, 103, 140, 141, 188, 205, 234, 235, 238, 274, 277, 282, 340 and/or 424, preferably 27, 66, 140, 205, 274, 277, 282 and/or 340, and even more specifically such a phytase which is the phytase of eukaryotic, preferably fungal, more preferably Aspergillus and most preferably Aspergillus fumigatus, origin.

It is furthermore an object of the present invention to provide such a phytase wherein at position 27 or at least at position 27 a change occurs, preferably a phytase wherein the amino acid at position 27 is replaced by one selected from one of the following groups:

a) Ala, Val, Leu, Ile; or

b) Thr or

c) Asn; and furthermore such a phytase wherein in addition to position 27 a change occurs also at position 66 or wherein in addition to position 27 a change occurs also at position 140 and/or at positions 274 and/or 277.

It is also an object of the present invention to provide a phytase as specified above which is characterized by at least one of the following mutations: Q27L, Q27N, Q27T, Q27I, Q27V, Q27A, Q27G, S66D, S140Y, D141G, A205E, Q274L, G277D, G277K, Y282H and/or N340S.

It is furthermore an object of the present invention to provide phytase muteins which are resistant against degradation by proteases of fungal, preferably Aspergillus and most preferably Aspergillus niger (ficuum) origin. Such muteins are characterized therein that at least at one of the following positions (which refers to the homologous position in the amino acid sequence of A. niger), namely position 130 or 129 and 130, preferably of the Aspergillus fumigatus or 167, 168 preferably of the A. nidulans phytase amino acid sequence, the amino acid which is present in the wild type sequence has been replaced against another amino acid which is known to change the protease sensitivity, e.g. in the case of A. fumigatus at position 130 from “S” to “N” and at position 129 from “R” to “L” and in case of A. nidulans at position 167 from “K” to “G” and at position 168 from R to Q. Such positions can be also combined with those providing for improved activity properties.

A desired property to be integrated into an unmodified phytase by sequence modification as described herein, may be a new property not present in the unmodified phytase, or may preferably be an existing property of the unmodified phytase which is to be improved, for example a specific activity over a broader pH range than in the unmodified phytase. The active site of the phytases is the part of the phytase which is the physical structure which provides all or part of the property. For example the binding site of the phytase provides the property of substrate specificity. Other parts of the phytase may have an influence on a given property, however the active site is the part which changes the property upon modification as described.

In this context a desired property which is to be improved, or an improved activity property means any type of improvement of the activity of the modified phytase as compared to the unmodified. This could mean for example a higher specific activity, preferably at least two fold or more preferably at least 3 to 4 fold higher in an assay known in the state of the art to measure phytase activity, see e.g. in EP 684 313 or described in the examples of the present application. Furthermore this could mean a different substrate specificity determined in an assay known in the state of the art or as described e.g. in the specific examples of the present invention. This could also mean a maximum of the specific activity at a different more favorable pH or a broad pH optimum (“improved pH profile”) determined by an assay as known in the state of the art or as described e.g. in the examples. This also could mean improved resistance to protease degradation, as described above. Finally this could also mean any combination of such properties.

“Homologous” in the context of the present invention means the best fit of the primary, preferably also secondary and most preferably also tertiary structure of the phytase to be modified and the phytase of Aspergillus niger. How such best fit can be obtained is described in detail in Example 1 of the present invention. FIG. 1 gives an example of such best fit for the phytase amino acid sequences of Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus terreus aligned on the basis of the Aspergillus niger amino acid sequence which latter sequence is also used as the reference to which the positions of the other sequences, e.g. the ones named before, are referred to. Furthermore the modified Aspergillus fumigatus phytase with the Q27L mutation, means nothing else than the phytase of Aspergillus fumigatus wherein at position 27 according to the assignment as defined above (which is in fact position 23 of the Aspergillus fumigatus amino acid sequence) the naturally occurring glutamine (“Q” refers to the standard UPAC one letter amino acid code) has been replaced by leucine (“L”). All muteins of the present invention are designated in this way independent from whether they are protease resistant muteins or muteins with improved activity properties.

Constructing a polynucleotide comprising a DNA sequence coding for the modified phytase whose amino acid sequence was obtained as described above is performed by known methods such as those described below. The nucleotides coding for the active site which provides the desired property are changed so that at least one of the amino acids now encoded corresponds to an amino acid which is different in the active site of the unmodified phytase and the active site of the phytase which has the desired property. Integrating such a polynucleotide into vectors and host cells so as to express the modified phytase is also part of this invention and may be accomplished by known methods and as described below.

Thus it is furthermore an object of the present invention to provide a polynucleotide comprising a DNA sequence coding for a phytase as described above, a vector, preferably an expression vector, comprising such a polynucleotide, a host cell which has been transformed by such a polynucleotide or vector, a process for the preparation of a phytase of the present invention wherein the host cell as described before is cultured under suitable culture conditions and the phytase is isolated from such host cell or the culture medium by methods known in the art, and a food or feed composition comprising a phytase of the present invention.

In this context it should be noted that it is also an object of the present invention to provide a DNA sequence which codes for a phytase carrying at least one of the specific mutations of the present invention and which hybridizes under standard conditions with the DNA sequences of the specific modified phytases of the present invention or a DNA sequence which, because of the degeneracy of the genetic code does not hybridize but which codes for a polypeptide with exactly the same amino acid sequence as the one encoded by the DNA sequence to which it does not hybridize or a DNA sequence which is a fragment of such DNA sequences which maintains the activity properties of the polypeptide of which it is a fragment.

“Standard conditions” for hybridization mean in the context the conditions which are generally used by a person skilled in the art to detect specific hybridization signals and which are described, e.g. by Sambrook et al., “Molecular Cloning”, second edition, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press 1989, New York, or preferably so called stringent hybridization and non-stringent washing conditions or more preferably so called stringent hybridization and stringent washing conditions a person skilled in the art is familiar with and which are described, e.g. in Sambrook et al. (s.a.).

It is furthermore an object of the present invention to provide a DNA sequence which can be obtained by the so called polymerase chain reaction method (“PCR”) by PCR primers designed on the basis of the specifically described DNA sequences of the present invention. It is understood that the so obtained DNA sequences code for phytases with at least the same mutation as the ones from which they are designed and show comparable activity properties.

The principles of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method are outlined e.g. by White et al., Trends in Genetics, 5, 185-189 (1989), whereas improved methods are described e.g. in Innis et al. [PCR Protocols: A guide to Methods and Applications, Academic Press, Inc. (1990)].

DNA sequences of the present invention can be constructed starting from genomic or cDNA sequences coding for phytases known in the state of the art [for sequence information see references mentioned above, e.g. EP 684 313 or sequence data bases, for example like Genbank (Intelligenetics, California, USA), European Bioinformatics Institute (Hinston Hall, Cambridge, GB), NBRF (Georgetown University, Medical Centre, Washington DC, USA) and Vecbase (University of Wisconsin, Biotechnology Centre, Madison, Wis., USA) or disclosed in the figures by methods of in vitro mutagenesis [see e.g. Sambrook et al., Molecular Cloning, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, New York]. A widely used strategy for such “site directed mutagenesis”, as originally outlined by Hurchinson and Edgell [J. Virol. 8, 181 (1971)], involves the annealing of a synthetic oligonucleotide carrying the desired nucleotide substitution to a target region of a single-stranded DNA sequence wherein the mutation should be introduced [for review see Smith, Annu. Rev. Genet. 19, 423 (1985) and for improved methods see references 2-6 in Stanssen et al., Nucl. Acid Res., 17, 4441-4454 (1989)]. Another possibility of mutating a given DNA sequence which is also preferred for the practice of the present invention is the mutagenesis by using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). DNA as starting material can be isolated by methods known in the art and described e.g. in Sambrook et al. (Molecular Cloning) from the respective strains. For strain information see, e.g. EP 684 313 or any depository authority indicated below. Aspergillus niger [ATCC 9142], Myceliophthora thermophila [ATCC 48102], Talaromyces thermophilus [ATCC 20186] and Aspergillus fumigatus [ATCC 34625] have been redeposited on Mar. 14, 1997 according to the conditions of the Budapest Treaty at the American Type Culture Cell Collection under the following accession numbers: ATCC 74337, ATCC 74340, ATCC 74338 and ATCC 74339, respectively. It is however, understood that DNA encoding a phytase to be mutated in accordance with the present invention can also be prepared on the basis of a known DNA sequence, e.g. as shown in FIG. 6 in a synthetic manner and described e.g. in EP 747 483 by methods known in the art.

Once complete DNA sequences of the present invention have been obtained they can be integrated into vectors by methods known in the art and described e.g. in Sambrook et al. (s.a.) to overexpress the encoded polypeptide in appropriate host systems. However, a man skilled in the art knows that also the DNA sequences themselves can be used to transform the suitable host systems of the invention to get overexpression of the encoded polypeptide. Appropriate host systems are for example fungi, like Aspergilli, e.g. Aspergillus niger [ATCC 9142] or Aspergillus ficuum [NRRL 3135] or like Trichoderma, e.g. Trichoderma reesei or yeasts, like Saccharomyces, e.g. Saccharomyces cerevisiae or Pichia, like Pichia pastoris, or Hansenula polymorpha, e.g. H. polymorpha (DSM5215). A man skilled in the art knows that such microorganisms are available from depository authorities, e.g. the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC), the Centraalbureau voor Schimmelcultures (CBS) or the Deutsche Sammlung fair Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen GmbH (DSM) or any other depository authority as listed in the Journal “Industrial Property” [(1991) 1, pages 29-40]. Bacteria which can be used are e.g. E. coli, Bacilli as, e.g. Bacillus subtilis or Streptomyces, e.g. Streptomyces lividans (see e.g. Anne and Mallaert in FEMS Microbiol. Letters 114, 121 (1993). E. coli, which could be used are E. coli K12 strains e.g. M15 [described as DZ 291 by Villarejo et al. in J. Bacteriol. 120, 466-474 (1974)], HB 101 [ATCC No. 33694] or E. coli SG13009 [Gottesman et al., J. Bacteriol. 148, 265-273 (1981)].

Vectors which can be used for expression in fungi are known in the art and described e.g. in EP 420 358, or by Cullen et al. [Bio/Technology 5, 369-376 (1987)] or Ward in Molecular Industrial Mycology, Systems and Applications for Filamentous Fungi, Marcel Dekker, New York (1991), Upshall et al. [Bio/Technology 5, 1301-1304 (1987)] Gwynne et al. [Bio/Technology 5, 71-79 (1987)], Punt et al. [J. Biotechnol. 17, 19-34 (1991)] and for yeast by Sreekrishna et al. [J. Basic Microbiol. 28, 265-278 (1988), Biochemistry 28, 4117-4125 (1989)], Hitzemann et al. [Nature 293, 717-722 (1981)] or in EP 183 070, EP 183 071, EP 248 227, EP 263 311. Suitable vectors which can be used for expression in E. coli are mentioned, e.g. by Sambrook et al. [s.a.] or by Fiers et al. in Procd. 8th Int. Biotechnology Symposium” [Soc. Franc. de Microbiol., Paris (Durand et al., eds.), pp. 680-697 (1988)] or by Bujard et al. in Methods in Enzymology, eds. Wu and Grossmann, Academic Press, Inc. Vol. 155, 416-433 (1987) and Stüber et al. in Immunological Methods, eds. Lefkovits and Pernis, Academic Press, Inc., Vol. IV, 121-152 (1990). Vectors which could be used for expression in Bacilli are known in the art and described, e.g. in EP 405 370, Procd. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 81, 439 (1984) by Yansura and Henner, Meth. Enzymol. 185, 199-228 (1990) or EP 207 459. Vectors which can be used for the expression in H. Polymorpha are known in the art and described, e.g. in Gellissen et al., Biotechnology 9, 291-295 (1991).

Either such vectors already carry regulatory elements, e.g. promotors, or the DNA sequences of the present invention can be engineered to contain such elements. Suitable promotor elements which can be used are known in the art and are, e.g. for Trichoderma reesei the cbh1- [Haarki et al., Biotechnology 7, 596-600 (1989)] or the pkil-promotor [Schindler et al., Gene 130, 271-275 (1993)], for Aspergillus oryzae the amy-promotor [Christensen et al., Abstr. 19th Lunteren Lectures on Molecular Genetics F23 (1987), Christensen et al., Biotechnology 6, 1419-1422 (1988), Tada et al., Mol. Gen. Genet. 229, 301 (1991)], for Aspergillus niger the glaA- [Cullen et al., Bio/Technology 5, 369-376 (1987), Gwynne et al., Bio/Technology 5, 713-719 (1987), Ward in Molecular Industrial Mycology, Systems and Applications for Filamentous Fungi, Marcel Dekker, New York, 83-106 (1991)], alcA- [Gwynne et al., Bio/Technology 5, 718-719 (1987)], suc1- [Boddy et al., Curr. Genet. 24, 60-66 (1993)], aphA- [MacRae et al., Gene 71, 339-348 (1988), MacRae et al., Gene 132, 193-198 (1993)], tpiA- [McKnight et al., Cell 46, 143-147 (1986), Upshall et al., Bio/Technology 5, 1301-1304 (1987)], gpdA-[Punt et al., Gene 69, 49-57 (1988), Punt et al., J. Biotechnol. 17, 19-37 (1991)] and the pkiA-promotor [de Graaff et al., Curr. Genet. 22, 21-27 (1992)]. Suitable promotor elements which could be used for expression in yeast are known in the art and are, e.g. the pho5-promotor [Vogel et al., Mol. Cell. Biol., 2050-2057 (1989); Rudolf and Hinnen, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 84, 1340-1344 (1987)] or the gap-promotor for expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and for Pichia pastoris, e.g. the aoxl-promotor [Koutz et al., Yeast 5, 167-177 (1989); Sreekrishna et al., J. Basic Microbiol. 28, 265-278 (1988)], or the FMD promoter [Hollenberg et al., EPA No. 0299108] or MOX-promotor [Ledeboer et al., Nucleic Acids Res. 13, 3063-3082 (1985)] for H. polymorpha.

Accordingly vectors comprising DNA sequences of the present invention, preferably for the expression of said DNA sequences in bacteria or a fungal or a yeast host and such transformed bacteria or fungal or yeast hosts are also an object of the present invention.

Once such DNA sequences have been expressed in an appropriate host cell in a suitable medium the encoded phytase can be isolated either from the medium in the case the phytase is secreted into the medium or from the host organism in case such phytase is present intracellularly by methods known in the art of protein purification or described, e.g. in EP 420 358 Known methods of protein purification may be used to isolate the phytases of this invention. For example various types of chromatography may be used individually or in combination. Gel purification may also be used. Accordingly a process for the preparation of a polypeptide of the present invention characterized in that transformed bacteria or a host cell as described above is cultured under suitable culture conditions and the polypeptide is recovered therefrom and a polypeptide when produced by such a process or a polypeptide encoded by a DNA sequence of the present invention are also an object of the present invention.

Phytases of the present invention can be also expressed in plants according to methods as described, e.g. by Pen et al. in Bio/Technology 11, 811-814 (1994) or in EP 449 375, preferably in seeds as described, e.g. in EP 449 376.

For example, a DNA sequence encoding a phytase of the present invention can be placed under the control of regulatory sequences from the gene encoding the 12S storage protein cruciferin from Brassica napus. The construct is thereafter subcloned into a binary vector such as pMOG23 (in E. coli K-12 strain DH5α, deposited at the Centraal Bureau voor Schimmelcultures, Baarn, The Netherlands under accession number CBS 102.90). This vector is introduced into Agrobacterium tumefaciens which contains a disarmed Ti plasmid. Bacterial cells containing this contruct are co-cultivated with tissues from tobacco or Brassica plants, and transformed plant cells are selected by nutrient media containing antibiotics and induced to regenerate into differentiated plants on such media. The resulting plants will produce seeds that contain and express the DNA contruct. Or the phytase-encoding DNA sequence can be placed under the control of regulatory sequences from the 35S promoter of Cauliflower Mosaic Virus (CaMV). The contruct is thereafter subcloned into a binary vector. This vector is then introduced into Agrobacterium tumefaciens which contains a disarmed Ti plasmid. Bacterial cells containing this construct are cocultivated with tissues from tobacco or Brassica plants, and transformed plant cells are selected by nutrient media containing antibiotics and induced to regenerate into differentiated plants on such media. The resulting plants contain and express the DNA construct constitutively.

The plant or plant part containing phytase can be used directly for the preparation of a feed composition or can be extracted from plants or plant organs by methods known in the art. Accordingly it is also an object of the present invention to provide a process for the production of the phytases of the present invention in plants or plant organs, like seeds, the phytases when produced by such methods, the transformed plants and plant organs, like seeds itself.

Once obtained the polypeptides of the present invention (which include modified phytases as described and active fragments thereof, and fusion proteins which include the phytases or fragments, or proteins which have stabilized by other moieties such as conjugation with polyalkylene glycols and such) can be characterized regarding their properties which make them useful in agriculture any assay known in the art and described e.g. by Simons et al. [Br. J. Nutr. 64, 525-540 (1990)], Schöner et al. [J. Anim. Physiol. a. Anim. Nutr. 66, 248-255 (1991)], Vogt [Arch. Geflügelk. 56, 93-98 (1992)], Jongbloed et al. [J. Anim. Sci., 70, 1159-1168 (1992)], Perney et al. [Poultry Sci. 72, 2106-2114 (1993)], Farrell et al., [J. Anim. Physiol. a. Anim. Nutr. 69, 278-283 (1993), Broz et al., [Br. Poultry Sci. 35, 273-280 (1994)] and Düngelhoef et al. [Animal Feed Sci. Technol. 49, 1-10 (1994)] can be used.

In general the polypeptides of the present invention can be used without being limited to a specific field of application for the conversion of inositol polyphosphates, like phytate to inositol and inorganic phosphate. For example phytases can be used to increase the nutrient value of plant material in animal feed by liberating from it inorganic phosphate which otherwise would otherwise not be accessible to non-ruminants. This reduces the amount of phosphorous which must be added to feed as a supplement and also reduces the amount of phosphorous which is excreted. Thus, phytases of this invention which have improved properties will enhance this process, or impart new benefits.

Furthermore the polypeptides of the present invention can be used in a process for the preparation of compound food or feeds wherein the components of such a composition are mixed with one or more polypeptides of the present invention. Accordingly compound food or feeds comprising one or more polypeptides of the present invention are also an object of the present invention. A person skilled in the art is familiar with their process of preparation. A phytase of this invention may be added to the complete feed preparation or to any component or premix or pelleted component. The effect of the added phytase may be an improvement in food utilization by virtue of the improved property or properties of the phytase. For example a phytase may have improved heat resistance to resist degradation caused by the food preparation process, and/or may have improved specific activity to liberate more phosphorous, and/or to liberate phosphorous in a wider range of conditions. Other properties of the modified phytase which increase the value or stability or other properties of the feed are also contemplated. Such compound foods or feeds can further comprise additives or components generally used for such purpose and known in the state of the art.

It is furthermore an object of the present invention to provide a process for the reduction of levels of phytate in animal manure characterized in that an animal is fed such a feed composition in an amount effective in converting phytate contained in the feedstuff to inositol and inorganic phosphate.

EXAMPLES Example 1 Homology Modeling of A. fumigatus and A. terreus cbs116.46 Phytase

The amino acid sequences of A. fumigatus [ATCC 13073] (see FIG. 1) and A. terreus cbs116.46 phytase (see FIG. 1) were compared with the sequence of A. niger (ficuum) phytase (see FIG. 1) for which the three-dimensional structure had been determined by X-ray crystallography. Crystallographic data are given in FIG. 8.

A multiple amino acid sequence alignment of A. niger (ficuum) phytase, A. fumigatus phytase and A. terreus cbs116.46 phytase was calculated with the program “PILEUP” (Prog. Menu for the Wisconsin Package, version 8, September 1994, Genetics Computer Group, 575 Science Drive, Madison Wis., USA 53711). The three-dimensional models of A. fumigatus phytase and A. terreus cbs116.46 phytase were built by using the structure of A. niger (ficuum) phytase as template and exchanging the amino acids of A. niger (ficuum) phytase according to the sequence alignment to amino acids of A. fumigatus and A. terreus cbs116.46 phytases, respectively. Model construction and energy optimization were performed by using the program Moloc (Gerber and Müller, 1995). C-alpha positions were kept fixed except for new insertions/deletions and in loop regions distant from the active site.

Only small differences of the modelled structures to the original crystal structure could be observed in external loops. Furthermore the different substrate molecules that mainly occur on the degradation pathway of phytic acid (myo-inositol-hexakisphosphate) by Pseudomonas sp. bacterium phytase and, as far as determined, by A. niger (ficuum) phytase (Cosgrove, 1980; FIG. 1) were constructed and forged into the active site cavity of each phytase structure. Each of these substrates was oriented in a hypothetical binding mode proposed for histidine acid phosphatases (Van Etten, 1982). The scissile phosphate group was oriented towards the catalytically essential His 59 to form the covalent phosphoenzyme intermediate. The oxygen of the substrate phosphoester bond which will be protonated by Asp 339 after cleavage was orientated towards the proton donor. Conformational relaxation of the remaining structural part of the substrates as well as the surrounding active site residues was performed by energy optimization with the program Moloc.

Based on the structure models the residues pointing into the active site cavity were identified. More than half (60%) of these positions were identical between these three phytases, whereas only few positions were not conserved (see FIG. 1). This observation could be extended to four additional phytase sequences (A. nidulans, A. terreus 9A1, Talaromyces thermophilus, Myceliophthora thermophila).

The results coming from sequence alignment and structural information including favourable enzyme-substrate interactions were combined to define the positions for mutational analysis which are shown in Table 1.

References

Gerber, P. and Müller, K. (1995) Moloc molecular modeling software. J. Comput. Aided Mol. Des. 9, 251-268

Van Etten, R. L. (1982) Human prostatic acid phosphatase: a histidine phosphatase. Ann. NY Acad. Sci. 390,27-50

Cosgrove, D. J. (1980) Inositol phosphates—their chemistry, biochemistry and physiology: studies in organic chemistry, chapter 4. Elsevier Scientific Publishing Company, Amsterdam, Oxford, N.Y.

Example 2 Construction of Plasmids pUC18-AfumgDNA and pUC18-AfumcDNA

Plasmids pUC18-AfumgDNA and pUC18-AfumcDNA, the basic constructs for all the A. fumigatus muteins described below were constructed as follows.

pUC18-AfumgDNA: The genomic DNA sequence of the phytase gene of Aspergillus fumigatus was obtained by PCR using the “Expand™ High Fidelity PCR Kit” (Boehringer Mannheim, Mannheim, Germany) with primers #39 and #40 (designed on the basis of the genomic sequence shown in FIG. 6) and genomic DNA of Aspergillus fumigatus [ATCC 13073] from the A. fumigatus (NIH stock 5233) genomic library in a Lambda FixII vector [Stratagene, Lugolla, Calif. 92037, USA; catalog No. 946055].

Primer #39:

         BspHI
5′ TAT ATC ATG ATT ACT CTG ACT TTC CTG CTT TCG 3′ (SEQ ID NO:16)
            M   I   T   L   T   F   L   L   S (SEQ ID NO:17)

Primer #40:

                           EcoRV
3′ CCT CTC ACG AAA TCA ACT CTA TAG ATA TAT 5′ (SEQ ID NO:8)
    G   E   C   F   S   * (SEQ ID NO:19)

The reaction mix included 10 pmol of each primer and 200 ng of template DNA. 35 rounds of amplification were done with the following cycling values: 95° C., 1 min/56° C., 1 min/72° C., 90 sec. The PCR-amplified Aspergillus fumigatus mutein genes had a new BspHI site at the ATG start codon, introduced with primer #39, which resulted in the change of the second amino acid from a valine to an isoleucine. Furthermore, an EcoRV site was created with primer #40 downstream of the TGA termination codon of the gene.

The PCR fragment (approx. 1450 bp) was subsequently cloned into the Smal site of pUC18 using the “sure clone Kit” (Boehringer Mannheim s.a.) according to the supplier's recommendations. The resulting plasmid was named pUC18-AfumgDNA.

pUC18-AfumcDNA: This plasmid lacks the intron (small gap letters in FIG. 6) of the A. fumigatus phytase gene and was constructed as outlined in FIG. 13. Briefly, using primers Fum28 and Fum11 the 5′ end of exon 2 was amplified by PCR (see below), digested with NcoI and EagI (new restriction site introduced with primer Fum28) and ligated together with the linker coding for exon 1 made of primers Fum26 and Fum27 into the XbaI and NcoI sites of pUC18-AfumgDNA, thereby resulting in plasmid pUC18-AfumcDNA.

Fum28:

(SEQ ID NO:20)
5′ ATATATCGGCCGAGTGTCTGCGGCACCTAGT 3′
         EagI

Fum11:

5′ TGAGGTCATCCGCACCCAGAG 3′ (SEQ ID NO:20)

Fum26:

5′ CTAGAATTCATGGTGACTCTGACTTTCCTGCTTTCGGCGGCGTATCT GCTTTCC 3′(SEQ ID NO:22)

Fum27:

5′ GGC C GGAAAGCAGATACGCCGCCGAAAGCAGGAAAGTCAGAGTC ACCATGAATT 3′ (SEQ ID NO:23)

PCR reaction to get 5′ end of exon 2 of the A. fumigatus phytase:

  2 μl template: pUC18-AfumgDNA (20 ng)
  1 μl dNTP's-mix (Boehringer Mannheim s.a.)
  5 μl l0× Buffer
  1 μl Taq polymerase (Boehringer Mannheim s.a.)
 1.9 μl Fum11 (= 10 pmol)
  2 μl Fum28 (= 10 pmol)
37,1 μl H2O

In total 35 cycles with the temperature profile: 95° C. for 30 sec/56° C. for 30 sec/72° C. for 45 sec were made. The amplified fragment (approx. 330 bp) was extracted once with an equal volume of phenol/chloroform (1:1). To the recovered aqueous phase 0.1 volume of 3 M sodium acetate, pH 4.8 and 2.5 volumes of ethanol were added. The mixture was centrifuged for 10 min at 12000 g and the pellet resuspended in 20 μl of H2O. Subsequently, the purified fragment was digested with NcoI and EagI and processed as outlined above.

Example 3 Construction of Muteins of the Phytase of Aspergillus fumigatus for Expression in A. niger

To construct all muteins for the expression in A. niger, plasmid pUC18-AfumgDNA was used as template for site-directed mutagenesis. Mutations were introduced using the “quick exchange site-directed mutagenesis kit” from Stratagene (La Jolla, Calif., USA) following the manufacturer's protocol and using the corresponding primers (FIG. 14). All mutations made are summarized in Table 1A and B wherein T1 to T7 and N1 to N6, respectively, refer to the muteins and “Mutation” to the amino acids replaced at such position. For example T5 refers to a mutein with a double mutation: L at position 27 for Q and L at position 274 for Q. The primer sets (A-H) used to introduce the corresponding mutations are shown in FIG. 14a. The newly introduced amino acid is shown in bold and the subscript indicates the position in the mature Aspergillus fumigatus enzyme concerning to the numbering of the A. niger amino acid sequence. FIGS. 15 and 16 outline the scheme for the construction of different plasmids pgT1-pgT7 and pgN1-pgN6 encoding the muteins carrying only one mutation (T1-T4; N1-N3) or more mutations (T5-T7; N4-N6). Clones harboring the desired mutations were identified by DNA sequence analysis as known in the art. The mutated phytases were verified by complete sequencing of the genes.

Example 4 Construction of Muteins of the Phytase of Aspergillus fumigatus for Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

Construction of plasmids pcT1-pcT7 (FIG. 17a) and pcN1-pcN6 (FIG. 18), respectively, encoding the muteins T1-T7 and N1-N6 for the expression in S. cerevisiae was basically done as outlined in Example 3. Instead of using pUC18-AfumgDNA as the basic construct to introduce the mutations, plasmid pUC18-AfumeDNA was used (FIG. 13).

The plasmids pcDNA-N27, -G27, -V27, -A27, -127 and -T27 encoding the muteins N27, G27, V27, A27, I27 and T27 were constructed as follows:

A silent restriction site for AvrII was introduced into plasmid pcT1 by site directed mutagenesis as described in Example 3 using primer set I (FIG. 14a; FIG. 17b). The A. fumigatus phytase gene fragment AvrII/XhoI was then replaced by the linker fragment harbouring the desired mutations (FIG. 17c). Each linker fragment was generated by annealing of the respective pairs of synthesized polynucleotides (FIG. 14b; sense and antisense strand; 90 ng each) for 3 min at 70 ΓC in 9 μl distilled water.

Construction of plasmids pcT1-S66D and pcT1-S140Y-D141G encoding the A. fumigatus Q27L-S66D double mutant and the A. fumigatus Q27L-S140Y-141G triple mutant was basically carried out as described in Example 3. Plasmid pcT1, harbouring the mutation coding for Q27L, was used as template for site directed mutagenesis together with the corresponding primer sets J andK (FIG. 14a; FIG. 17b).

All mutations were verified by DNA sequence analysis of the entire gene.

Example 5 Expression in Aspergillus niger

The genes encoding the aforementioned A. fumigatus wild-type phytase and muteins (FIG. 16) were isolated with BspHI and EcoRV from plasmids pgDNAT1-pgDNAT7 and pgDNAN1-pgDNAN6 and ligated into the NcoI site downstream of the glucoamylase promoter of Aspergillus niger (glaA) and the EcoRV site upstream of the Aspergillus nidulans tryptophan C terminator (trpC) (Mullaney et al., 1985). The resulting expression plasmids had in addition the orotidine-5′-phosphate decarboxylase gene (pyr4) of Neurospora crassa as selection marker. FIG. 19 shows an example for such an expression plasmid carrying the gene encoding mutein T1 (van den Hondel et al., 1991). The basic expression plasmid described above corresponds basically to the pGLAC vector described in example 9 of EP 684 313. Transformation of Aspergillus niger and expression of the muteins was done as described in EP 684 313.

The supernatant was concentrated by way of ultrafiltration in Amicon 8400 cells (PM30 membranes) and ultrafree-15 centrifugal filter devices (Biomax-30K, Millipore).

The concentrate (typically 1.5-5 ml) was desalted in aliquots of 1.5 ml on a Fast Desalting HR 10/10 column (Pharmacia Biotech), with 10 mM sodium acetate, pH 5.0, serving as elution buffer. The desalted A. fumigatus samples were directly loaded onto a 1.7 ml Poros HS/M cation exchange chromatography column (PerSeptive Biosystems, Framingham, Mass., USA). A. terreus cbs116.46 [CBS 220.95] phytase was directly loaded onto a 1.7 ml Poros HQ/M anion exchange chromatography column. In both cases, phytase was eluted in pure form by way of a sodium chloride gradient.

References

Mullaney, E. J., J. E. Hamer, K. A. Roberti, M. M. Yelton, and W. E. Timberlake. 1985. Primary structure of the trpC gene from Aspergillus nidulans. Mol. Gen. Genet. 199:37-45.

Van den Hondel, C. A. M. J. J., P. J. Punt, and R. F. M. van Gorcom. 1991. Heterologous gene expression in filamentous fungi. In: More gene manipulations in fungi. pp. 396-428. Bennett, J. W. and Lasure, L. L. (eds.). Academic Press Inc., San Diego, Calif.

Example 6 Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

The intron less genes encoding the A. fumigatus wild-type phytase and the different muteins (FIGS. 17/18) mentioned above were isolated from the respective plasmids pUC18-AfumcDNA, pcDNAT1-pcDNAT7 and pcDNAN1-pcDNAN6 with EcoRI and EcoRV and subcloned either between the blunt ended XhoI and the EcoRI sites of plasmid pYES2 (Invitrogen, San Diego, Calif., USA) or the shortened GAPFL (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) promoter and the PHO5 terminator as described by Janes et al. (1990). Transformation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, e.g. INVSc1 (Invitrogen, San Diego, Calif., USA) was done according to Hinnen et al. (1978). Single colonies harbouring the phytase gene under the control of the GAPFL promoter were picked and cultivated in 5ml selection medium (SD -uracil) (Sherman et al., 1986) at 30Γ C under vigorous shaking (250 rpm) for 1 day. The preculture was then added to 500 ml YPD medium (Sherman et al., 1986) and cultivated under the same conditions. After four days cell broth was centrifuged (7000 rpm, GS3 rotor, 15 min. 5Γ C) and the supernatant was collected. Induction of the GALL promotor (plasmid pYES2 from Invitrogen, San Diego, Calif., USA) was done according to the manufacturers instructions. Purification of the muteins was as described in example 5 (s.a.).

References

Janes, M., B. Meyhack, W. Zimmermann and A. Hinnen. 1990. The influence of GAP promoter variants on hirudine production, avarage plasmid copy number and cell growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Curr. Genet. 18: 97-103

Hinnen, A., J. B. Hicks and G. R. Fink. 1978. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 75: 1929-1933

Sheman, J. P., Finck, G. R. and Hicks, J. B. (1986). Laboratory Course Manual for Methods in Yeast Genetics. Cold Spring Harbor University Press.

Example 7 Determination of Phytase Activity and Substrate Specificity

Phytase activity was measured in an assay mixture containing 0.5% phytic acid (˜5 mM), 200 mM sodium acetate, pH 5.0. After 15 min incubation at 37° C., the reaction was stopped by addition of an equal volume of 15% trichloroacetic acid. The liberated phosphate ions were quantified by mixing 100 μl of the assay mixture with 900 μl H2O and 1 ml of 0.6 M H2SO4, 2% ascorbic acid and 0.5% ammonium molybdate. Standard solutions of potassium phosphate were used as reference.

In case of pH optimum curves, purified enzymes were diluted in 10 mM sodium acetate, pH 5.0. Incubations were started by mixing aliquots of the diluted protein with an equal volume of 1% phytic acid (˜10 mM) in a series of different buffers: 0.4 M glycine/HCl, pH 2.5; 0.4 M acetate/NaOH, pH 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, 5.0, 5.5; 0.4 M imidazole/HCl, pH 6.0, 6.5; 0.4 M Tris/HCl, pH 7.0, 7.5, 8.0, 8.5, 9.0. Control experiments showed that pH was only slightly affected by the mixing step. Incubations were performed for 15 min at 37° C. as described above.

For determination of the substrate specificities of wild-type and mutant A. fumigatus phytases, phytic acid in the assay mixture was replaced by 5 mM-concentrations of the respective phosphate compounds. The activity tests were performed as described above.

Protein concentrations were calculated from the OD at 280 nm, using theoretical absorption values calculated from the known protein sequences with the DNA* software (DNASTAR, Inc., Madison, Wis., USA). An absorption of 1.0 OD at 280 nm corresponds to 0.94 mg/ml A. fumigatus phytase and 0.85 mg/ml of A. terreus cbs116.46 phytase.

pH profiles of Aspergillus fumigatus mutants T1 (Q27L), T5 (Q27L, Q274L) and T6 (Q27L, Q274L, G277D) have drastically changed compared to the wild-type A. fumigatus phytase (see FIG. 2). All mutants showed equal pH profiles. Increase in specific activity at pH 5.0 of the muteins as compared to the wild-type phytase of Aspergillus fumigatus is shown in Table 2. Enzyme activities were measured under standard assay conditions at pH 5.0. Several individual measurements (n: number of assays) were averaged.

The pH profile of A. fumigatus phytase mutant Q27A resembles the pH profile of A. fumigatus wild-type phytase over nearly the whole pH range (FIG. 20). Whereas the specific activity of wild-type phytase is decreasing at pH values below pH 4.0, the specific activity of the phytase mutant Q27A remains nearly constant down to pH 2.9.

The single amino acid exchanges Q27L, Q27I, Q27V or Q27T have remarkably increased the specific activity over the whole pH range, especially between pH 5.0 and 7.5 (FIG. 20). Maximum values are reached at pH 6.5. In addition, mutation Q27T caused the highest specific activity values for phytic acid at low pH (pH 3.0-5.0).

Higher specific activities are also gained by the single mutations Q27G or Q27N, between pH 2.5 and 7.0, with maximum values at pH 6.0 (FIG. 20). The specific activity decreases at pH values below 3.5.

All single mutants still show a broad substrate specificity which is comparable to that of A. fumigatus wild-type phytase (FIG. 21). Some of the mutants show significantly higher specific activities than other mutants for selected substrates, e. g., the Q27T mutant for p-nitrophenyl phosphate and ATP, or the Q27G mutant for phosphoenolpyruvate.

As shown in FIG. 22 the combination of mutation Q27L with S66D or S140Y and D141G led to a shift of the pH profile towards lower pH. The maximum specific activity gained by the single mutation Q27L is further increased by the additional amino acid exchanges.

As shown in FIG. 3, Aspergillus fumigatus phytase mutant T1 (Q27L) showed no difference in substrate specificity compared to the triple mutant T6 (Q27L, Q274L, G277D).

The pH profiles of the muteins N1-6, except N2 show significant differences compared to the wild-type phytase (FIG. 10). Whereas the pH profile of mutein N4 is expanded towards lower pH, the profiles of muteins N3 to N6 are shifted towards lower pH. The muteins N5, N6 reach maximum activity already at pH 3.0.

The muteins N1 to N6 show in almost all cases a drastic reduction in specific activity for all tested substrates, except for phytic acid (FIG. 9). Specific activity for phytic acid remained unchanged compared to the wild-type phytase, whereas mutant N3 and N6 show a tendential higher activity (FIG. 19).

TABLE 1
A) Mutations towards A. terreus cbs116.46 phytase
Mutation T1 T2 T3 T4 T5 T6 T7
Q27L X X X X
Q274L X X X X
G277D X X X
N340S X x
B) Mutations towards A. niger (ficuum) phytase
Mutation N1 N2 N3 N4 N5 N6
G277K X X
A205E X X X
Y282H X X x

TABLE 2
U/mg
A. fumigatus wild-type phytase  26.5 ± 5.2 22
A. fumigatus Q27L  83.4 4
A. fumigatus Q27L, Q274L  88.7 ± 13.5 8
A. fumigatus Q27L, Q274L, G277D  92.3 ± 12.0 9
A. terreus cbs116.46 phytase 195.8 ± 17.8 7

TABLE 3
Specific activity under standard assay conditions at pH 5.0. Average
standard deviation is 10%.
Number of
Specific activity independent
[U/mg] assays
A. fumigatus wild- 26.5 22
type phytase
A. fumigatus Q27N 45.5 3
A. fumigatus Q27T 106.9 3
A. fumigatus Q27L 83.4 4
A. fumigatus Q27I 91.2 3
A. fumigatus Q27V 35.0 3
A. fumigatus Q27A 27.3 3
A. fumigatus Q27G 59.6 3
A. fumigatus 118.5 3
Q27L-S66D
A. fumigatus 193.0 3
Q27L-S140Y-D141G

Example 8

As an alternative approach to obtain phytases with modified characteristics and to get a better idea about the natural variation found in phytase characteristics within a certain species, naturally occurring variants of A. fumigatus phytase were analysed. Phytase genes were obtained from six different isolates of A. fumigatus. The amino acid sequence of phytase from two of the A. fumigatus isolates (ATCC 26934 and ATCC 34625) showed no difference to the original amino acid sequence of wild-type A. fumigatus phytase ATCC 13073. Phytase from three other isolates had one or two amino acid substitutions, none of which directly affected the active site. Enzymatic characteristics remained unaffected by these substitutions (not shown). The phytase of isolate of A. fumigatus (ATCC 32239) differed in 13 positions in the signal sequence and 51 positions in the mature part of the protein compared to the original wild-type A. fumigatus phytase (ATCC 13073). Several of these substitutions affect variable amino acids of the active site cavity. This resulted in an increase in specific activity with phytic acid as substrate (47 U/mg, standard enzyme assay) and in loss of enzymatic activity above pH 7 (FIG. 24). Also in this case, the specific activity against phytic acid was increased relative to the specific activities with other substrates (FIG. 25).

Example 9

Construction of plasmids pc-S130N, pc-R129L-S130N, pc-K167G-R168Q encoding A. fumigatus [ATCC 13073] phytase S130N single mutant and R129L-S130N double mutant and A. nidulans phytase K167G-R168Q double mutant was basically carried out as described in Example 3. Plasmid pUC18-AfumcDNA was used as template for site directed mutagenesis together with the corresponding primer sets L, M and N (FIG. 14a; FIG. 26).

All mutations were verified by DNA sequence analysis of the entire gene.

Example 10

When expressed in A. niger and stored as concentrated culture supernatants at 4° C., the phytases from A. fumigatus, A. nidulans displayed tendency to undergo proteolytic degradation. N-terminal sequencing of fragments suggested that cleavage occured between amino acids S130-V131 and K167-R168 or R168-A169, respectively. Compared with 3D structure of A. niger phytase revealed that all cleavage sites are found within surface-exposed loop structures and are therefore accessible to proteases.

Site-directed mutagenesis at protease-sensitive sites of A. fumigatus phytase (S130N, R129L-S130N) andA. nidulans phytase (K167G-R168Q) yielded mutant proteins with considerably reduced susceptibility to proteolysis.

In contrast to expression in A. niger, proteolytic degradation was not observed when the phytases were expressed in Hansenula polymorpha.

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Glu Leu Ser Pro Phe Cys Ala Ile Phe Thr Glu Lys Glu Trp Leu Gln
260 265 270
Tyr Asp Tyr Leu Gln Ser Leu Ser Lys Tyr Tyr Gly Tyr Gly Ala Gly
275 280 285
Ser Pro Leu Gly Pro Ala Gln Gly Ile Gly Phe Thr Asn Glu Leu Ile
290 295 300
Ala Arg Leu Thr Gln Ser Pro Val Gln Asp Asn Thr Ser Thr Asn His
305 310 315 320
Thr Leu Asp Ser Asn Pro Ala Thr Phe Pro Leu Asp Arg Lys Leu Tyr
325 330 335
Ala Asp Phe Ser His Asp Asn Ser Met Ile Ser Ile Phe Phe Ala Met
340 345 350
Gly Leu Tyr Asn Gly Thr Gln Pro Leu Ser Met Asp Ser Val Glu Ser
355 360 365
Ile Gln Glu Met Asp Gly Tyr Ala Ala Ser Trp Thr Val Pro Phe Gly
370 375 380
Ala Arg Ala Tyr Phe Glu Leu Met Gln Cys Glu Lys Lys Glu Pro Leu
385 390 395 400
Val Arg Val Leu Val Asn Asp Arg Val Val Pro Leu His Gly Cys Ala
405 410 415
Val Asp Lys Phe Gly Arg Cys Thr Leu Asp Asp Trp Val Glu Gly Leu
420 425 430
Asn Phe Ala Arg Ser Gly Gly Asn Trp Lys Thr Cys Phe Thr Leu
435 440 445
<210> SEQ ID NO 7
<211> LENGTH: 1845
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Talaromyces thermophilus
<220> FEATURE:
<221> NAME/KEY: CDS
<222> LOCATION: (288)..(335)
<221> NAME/KEY: CDS
<222> LOCATION: (391)..(1740)
<400> SEQUENCE: 7
ttccacgctg aaagcctgac tgcgatttcc aagctgcatg caggctgctc aactgcctgc 60
ttatcttcat cagacgcaga tacacaacct ggtctgtaga tgcacccatg acggacgaac 120
gcaccgctct cttggcctcc agggacccgg aggtcgaggg cgatgaggtc gcgccctcga 180
cggcctccca gtccctgttg cagttgagat ctcgctgcga acgtcgaccg cagatatggt 240
tgtcttcgac gttttctcgc cttcgaggaa gaattgctgc tgtgacg atg agt ctg 296
Met Ser Leu
1
ttg ttg ctg gtg ctg tcc ggc ggg ttg gtc gcg tta tag tatgctcctt 345
Leu Leu Leu Val Leu Ser Gly Gly Leu Val Ala Leu
5 10 15
ctctctggtc atattgtttt ctgctaacgt tctcataatt gaagt gtc tca aga aat 402
Val Ser Arg Asn
20
ccg cat gtt gat agc cac tct tgc aat aca gtg gaa gga ggg tat cag 450
Pro His Val Asp Ser His Ser Cys Asn Thr Val Glu Gly Gly Tyr Gln
25 30 35
tgt cgt cca gaa atc tcc cac tcc tgg ggc cag tat tct cca ttc ttc 498
Cys Arg Pro Glu Ile Ser His Ser Trp Gly Gln Tyr Ser Pro Phe Phe
40 45 50
tcc ctg gca gac cag tcg gag atc tcg cca gat gtc cca cag aac tgc 546
Ser Leu Ala Asp Gln Ser Glu Ile Ser Pro Asp Val Pro Gln Asn Cys
55 60 65
aag att acg ttt gtc cag ctg ctt tct cgt cac ggc gct aga tac cct 594
Lys Ile Thr Phe Val Gln Leu Leu Ser Arg His Gly Ala Arg Tyr Pro
70 75 80
acg tct tcc aag acg gag ctg tat tcg cag ctg atc agt cgg att cag 642
Thr Ser Ser Lys Thr Glu Leu Tyr Ser Gln Leu Ile Ser Arg Ile Gln
85 90 95 100
aag acg gcg act gcg tac aaa ggc tac tat gcc ttc ttg aaa gac tac 690
Lys Thr Ala Thr Ala Tyr Lys Gly Tyr Tyr Ala Phe Leu Lys Asp Tyr
105 110 115
aga tac cag ctg gga gcg aac gac ctg acg ccc ttt ggg gaa aac cag 738
Arg Tyr Gln Leu Gly Ala Asn Asp Leu Thr Pro Phe Gly Glu Asn Gln
120 125 130
atg atc cag ttg ggc atc aag ttt tat aac cat tac aag agt ctc gcc 786
Met Ile Gln Leu Gly Ile Lys Phe Tyr Asn His Tyr Lys Ser Leu Ala
135 140 145
agg aat gcc gtc cca ttc gtt cgt tgc tcc ggc tct gat cgg gtc att 834
Arg Asn Ala Val Pro Phe Val Arg Cys Ser Gly Ser Asp Arg Val Ile
150 155 160
gcc tcg ggg aga ctt ttc atc gaa ggt ttc cag agc gcc aaa gtg ctg 882
Ala Ser Gly Arg Leu Phe Ile Glu Gly Phe Gln Ser Ala Lys Val Leu
165 170 175 180
gat cct cat tca gac aag cat gac gct cct ccc acg atc aac gtg atc 930
Asp Pro His Ser Asp Lys His Asp Ala Pro Pro Thr Ile Asn Val Ile
185 190 195
atc gag gag ggt ccg tcc tac aat aac acg ctc gac acc ggc agc tgt 978
Ile Glu Glu Gly Pro Ser Tyr Asn Asn Thr Leu Asp Thr Gly Ser Cys
200 205 210
cca gtc ttt gag gac agc agc ggg gga cat gac gca cag gaa aag ttc 1026
Pro Val Phe Glu Asp Ser Ser Gly Gly His Asp Ala Gln Glu Lys Phe
215 220 225
gca aag caa ttc gca cca gct atc ctg gaa aag atc aag gac cat ctt 1074
Ala Lys Gln Phe Ala Pro Ala Ile Leu Glu Lys Ile Lys Asp His Leu
230 235 240
ccc ggc gtg gac ctg gcc gtg tcg gat gta ccg tac ttg atg gac ttg 1122
Pro Gly Val Asp Leu Ala Val Ser Asp Val Pro Tyr Leu Met Asp Leu
245 250 255 260
tgt ccg ttt gag acc ttg gct cgc aac cac aca gac acg ctg tct ccg 1170
Cys Pro Phe Glu Thr Leu Ala Arg Asn His Thr Asp Thr Leu Ser Pro
265 270 275
ttc tgc gct ctt tcc acg caa gag gag tgg caa gca tat gac tac tac 1218
Phe Cys Ala Leu Ser Thr Gln Glu Glu Trp Gln Ala Tyr Asp Tyr Tyr
280 285 290
caa agt ctg ggg aaa tac tat ggc aat ggc ggg ggt aac ccg ttg ggg 1266
Gln Ser Leu Gly Lys Tyr Tyr Gly Asn Gly Gly Gly Asn Pro Leu Gly
295 300 305
cca gcc caa ggc gtg ggg ttt gtc aac gag ttg att gct cgc atg acc 1314
Pro Ala Gln Gly Val Gly Phe Val Asn Glu Leu Ile Ala Arg Met Thr
310 315 320
cat agc cct gtc cag gac tac acc acg gtc aac cac act ctt gac tcg 1362
His Ser Pro Val Gln Asp Tyr Thr Thr Val Asn His Thr Leu Asp Ser
325 330 335 340
aat ccg gcg aca ttc cct ttg aac gcg acg ctg tac gca gat ttc agc 1410
Asn Pro Ala Thr Phe Pro Leu Asn Ala Thr Leu Tyr Ala Asp Phe Ser
345 350 355
cac gac aac aca atg acg tca att ttc gcg gcc ttg ggc ctg tac aac 1458
His Asp Asn Thr Met Thr Ser Ile Phe Ala Ala Leu Gly Leu Tyr Asn
360 365 370
ggg acc gcg aag ctg tcc acg acc gag atc aag tcc att gaa gag acg 1506
Gly Thr Ala Lys Leu Ser Thr Thr Glu Ile Lys Ser Ile Glu Glu Thr
375 380 385
gac ggc tac tcg gcg gcg tgg acc gtt ccg ttc ggg ggg cga gcc tat 1554
Asp Gly Tyr Ser Ala Ala Trp Thr Val Pro Phe Gly Gly Arg Ala Tyr
390 395 400
atc gag atg atg cag tgt gat gat tcg gat gag cca gtc gtt cgg gtg 1602
Ile Glu Met Met Gln Cys Asp Asp Ser Asp Glu Pro Val Val Arg Val
405 410 415 420
ctg gtc aac gac cgg gtg gtg cca ctg cat ggc tgc gag gtg gac tcc 1650
Leu Val Asn Asp Arg Val Val Pro Leu His Gly Cys Glu Val Asp Ser
425 430 435
ctg ggg cga tgc aaa cga gac gac ttt gtc agg gga ctg agt ttt gcg 1698
Leu Gly Arg Cys Lys Arg Asp Asp Phe Val Arg Gly Leu Ser Phe Ala
440 445 450
cga cag ggt ggg aac tgg gag ggg tgt tac gct gct tct gag 1740
Arg Gln Gly Gly Asn Trp Glu Gly Cys Tyr Ala Ala Ser Glu
455 460 465
taggtttatt cagcgagttt cgacctttct atccttcaaa cactgcacaa agacacactg 1800
catgaaatgg taacaggcct ggagcgtttt agaaggaaaa aagtt 1845
<210> SEQ ID NO 8
<211> LENGTH: 15
<212> TYPE: PRT
<213> ORGANISM: Talaromyces thermophilus
<400> SEQUENCE: 8
Met Ser Leu Leu Leu Leu Val Leu Ser Gly Gly Leu Val Ala Leu
1 5 10 15
<210> SEQ ID NO 9
<211> LENGTH: 450
<212> TYPE: PRT
<213> ORGANISM: Talaromyces thermophilus
<400> SEQUENCE: 9
Val Ser Arg Asn Pro His Val Asp Ser His Ser Cys Asn Thr Val Glu
1 5 10 15
Gly Gly Tyr Gln Cys Arg Pro Glu Ile Ser His Ser Trp Gly Gln Tyr
20 25 30
Ser Pro Phe Phe Ser Leu Ala Asp Gln Ser Glu Ile Ser Pro Asp Val
35 40 45
Pro Gln Asn Cys Lys Ile Thr Phe Val Gln Leu Leu Ser Arg His Gly
50 55 60
Ala Arg Tyr Pro Thr Ser Ser Lys Thr Glu Leu Tyr Ser Gln Leu Ile
65 70 75 80
Ser Arg Ile Gln Lys Thr Ala Thr Ala Tyr Lys Gly Tyr Tyr Ala Phe
85 90 95
Leu Lys Asp Tyr Arg Tyr Gln Leu Gly Ala Asn Asp Leu Thr Pro Phe
100 105 110
Gly Glu Asn Gln Met Ile Gln Leu Gly Ile Lys Phe Tyr Asn His Tyr
115 120 125
Lys Ser Leu Ala Arg Asn Ala Val Pro Phe Val Arg Cys Ser Gly Ser
130 135 140
Asp Arg Val Ile Ala Ser Gly Arg Leu Phe Ile Glu Gly Phe Gln Ser
145 150 155 160
Ala Lys Val Leu Asp Pro His Ser Asp Lys His Asp Ala Pro Pro Thr
165 170 175
Ile Asn Val Ile Ile Glu Glu Gly Pro Ser Tyr Asn Asn Thr Leu Asp
180 185 190
Thr Gly Ser Cys Pro Val Phe Glu Asp Ser Ser Gly Gly His Asp Ala
195 200 205
Gln Glu Lys Phe Ala Lys Gln Phe Ala Pro Ala Ile Leu Glu Lys Ile
210 215 220
Lys Asp His Leu Pro Gly Val Asp Leu Ala Val Ser Asp Val Pro Tyr
225 230 235 240
Leu Met Asp Leu Cys Pro Phe Glu Thr Leu Ala Arg Asn His Thr Asp
245 250 255
Thr Leu Ser Pro Phe Cys Ala Leu Ser Thr Gln Glu Glu Trp Gln Ala
260 265 270
Tyr Asp Tyr Tyr Gln Ser Leu Gly Lys Tyr Tyr Gly Asn Gly Gly Gly
275 280 285
Asn Pro Leu Gly Pro Ala Gln Gly Val Gly Phe Val Asn Glu Leu Ile
290 295 300
Ala Arg Met Thr His Ser Pro Val Gln Asp Tyr Thr Thr Val Asn His
305 310 315 320
Thr Leu Asp Ser Asn Pro Ala Thr Phe Pro Leu Asn Ala Thr Leu Tyr
325 330 335
Ala Asp Phe Ser His Asp Asn Thr Met Thr Ser Ile Phe Ala Ala Leu
340 345 350
Gly Leu Tyr Asn Gly Thr Ala Lys Leu Ser Thr Thr Glu Ile Lys Ser
355 360 365
Ile Glu Glu Thr Asp Gly Tyr Ser Ala Ala Trp Thr Val Pro Phe Gly
370 375 380
Gly Arg Ala Tyr Ile Glu Met Met Gln Cys Asp Asp Ser Asp Glu Pro
385 390 395 400
Val Val Arg Val Leu Val Asn Asp Arg Val Val Pro Leu His Gly Cys
405 410 415
Glu Val Asp Ser Leu Gly Arg Cys Lys Arg Asp Asp Phe Val Arg Gly
420 425 430
Leu Ser Phe Ala Arg Gln Gly Gly Asn Trp Glu Gly Cys Tyr Ala Ala
435 440 445
Ser Glu
450
<210> SEQ ID NO 10
<211> LENGTH: 1571
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Aspergillus fumigatus
<220> FEATURE:
<221> NAME/KEY: CDS
<222> LOCATION: (43)..(90)
<221> NAME/KEY: CDS
<222> LOCATION: (148)..(1494)
<400> SEQUENCE: 10
agattcaacg acggaggaat cgcaacccta attgtcggta tc atg gtg act ctg 54
Met Val Thr Leu
1
act ttc ctg ctt tcg gcg gcg tat ctg ctt tct ggg tgagtggctt 100
Thr Phe Leu Leu Ser Ala Ala Tyr Leu Leu Ser Gly
5 10 15
ggatctattg ctcggatagg gctgtggtgc tgattctgaa acggagt aga gtg tct 156
Arg Val Ser
gcg gca cct agt tct gct ggc tcc aag tcc tgc gat acg gta gac ctc 204
Ala Ala Pro Ser Ser Ala Gly Ser Lys Ser Cys Asp Thr Val Asp Leu
20 25 30 35
ggg tac cag tgc tcc cct gcg act tct cat cta tgg ggc cag tac tcg 252
Gly Tyr Gln Cys Ser Pro Ala Thr Ser His Leu Trp Gly Gln Tyr Ser
40 45 50
cca ttc ttt tcg ctc gag gac gag ctg tcc gtg tcg agt aag ctt ccc 300
Pro Phe Phe Ser Leu Glu Asp Glu Leu Ser Val Ser Ser Lys Leu Pro
55 60 65
aag gat tgc cgg atc acc ttg gta cag gtg cta tcg cgc cat gga gcg 348
Lys Asp Cys Arg Ile Thr Leu Val Gln Val Leu Ser Arg His Gly Ala
70 75 80
cgg tac cca acc agc tcc aag agc aaa aag tat aag aag ctt gtg acg 396
Arg Tyr Pro Thr Ser Ser Lys Ser Lys Lys Tyr Lys Lys Leu Val Thr
85 90 95
gcg atc cag gcc aat gcc acc gac ttc aag ggc aag ttt gcc ttt ttg 444
Ala Ile Gln Ala Asn Ala Thr Asp Phe Lys Gly Lys Phe Ala Phe Leu
100 105 110 115
aag acg tac aac tat act ctg ggt gcg gat gac ctc act ccc ttt ggg 492
Lys Thr Tyr Asn Tyr Thr Leu Gly Ala Asp Asp Leu Thr Pro Phe Gly
120 125 130
gag cag cag ctg gtg aac tcg ggc atc aag ttc tac cag agg tac aag 540
Glu Gln Gln Leu Val Asn Ser Gly Ile Lys Phe Tyr Gln Arg Tyr Lys
135 140 145
gct ctg gcg cgc agt gtg gtg ccg ttt att cgc gcc tca ggc tcg gac 588
Ala Leu Ala Arg Ser Val Val Pro Phe Ile Arg Ala Ser Gly Ser Asp
150 155 160
cgg gtt att gct tcg gga gag aag ttc atc gag ggg ttc cag cag gcg 636
Arg Val Ile Ala Ser Gly Glu Lys Phe Ile Glu Gly Phe Gln Gln Ala
165 170 175
aag ctg gct gat cct ggc gcg acg aac cgc gcc gct ccg gcg att agt 684
Lys Leu Ala Asp Pro Gly Ala Thr Asn Arg Ala Ala Pro Ala Ile Ser
180 185 190 195
gtg att att ccg gag agc gag acg ttc aac aat acg ctg gac cac ggt 732
Val Ile Ile Pro Glu Ser Glu Thr Phe Asn Asn Thr Leu Asp His Gly
200 205 210
gtg tgc acg aag ttt gag gcg agt cag ctg gga gat gag gtt gcg gcc 780
Val Cys Thr Lys Phe Glu Ala Ser Gln Leu Gly Asp Glu Val Ala Ala
215 220 225
aat ttc act gcg ctc ttt gca ccc gac atc cga gct cgc gcc gag aag 828
Asn Phe Thr Ala Leu Phe Ala Pro Asp Ile Arg Ala Arg Ala Glu Lys
230 235 240
cat ctt cct ggc gtg acg ctg aca gac gag gac gtt gtc agt cta atg 876
His Leu Pro Gly Val Thr Leu Thr Asp Glu Asp Val Val Ser Leu Met
245 250 255
gac atg tgt tcg ttt gat acg gta gcg cgc acc agc gac gca agt cag 924
Asp Met Cys Ser Phe Asp Thr Val Ala Arg Thr Ser Asp Ala Ser Gln
260 265 270 275
ctg tca ccg ttc tgt caa ctc ttc act cac aat gag tgg aag aag tac 972
Leu Ser Pro Phe Cys Gln Leu Phe Thr His Asn Glu Trp Lys Lys Tyr
280 285 290
aac tac ctt cag tcc ttg ggc aag tac tac ggc tac ggc gca ggc aac 1020
Asn Tyr Leu Gln Ser Leu Gly Lys Tyr Tyr Gly Tyr Gly Ala Gly Asn
295 300 305
cct ctg gga ccg gct cag ggg ata ggg ttc acc aac gag ctg att gcc 1068
Pro Leu Gly Pro Ala Gln Gly Ile Gly Phe Thr Asn Glu Leu Ile Ala
310 315 320
cgg ttg act cgt tcg cca gtg cag gac cac acc agc act aac tcg act 1116
Arg Leu Thr Arg Ser Pro Val Gln Asp His Thr Ser Thr Asn Ser Thr
325 330 335
cta gtc tcc aac ccg gcc acc ttc ccg ttg aac gct acc atg tac gtc 1164
Leu Val Ser Asn Pro Ala Thr Phe Pro Leu Asn Ala Thr Met Tyr Val
340 345 350 355
gac ttt tca cac gac aac agc atg gtt tcc atc ttc ttt gca ttg ggc 1212
Asp Phe Ser His Asp Asn Ser Met Val Ser Ile Phe Phe Ala Leu Gly
360 365 370
ctg tac aac ggc act gaa ccc ttg tcc cgg acc tcg gtg gaa agc gcc 1260
Leu Tyr Asn Gly Thr Glu Pro Leu Ser Arg Thr Ser Val Glu Ser Ala
375 380 385
aag gaa ttg gat ggg tat tct gca tcc tgg gtg gtg cct ttc ggc gcg 1308
Lys Glu Leu Asp Gly Tyr Ser Ala Ser Trp Val Val Pro Phe Gly Ala
390 395 400
cga gcc tac ttc gag acg atg caa tgc aag tcg gaa aag gag cct ctt 1356
Arg Ala Tyr Phe Glu Thr Met Gln Cys Lys Ser Glu Lys Glu Pro Leu
405 410 415
gtt cgc gct ttg att aat gac cgg gtt gtg cca ctg cat ggc tgc gat 1404
Val Arg Ala Leu Ile Asn Asp Arg Val Val Pro Leu His Gly Cys Asp
420 425 430 435
gtg gac aag ctg ggg cga tgc aag ctg aat gac ttt gtc aag gga ttg 1452
Val Asp Lys Leu Gly Arg Cys Lys Leu Asn Asp Phe Val Lys Gly Leu
440 445 450
agt tgg gcc aga tct ggg ggc aac tgg gga gag tgc ttt agt 1494
Ser Trp Ala Arg Ser Gly Gly Asn Trp Gly Glu Cys Phe Ser
455 460 465
tgagatgtca ttgttatgct atactccaat agaccgttgc ttagccattc acttcacttt 1554
gctcgaaccg cctgccg 1571
<210> SEQ ID NO 11
<211> LENGTH: 16
<212> TYPE: PRT
<213> ORGANISM: Aspergillus fumigatus
<400> SEQUENCE: 11
Met Val Thr Leu Thr Phe Leu Leu Ser Ala Ala Tyr Leu Leu Ser Gly
1 5 10 15
<210> SEQ ID NO 12
<211> LENGTH: 449
<212> TYPE: PRT
<213> ORGANISM: Aspergillus fumigatus
<400> SEQUENCE: 12
Arg Val Ser Ala Ala Pro Ser Ser Ala Gly Ser Lys Ser Cys Asp Thr
1 5 10 15
Val Asp Leu Gly Tyr Gln Cys Ser Pro Ala Thr Ser His Leu Trp Gly
20 25 30
Gln Tyr Ser Pro Phe Phe Ser Leu Glu Asp Glu Leu Ser Val Ser Ser
35 40 45
Lys Leu Pro Lys Asp Cys Arg Ile Thr Leu Val Gln Val Leu Ser Arg
50 55 60
His Gly Ala Arg Tyr Pro Thr Ser Ser Lys Ser Lys Lys Tyr Lys Lys
65 70 75 80
Leu Val Thr Ala Ile Gln Ala Asn Ala Thr Asp Phe Lys Gly Lys Phe
85 90 95
Ala Phe Leu Lys Thr Tyr Asn Tyr Thr Leu Gly Ala Asp Asp Leu Thr
100 105 110
Pro Phe Gly Glu Gln Gln Leu Val Asn Ser Gly Ile Lys Phe Tyr Gln
115 120 125
Arg Tyr Lys Ala Leu Ala Arg Ser Val Val Pro Phe Ile Arg Ala Ser
130 135 140
Gly Ser Asp Arg Val Ile Ala Ser Gly Glu Lys Phe Ile Glu Gly Phe
145 150 155 160
Gln Gln Ala Lys Leu Ala Asp Pro Gly Ala Thr Asn Arg Ala Ala Pro
165 170 175
Ala Ile Ser Val Ile Ile Pro Glu Ser Glu Thr Phe Asn Asn Thr Leu
180 185 190
Asp His Gly Val Cys Thr Lys Phe Glu Ala Ser Gln Leu Gly Asp Glu
195 200 205
Val Ala Ala Asn Phe Thr Ala Leu Phe Ala Pro Asp Ile Arg Ala Arg
210 215 220
Ala Glu Lys His Leu Pro Gly Val Thr Leu Thr Asp Glu Asp Val Val
225 230 235 240
Ser Leu Met Asp Met Cys Ser Phe Asp Thr Val Ala Arg Thr Ser Asp
245 250 255
Ala Ser Gln Leu Ser Pro Phe Cys Gln Leu Phe Thr His Asn Glu Trp
260 265 270
Lys Lys Tyr Asn Tyr Leu Gln Ser Leu Gly Lys Tyr Tyr Gly Tyr Gly
275 280 285
Ala Gly Asn Pro Leu Gly Pro Ala Gln Gly Ile Gly Phe Thr Asn Glu
290 295 300
Leu Ile Ala Arg Leu Thr Arg Ser Pro Val Gln Asp His Thr Ser Thr
305 310 315 320
Asn Ser Thr Leu Val Ser Asn Pro Ala Thr Phe Pro Leu Asn Ala Thr
325 330 335
Met Tyr Val Asp Phe Ser His Asp Asn Ser Met Val Ser Ile Phe Phe
340 345 350
Ala Leu Gly Leu Tyr Asn Gly Thr Glu Pro Leu Ser Arg Thr Ser Val
355 360 365
Glu Ser Ala Lys Glu Leu Asp Gly Tyr Ser Ala Ser Trp Val Val Pro
370 375 380
Phe Gly Ala Arg Ala Tyr Phe Glu Thr Met Gln Cys Lys Ser Glu Lys
385 390 395 400
Glu Pro Leu Val Arg Ala Leu Ile Asn Asp Arg Val Val Pro Leu His
405 410 415
Gly Cys Asp Val Asp Lys Leu Gly Arg Cys Lys Leu Asn Asp Phe Val
420 425 430
Lys Gly Leu Ser Trp Ala Arg Ser Gly Gly Asn Trp Gly Glu Cys Phe
435 440 445
Ser
<210> SEQ ID NO 13
<211> LENGTH: 1567
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Aspergillus terreus
<220> FEATURE:
<221> NAME/KEY: CDS
<222> LOCATION: (78)..(125)
<221> NAME/KEY: CDS
<222> LOCATION: (178)..(1527)
<400> SEQUENCE: 13
acgtcccagg tcggggacta catccgctat gtggtcctct acttcgtcgg aagaatatac 60
tgtctcttgt ggctacc atg ggg gtt ttc gtc gtt cta tta tct atc gcg 110
Met Gly Val Phe Val Val Leu Leu Ser Ile Ala
1 5 10
act ctg ttc ggc agg tatgtgcacc gctctaggtt caactcgcct ggtaactgac 165
Thr Leu Phe Gly Arg
15
aaacagtaca gc aca tcg ggc act gcg ctg ggc ccc cgt gga aat cac agc 216
Thr Ser Gly Thr Ala Leu Gly Pro Arg Gly Asn His Ser
20 25
gac tgc acc tca gtc gac cgg ggg tat caa tgc ttc cct gag ctc tcc 264
Asp Cys Thr Ser Val Asp Arg Gly Tyr Gln Cys Phe Pro Glu Leu Ser
30 35 40 45
cat aaa tgg ggt ctc tac gcg ccc tat ttc tcc ctc cag gat gaa tct 312
His Lys Trp Gly Leu Tyr Ala Pro Tyr Phe Ser Leu Gln Asp Glu Ser
50 55 60
ccg ttt cct ctg gac gtc ccg gat gac tgc cac atc acc ttt gtg cag 360
Pro Phe Pro Leu Asp Val Pro Asp Asp Cys His Ile Thr Phe Val Gln
65 70 75
gtg ctg gcc cga cat gga gcg cgg tct cca acc gat agc aag aca aag 408
Val Leu Ala Arg His Gly Ala Arg Ser Pro Thr Asp Ser Lys Thr Lys
80 85 90
gcg tat gcc gcg act att gca gcc atc cag aag aat gcc acc gcg ttg 456
Ala Tyr Ala Ala Thr Ile Ala Ala Ile Gln Lys Asn Ala Thr Ala Leu
95 100 105
ccg ggc aaa tac gcc ttc ctg aag tcg tac aat tac tcc atg ggc tcc 504
Pro Gly Lys Tyr Ala Phe Leu Lys Ser Tyr Asn Tyr Ser Met Gly Ser
110 115 120 125
gag aac ctg aac ccc ttc ggg cgg aac caa ctg caa gat ctg ggc gcc 552
Glu Asn Leu Asn Pro Phe Gly Arg Asn Gln Leu Gln Asp Leu Gly Ala
130 135 140
cag ttc tac cgt cgc tac gac acc ctc acc cgg cac atc aac cct ttc 600
Gln Phe Tyr Arg Arg Tyr Asp Thr Leu Thr Arg His Ile Asn Pro Phe
145 150 155
gtc cgg gcc gcg gat tcc tcc cgc gtc cac gaa tca gcc gag aag ttc 648
Val Arg Ala Ala Asp Ser Ser Arg Val His Glu Ser Ala Glu Lys Phe
160 165 170
gtc gag ggc ttc caa aac gcc cgc caa ggc gat cct cac gcc aac cct 696
Val Glu Gly Phe Gln Asn Ala Arg Gln Gly Asp Pro His Ala Asn Pro
175 180 185
cac cag ccg tcg ccg cgc gtg gat gta gtc atc ccc gaa ggc acc gcc 744
His Gln Pro Ser Pro Arg Val Asp Val Val Ile Pro Glu Gly Thr Ala
190 195 200 205
tac aac aac acg ctc gag cac agc atc tgc acc gcc ttc gag gcc agc 792
Tyr Asn Asn Thr Leu Glu His Ser Ile Cys Thr Ala Phe Glu Ala Ser
210 215 220
acc gtc ggc gac gcc gcg gca gac aac ttc act gcc gtg ttc gcg ccg 840
Thr Val Gly Asp Ala Ala Ala Asp Asn Phe Thr Ala Val Phe Ala Pro
225 230 235
gcg atc gcc aag cgt ctg gag gcc gat ctg ccc ggc gtg cag ctg tcc 888
Ala Ile Ala Lys Arg Leu Glu Ala Asp Leu Pro Gly Val Gln Leu Ser
240 245 250
gcc gac gac gtg gtc aat ctg atg gcc atg tgt ccg ttc gag acg gtc 936
Ala Asp Asp Val Val Asn Leu Met Ala Met Cys Pro Phe Glu Thr Val
255 260 265
agc ctg acc gac gac gcg cac acg ctg tcg ccg ttc tgc gac ctc ttc 984
Ser Leu Thr Asp Asp Ala His Thr Leu Ser Pro Phe Cys Asp Leu Phe
270 275 280 285
acc gcc gcc gag tgg acg cag tac aac tac ctg ctc tcg ctg gac aag 1032
Thr Ala Ala Glu Trp Thr Gln Tyr Asn Tyr Leu Leu Ser Leu Asp Lys
290 295 300
tac tac ggc tac ggc ggc ggc aat ccg ctg ggc ccc gtg cag ggc gtg 1080
Tyr Tyr Gly Tyr Gly Gly Gly Asn Pro Leu Gly Pro Val Gln Gly Val
305 310 315
ggc tgg gcg aac gag ctg atc gcg cgg ctg acg cgc tcc ccc gtc cac 1128
Gly Trp Ala Asn Glu Leu Ile Ala Arg Leu Thr Arg Ser Pro Val His
320 325 330
gac cac acc tgc gtc aac aac acc ctc gac gcc aac ccg gcc acc ttc 1176
Asp His Thr Cys Val Asn Asn Thr Leu Asp Ala Asn Pro Ala Thr Phe
335 340 345
ccg ctg aac gcc acc ctc tac gcg gac ttt tcg cac gac agt aac ctg 1224
Pro Leu Asn Ala Thr Leu Tyr Ala Asp Phe Ser His Asp Ser Asn Leu
350 355 360 365
gtg tcg atc ttc tgg gcg ctg ggt ctg tac aac ggc acc aag ccc ctg 1272
Val Ser Ile Phe Trp Ala Leu Gly Leu Tyr Asn Gly Thr Lys Pro Leu
370 375 380
tcg cag acc acc gtg gag gat atc acc cgg acg gac ggg tac gcg gcc 1320
Ser Gln Thr Thr Val Glu Asp Ile Thr Arg Thr Asp Gly Tyr Ala Ala
385 390 395
gcc tgg acg gtg ccg ttt gcc gcc cgc gcc tac atc gag atg atg cag 1368
Ala Trp Thr Val Pro Phe Ala Ala Arg Ala Tyr Ile Glu Met Met Gln
400 405 410
tgt cgc gcg gag aag cag ccg ctg gtg cgc gtg ctg gtc aac gac cgt 1416
Cys Arg Ala Glu Lys Gln Pro Leu Val Arg Val Leu Val Asn Asp Arg
415 420 425
gtc atg ccg ctg cac ggc tgc gcg gtg gat aat ctg ggc agg tgt aaa 1464
Val Met Pro Leu His Gly Cys Ala Val Asp Asn Leu Gly Arg Cys Lys
430 435 440 445
cgg gac gac ttt gtg gag gga ctg agc ttt gcg cgg gca gga ggg aac 1512
Arg Asp Asp Phe Val Glu Gly Leu Ser Phe Ala Arg Ala Gly Gly Asn
450 455 460
tgg gcc gag tgt ttc tgatgtacat gctgtagtta gctttgagtc ctgaggtacc 1567
Trp Ala Glu Cys Phe
465
<210> SEQ ID NO 14
<211> LENGTH: 16
<212> TYPE: PRT
<213> ORGANISM: Aspergillus terreus
<400> SEQUENCE: 14
Met Gly Val Phe Val Val Leu Leu Ser Ile Ala Thr Leu Phe Gly Arg
1 5 10 15
<210> SEQ ID NO 15
<211> LENGTH: 450
<212> TYPE: PRT
<213> ORGANISM: Aspergillus terreus
<400> SEQUENCE: 15
Thr Ser Gly Thr Ala Leu Gly Pro Arg Gly Asn His Ser Asp Cys Thr
1 5 10 15
Ser Val Asp Arg Gly Tyr Gln Cys Phe Pro Glu Leu Ser His Lys Trp
20 25 30
Gly Leu Tyr Ala Pro Tyr Phe Ser Leu Gln Asp Glu Ser Pro Phe Pro
35 40 45
Leu Asp Val Pro Asp Asp Cys His Ile Thr Phe Val Gln Val Leu Ala
50 55 60
Arg His Gly Ala Arg Ser Pro Thr Asp Ser Lys Thr Lys Ala Tyr Ala
65 70 75 80
Ala Thr Ile Ala Ala Ile Gln Lys Asn Ala Thr Ala Leu Pro Gly Lys
85 90 95
Tyr Ala Phe Leu Lys Ser Tyr Asn Tyr Ser Met Gly Ser Glu Asn Leu
100 105 110
Asn Pro Phe Gly Arg Asn Gln Leu Gln Asp Leu Gly Ala Gln Phe Tyr
115 120 125
Arg Arg Tyr Asp Thr Leu Thr Arg His Ile Asn Pro Phe Val Arg Ala
130 135 140
Ala Asp Ser Ser Arg Val His Glu Ser Ala Glu Lys Phe Val Glu Gly
145 150 155 160
Phe Gln Asn Ala Arg Gln Gly Asp Pro His Ala Asn Pro His Gln Pro
165 170 175
Ser Pro Arg Val Asp Val Val Ile Pro Glu Gly Thr Ala Tyr Asn Asn
180 185 190
Thr Leu Glu His Ser Ile Cys Thr Ala Phe Glu Ala Ser Thr Val Gly
195 200 205
Asp Ala Ala Ala Asp Asn Phe Thr Ala Val Phe Ala Pro Ala Ile Ala
210 215 220
Lys Arg Leu Glu Ala Asp Leu Pro Gly Val Gln Leu Ser Ala Asp Asp
225 230 235 240
Val Val Asn Leu Met Ala Met Cys Pro Phe Glu Thr Val Ser Leu Thr
245 250 255
Asp Asp Ala His Thr Leu Ser Pro Phe Cys Asp Leu Phe Thr Ala Ala
260 265 270
Glu Trp Thr Gln Tyr Asn Tyr Leu Leu Ser Leu Asp Lys Tyr Tyr Gly
275 280 285
Tyr Gly Gly Gly Asn Pro Leu Gly Pro Val Gln Gly Val Gly Trp Ala
290 295 300
Asn Glu Leu Ile Ala Arg Leu Thr Arg Ser Pro Val His Asp His Thr
305 310 315 320
Cys Val Asn Asn Thr Leu Asp Ala Asn Pro Ala Thr Phe Pro Leu Asn
325 330 335
Ala Thr Leu Tyr Ala Asp Phe Ser His Asp Ser Asn Leu Val Ser Ile
340 345 350
Phe Trp Ala Leu Gly Leu Tyr Asn Gly Thr Lys Pro Leu Ser Gln Thr
355 360 365
Thr Val Glu Asp Ile Thr Arg Thr Asp Gly Tyr Ala Ala Ala Trp Thr
370 375 380
Val Pro Phe Ala Ala Arg Ala Tyr Ile Glu Met Met Gln Cys Arg Ala
385 390 395 400
Glu Lys Gln Pro Leu Val Arg Val Leu Val Asn Asp Arg Val Met Pro
405 410 415
Leu His Gly Cys Ala Val Asp Asn Leu Gly Arg Cys Lys Arg Asp Asp
420 425 430
Phe Val Glu Gly Leu Ser Phe Ala Arg Ala Gly Gly Asn Trp Ala Glu
435 440 445
Cys Phe
450
<210> SEQ ID NO 16
<211> LENGTH: 33
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence: Nucleotide
Sequence of Primer #39 designed based on Aspergillus fumigatus
ATCC 13073
<400> SEQUENCE: 16
tatatcatga ttactctgac tttcctgctt tcg 33
<210> SEQ ID NO 17
<211> LENGTH: 9
<212> TYPE: PRT
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence: Amino Acid
Sequence Corresponding to Primer #39
<400> SEQUENCE: 17
Met Ile Thr Leu Thr Phe Leu Leu Ser
1 5
<210> SEQ ID NO 18
<211> LENGTH: 30
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence: Nucleotide
Sequence of Primer #40 designed based on Aspergillus fumigatus
ATCC 13073
<400> SEQUENCE: 18
tatatagata tctcaactaa agcactctcc 30
<210> SEQ ID NO 19
<211> LENGTH: 5
<212> TYPE: PRT
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence: Amino Acid
Sequence Corresponding to Primer #40
<400> SEQUENCE: 19
Gly Glu Cys Phe Ser
1 5
<210> SEQ ID NO 20
<211> LENGTH: 31
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence: Fum28 PCR
Primer
<400> SEQUENCE: 20
atatatcggc cgagtgtctg cggcacctag t 31
<210> SEQ ID NO 21
<211> LENGTH: 21
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence: Fum11 PCR
Primer
<400> SEQUENCE: 21
tgaggtcatc cgcacccaga g 21
<210> SEQ ID NO 22
<211> LENGTH: 54
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence: Fum26 PCR
Primer
<400> SEQUENCE: 22
ctagaattca tggtgactct gactttcctg ctttcggcgg cgtatctgct ttcc 54
<210> SEQ ID NO 23
<211> LENGTH: 54
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence: Fum27 PCR
Primer
<400> SEQUENCE: 23
ggccggaaag cagatacgcc gccgaaagca ggaaagtcag agtcaccatg aatt 54
<210> SEQ ID NO 24
<211> LENGTH: 27
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Primer
Q27L s
<400> SEQUENCE: 24
catctatggg gcctgtactc gccattc 27
<210> SEQ ID NO 25
<211> LENGTH: 27
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Primer
Q27L as
<400> SEQUENCE: 25
gaatggcgag tacaggcccc atagatg 27
<210> SEQ ID NO 26
<211> LENGTH: 9
<212> TYPE: PRT
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Amino Acid
Sequence Encoded by Primer Set A
<400> SEQUENCE: 26
His Leu Trp Gly Leu Tyr Ser Pro Phe
1 5
<210> SEQ ID NO 27
<211> LENGTH: 27
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Primer
Q274L s
<400> SEQUENCE: 27
tacaactacc ttctgtcctt gggcaag 27
<210> SEQ ID NO 28
<211> LENGTH: 27
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Primer
Q274L as
<400> SEQUENCE: 28
cttgcccaag gacagaaggt agttgta 27
<210> SEQ ID NO 29
<211> LENGTH: 9
<212> TYPE: PRT
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Amino Acid
Sequence Encoded by Primer Set B
<400> SEQUENCE: 29
Tyr Asn Tyr Leu Leu Ser Leu Gly Lys
1 5
<210> SEQ ID NO 30
<211> LENGTH: 27
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Primer
G277D s
<400> SEQUENCE: 30
cttcagtcct tggacaagta ctacggc 27
<210> SEQ ID NO 31
<211> LENGTH: 27
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Primer
G277D as
<400> SEQUENCE: 31
gccgtagtac ttgtccaagg actgaag 27
<210> SEQ ID NO 32
<211> LENGTH: 9
<212> TYPE: PRT
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Amino Acid
Sequence encoded by Primer set C
<400> SEQUENCE: 32
Leu Gln Ser Leu Asp Lys Tyr Tyr Gly
1 5
<210> SEQ ID NO 33
<211> LENGTH: 27
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Primer
G277D* s
<400> SEQUENCE: 33
cttctgtcct tggacaagta ctacggc 27
<210> SEQ ID NO 34
<211> LENGTH: 27
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Primer
G277D* as
<400> SEQUENCE: 34
gccgtagtac ttgtccaagg acagaag 27
<210> SEQ ID NO 35
<211> LENGTH: 9
<212> TYPE: PRT
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Amino Acid
Sequence Encoded by Primer Set D
<400> SEQUENCE: 35
Leu Leu Ser Leu Asp Lys Tyr Tyr Gly
1 5
<210> SEQ ID NO 36
<211> LENGTH: 27
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Primer
N340S s
<400> SEQUENCE: 36
ttttcacacg acagcagcat ggtttcc 27
<210> SEQ ID NO 37
<211> LENGTH: 27
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Primer
N340S as
<400> SEQUENCE: 37
ggaaaccatg ctgctgtcgt gtgaaaa 27
<210> SEQ ID NO 38
<211> LENGTH: 9
<212> TYPE: PRT
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Amino Acid
Sequence Encoded by Primer Set E
<400> SEQUENCE: 38
Phe Ser His Asp Ser Ser Met Val Ile
1 5
<210> SEQ ID NO 39
<211> LENGTH: 31
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Primer
G277K s
<400> SEQUENCE: 39
ccttcagtcc ttgaagaagt actacggcta c 31
<210> SEQ ID NO 40
<211> LENGTH: 31
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Primer
G277K as
<400> SEQUENCE: 40
gtagccgtag tacttcttca aggactgaag g 31
<210> SEQ ID NO 41
<211> LENGTH: 10
<212> TYPE: PRT
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Amino Acid
Sequence Encoded by Primer Set F
<400> SEQUENCE: 41
Leu Gln Ser Leu Lys Lys Tyr Tyr Gly Tyr
1 5 10
<210> SEQ ID NO 42
<211> LENGTH: 28
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Primer
A205E s
<400> SEQUENCE: 42
ggagatgagg ttgaggccaa tttcactg 28
<210> SEQ ID NO 43
<211> LENGTH: 28
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Primer
A205E as
<400> SEQUENCE: 43
cagtgaaatt ggcctcaacc tcatctcc 28
<210> SEQ ID NO 44
<211> LENGTH: 9
<212> TYPE: PRT
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Amino Acid
Sequence Encoded by Primer Set G
<400> SEQUENCE: 44
Gly Asp Glu Val Glu Ala Asn Phe Thr
1 5
<210> SEQ ID NO 45
<211> LENGTH: 27
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Primer
Y282H s
<400> SEQUENCE: 45
aagtactacg gccacggcgc aggcaac 27
<210> SEQ ID NO 46
<211> LENGTH: 27
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Primer
Y282H as
<400> SEQUENCE: 46
gttgcctgcg ccgtggccgt agtactt 27
<210> SEQ ID NO 47
<211> LENGTH: 9
<212> TYPE: PRT
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Amino Acid
Sequence Encoded by Primer Set H
<400> SEQUENCE: 47
Lys Tyr Tyr Gly His Gly Ala Gly Asn
1 5
<210> SEQ ID NO 48
<211> LENGTH: 27
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Primer
AvrII s
<400> SEQUENCE: 48
gatacggtag acctagggta ccagtgc 27
<210> SEQ ID NO 49
<211> LENGTH: 27
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Primer
AvrII as
<400> SEQUENCE: 49
gcactggtac cctaggtcta ccgtatc 27
<210> SEQ ID NO 50
<211> LENGTH: 9
<212> TYPE: PRT
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Amino Acid
Sequence Encoded by Primer Set I
<400> SEQUENCE: 50
Asp Thr Val Asp Leu Gly Tyr Gln Cys
1 5
<210> SEQ ID NO 51
<211> LENGTH: 30
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Primer
S66D s
<400> SEQUENCE: 51
cggtacccaa ccgattcgaa gagcaaaaag 30
<210> SEQ ID NO 52
<211> LENGTH: 30
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Primer
S66D as
<400> SEQUENCE: 52
ctttttgctc ttcgaatcgg ttgggtaccg 30
<210> SEQ ID NO 53
<211> LENGTH: 10
<212> TYPE: PRT
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Amino Acid
Sequence Encoded by Primer Set J
<400> SEQUENCE: 53
Arg Tyr Pro Thr Asp Ser Lys Ser Lys Lys
1 5 10
<210> SEQ ID NO 54
<211> LENGTH: 28
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Primer
S140Y/D141G s
<400> SEQUENCE: 54
gcgcctcagg ctacggccgg gttattgc 28
<210> SEQ ID NO 55
<211> LENGTH: 28
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Primer
S140Y/D141G as
<400> SEQUENCE: 55
gcaataaccc ggccgtagcc tgaggcgc 28
<210> SEQ ID NO 56
<211> LENGTH: 9
<212> TYPE: PRT
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Amino Acid
Sequence Encoded by Primer Set K
<400> SEQUENCE: 56
Ala Ser Gly Tyr Gly Arg Val Ile Ala
1 5
<210> SEQ ID NO 57
<211> LENGTH: 28
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Primer
S130N s
<400> SEQUENCE: 57
ctggcgcgca atgtggtgcc gtttattc 28
<210> SEQ ID NO 58
<211> LENGTH: 28
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Primer
S130N as
<400> SEQUENCE: 58
gaataaacgg caccacattg cgcgccag 28
<210> SEQ ID NO 59
<211> LENGTH: 9
<212> TYPE: PRT
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Amino Acid
Sequence Encoded by Primer Set L
<400> SEQUENCE: 59
Leu Ala Arg Asn Val Val Pro Phe Ile
1 5
<210> SEQ ID NO 60
<211> LENGTH: 31
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Primer
R129L/S130N s
<400> SEQUENCE: 60
gctctggcgc tcaatgtggt gccgtttatt c 31
<210> SEQ ID NO 61
<211> LENGTH: 31
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Primer
R129L/S130N as
<400> SEQUENCE: 61
gaataaacgg caccacattg agcgccagag c 31
<210> SEQ ID NO 62
<211> LENGTH: 10
<212> TYPE: PRT
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Amino Acid
Sequence Encoded by Primer Set M
<400> SEQUENCE: 62
Ala Leu Ala Leu Asn Val Val Pro Phe Ile
1 5 10
<210> SEQ ID NO 63
<211> LENGTH: 28
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Primer
K167G/R168Q s
<400> SEQUENCE: 63
gaccatggct ccggacaagc tacgccag 28
<210> SEQ ID NO 64
<211> LENGTH: 28
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Primer
K167G/R168Q as
<400> SEQUENCE: 64
ctggcgtagc ttgtccggag ccatggtc 28
<210> SEQ ID NO 65
<211> LENGTH: 9
<212> TYPE: PRT
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:Amino Acid
Sequence Encoded by Primer Set N
<400> SEQUENCE: 65
Asp His Gly Ser Gly Gln Ala Thr Pro
1 5
<210> SEQ ID NO 66
<211> LENGTH: 64
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:FumG27-s
from Primer Set O
<400> SEQUENCE: 66
ctagggtacc agtgctcccc tgcgacttct catctatggg gcggatactc gccattcttt 60
tcgc 64
<210> SEQ ID NO 67
<211> LENGTH: 64
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:FumG27-as
from Primer Set O
<400> SEQUENCE: 67
tcgagcgaaa agaatggcga gtatccgccc catagatgag aagtcgcagg ggagcactgg 60
tacc 64
<210> SEQ ID NO 68
<211> LENGTH: 64
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:FumV27-s
from Primer Set P
<400> SEQUENCE: 68
ctagggtacc agtgctcccc tgcgacttct catctatggg gcgtgtactc gccattcttt 60
tcgc 64
<210> SEQ ID NO 69
<211> LENGTH: 64
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:FumV27-as
from Primer Set P
<400> SEQUENCE: 69
tcgagcgaaa agaatggcga gtacacgccc catagatgag aagtcgcagg ggagcactgg 60
tacc 64
<210> SEQ ID NO 70
<211> LENGTH: 64
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:FumN27-s
from Primer Set Q
<400> SEQUENCE: 70
ctagggtacc agtgctcccc tgcgacttct catctatggg gcaactactc gccattcttt 60
tcgc 64
<210> SEQ ID NO 71
<211> LENGTH: 64
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:FumN27-as
from Primer Set Q
<400> SEQUENCE: 71
tcgagcgaaa agaatggcga gtagttgccc catagatgag aagtcgcagg ggagcactgg 60
tacc 64
<210> SEQ ID NO 72
<211> LENGTH: 64
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:FumI27-s
from Primer Set R
<400> SEQUENCE: 72
ctagggtacc agtgctcccc tgcgacttct catctatggg gcatctactc gccattcttt 60
tcgc 64
<210> SEQ ID NO 73
<211> LENGTH: 64
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:FumI27-as
from Primer Set R
<400> SEQUENCE: 73
tcgagcgaaa agaatggcga gtagatgccc catagatgag aagtcgcagg ggagcactgg 60
tacc 64
<210> SEQ ID NO 74
<211> LENGTH: 64
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:FumA27-s
from Primer Set S
<400> SEQUENCE: 74
ctagggtacc agtgctcccc tgcgacttct catctatggg gcgcgtactc gccattcttt 60
tcgc 64
<210> SEQ ID NO 75
<211> LENGTH: 64
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:FumA27-as
from Primer Set S
<400> SEQUENCE: 75
tcgagcgaaa agaatggcga gtacgcgccc catagatgag aagtcgcagg ggagcactgg 60
tacc 64
<210> SEQ ID NO 76
<211> LENGTH: 64
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:FumT27-s
from Primer Set T
<400> SEQUENCE: 76
ctagggtacc agtgctcccc tgcgacttct catctatggg gcacgtactc gccattcttt 60
tcgc 64
<210> SEQ ID NO 77
<211> LENGTH: 64
<212> TYPE: DNA
<213> ORGANISM: Artificial Sequence
<220> FEATURE:
<223> OTHER INFORMATION: Description of Artificial Sequence:FumT27-as
from Primer Set T
<400> SEQUENCE: 77
tcgagcgaaa agaatggcga gtacgtgccc catagatgag aagtcgcagg ggagcactgg 60
tacc 64
<210> SEQ ID NO 78
<211> LENGTH: 465
<212> TYPE: PRT
<213> ORGANISM: Aspergillus fumigatus
<400> SEQUENCE: 78
Met Val Thr Leu Thr Phe Leu Leu Ser Ala Ala Tyr Leu Leu Ser Gly
1 5 10 15
Arg Val Ser Ala Ala Pro Ser Ser Ala Gly Ser Lys Ser Cys Asp Thr
20 25 30
Val Asp Leu Gly Tyr Gln Cys Ser Pro Ala Thr Ser His Leu Trp Gly
35 40 45
Gln Tyr Ser Pro Phe Phe Ser Leu Glu Asp Glu Leu Ser Val Ser Ser
50 55 60
Lys Leu Pro Lys Asp Cys Arg Ile Thr Leu Val Gln Val Leu Ser Arg
65 70 75 80
His Gly Ala Arg Tyr Pro Thr Ser Ser Lys Ser Lys Lys Tyr Lys Lys
85 90 95
Leu Val Thr Ala Ile Gln Ala Asn Ala Thr Asp Phe Lys Gly Lys Phe
100 105 110
Ala Phe Leu Lys Thr Tyr Asn Tyr Thr Leu Gly Ala Asp Asp Leu Thr
115 120 125
Pro Phe Gly Glu Gln Gln Leu Val Asn Ser Gly Ile Lys Phe Tyr Gln
130 135 140
Arg Tyr Lys Ala Leu Ala Arg Ser Val Val Pro Phe Ile Arg Ala Ser
145 150 155 160
Gly Ser Asp Arg Val Ile Ala Ser Gly Glu Lys Phe Ile Glu Gly Phe
165 170 175
Gln Gln Ala Lys Leu Ala Asp Pro Gly Ala Thr Asn Arg Ala Ala Pro
180 185 190
Ala Ile Ser Val Ile Ile Pro Glu Ser Glu Thr Phe Asn Asn Thr Leu
195 200 205
Asp His Gly Val Cys Thr Lys Phe Glu Ala Ser Gln Leu Gly Asp Glu
210 215 220
Val Ala Ala Asn Phe Thr Ala Leu Phe Ala Pro Asp Ile Arg Ala Arg
225 230 235 240
Ala Glu Lys His Leu Pro Gly Val Thr Leu Thr Asp Glu Asp Val Val
245 250 255
Ser Leu Met Asp Met Cys Ser Phe Asp Thr Val Ala Arg Thr Ser Asp
260 265 270
Ala Ser Gln Leu Ser Pro Phe Cys Gln Leu Phe Thr His Asn Glu Trp
275 280 285
Lys Lys Tyr Asn Tyr Leu Gln Ser Leu Gly Lys Tyr Tyr Gly Tyr Gly
290 295 300
Ala Gly Asn Pro Leu Gly Pro Ala Gln Gly Ile Gly Phe Thr Asn Glu
305 310 315 320
Leu Ile Ala Arg Leu Thr Arg Ser Pro Val Gln Asp His Thr Ser Thr
325 330 335
Asn Ser Thr Leu Val Ser Asn Pro Ala Thr Phe Pro Leu Asn Ala Thr
340 345 350
Met Tyr Val Asp Phe Ser His Asp Asn Ser Met Val Ser Ile Phe Phe
355 360 365
Ala Leu Gly Leu Tyr Asn Gly Thr Glu Pro Leu Ser Arg Thr Ser Val
370 375 380
Glu Ser Ala Lys Glu Leu Asp Gly Tyr Ser Ala Ser Trp Val Val Pro
385 390 395 400
Phe Gly Ala Arg Ala Tyr Phe Glu Thr Met Gln Cys Lys Ser Glu Lys
405 410 415
Glu Pro Leu Val Arg Ala Leu Ile Asn Asp Arg Val Val Pro Leu His
420 425 430
Gly Cys Asp Val Asp Lys Leu Gly Arg Cys Lys Leu Asn Asp Phe Val
435 440 445
Lys Gly Leu Ser Trp Ala Arg Ser Gly Gly Asn Trp Gly Glu Cys Phe
450 455 460
Ser
465
<210> SEQ ID NO 79
<211> LENGTH: 465
<212> TYPE: PRT
<213> ORGANISM: Aspergillus fumigatus
<400> SEQUENCE: 79
Met Val Thr Leu Thr Phe Leu Leu Ser Ala Ala Tyr Leu Leu Ser Gly
1 5 10 15
Arg Val Ser Ala Ala Pro Ser Ser Ala Gly Ser Lys Ser Cys Asp Thr
20 25 30
Val Asp Leu Gly Tyr Gln Cys Ser Pro Ala Thr Ser His Leu Trp Gly
35 40 45
Gln Tyr Ser Pro Phe Phe Ser Leu Glu Asp Glu Leu Ser Val Ser Ser
50 55 60
Lys Leu Pro Lys Asp Cys Arg Ile Thr Leu Val Gln Val Leu Ser Arg
65 70 75 80
His Gly Ala Arg Tyr Pro Thr Ser Ser Lys Ser Lys Lys Tyr Lys Lys
85 90 95
Leu Val Thr Ala Ile Gln Ala Asn Ala Thr Asp Phe Lys Gly Lys Phe
100 105 110
Ala Phe Leu Lys Thr Tyr Asn Tyr Thr Leu Gly Ala Asp Asp Leu Thr
115 120 125
Pro Phe Gly Glu Gln Gln Leu Val Asn Ser Gly Ile Lys Phe Tyr Gln
130 135 140
Arg Tyr Lys Ala Leu Ala Arg Ser Val Val Pro Phe Ile Arg Ala Ser
145 150 155 160
Gly Ser Asp Arg Val Ile Ala Ser Gly Glu Lys Phe Ile Glu Gly Phe
165 170 175
Gln Gln Ala Lys Leu Ala Asp Pro Gly Ala Thr Asn Arg Ala Ala Pro
180 185 190
Ala Ile Ser Val Ile Ile Pro Glu Ser Glu Thr Phe Asn Asn Thr Leu
195 200 205
Asp His Gly Val Cys Thr Lys Phe Glu Ala Ser Gln Leu Gly Asp Glu
210 215 220
Val Ala Ala Asn Phe Thr Ala Leu Phe Ala Pro Asp Ile Arg Ala Arg
225 230 235 240
Ala Glu Lys His Leu Pro Gly Val Thr Leu Thr Asp Glu Asp Val Val
245 250 255
Ser Leu Met Asp Met Cys Ser Phe Asp Thr Val Ala Arg Thr Ser Asp
260 265 270
Ala Ser Gln Leu Ser Pro Phe Cys Gln Leu Phe Thr His Asn Glu Trp
275 280 285
Lys Lys Tyr Asn Tyr Leu Gln Ser Leu Gly Lys Tyr Tyr Gly Tyr Gly
290 295 300
Ala Gly Asn Pro Leu Gly Pro Ala Gln Gly Ile Gly Phe Thr Asn Glu
305 310 315 320
Leu Ile Ala Arg Leu Thr Arg Ser Pro Val Gln Asp His Thr Ser Thr
325 330 335
Asn Ser Thr Leu Val Ser Asn Pro Ala Thr Phe Pro Leu Asn Ala Thr
340 345 350
Met Tyr Val Asp Phe Ser His Asp Asn Ser Met Val Ser Ile Phe Phe
355 360 365
Ala Leu Gly Leu Tyr Asn Gly Thr Glu Gly Leu Ser Arg Thr Ser Val
370 375 380
Glu Ser Ala Lys Glu Leu Asp Gly Tyr Ser Ala Ser Trp Val Val Pro
385 390 395 400
Phe Gly Ala Arg Ala Tyr Phe Glu Thr Met Gln Cys Lys Ser Glu Lys
405 410 415
Glu Pro Leu Val Arg Ala Leu Ile Asn Asp Arg Val Val Pro Leu His
420 425 430
Gly Cys Asp Val Asp Lys Leu Gly Arg Cys Lys Leu Asn Asp Phe Val
435 440 445
Lys Gly Leu Ser Trp Ala Arg Ser Gly Gly Asn Trp Gly Glu Cys Phe
450 455 460
Ser
465
<210> SEQ ID NO 80
<211> LENGTH: 465
<212> TYPE: PRT
<213> ORGANISM: Aspergillus fumigatus
<400> SEQUENCE: 80
Met Val Thr Leu Thr Phe Leu Leu Ser Ala Ala Tyr Leu Leu Ser Gly
1 5 10 15
Arg Val Ser Ala Ala Pro Ser Ser Ala Gly Ser Lys Ser Cys Asp Thr
20 25 30
Val Asp Leu Gly Tyr Gln Cys Ser Pro Ala Thr Ser His Leu Trp Gly
35 40 45
Gln Tyr Ser Pro Phe Phe Ser Leu Glu Asp Glu Leu Ser Val Ser Ser
50 55 60
Lys Leu Pro Lys Asp Cys Arg Ile Thr Leu Val Gln Val Leu Ser Arg
65 70 75 80
His Gly Ala Arg Tyr Pro Thr Ser Ser Lys Ser Lys Lys Tyr Lys Lys
85 90 95
Leu Val Thr Ala Ile Gln Ala Asn Ala Thr Asp Phe Lys Gly Lys Phe
100 105 110
Ala Phe Leu Lys Thr Tyr Asn Tyr Thr Leu Gly Ala Asp Asp Leu Thr
115 120 125
Pro Phe Gly Glu Gln Gln Leu Val Asn Ser Gly Ile Lys Phe Tyr Gln
130 135 140
Arg Tyr Lys Ala Leu Ala Arg Ser Val Val Pro Phe Ile Arg Ala Ser
145 150 155 160
Gly Ser Asp Arg Val Ile Ala Ser Gly Glu Lys Phe Ile Glu Gly Phe
165 170 175
Gln Gln Ala Lys Leu Ala Asp Pro Gly Ala Thr Asn Arg Ala Ala Pro
180 185 190
Ala Ile Ser Val Ile Ile Pro Glu Ser Glu Thr Phe Asn Asn Thr Leu
195 200 205
Asp His Gly Val Cys Thr Lys Phe Glu Ala Ser Gln Leu Gly Asp Glu
210 215 220
Val Ala Ala Asn Phe Thr Ala Leu Phe Ala Pro Asp Ile Arg Ala Arg
225 230 235 240
Ala Glu Lys His Leu Pro Gly Val Thr Leu Thr Asp Glu Asp Val Val
245 250 255
Ser Leu Met Asp Met Cys Ser Phe Asp Thr Val Ala Arg Thr Ser Asp
260 265 270
Ala Ser Gln Leu Ser Pro Phe Cys Gln Leu Phe Thr His Asn Glu Trp
275 280 285
Lys Lys Tyr Asn Tyr Leu Gln Ser Leu Gly Lys Tyr Tyr Gly Tyr Gly
290 295 300
Ala Gly Asn Pro Leu Gly Pro Ala Gln Gly Ile Gly Phe Thr Asn Glu
305 310 315 320
Leu Ile Ala Arg Leu Thr Arg Ser Pro Val Gln Asp His Thr Ser Thr
325 330 335
Asn Ser Thr Leu Val Ser Asn Pro Ala Thr Phe Pro Leu Asn Ala Thr
340 345 350
Met Tyr Val Asp Phe Ser His Asp Asn Ser Met Val Ser Ile Phe Phe
355 360 365
Ala Leu Gly Leu Tyr Asn Gly Thr Glu Pro Leu Ser Arg Thr Ser Val
370 375 380
Glu Ser Ala Lys Glu Leu Asp Gly Tyr Ser Ala Ser Trp Val Val Pro
385 390 395 400
Phe Gly Ala Arg Ala Tyr Phe Glu Thr Met Gln Cys Lys Ser Glu Lys
405 410 415
Glu Ser Leu Val Arg Ala Leu Ile Asn Asp Arg Val Val Pro Leu His
420 425 430
Gly Cys Asp Val Asp Lys Leu Gly Arg Cys Lys Leu Asn Asp Phe Val
435 440 445
Lys Gly Leu Ser Trp Ala Arg Ser Gly Gly Asn Trp Gly Glu Cys Phe
450 455 460
Ser
465
<210> SEQ ID NO 81
<211> LENGTH: 465
<212> TYPE: PRT
<213> ORGANISM: Aspergillus fumigatus
<400> SEQUENCE: 81
Met Val Thr Leu Thr Phe Leu Leu Ser Ala Ala Tyr Leu Leu Ser Gly
1 5 10 15
Arg Val Ser Ala Ala Pro Ser Ser Ala Gly Ser Lys Ser Cys Asp Thr
20 25 30
Val Asp Leu Gly Tyr Gln Cys Ser Pro Ala Thr Ser His Leu Trp Gly
35 40 45
Gln Tyr Ser Pro Phe Phe Ser Leu Glu Asp Glu Leu Ser Val Ser Ser
50 55 60
Lys Leu Pro Lys Asp Cys Arg Ile Thr Leu Val Gln Val Leu Ser Arg
65 70 75 80
His Gly Ala Arg Tyr Pro Thr Ser Ser Lys Ser Lys Lys Tyr Lys Lys
85 90 95
Leu Val Thr Ala Ile Gln Ala Asn Ala Thr Asp Phe Lys Gly Lys Phe
100 105 110
Ala Phe Leu Lys Thr Tyr Asn Tyr Thr Leu Gly Ala Asp Asp Leu Thr
115 120 125
Ala Phe Gly Glu Gln Gln Leu Val Asn Ser Gly Ile Lys Phe Tyr Gln
130 135 140
Arg Tyr Lys Ala Leu Ala Arg Ser Val Val Pro Phe Ile Arg Ala Ser
145 150 155 160
Gly Ser Asp Arg Val Ile Ala Ser Gly Glu Lys Phe Ile Glu Gly Phe
165 170 175
Gln Gln Ala Lys Leu Ala Asp Pro Gly Ala Thr Asn Arg Ala Ala Pro
180 185 190
Ala Ile Ser Val Ile Ile Pro Glu Ser Glu Thr Phe Asn Asn Thr Leu
195 200 205
Asp His Gly Val Cys Thr Lys Phe Glu Ala Ser Gln Leu Gly Asp Glu
210 215 220
Val Ala Ala Asn Phe Thr Ala Leu Phe Ala Pro Asp Ile Arg Ala Arg
225 230 235 240
Ala Lys Lys His Leu Pro Gly Val Thr Leu Thr Asp Glu Asp Val Val
245 250 255
Ser Leu Met Asp Met Cys Ser Phe Asp Thr Val Ala Arg Thr Ser Asp
260 265 270
Ala Ser Gln Leu Ser Pro Phe Cys Gln Leu Phe Thr His Asn Glu Trp
275 280 285
Lys Lys Tyr Asn Tyr Leu Gln Ser Leu Gly Lys Tyr Tyr Gly Tyr Gly
290 295 300
Ala Gly Asn Pro Leu Gly Pro Ala Gln Gly Ile Gly Phe Thr Asn Glu
305 310 315 320
Leu Ile Ala Arg Leu Thr Arg Ser Pro Val Gln Asp His Thr Ser Thr
325 330 335
Asn Ser Thr Leu Val Ser Asn Pro Ala Thr Phe Pro Leu Asn Ala Thr
340 345 350
Met Tyr Val Asp Phe Ser His Asp Asn Ser Met Val Ser Ile Phe Phe
355 360 365
Ala Leu Gly Leu Tyr Asn Gly Thr Glu Pro Leu Ser Arg Thr Ser Val
370 375 380
Glu Ser Ala Lys Glu Leu Asp Gly Tyr Ser Ala Ser Trp Val Val Pro
385 390 395 400
Phe Gly Ala Arg Ala Tyr Phe Glu Thr Met Gln Cys Lys Ser Glu Lys
405 410 415
Glu Pro Leu Val Arg Ala Leu Ile Asn Asp Arg Val Val Pro Leu His
420 425 430
Gly Cys Asp Val Asp Lys Leu Gly Arg Cys Lys Leu Asn Asp Phe Val
435 440 445
Lys Gly Leu Ser Trp Ala Arg Ser Gly Gly Asn Trp Gly Glu Cys Phe
450 455 460
Ser
465
<210> SEQ ID NO 82
<211> LENGTH: 469
<212> TYPE: PRT
<213> ORGANISM: Aspergillus fumigatus
<400> SEQUENCE: 82
Met Gly Ala Leu Thr Phe Leu Leu Ser Val Met Tyr Leu Leu Ser Gly
1 5 10 15
Val Ala Gly Ala Pro Ser Ser Gly Cys Ser Ala Gly Ser Gly Ser Lys
20 25 30
Ala Cys Asp Thr Val Glu Leu Gly Tyr Gln Cys Ser Pro Gly Thr Ser
35 40 45
His Leu Trp Gly Gln Tyr Ser Pro Phe Phe Ser Leu Glu Asp Glu Leu
50 55 60
Ser Val Ser Ser Asp Leu Pro Lys Asp Cys Arg Val Thr Phe Val Gln
65 70 75 80
Val Leu Ser Arg His Gly Ala Arg Tyr Pro Thr Ala Ser Lys Ser Lys
85 90 95
Lys Tyr Lys Lys Leu Val Thr Ala Ile Gln Lys Asn Ala Thr Glu Phe
100 105 110
Lys Gly Lys Phe Ala Phe Leu Glu Thr Tyr Asn Tyr Thr Leu Gly Ala
115 120 125
Asp Asp Leu Thr Pro Phe Gly Glu Gln Gln Met Val Asn Ser Gly Ile
130 135 140
Lys Phe Tyr Gln Lys Tyr Lys Ala Leu Ala Gly Ser Val Val Pro Phe
145 150 155 160
Ile Arg Ser Ser Gly Ser Asp Arg Val Ile Ala Ser Gly Glu Lys Phe
165 170 175
Ile Glu Gly Phe Gln Gln Ala Asn Val Ala Asp Pro Gly Ala Thr Asn
180 185 190
Arg Ala Ala Pro Val Ile Ser Val Ile Ile Pro Glu Ser Glu Thr Tyr
195 200 205
Asn Asn Thr Leu Asp His Ser Val Cys Thr Asn Phe Glu Ala Ser Glu
210 215 220
Leu Gly Asp Glu Val Glu Ala Asn Phe Thr Ala Leu Phe Ala Pro Ala
225 230 235 240
Ile Arg Ala Arg Ile Glu Lys His Leu Pro Gly Val Gln Leu Thr Asp
245 250 255
Asp Asp Val Val Ser Leu Met Asp Met Cys Ser Phe Asp Thr Val Ala
260 265 270
Arg Thr Ala Asp Ala Ser Glu Leu Ser Pro Phe Cys Ala Ile Phe Thr
275 280 285
His Asn Glu Trp Lys Lys Tyr Asp Tyr Leu Gln Ser Leu Gly Lys Tyr
290 295 300
Tyr Gly Tyr Gly Ala Gly Asn Pro Leu Gly Pro Ala Gln Gly Ile Gly
305 310 315 320
Phe Thr Asn Glu Leu Ile Ala Arg Leu Thr Asn Ser Pro Val Gln Asp
325 330 335
His Thr Ser Thr Asn Ser Thr Leu Asp Ser Asp Pro Ala Thr Phe Pro
340 345 350
Leu Asn Ala Thr Ile Tyr Val Asp Phe Ser His Asp Asn Gly Met Ile
355 360 365
Pro Ile Phe Phe Ala Met Gly Leu Tyr Asn Gly Thr Glu Pro Leu Ser
370 375 380
Gln Thr Ser Glu Glu Ser Thr Lys Glu Ser Asn Gly Tyr Ser Ala Ser
385 390 395 400
Trp Ala Val Pro Phe Gly Ala Arg Ala Tyr Phe Glu Thr Met Gln Cys
405 410 415
Lys Ser Glu Lys Glu Pro Leu Val Arg Ala Leu Ile Asn Asp Arg Val
420 425 430
Val Pro Leu His Gly Cys Ala Val Asp Lys Leu Gly Arg Cys Lys Leu
435 440 445
Lys Asp Phe Val Lys Gly Leu Ser Trp Ala Arg Ser Gly Gly Asn Ser
450 455 460
Glu Gln Ser Phe Ser
465

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Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification435/196, 424/94.6
International ClassificationC12R1/68, C12N9/16, C12R1/685, A23K1/165, C12N15/09, C12N15/55, C12R1/865, C12N1/19, C12N1/15, C12N15/00
Cooperative ClassificationY10S435/913, Y10S435/916, Y10S435/917, A23K1/1653, C12N9/16
European ClassificationC12N9/16, A23K1/165B
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