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Publication numberUS6436082 B1
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 09/707,392
Publication dateAug 20, 2002
Filing dateNov 7, 2000
Priority dateNov 15, 1999
Fee statusLapsed
Also published asCA2325294A1, CA2325294C, CN1140240C, CN1295827A, DE60022965D1, DE60022965T2, EP1103240A1, EP1103240B1
Publication number09707392, 707392, US 6436082 B1, US 6436082B1, US-B1-6436082, US6436082 B1, US6436082B1
InventorsSatoshi Mizutani, Etsuko Tagami
Original AssigneeUni-Charm Corporation
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Absorbent article having an improved diffusion property
US 6436082 B1
Abstract
An absorbent article including an absorbent layer and a liquid-permeable surface sheet placed on a liquid-receiving side of the absorbent layer for introducing excreted liquid from the human body to the absorbent layer. The surface sheet is of a corrugated configuration to have valleys and peaks extending in a longitudinal direction of the article and alternately arranged in a transverse direction perpendicular to the longitudinal direction. Each peak is formed with spares parts and dense parts alternately arranged in the longitudinal direction. The surface sheet has a lower fiber density in the sparse parts than in the dense parts.
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Claims(10)
What is claimed is:
1. An absorbent article comprising an absorbent layer and a liquid-permeable surface sheet placed on a liquid-receiving side of the absorbent layer for introducing excreted liquid from the human body to the absorbent layer, the surface sheet being of a corrugated configuration to have valleys and peaks extending in a longitudinal direction of the article and alternately arranged in a transverse direction perpendicular to the longitudinal direction, wherein
each peak is formed with sparse parts and dense parts alternately arranged in the longitudinal direction, and the surface sheet has a lower fiber density in the sparse parts than in the dense parts.
2. The absorbent article as set forth in claim 1, wherein the dense parts are formed by compressing the peaks intermittently in the longitudinal direction, such that the sparse parts that do not receive the compression between the dense parts.
3. The absorbent article as set forth in claim 2, wherein the peak is made uneven at the top thereof so that the sparse parts form recessed parts and the dense parts form raised parts.
4. The absorbent article as set forth in claim 3, wherein the sparse part has a dimension (w1) in the longitudinal direction of from 1 to 5 mm.
5. The absorbent article as set forth in claim 4, wherein the sparse part has a depth dimension (d2) from the surface of the dense part toward the absorbent layer of from 0.5 to 3 mm.
6. The absorbent article as set forth in claim 5, wherein the sparse parts are arranged with a pitch (p) in the longitudinal direction of from 3 to 15 mm.
7. The absorbent article as set forth in claim 6, wherein the sparse parts are staggered in the longitudinal direction, between two adjacent peaks.
8. The absorbent article as set forth in claim 1, wherein the sparse parts are arranged to surround a prescribed region of the surface sheet.
9. The absorbent article as set forth in claim 1, wherein the sparse parts are formed as concentrated in a prescribed region of the surface sheet.
10. The absorbent article as set forth in claim 1, wherein in each valley, there is provided at least one connecting part for interconnecting two adjacent peaks.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates to an absorbent article, such as a sanitary napkin, a panty liner and a pad for incontinence, and in particular, it relates to an absorbent article in that absorbent property and diffusion property between a surface sheet and an absorbent core are improved to have excellent dry feeling.

2. Description of the Related Art

There have been some absorbent articles including a sanitary napkin and a panty liner in which a skin contacting surface of a surface sheet is of a corrugated configuration to have peaks and valleys alternately arranged so that the surface sheet to contact the skin directly is improved in dry feeling and soft feeling.

However, when the direction along which the peaks and valleys extend (i.e., an orientation direction) is identical with the longitudinal direction of the absorbent article, the corrugated configuration is liable to be resistance against the absorbent article being incurvated in the longitudinal direction. Accordingly, in order to incurvate and deform the absorbent article by pressure from the body upon use, a plurality of creases are necessarily formed on the surface of the peaks to extend in the transverse direction perpendicular to the longitudinal direction. Because the surface sheet is folded at the creases, the surface sheet can be incurvated along the body shape of the user.

In the parts of the surface sheet where the creases are formed, the surface sheet is in contact with the absorbent core located therebelow, but in the parts where the creases are not formed, an excessive force may be applied to separate the absorbent core and the surface sheet. As a result, in the part where the absorbent core and the surface sheet are separated, the amount of liquid remaining in the surface sheet is increased, so that the surface sheet loses dry feeling and provides the user with uncomfortable wet feeling.

In particular, because the pressure from the body does not act uniformly on the whole surface of the surface sheet, the surface sheet is often incurvated with irregular curvature radii. That is, in parts where the pressure from the body is concentrated, the curvature radius becomes small to form a large number of creases, whereas in parts where the pressure from the body acts relatively lightly, the curvature radius becomes large to decrease the number of the creases.

Furthermore, because the peaks and valleys are liable to be irregularly creased, there are cases where the peak plugs the valley, and the flow of an excreted liquid is dammed at a part where the surface sheet is bent at an acute angle.

As described in the foregoing, when creases are irregularly formed on the surface sheet, the part where the surface sheet and the absorbent core are separated and the part where the surface sheet is bent are formed irregularly, and therefore an excreted liquid is insufficiently diffused to cause a problem that the surface sheet has a part exhibiting dry feeling and a part exhibiting no dry feeling.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

An object of the invention is to provide an absorbent article in which a surface sheet can be easily incurvated as a whole so that absorbent property and diffusion property between the surface sheet and an absorbent core are improved to have excellent dry feeling.

According to the invention, there is provided an absorbent article comprising an absorbent layer and a liquid-permeable surface sheet placed on a liquid-receiving side of the absorbent layer for introducing excreted liquid from the human body to the absorbent layer, the surface sheet being of a corrugated configuration to have valleys and peaks extending in a longitudinal direction of the article and alternately arranged in a transverse direction perpendicular to the longitudinal direction, wherein

each peak is formed with sparse parts and dense parts alternately arranged in the longitudinal direction, and the surface sheet has a lower fiber density in the sparse parts than in the dense parts.

For example, the dense parts may be formed by compressing the peaks intermittently in the longitudinal direction, so that parts that do not receive the compression between the dense parts are the sparse parts.

It is preferred that the peak is made uneven at the top thereof so that the sparse parts form recessed parts and the dense parts form raised parts.

In the invention, the peaks of the corrugated surface sheet can be easily bent due to the presence of the sparse parts having a low fiber density. In addition, because the sparse parts are formed along the peaks of the corrugated surface sheet, the surface sheet can be incurvated as a whole by bending each peak at the sparse parts. Therefore, the peaks are not forcibly bent at the dense parts, so that the surface sheet and the absorbent core are prevented from locally separating by an excessive force. As a result, the liquid permeability of the surface sheet and the absorbent core can be prevented from lowering, and an excreted liquid received by the surface sheet can be effectively led to the absorbent core.

If the sparse parts are recessed toward the absorbent core (i.e., lowered than the dense part), the peaks can be bent at the sparse parts more easily.

In the above, it is preferred that the sparse part has a dimension (w1) in the longitudinal direction of from 1 to 5 mm.

It is preferred that the sparse part has a depth dimension (d2) from the surface of the dense part toward the absorbent core of from 0.5 to 3 mm.

It is preferred that the sparse parts are arranged with a pitch (p) in the longitudinal direction of from 3 to 15 mm.

Owing to the dimensions, a wearer hardly receives uncomfortable feeling due to the unevenness, and the separation of the surface sheet and the absorbent core can be effectively prevented.

The sparse parts may be staggered in the longitudinal direction, between two adjacent peaks. That is, the sparse parts may be arranged in such a manner that one sparse part formed on one peak is positioned between two sparse parts formed on another peak adjacent thereto in the transverse direction.

The sparse parts may be arranged to surround a prescribed region of the surface sheet.

The sparse parts may be formed as concentrated in a prescribed region of the surface sheet.

In the above, it is also preferred that, in each valley, there is provided at least one connecting part to connect between two adjacent peaks.

Owing to the structure, soft feeling of the surface sheet can be maintained, and the shape thereof can be prevented from losing.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a plan view showing an absorbent article according to one embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a partial cross sectional view of FIG. 1 on line II—II;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view showing the fragmentary detail of a surface sheet of the absorbent article shown in FIG. 1;

FIGS. 4A, 4B, 4C and 4D are perspective views showing embodiments of arrangements of sparse parts on a surface sheet, in which FIG. 4A shows the first pattern, FIG. 4B shows the second pattern, FIG. 4C shows the third pattern, and FIG. 4D shows the fourth pattern;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view showing an upper plate for producing the surface sheet;

FIG. 6 is a perspective view showing a lower plate for producing the surface sheet;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged perspective view showing the fragmentary detail of ribs on the lower plate; and

FIGS. 8A, 8B and 8C are cross sectional views showing the state where the upper plate and the lower plate are interfitted to each other, in which FIG. 8A is a cross sectional view in the transverse direction of a dense part forming part of the lower plate and the upper plate, FIG. 8B is a cross sectional view in the transverse direction of a sparse part forming part of the lower plate and the upper plate, and FIG. 8C is a cross sectional view in the longitudinal direction of the rib of the lower plate (on line c—c in FIG. 7) and the upper plate.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

The invention will be described in detail with reference to the drawings.

FIG. 1 is a plan view showing an absorbent article according to one embodiment of the invention, FIG. 2 is a cross sectional view of FIG. 1 on line II—II (partially omitted), and FIG. 3 is a perspective view showing the fragmentary detail of a surface sheet of the absorbent article shown in FIG. 1.

As shown in FIG. 1, a skin contacting part 10 for receiving a liquid excreted from the body is formed at the center of a sanitary napkin (absorbent article) 1. As shown in FIG. 2, the sanitary napkin 1 is constructed to include a surface sheet 2, an absorbent core 3 and a back sheet 4. On both sides of the skin contacting part 10, side flaps 5 and 5 are provided.

The surface sheet 2 may be made of any suitable sheet material. Examples of the sheet material include: nonwoven fabric such as air-through nonwoven fabric, point-bonded nonwoven fabric and spun-bonded nonwoven fabric produced by accumulating synthetic fibers, such as of PE (polyethylene), PET (polyethylene terephthalate), etc., or composite fibers, such as of PE/PET, PE/PP (polypropylene), etc., and making the accumulated fibers into a sheet form by thermal welding; a porous film formed with a number of pores and laminated with a fibrous sheet on the skin contacting side thereof; and a porous fibrous sheet formed with a number of pores. These sheet materials may be used alone as a single-layer sheet or may be used in combination as a multi-layer sheet formed by laminating two or more sheets. The constituent fibers for the surface sheet 2 preferably have a fineness in a range of from 1.1 to 6.6 dtex. If it is less than 1.1 dtex, the amount of liquid remaining due to the capillary action is increased to give wet feeling to the wearer. If it exceeds 6.6 dtex, hard and rough feeling is given. The basis weight (This may be referred to as “Metsuke”) of the surface sheet 2 is preferably in a range of from 20 to 120 g/m2. If it is less than 20 g/m2, the surface sheet cannot provide sufficient elasticity to the corrugated configuration thereof and is liable to lose shape. If it exceeds 120 g/m2, it becomes too rigid.

In the case where the surface sheet 2 is a multi-layer sheet formed by adhering the entire surfaces of the plurality of sheets of nonwoven fabric, the adhesion strength between the upper layer (upper sheet) and the lower layer (lower sheet) in CD (Cross Direction) is preferably 0.49 N/inch (50 g/inch) or more, so as to secure the durability upon use. When the adhesion strength is less than 0.49 N/inch (50 g/inch), there tend to be cases causing a problem in that the upper layer is peeled to float or is broken.

When the entire surfaces of the upper layer and the lower layer are adhered, the strength between the sheets is increased to improve the durability, as described above. However, on the other hand, the finish of the surface sheet thus laminated tends to be stiff. In such a case, it is preferred that the upper and lower layers of a corrugated configuration are adhered and fixed to each other not in the peaks but only at the bottom parts of the valleys, whereby the peaks to come into contact with the skin directly can be finished more softly.

In the sanitary napkin 1 shown in FIG. 1 to FIG. 3, the surface sheet 2 is made of a multi-layer sheet formed by laminating the plurality of sheets of nonwoven fabric. The surface sheet 2 is formed to have a corrugated configuration (i.e., wavy shape), in which valleys 2 b having a concave cross section and peaks 2 a having a convex cross section extend in the longitudinal (Y) direction and are alternately arranged in the transverse (X) direction. The bottom parts of the valleys 2 b and the surface of the absorbent core 3 are adhered and fixed to each other at the positions indicated with symbols (x) in FIG. 2.

The adhesion between the bottom parts of the valleys 2 b and the surface of the absorbent core 3 can be conducted, for example, with a hot melt adhesive. For application of the hot melt adhesive, use can be made of a silicone roll having the same shape as the peaks 2 a and the valleys 2 b. The roll is applied with the hot melt adhesive in a bead form, inside the valleys thereof, and is then made in contact with the back surface of the surface sheet 2 (the surface directed to the −Z direction) to mach the wavy shape thereof and is trundled, whereby the adhesive can be transferred to the back surface of the valleys 2 b of the surface sheet 2. Thus, only the valleys 2 b of the surface sheet 2 can be adhered to the absorbent core 3, while preventing the peaks 2 a from adhering to each other.

As shown in FIG. 3, the distance H (height in the Z direction) between the top of the peak 2 a and the bottom part of the valley 2 b is preferably from 1 to 10 mm, and more preferably from 2 to 6 mm. The width W between the peaks 2 a, 2 a or the valleys 2 b, 2 b arranged alternately is preferably from 1 to 15 mm, and more preferably from 2 to 10 mm.

On the surface of the peak 2 a, sparse parts 2 c and dense parts 2 d are alternately formed to line with a constant interval in the longitudinal direction. The sparse parts 2 c are recessed into a concave shape, i.e., lowered than the dense parts 2 d in the −Z direction toward the absorbent core 3, and are formed as extending in the transverse (X) direction in a strip form. The dense parts 2 d are formed by heating and/or compression by the means described later and have a density of fibers per unit volume (hereinafter referred to as a fiber density) higher than that of the sparse parts 2 c of the surface sheet 2.

The pitch p of the sparse parts 2 c in the longitudinal direction is preferably from 3 to 15 mm, and more preferably from 3 to 10 mm. The depth dimension d2 of the sparse parts 2 c in the −Z direction is preferably in a range of from 0.5 to 3 mm from the dense parts 2 d (top) of the peak 2 a toward the absorbent core 3 from the standpoints of bumpy feeling given to the wearer and separation between the surface sheet 2 and the absorbent core 3. The dimension w1 of the sparse parts 2 c in the longitudinal direction is preferably from 1 to 5 mm.

The sparse parts 2 c preferably have such a shape that when viewed from the longitudinal cross section (the same direction as FIG. 2), the shape from the dense part 2 d to the bottom part of the sparse part 2 c is not perpendicularly steep-up but forms a curved surface. Owing to such a shape, the dense parts 2 d of the surface sheet 2 in contact with the skin are prevented from giving harsh feeling to the wearer. In order to attain the shape, the shape of the edge of the dense part forming part 22 c of the lower plate 22 described later is formed to have a taper form (see FIG. 7 and FIG. 8C).

In the sanitary napkin 1 having the surface sheet 2 with such a configuration, when a pressure from the body is applied from the upper side (+Z) to the lower side (−Z) of the surface sheet 2, the center part of the surface sheet 2 is caved with respect to the both ends thereof, whereby the surface sheet 2 is incurvated to a concave form. At this time, the individual sparse parts 2 c are bent and approach each other, so that the surface sheet 2 is incurvated as a whole. The peaks 2 a of the surface sheet 2 are bent only at the sparse parts 2 c, but they are not bent at the dense parts 2 d. That is, the peaks 2 a can be uniformly incurvated by dispersing the pressure from the body to the sparse parts 2 c, and therefore, no crease is formed in the dense parts 2 d. This can prevent the separation of the surface sheet 2 from the surface of the absorbent core 3. As a result, the permeability (transmissibility) of a liquid from the surface sheet 2, more particularly from the peaks 2 a of the surface sheet 2 to the absorbent core 3 is not lost, so that the amount of the liquid remaining in the surface sheet 2 can be made less. Thus, excellent dry feeling can be obtained, and comfortable feeling can always be given to the wearer.

In the surface sheet 2 shown in FIG. 3, a plurality of connecting parts 2 e are formed inside one valley 2 b with a prescribed pitch P, so as to connect between the adjacent peaks 2 a, 2 a at both sides of the valley 2 b. Due to the presence of the connecting parts 2 e, the deformation amount of the surface sheet 2 caused by the pressure from the body can be minimized. The elasticity of the connecting parts 2 e functions as a restoring force to recover the original state of the surface sheet 2 upon releasing the pressure from the body. Therefore, since the surface sheet 2 has an excellent recovering force, the shape thereof is not lost even when the wearer gets hard exercise.

The sparse parts 2 c may be arranged on the surface sheet 2 in the following manner.

FIGS. 4A, 4B, 4C and 4D are perspective views showing embodiments of arrangements of the sparse parts on the surface sheet, in which FIG. 4A shows the first pattern, FIG. 4B shows the second pattern, FIG. 4C shows the third pattern, and FIG. 4D shows the fourth pattern.

In the first pattern (linear array) shown in FIG. 4A, the peaks 2 a extend in the longitudinal (Y) direction of the surface sheet 2, and a plurality of sparse parts 2 c are arranged in the transverse (X) direction perpendicular to the peaks 2 a. In the first pattern (linear array), the sparse parts 2 c form a plurality of bent lines L1 extending parallel to each other and arranged at regular intervals. When the surface sheet 2 is incurvated to make the center of curvature radius directed to the side of the skin contacting part (+Z side) of the surface sheet 2, it can be easily bent at the bent lines L1. Thus, the resistance caused by the arrangement of the peaks 2 a can be relaxed.

In the second pattern (staggered array) shown in FIG. 4B, the sparse parts 2 c are arranged alternately with respect to the adjacent peaks 2 a in the transverse direction. That is, the sparse parts 2 c are staggered in the longitudinal direction, between the adjacent peaks 2 a in the transverse direction. In the second pattern, a plurality of bent lines connecting the sparse parts 2 c are formed in a polygonal line form. The resistance caused by the arrangement of the peaks 2 a can also be relaxed with the bent lines.

In the third pattern (round array) shown in FIG. 4C, the sparse parts 2 c are formed on the peaks 2 a inside the prescribed region of the surface sheet 2 in a circular or elliptical form. Owing to such a structure, the dense parts 2 d having high liquid permeability are formed inside the region. On the other hand, the sparse parts 2 c in the periphery outside the region have higher retaining property of a liquid than the dense parts 2 d. It is visually confirmed that the interior of the prescribed region is a part having a high absorbent effect of an excreted liquid. Because the sparse parts 2 c inside the region have low liquid permeability, unnecessary diffusion of the excreted liquid can be suppressed.

In the fourth pattern (pattern with dense center and sparse periphery) shown in FIG. 4D, the sparse parts 2 c are formed as concentrated in a prescribed region (substantially the central part) of the surface sheet 2. In the surface sheet 2, as a result of concentration of the sparse parts 2 c of low permeability in the central part thereof, the retaining ability of an excreted liquid in the central part can be improved. The diffusion property of the excreted liquid in the transverse direction of the surface sheet 2 can be improved by surrounding the periphery of the central part with the dense parts 2 d having a high fiber density. As a result, the absorption rate to the absorbent core 3 can be increased.

A production process of the surface sheet will be described below.

FIGS. 5 and 6 show a mold for producing the surface sheet, in which FIG. 5 shows an upper plate, and FIG. 6 shows a lower plate.

As shown in FIG. 5, a plurality of convex ribs 21 a having a prescribed length are formed in the longitudinal direction on a press surface 21A of the upper plate 21. In the upper plate 21, gaps 21 b having a prescribed length are formed between the convex ribs 21 a adjacent to each other in the longitudinal (Y) direction. The convex ribs 21 a are also arranged in the transverse (X) direction, and the distances between the rows adjacent to each other is set at a constant width. The gaps 21 b are formed as staggered in the longitudinal direction in the rows adjacent to each other.

On a press surface 22A of the lower plate 22 shown in FIG. 6, on the other hand, there are formed ribs 22 a extending in the longitudinal direction and arranged in the transverse direction in rows. FIG. 7 is a perspective view showing the detail of the ribs on the lower plate. As shown in FIG. 7, on the upper surface of the ribs 22 a, sparse part forming parts 22 b having a concave form, and dense part forming parts 22 c having a convex form are alternately formed. That is, the sparse part forming parts 22 b are formed at regular intervals. The top parts of the dense part forming part 22 c are compression parts 22 d.

FIGS. 8A, 8B and 8C are cross sectional views showing the state where the upper plate and the lower plate are interfitted to each other, in which FIG. 8A is a cross sectional view in the transverse direction of the dense part forming part of the lower plate (on line a—a in FIG. 7) and the upper plate, FIG. 8B is a cross sectional view in the transverse direction of the sparse part forming part of the lower plate (on line b—b in FIG. 7) and the upper plate, and FIG. 8C is a cross sectional view in the longitudinal direction of the rib of the lower plate (on line c-c in FIG. 7) and the upper plate.

When the upper plate 21 and the lower plate 22 are superposed on each other in such a state that the press surfaces 21A and 22A face each other, the convex ribs 21 a of the upper plate 21 each is interfitted between the ribs 22 a of the lower plate 22. When nonwoven fabric intervenes between the plates as shown in FIG. 8A at this time, the surface sheet 2 having the corrugated configuration can be formed by the ribs 22 a and the convex ribs 21 a.

The sparse parts 2 c and the dense parts 2 d are simultaneously formed alternately on the top parts of the peaks 2 a along the longitudinal direction as shown in FIGS. 2 and 3. That is, as shown in FIGS. 8A and 8C, because the distance d1 between the compression part 22 d of the dense part forming part 22 c of the lower plate 22 and the bottom between the convex ribs 21 a of the upper plate 21 is set at a value smaller than the thickness of the nonwoven fabric (surface sheet), the top parts of the nonwoven fabric (surface sheet) are compressed by the compression parts 22 d of the dense part forming part 22 c. As a result, the dense parts 2 d having a high fiber density can be formed at the top parts of the surface sheet 2. As shown in FIGS. 8B and 8C, on the other hand, the distance d2 (depth dimension of the sparse part) between the bottom between the convex ribs 21 a of the upper plate 21 and the sparse part forming part 22 b of the lower plate 22 is set at a value larger than the distance d1 on the side of the dense part forming part 21 c. Therefore, the sparse parts 2 c having a low fiber density suffering relatively light compression are formed at the top parts of the surface sheet 2.

In addition, the connecting parts 2 e in the valleys 2 b of the surface sheet 2 shown in FIG. 2 can be formed by the gaps 21 b provided in the upper plate 21, whereby two peaks 2 a, 2 a at the sides of each valley 2 b can be connected to each other.

In the lower plate 22 shown in FIG. 7, since the sparse part forming parts 22 b are formed with a constant pitch p in the longitudinal direction, the surface sheet having the first pattern (linear array) shown in FIG. 4A can be formed. When the sparse part forming parts 22 b on the ribs 22 a are formed alternately (staggered pattern), the surface sheet having the second pattern shown in FIG. 4B can be formed. When the sparse part forming parts 22 b are formed in the ribs 22 a on the press surface 22A of the lower plate 22 in a circular or elliptical form, the surface sheet having the third pattern shown in FIG. 4C can be formed. Furthermore, when the sparse part forming parts 22 b are concentrated in the central part of the press surface 22A of the lower plate 22, the surface sheet having the fourth pattern shown in FIG. 4D can be formed.

In order to mass-produce the surface sheet, rollers are employed. That is, the upper plate 21 and the lower plate 22 are formed into an upper roller and a lower roller, respectively, each having a roll form, and when a strip of nonwoven fabric is passed between the upper roller and the lower roller, the surface sheet 2 shown in FIG. 2, FIG. 3 and FIGS. 4A to 4D can be continuously formed.

At this time, when the nonwoven fabric is pressed under the condition where the rollers are heated to a temperature of from 60 to 160° C., the surface sheet 2 having higher stiffness, i.e., difficult to lose the shape thereof, can be formed. It is also possible that the nonwoven fabric before passing between the rollers is subjected to a pre-heating treatment, and examples of the pre-heating treatment include passing through pre-heating rollers or blowing hot air.

While the absorbent article of the invention has been described with reference to a sanitary napkin, it may also be embodied in a panty liner, a pad for incontinence and the like.

As has been described in detail, according to the invention, the surface sheet can be incurvated and deformed at the sparse parts formed on the peaks, so that the surface sheet is not forcedly bent at the dense parts other than the sparse parts. Therefore, no excessive force is applied between the surface sheet and the absorbent core, and the separation thereof can be prevented. As a result, deterioration of the liquid permeability and the diffusion property between the surface sheet and the absorbent core is prevented to maintain dry feeling of the surface sheet.

Here, “comprises/comprising” when used in this specification is taken to specify the presence of stated features, integers, steps or components but does not preclude the presence or addition of one or more other features, integers, steps, components or groups thereof.

Although various exemplary embodiments have been shown and described, the invention is not limited to the embodiments shown. Therefore, the scope of the invention is intended to be limited solely by the scope of the claims that follow.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6586076 *Sep 29, 2000Jul 1, 2003Uni-Charm CorporationAbsorbent article and process for manufacturing the same
US6753455 *Oct 26, 2001Jun 22, 2004Paragon Trade Brands, Inc.Disposable diapers; impermeable backsheet; a permeable topsheet; an absorbent core disposed between impermeable backsheet and skin opposing surface of permeable topsheet, a low-tack adhesive on skin facing surface of topsheet
US7132585 *Feb 16, 2005Nov 7, 2006Uni-Charm CorporationAbsorbent article with liquid acquisition layer
US7154020 *Dec 21, 2001Dec 26, 2006Uni-Charm CorporationBody fluid absorbent wearing article
US7597690 *May 5, 2005Oct 6, 2009Uni-Charm CorporationSanitary napkin having a protuberance and compressed portions
US7951126Sep 30, 2004May 31, 2011Daio Paper CorporationAbsorbent article
US8388593Jun 12, 2003Mar 5, 2013Mcneil-Ppc, Inc.Fluid management article having body-faceable protrusions
US8450556Apr 30, 2008May 28, 2013Kao CorporationShaped sheet and absorbent article using the same
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Classifications
U.S. Classification604/385.101, 264/286, 428/182
International ClassificationA61F13/49, A61F13/511, A61F5/44, A61F13/15
Cooperative ClassificationA61F2013/4958, A61F13/511
European ClassificationA61F13/511
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Aug 20, 2014LAPSLapse for failure to pay maintenance fees
Mar 28, 2014REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed
Jan 29, 2010FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
Jan 27, 2006FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
Nov 7, 2000ASAssignment
Owner name: UNI-CHARM CORPORATION, JAPAN
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:MIZUTANI, SATOSHI;TAGAMI, ETSUKO;REEL/FRAME:011269/0753;SIGNING DATES FROM 20000922 TO 20000929
Owner name: UNI-CHARM CORPORATION 182 SHIMOBUN, KINSEI-CHO KAW