Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS652887 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 3, 1900
Filing dateJul 1, 1897
Priority dateJul 1, 1897
Publication numberUS 652887 A, US 652887A, US-A-652887, US652887 A, US652887A
InventorsGeorge F Butterfield
Original AssigneeGeorge F Butterfield
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Heel for boots or shoes.
US 652887 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

No. 652,887. Patentedruly 13, |900. G. F. BuTTEnFlELn,

`HEEL FOR BDOTSUR SHOE-S.l

(Application led July 1, 1897.)

(No Model.)

ATTN.

GEORGE F. BUTTERFIELD, OF STONEHAM, MASSACHUSETTS.

HEEL FOR BOOTS OR SHOES.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 652,887, dated J' uly 3, 1900. Application led July 1,1897. Serial No. 643,079. (No-model.)

To all whom t may concern.-

Be it known that I, GEORGE F. BUTTER- FIELD, of Stoneham, in the county of Middlesex and State of Massachusetts, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Heels for Boots or Shoes, of which the following, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, is a specilication.

The object of this invention is to provide' against the bottom of the boss or heel-formy fixed to the shoe, and through this partition screws or other fastenings pass upwardly tosecure the shell to the bossi A yielding tread or cushion, preferably of vulcanized rubber, is held in the lower chamber of the shell by any suitable means, such as vulcanizing it in position; but I prefer to secure it detachably by one or more screws entering the horizontalv partition, so that it may be removed,when desired, so as to bring the edges of theshell toA the ground, whereby slipping on ice in lwinter is prevented. The lower edge of the shell may be toothed or roughened to make it more effective for this purpose. The rubber cushion when in use projects considerably below the shell, and while transversely horizontal its bottom is preferably quite convex from front to rear.

The upper chamber of the shell may be omitted, together withl the wooden or other boss or heel-form on the shoe, and the horizontal portion secured direct to the heel portion of the shoeby staples, nails, or rivets extending upwardly through the sole and insole and clenched inside the shoe. For mens shoes, where the heel is relatively low, this form is especially desirable.

In .the drawings, Figure 1 is a side View of one of my improved heels. Fig. 2 is a vertical longitudinal section through the parts, shown detached. Fig. 3 is a like section through the completed heel.l Fig. t is an elevation of the shell without the cushion. Fig. 5 is a modification.

A represent-s the outer shell, and B the partition or horizontal portion, through which pass the fastenings which secure the shell to the shoe. A In Figs. 2 and 3 these fastenings are shown as screws O, extending upwardly into the boss or heel-form D, which is fixed to the heel portion of the sole or shoe E.

In Fig. 5 the upper walls of the shell are omitted or reduced and the part B becomes a concave top of the shell, fitting beneath the heel portion of the shoe, and the fastenings are clenching-staples which hold the shell i'rmly, its upper edges inclosing the rear end of thesole. Y

F is a yielding cushion, preferably of vulcanized rubber, tted into the lower chamber of the hollow shell A. G is a screw countersunk in the cushion F and extending up and threaded to engage in a thickened portion of the part B of the shell. Any desired number of such screws may be used, and when the cushion is not to be removable it may be permanently cemented or vulcanized in place. The bottom is shown convex in its longitudinal section, with the greater swell at the rear.

I claim as my invention- `A boot or shoehaving secured to its heel portion a heel-shaped metallic shell, open at bottoml and roughened along its lower margin, in combination with a yielding cushion fitting within and protruding below said shell and provided with detachable fastenings permitting its removal, substantially as set forth. In testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specification, in the presence of two subscribing witnesses, on this 29th day of June, A. D. 1897.

GEORGE F. BUTTERFIELD.

Witnesses:

A. II. SPENCER, MATTHEW M. BLUNT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5560126 *Aug 17, 1994Oct 1, 1996Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US5615497 *Aug 17, 1993Apr 1, 1997Meschan; David F.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US5806210 *Oct 12, 1995Sep 15, 1998Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved heel structure
US5826352 *Sep 30, 1996Oct 27, 1998Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US5918384 *Sep 30, 1996Jul 6, 1999Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US5970628 *Sep 8, 1998Oct 26, 1999Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved heel structure
US6050002 *May 18, 1999Apr 18, 2000Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US6195916Feb 25, 2000Mar 6, 2001Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US6324772Aug 17, 2000Dec 4, 2001Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US6604300Dec 4, 2001Aug 12, 2003Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US6662471Oct 18, 1999Dec 16, 2003Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved heel structure
US6962009Jun 30, 2004Nov 8, 2005Akeva L.L.C.Bottom surface configuration for athletic shoe
US6966129Jun 30, 2004Nov 22, 2005Akeva L.L.C.Cushioning for athletic shoe
US6966130Jun 30, 2004Nov 22, 2005Akeva L.L.C.Plate for athletic shoe
US6968635Jun 30, 2004Nov 29, 2005Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe bottom
US6996923Jun 30, 2004Feb 14, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Shock absorbing athletic shoe
US6996924Jun 30, 2004Feb 14, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Rear sole structure for athletic shoe
US7040040Jun 30, 2004May 9, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Midsole for athletic shoe
US7040041Jun 30, 2004May 9, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with plate
US7043857Jun 30, 2004May 16, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe having cushioning
US7069671Jun 30, 2004Jul 4, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Arch bridge for athletic shoe
US7076892Jun 30, 2004Jul 18, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Shock absorbent athletic shoe
US7082700Aug 3, 2005Aug 1, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with inclined wall configuration
US7089689Aug 3, 2005Aug 15, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with inclined wall configuration and non-ground-engaging member
US7114269May 28, 2003Oct 3, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US7127835Dec 11, 2003Oct 31, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved heel structure
US7155843Aug 3, 2005Jan 2, 2007Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with visible arch bridge
US7380350Jun 30, 2004Jun 3, 2008Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with bottom opening
US7536809Dec 28, 2006May 26, 2009Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with visible arch bridge
US7540099Jun 30, 2004Jun 2, 2009Akeva L.L.C.Heel support for athletic shoe
US7596888Dec 12, 2008Oct 6, 2009Akeva L.L.C.Shoe with flexible plate
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA43B21/37