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Publication numberUS6534492 B2
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 09/848,881
Publication dateMar 18, 2003
Filing dateMay 4, 2001
Priority dateMay 4, 2000
Fee statusPaid
Also published asCA2383858A1, CA2383858C, CN1171875C, CN1383425A, DE60139107D1, EP1226127A2, EP1226127B1, US6689773, US6849618, US20020045550, US20030224941, US20040220172, WO2001083459A2, WO2001083459A3
Publication number09848881, 848881, US 6534492 B2, US 6534492B2, US-B2-6534492, US6534492 B2, US6534492B2
InventorsMarianne Carlsen, Michael Anthony Guaciaro, James Jan Takasugi
Original AssigneeBasf Aktiengesellschaft
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Uracil substituted phenyl sulfamoyl carboxamides
US 6534492 B2
Abstract
Novel uracil substituted phenyl sulfamoyl carboxamides I
and salts thereof, where
A=oxygen or sulfur;
X1=H, halogen, C1-C4-alkyl;
X2=H, CN, CSŚNH2, halogen, C1-C4-alkyl, C1-C4-haloalkyl;
X3=H, CN, C1-C6-alkyl, C1-C6-alkoxyalkyl, C3-C7-cycloalkyl, C3-C6-alkenyl, C3-C6-alkynyl, optionally substituted benzyl;
R1, R2=H, halogen, optionally substituted hydroxy, C1-C10-alkyl, C2-C10-alkenyl, C3-C10-alkynyl, C3-C7-cycloalkyl, phenyl, benzyl or C5-C7-cycloalkenyl,
or R1+R2 together with the atom to which they are attached form 3- to 7-membered heterocyclic ring;
Q is selected from Q1 to Q40 as defined in the description.
Use: As herbicides; for the desiccation/defoliation of plants.
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Claims(12)
What is claimed is:
1. An uracil substituted phenyl sulfamoyl carboxamide compound of formula I
wherein the variables have the following meanings:
A oxygen or sulfur;
X1 hydrogen, halogen or C1-C4-alkyl;
X2 hydrogen, cyano, CSŚNH2, halogen, C1-C4-alkyl or C1-C4-haloalkyl;
X3 hydrogen, cyano, C1-C6-alkyl, C1-C6-alkoxy-alkyl, C3-C7-cycloalkyl, C3-C6-alkenyl, C3-C6-alkynyl or optionally substituted benzyl;
R1 and R2 independently of one another hydrogen, halogen, OR48, C1-C10-alkyl, C2-C10-alkenyl, C3-C10-alkynyl, C3-C7-cycloalkyl, phenyl, benzyl or C5-C7-cycloalkenyl, whereas each of the lastmentioned 7 groups can be substituted with any combination of one to six halogen atoms, one to three C1-C6-alkoxy groups, one or two C1-C8-haloalkoxy groups, one or two cyano groups, one or two C3-C7-cycloalkyl groups, one or two C(O)R49 groups, one or two COŚOR50 groups, one or two COŚSR51 groups, one or two COŚNR52R53 groups, one to three OR54 groups, one to three SR54 groups, one or two optionally substituted phenyl groups or one or two optionally substituted benzyl groups;
Q is a radical selected from the group consisting of
wherein
A1, A2 and A8 to A15 are each independently oxygen or sulfur;
R3, R4, R27, R29, R32, R33, R44 and R45 are each independently hydrogen, cyano, amino, C1-C6-alkyl, C1-C6-haloalkyl, C1-C6-haloalkoxy, C3-C7-cycloalkyl, C2-C6-alkenyl, C2-C6-haloalkenyl, C3-C6-alkynyl, benzyl, OR55 or C1-C3-cyanoalkyl;
R5, R6, R30, R31, R35 and R36 are each independently hydrogen, C1-C6-alkyl, C1-C6-haloalkyl, C3-C7-cycloalkyl, C2-C6-alkenyl, C2-C6-haloalkenyl, C3-C6-alkynyl, OR56, S(O)nR57, OŚSO2ŚR57 or NR58R59;
R22 and R23 are each independently hydrogen, halogen or C1-C6-alkyl;
R17, R28 and R34 are each independently hydrogen, halogen, C1-C6-alkyl, C1-C6-haloalkyl, C3-C7-cycloalkyl, C2-C6-alkenyl, C2-C6-haloalkenyl, C3-C6-alkynyl, OR60 or SR61;
R48, R49, R50, R51, R52, R53, R54, R55, R56, R57, R58, R59, are independently of one another hydrogen, C1-C6-alkyl, C1-C6-haloalkyl, C3-C7-cycloalkyl, C2-C6-alkenyl, C3-C6-alkynyl, optionally substituted phenyl or optionally substituted benzyl;
n is zero, 1 or 2;
or an agriculturally useful salt of the compound of formula I.
2. The compound defined in claim 1, wherein Q is selected from Q21, Q22, Q27, and Q39.
3. The compound defined in claim 1, which is selected from
2-chloro-5-[3,6-dihydro-3-methyl-2,6-dioxo-4-(trifluoromethyl)-1(2H)-pyrimidinyl]-N-(dimethylsulfamoyl)-4-fluorobenzamide,
2-chloro-5-[3,6-dihydro-3-methyl-2,6-dioxo-4-(trifluoromethyl)-1(2H)-pyrimidinyl]-N-[(ethyl)propylsulfamoyl)]-4-fluorobenzamide,
2-chloro-5-[3,6-dihydro-3-methyl-2,6-dioxo-4-(trifluoromethyl)-1(2H)-pyrimidinyl]-N-(sec.-butylsulfamoyl)-4-fluorobenzamide,
2-chloro-5-[3,6-dihydro-3-methyl-2,6-dioxo-4-(trifluoromethyl)-1(2H)-pyrimidinyl]-N-(tert.-butylsulfamoyl)-4-fluorobenzamide,
2-chloro-5-[3,6-dihydro-3-methyl-2,6-dioxo-4-(trifluoromethyl)-1(2H)-pyrimidinyl]-N-[(ethyl)methylsulfamoyl)]-4-fluorobenzamide,
2-chloro-5-[3,6-dihydro-3-methyl-2,6-dioxo-4-(trifluoromethyl)-1(2H)-pyrimidinyl]-N-[(methyl)propylsulfamoyl)]-4-fluorobenzamide,
2-chloro-5-[3,6-dihydro-3-methyl-2,6-dioxo-4-(trifluoromethyl)-1(2H)-pyrimidinyl]-N-(diethyl)sulfamoyl-4-fluorobenzamide,
2-chloro-5-[3,6-dihydro-3-amino-2,6-dioxo-4-(trifluoromethyl)-1(2H)-pyrimidinyl]-N-[(methyl)isopropylsulfamoyl]-4-fluorobenzamide,
2-chloro-5-[3,6-dihydro-3-methyl-2,6-dioxo-4-(trifluoromethyl)-1(2H)-pyrimidinyl]-N-[(sec.-butyl)methylsulfamoyl]-4-fluorobenzamide,
2-chloro-5-[3,6-dihydro-3-methyl-2,6-dioxo-4-(trifluoromethyl)-1(2H)-pyrimidinyl]-N-[(methyl)phenylsulfamoyl]-4-fluorobenzamide,
2-chloro-5-[3,6-dihydro-3-methyl-2,6-dioxo-4-(trifluoromethyl)-1(2H)-pyrimidinyl]-N-[(methyl)isopropylsulfamoyl]-4-fluorobenzamide,
2-chloro-5-[3,6-dihydro-3-methyl-2,6-dioxo-4-(trifluoromethyl)-1(2H)-pyrimidinyl]-N-[(n-butyl)methylsulfamoyl]-4-fluorobenzamide,
N′-[2-chloro-5-(3,5-dimethyl-2,6-dioxo-4-thioxo-1,3,5-triazinan-1-yl)-4-fluorobenzoyl]-N-isopropyl-N-methylsulfamide, and
N′-[2-chloro-4-fluoro-5-(5-trifluoromethylpyridazon-3-on-2-yl)-benzoyl]-N-isopropyl-N-methylsulfenamide.
4. A herbicidal composition, comprising a herbicidally effective amount of at least one compound of formula I defined in claim 1, or of an agriculturally useful salt thereof, and at least one inert liquid or solid carrier and optionally at least one surfactant.
5. A process for preparing the compound of formula I defined in claim 1, which comprises reacting a benzoic acid compound of formula II
optionally in the presence of a coupling agent, or the corresponding acid chloride of the benzoic acid of formula II, with a sulfamide of formula III
6. A process for preparing the compound of formula I defined in claim 1 wherein A is oxygen, X3 is hydrogen, Q is Q21, A8 and A9 are oxygen and R29 is hydrogen, which comprises reacting an aniline intermediate of formula VI
with an oxazinone compound of formula VII
optionally followed by alkylation and hydrolysis.
7. The process of claim 6, which further comprises preparing the intermediate of formula VI
by treating a sulfamoyl carboxamide of formula X
with a nitration reagent to give the corresponding nitrated compound of formula XI
and subsequently reducing the nitro group with a transition metal under acidic conditions or with a complex hydride.
8. The process of claim 7, which further comprises preparing the sulfamoyl carboxamide of formula X
by reacting a benzoic acid of formula IX
optionally in the presence of a coupling agent, or the corresponding acid chloride of IX, with a sulfamide of formula III
9. A method of controlling undesirable vegetation, which comprises treating the vegetation or its environment or seed with an effective amount of at least one compound of formula I as defined in claim 1, or of an agriculturally useful salt thereof.
10. The method of claim 9 wherein the compound of formula I or its salt is applied in the presence of a crop.
11. The method of claim 10 wherein the crop is a cereal crop or a leguminous crop.
12. The method of claim 11 wherein the crop is corn, wheat or rice.
Description

This application claims the benefit of Ser. No. 60/201,824, filed May 4, 2000.

Weeds cause tremendous global economic losses by reducing crop yields and lowering crop quality. Worldwide, agronomic crops must compete with hundreds of weed species.

In spite of the commercial herbicides available today, damage to crops caused by weeds still occurs. Accordingly, there is ongoing research to create more effective and/or more selective herbicidal agents.

In WO 98/06706 are disclosed the use of certain p-trifluoromethylphenyl uracils, their method of production and their use as herbicides. In addition, WO 96/08151 discloses herbicidal aryl uracils and arylthiouracils in which the aryl ring is an optionally substituted phenyl group. In neither disclosure, however is there mentioned a sulfamoyl carboxamide group substituent.

Therefore, it was an object of the present invention to provide novel 3-phenyluracils which are highly effective for the control of undesirable plant species. The object also extends to providing novel compounds which act as desiccants/defoliants.

It was also an object of the present invention to provide a method for the control of undesirable plant species and compositions useful therefor.

It is an advantage of the present invention that the method for the control of undesirable plant species may be employed in the presence of a crop.

It was a further object of the present invention to provide a process for the preparation of herbicidal phenylsulfamoyl carboxamides and an intermediate compound useful therefor.

These and other objects and advantages of the present invention will become more apparent from the detailed description thereof set forth below.

We have found that this object is achieved in accordance with the invention by the novel uracil substituted phenylsulfamoyl carboxamides of the formula I

wherein the variables have the following meanings:

A oxygen or sulfur;

X1 hydrogen, halogen or C1-C4-alkyl;

X2 hydrogen, cyano, CSŚNH2, halogen, C1-C4-alkyl or C1-C4-haloalkyl;

X3 hydrogen, cyano, C1-C6-alkyl, C1-C6-alkoxy-alkyl, C3-C7-cycloalkyl, C3-C6-alkenyl, C3-C6-alkynyl or optionally substituted benzyl;

R1 and R2 independently of one another hydrogen, halogen, OR48, C1-C10-alkyl, C2-C10-alkenyl, C3-C10-alkynyl, C3-C7-cycloalkyl, phenyl, benzyl or C5-C7-cycloalkenyl, whereas each of the last-mentioned 7 groups can be substituted with any combination of one to six halogen atoms, one to three C1-C6-alkoxy groups, one or two C1-C8-haloalkoxy groups, one or two cyano groups, one or two C3-C7-cycloalkyl groups, one or two C(O)R49 groups, one or two COŚOR50 groups, one or two COŚSR51 groups, one or two COŚNR52R53 groups, one to three OR54 groups, one to three SR54 groups, one optionally substituted four to 10-membered monocyclic or fused bicyclic heterocyclic ring, one or two optionally substituted phenyl groups or one or two optionally substituted benzyl groups,

or R1 and R2 together with the atom to which they are attached form a 3- to 7-membered heterocyclic ring;

Q is selected from

wherein

A1 to A17 are each independently oxygen or sulfur; R3, R4, R7, R8, R11, R12, R18, R19, R27, R29, R32, R33, R38, R39, R44, R45, R46 and R47 are each independently hydrogen, cyano, amino, C1-C6-alkyl, C1-C6-haloalkyl, C1-C6-haloalkoxy, C3-C7-cycloalkyl, C2-C6-alkenyl, C2-C6-halo-alkenyl, C3-C6-alkynyl, benzyl, OR55, C1-C3-cyanoalkyl, or

R3 and R4, R7 and R8, R11 and R12, R18 and R19 or R46 and R47 may be taken together with the atoms to which they are attached to represent a four- to seven-membered ring, optionally interrupted by oxygen, sulfur or nitrogen and optionally substituted with one or more halogen or C1-C4-alkyl groups;

R5, R6, R9, R10, R15, R16, R20, R21, R30, R31, R35, R36, R41, R42 and R43 are each independently hydrogen, C1-C6-alkyl, C1-C6-haloalkyl, C3-C7-cycloalkyl, C2-C6-alkenyl, C2-C6-haloalkenyl, C3-C6-alkynyl, OR56, S(O)nR57, OŚSO2ŚR57, NR58R59 or

R5 and R6, R9 and R10, R15 and R16, R20 and R21 or R30 and R31 may be taken together with the atoms to which they are attached to represent a four- to seven membered ring optionally substituted with one or more halogen or C1-C4-alkyl groups;

R13, R14, R22, R23, R25 and R26 are each independently hydrogen, halogen or C1-C6-alkyl;

R17, R29, R34, R37 or R40 are each independently hydrogen, halogen, C1-C6-alkyl, C1-C6-haloalkyl, C3-C7-cycloalkyl, C2-C6-alkenyl, C2-C6-haloalkenyl, C3-C6-alkynyl, OR60 or SR61;

R24 is hydrogen, C1-C4-alkyl, C1-C4-haloalkyl, C2-C4-alkenyl, C3-C4-alkynyl, C1-C4-haloalkoxy or amino;

R48, R49, R50, R51, R52, R53, R54, R55, R56, R57, R58, R59, R60 and R61 are independently of one another hydrogen, C1-C6-alkyl, C1-C6-haloalkyl, C3-C7-cycloalkyl, C2-C6-alkenyl, C3-C6-alkynyl, optionally substituted phenyl or optionally substituted benzyl;

n is zero, 1 or 2;

and the agriculturally useful salts of the compounds I.

Furthermore, the invention relates to

the use of the compounds I as herbicides and/or for the desiccation/defoliation of plants,

herbicidal compositions and compositions for the desiccation/defoliation of plants which comprise compounds I as active substances,

processes for preparing the compounds I and herbicidal compositions and compositions for the desiccation/defoliation of plants using the compounds I,

methods for controlling undesirable vegetation and for the desiccation/defoliation of plants using the compounds I, and

novel intermediates of the formula II.

wherein Q, X1 and X2 are as defined hereinabove, with the proviso that Q must be other than Q21.

Preferred compounds of the formulae I and II can be seen from the sub-claims and from the description which follows.

Depending on the substitution pattern, the compounds of the formula I can contain one or more chiral centers, in which case they exist in the form of enantiomer or diastereomer mixtures. This invention provides both the pure enantiomers or diasteromers and mixtures thereof.

Agriculturally useful salts are in particular the salts of those cations and the acid addition salts of those acids whose cations and anions, respectively, do not adversely affect the herbicidal activity of the compounds I. Suitable cations are therefore in particular the ions of the alkali metals, preferably sodium and potassium, of the alkaline earth metals, preferably calcium, magnesium and barium, and of the transition metals, preferably manganese, copper, zinc and iron, and the ammonium ion, which may carry one to four C1-C4-alkyl substituents, and/or one phenyl or benzyl substituent, preferably diisopropylammonium, tetramethylammonium, tetrabutylammonium, trimethylbenzylammonium, and furthermore phosphonium ions, sulfonium ions, preferably tri(C1-C4-alkyl)sulfonium and sulfoxonium ions, preferably tri(C1-C4-alkyl)sulfoxonium.

Anions of useful acid addition salts are primarily chloride, bromide, fluoride, hydrogensulfate, sulfate, dihydrogenphosphate, hydrogenphosphate, phosphate, nitrate, hydrogencarbonate, carbonate, hexafluorosilicate, hexafluorophosphate, benzoate, and the anions of C1-C4-alkanoic acids, preferably formate, acetate, propionate and butyrate.

The organic moieties mentioned for the substituents X3 and R1 to R61 or as radicals on phenyl or heterocyclic rings are collective terms for individual enumerations of each of the group members, as is the meaning halogen. All carbon chains, ie. all alkyl, haloalkyl, alkenyl, alkynyl and phenylalkyl moieties can be straight-chain or branched.

The terms haloalkyl, haloalkoxy and haloalkenyl as used in the specification and claims designate an alkyl group, an alkoxy group or an alkenyl group substituted with one or more halogen atoms, respectively. The halogen atoms may be the same or different.

Halogenated substituents preferably have attached to them one to five identical or different halogen atoms.

In formula I above, 4- to 10-membered monocyclic or fused bicyclic, heterocyclic rings include, but are not limited to, benzimidazole, imidazole, imidazoline-2-thione, indole, isatoic anhydride, morpholine, piperazine, piperidine, purine, pyrazole, pyrrole, pyrrolidine and 1,2,4-triazole rings, wherein each ring is optionally substituted with one or more groups independently selected from halogen, cyano, nitro, amino, hydroxyl, C1-C4-alkyl, C1-C4-haloalkyl, C1-C4-alkoxy, C1-C4-haloalkoxy or C1-C4-haloalkylsulfonyl groups.

When the terms phenyl or benzyl are designated as being optionally substituted, the substituents which are optionally present may be any one or more of those customarily employed in the development of pesticidal compounds and/or the modification of such compounds to influence their structure/activity, persistence, penetration or other property. Specific examples of such substituents include, for example, halogen atoms, nitro, cyano, thiocyanato, cyanato, hydroxyl, alkyl, haloalkyl, alkoxy, haloalkoxy, amino, alkylamino, dialkylamino, formyl, alkoxycarbonyl, carboxyl, alkanoyl, alkylthio, alkylsulphinyl, alkylsulfonyl, carbamoyl, alkylamido, phenyl, phenoxy, benzyl, benzyloxy, heterocyclyl, especially furyl, and cycloalkyl, expecially cyclopropyl, groups. Typically, zero to three substituents may be present. When any of the foregoing substituents represents or contains an alkyl substituent group, this may be linear or branched and may contain up to 12, preferably up to 6, and especially up to 4 carbon atoms.

In formula I above, 3- to 7-membered heterocyclic rings include, but are not limited to, imidazole and phthalimide rings wherein each ring is optionally substituted with any combination of one to three halogen atoms, one to three C1-C4-alkyl groups, one to three C1-C4-haloalkyl groups, one to three C1-C4-alkoxy groups, or one to three C1-C4-haloalkoxy groups.

The uracil substituted phenyl sulfamoyl carboxamides I possess an unexpected level of herbicidal activity and surprising crop selectivity.

Examples of individual meanings are:

halogen: fluorine, chlorine, bromine or iodine, preferably fluorine or chlorine:

C1-C4-alkyl; CH3, C2H5, CH2ŚC2H5, CH(CH3)2, n-C4H9, CH(CH3)ŚC2H5, CH2ŚCH(CH3)2 or C(CH3)3;

C1-C6-alkyl and the alkyl moiety of C1-C6-alkoxy-C1-C6-alkyl: methyl, ethyl, n-propyl, 1-methylethyl, n-butyl, 1-methylpropyl, 2-methylpropyl, 1,1-dimethylethyl, n-pentyl, 1-methylbutyl, 2-methylbutyl, 3-methylbutyl, 2,2-dimethylpropyl, 1-ethylpropyl, n-hexyl, 1,1-dimethylpropyl, 1,2-dimethylpropyl, 1-methylpentyl, 2-methylpentyl, 3-methylpentyl, 4-methylpentyl, 1,1-dimethylbutyl, 1,2-dimethylbutyl, 1,3-dimethylbutyl, 2,2-dimethylbutyl, 2,3-dimethylbutyl, 3,3-dimethylbutyl, 1-ethylbutyl, 2-ethylbutyl, 1,1,2-trimethylpropyl, 1,2,2-trimethylpropyl, 1-ethyl-1-methylpropyl or 1-ethyl-2-methylpropyl, preferably C1-C4-alkyl, in particular methyl or ethyl;

C1-C3-cyanoalkyl: CH2CN, 1-cyanoethyl, 2-cyanoethyl, 1-cyanoprop-1-yl, 2-cyanoprop-1-yl, 3-cyanoprop-1-yl or 1-(CH2CN)eth-1-yl;

C1-C6-haloalkyl: C1-C6-alkyl as mentioned above which is partially or fully substituted by fluorine, chlorine, bromine and/or iodine, eg. CH2F, CHF2, CF3, CH2Cl, CH(Cl)2, C(Cl)3, chlorofluoromethyl, dichlorofluoromethyl, chlorodifluoromethyl, 1-fluoroethyl, 2-fluoroethyl, 2,2-difluoroethyl, 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl, 2-chloro-2-fluoroethyl, 2-chloro-2,2-difluoroethyl, 2,2-dichloro-2-fluoroethyl, 2,2,2-trichloroethyl, C2F5, 3-fluoropropyl, 3-chloropropyl or CF2ŚC2F5, preferably C1-C4-haloalkyl, in particular trifluoromethyl or 1,2-dichloroethyl;

C2-C6-alkenyl: ethenyl, prop-1-en-1-yl, prop-2-en-1-yl, 1-methylethenyl, n-buten-1-yl, n-buten-2-yl, n-buten-3-yl, 1-methylprop-1-en-1-yl, 2-methylprop-1-en-1-yl, 1-methylprop-2-en-1-yl, 2-methylprop-2-en-1-yl, n-penten-1-yl, n-penten-2-yl, n-penten-3-yl, n-penten-4-yl, 1-methylbut-1-en-1-yl, 2-methylbut-1-en-1-yl, 3-methylbut-1-en-1-yl, 1-methybut-2-en-1-yl, 2-methylbut-2-en-1-yl, 3-methylbut-2-en-1-yl, 1-methylbut-3-en-1-yl, 2-methylbut-3-en-1-yl, 3-methylbut-3-en-1-yl, 1,1-dimethylprop-2-en-1-yl, 1,2-dimethylprop-1-en-1-yl, 1,2-dimethylprop-2-en-1-yl, 1-ethylprop-1-en-2-yl, 1-ethylprop-2-en-1-yl, n-hex-1-en-1-yl, n-hex-2-en-1-yl, n-hex-3-en-1-yl, n-hex-4-en-1-yl, n-hex-5-en-1-yl, 1-methylpent-1-en-1-yl, 2-methylpent-1-en-1-yl, 3-methylpent-1-en-1-yl, 4-methylpent-1-en-1-yl, 1-methylpent-2-en-1-yl, 2-methylpent-2-en-1-yl, 3-methylpent-2-en-1-yl, 4-methylpent-2-en-1-yl, 1-methylpent-3-en-1-yl, 2-methylpent-3-en-1-yl, 3-methylpent-3-en-1-yl, 4-methylpent-3-en-1-yl, 1-methylpent-4-en-1-yl, 2-methylpent-4-en-1-yl, 3-methylpent-4-en-1-yl, 4-methylpent-4-en-1-yl, 1,1-dimethylbut-2-en-1-yl, 1,1-dimethylbut-3-en-1-yl, 1,2-dimethylbut-1-en-1-yl, 1,2-dimethylbut-2-en-1-yl, 1,2-dimethylbut-3-en-1-yl, 1,3-dimethylbut-1-en-1-yl, 1,3-dimethylbut-2-en-1-yl, 1,3-dimethylbut-3-en-1-yl, 2,2-dimethylbut-3-en-1-yl, 2,3-dimethylbut-1-en-1-yl, 2,3-dimethylbut-2-en-1-yl, 2,3-dimethylbut-3-en-1-yl, 3,3-dimethylbut-1-en-1-yl, 3,3-dimethylbut-2-en-1-yl, 1-ethylbut-1-en-1-yl, 1-ethylbut-2-en-1-yl, 1-ethylbut-3-en-1-yl, 2-ethylbut-1-en-1-yl, 2-ethylbut-2-en-1-yl, 2-ethylbut-3-en-1-yl, 1,1,2-trimethylprop-2-en-1-yl, 1-ethyl-1-methylprop-2-en-1-yl, 1-ethyl-2-methylprop-1-en-1-yl or 1-ethyl-2-methylprop-2-en-1-yl, preferably C3- or C4-alkenyl;

C2-C6-haloalkenyl: C2-C6-alkenyl as mentioned above which is partially or fully substituted by fluorine, chlorine, bromine and/or iodine, ie. for example 2-chloroallyl, 3-chloroallyl, 2,3-dichloroallyl, 3,3-dichloroallyl, 2,3,4-trichloroallyl, 2,3-dichlorobut-2-enyl, 2-bromoallyl, 3-bromoallyl, 2,3-dibromoallyl, 3,3-dibromoallyl, 2,3,3-tribromoallyl or 2,3-dibromobut-2-enyl;

C3-C6-alkynyl: prop-1-yn-1-yl, prop-2-yn-3-yl, n-but-1-yn-1-yl, n-but-1-yn-4-yl, n-but-2-yn-1-yl, n-pent-1-yn-1-yl, n-pent-1-yn-3-yl, n-pent-1-yn-4-yl, n-pent-1-yn-5-yl, n-pent-2-yn-1-yl, n-pent-2-yn-4-yl, n-pent-2-yn-5-yl, 3-methylbut-1-yn-1-yl, 3-methylbut-1-yn-3-yl, 3-methylbut-1-yn-4-yl, n-hex-1-yn-1-yl, n-hex-1-yn-3-yl, n-hex-1-yn-4-yl, n-hex-1-yn-5-yl, n-hex-1-yn-6-yl, n-hex-2-yn-1-yl, n-hex-2-yn-4-yl, n-hex-2-yn-5-yl, n-hex-2-yn-6-yl, n-hex-3-yn-1-yl, n-hex-3-yn-2-yl, 3-methylpent-1-yn-1-yl, 3-methylpent-1-yn-3-yl, 3-methylpent-1-yn-4-yl, 3-methylpent-1-yn-5-yl, 4-methylpent-1-yn-1-yl, 4-methylpent-2-yn-4-yl or 4-methylpent-2-yn-5-yl, preferably C3- or C4-alkynyl, in particular prop-2-yn-3-yl;

phenyl-C1-C6-alkyl: for example benzyl, 1-phenyleth-1-yl, 2-phenyleth-1-yl, 1-phenylprop-1-yl, 2-phenylprop-1-yl, 3-phenylprop-1-yl, 1-phenylprop-2-yl, 2-phenylprop-2-yl, 1-phenylbut-1-yl, 2-phenylbut-1-yl, 3-phenylbut-1-yl, 4-phenylbut-1-yl, 1-phenylbut-2-yl, 2-phenylbut-2-yl, 1-phenylbut-3-yl, 2-phenylbut-3-yl, 1-phenyl-2-methylprop-3-yl, 2-phenyl-2-methylprop-3-yl, 3-phenyl-2-methylprop-3-yl or 2-benzylprop-2-yl, preferably phenyl-C1-C4-alkyl, in particular 2-phenyleth-1-yl;

C1-C6-alkoxy and the alkoxy moiety of C1-C6-Alkoxy-C1-C6-alkyl: methoxy, ethoxy, n-propoxy, 1-methylethoxy, n-butoxy, 1-methylpropoxy, 2-methylpropoxy, 1,1-dimethylethoxy, n-pentoxy, 1-methylbutoxy, 2-methylbutoxy, 3-methylbutoxy, 1,1-dimethylpropoxy, 1,2-dimethylpropoxy, 2,2-dimethylpropoxy, 1-ethylpropoxy, n-hexoxy, 1-methylpentoxy, 2-methylpentoxy, 3-methylpentoxy, 4-methylpentoxy, 1,1-dimethylbutoxy, 1,2-dimethylbutoxy, 1,3-dimethylbutoxy, 2,2-dimethylbutoxy, 2,3-dimethylbutoxy, 3,3-dimethylbutoxy, 1-ethylbutoxy, 2-ethylbutoxy, 1,1,2-trimethylpropoxy, 1,2,2-trimethylpropoxy, 1-ethyl-1-methylpropoxy or 1-ethyl-2-methylpropoxy, preferably C1-C4-alkoxy, in particular OCH3, OC2H5 or OCH(CH3)2;

C3-C7-cycloalkyl: cyclopropyl, cyclobutyl, cyclopentyl, cyclohexyl and cycloheptyl;

C5-C7-Cycloalkenyl: cyclopent-1-enyl, cyclopent-2-enyl, cyclopent-3-enyl, cyclohex-1-enyl, cyclohex-2-enyl, cyclohex-3-enyl, cyclohept-1-enyl, cyclohept-2-enyl, cyclohept-3-enyl, cyclohept-4-enyl, cyclooct-2-enyl, cyclooct-2-enyl, cyclooct-3-enyl and cyclooct-4-enyl.

3- to 7-membered heterocycle is a saturated, partially or fully unsaturated or aromatic heterocycle having one to three hetero atoms selected from a group consisting of

one to three nitrogens,

one or two oxygens and

one or two sulfur atoms.

With a view to the use of the compounds I as herbicides and/or compounds which have a desiccant/defoliant action, the variables preferably have the following meanings, to be precise in each case alone or in combination:

X1 is hydrogen or halogen, in particular hydrogen or chlorine;

X2 is cyano or halogen, in particular cyano or chlorine;

X3 is hydrogen;

Q is Q5, Q7, Q21, Q22, Q27, Q32, Q38, Q39 or Q40;

A1 is oxygen;

A3, A4 are, independently of one another, oxygen;

A8, A9 are, independently of one another, oxygen;

A10, A11 are, independently of one another, oxygen;

A12 is sulfur;

A13 is oxygen;

A15 is sulfur;

R1 is C1-C4-alkyl;

R2 is C1-C6-alkyl, C2-C6-alkenyl or C2-C6-alkynyl;

R7 is amino, C1-C6-alkyl, C1-C6-haloalkyl, C1-C6-alkoxy or C1-C6-haloalkoxy;

R8 is C1-C6-alkyl, C1-C6-haloalkyl, C3-C7-cycloalkyl, C2-C6-alkenyl or C1-C6-haloalkoxy;

R7 and R8 may be taken together with the atoms to which they are attached to represent a four to seven membered ring, optionally interrupted by oxygen, sulfur or nitrogen:

R9, R10 are, independently of one another, hydrogen, C1-C6-alkyl, C1-C6-alkoxy or together with the atoms to which they are attached to represent a 5- or 6-membered ring;

R29 is hydrogen, amino or C1-C6-alkyl;

R30 is C1-C6-haloalkyl, C1-C6-haloalkoxy or C1-C6-alkylsulfonyl and

R31 is hydrogen, amino, C1-C6-alkyl, C3-C7-cycloalkyl or C2-C6-alkenyl or

R30 and R31 together with the atoms to which they are attached to represent a 5- or 6-membered ring;

R32 is hydrogen, amino, C1-C6-alkyl, C1-C6-haloalkyl or C2-C6-alkenyl;

R33 is hydrogen, amino, C1-C6-alkyl, C1-C6-haloalkyl or C2-C6-alkenyl;

R34 is hydrogen oder C1-C6-alkyl;

R35 is C1-C6-haloalkyl, C1-C6-haloalkoxy or C1-C6-alkylsulfonyl;

R36 is hydrogen, amino, C1-C6-alkyl, C3-C7-cycloalkyl or C2-C6-alkenyl;

R37 is hydrogen, cyano, halogen, C1-C6-alkyl or C1-C6-alkoxy;

R38 is cyano, C1-C6-alkyl, C1-C6-haloalkyl, C1-C6-haloalkoxy or C1-C6-alkylsulfonyl;

R39 is cyano, C1-C6-alkyl, C1-C6-haloalkyl, C1-C6-haloalkoxy or C1-C6-alkylsulfonyl;

R40 is halogen;

R41 is hydrogen, amino or C1-C6-alkyl;

R42 is C1-C6-haloalkyl, C1-C6-haloalkoxy, C1-C6-alkylsulfonyl or C1-C6-alkylsulfonyloxy;

R43 is hydrogen, amino or C1-C6-alkyl;

R44 is hydrogen, amino or C1-C6-alkyl;

R45 is hydrogen, amino or C1-C6-alkyl;

R46, R47 are, independently of one another, C1-C6-haloalkyl or together with the nitrogen atoms to which they are attached to represent a 5- or 6-membered ring, optionally interrupted by one oxygen or sulfur ring member.

Very especially preferred are the compounds of the formula Ia (≃I where X1=fluorine; X2=chlorine; Q=Q21; X3=hydrogen; A, A8, A9=oxygen; R29=methyl; R30=trifluoromethyl; R31=hydrogen)

in particular the compounds of Table 1:

TABLE 1
No. R1 R2
Ia.1 H CH3
Ia.2 H C2H5
Ia.3 H CH2CH2ŚCl
Ia.4 H CH2CH2ŚCN
Ia.5 H CH2ŚCOŚOCH3
Ia.6 H CH2ŚCOŚOC2H5
Ia.7 H CH(CH3)ŚCOŚOCH3
Ia.8 H CH2CH2ŚOCH3
Ia.9 H CH2ŚC2H5
Ia.10 H CH2CH2ŚC2H5
Ia.11 H CH(CH3)2
Ia.12 H CH(CH3)ŚC2H5
Ia.13 H CH2ŚCH(CH3)2
Ia.14 H C(CH3)3
Ia.15 H CH(CH3)ŚCH2ŚC2H5
Ia.16 H CH2ŚCH(CH3)ŚC2H5
Ia.17 H CH2CH2ŚCH(CH3)2
Ia.18 H CH2ŚCH═CH2
Ia.19 H CH(CH3)═CH2
Ia.20 H CH2═CHŚCH3
Ia.21 H CH2ŚC≡CH
Ia.22 H CH(CH3)ŚC≡CH
Ia.23 H Cyclopropyl
Ia.24 H CH2-Cyclopropyl
Ia.25 H Cyclopentyl
Ia.26 H CH2-Cyclopentyl
Ia.27 H CH2Ś(1,3-Dioxolanyl)
Ia.28 H CH2Ś(2-Furyl)
Ia.29 H CH2Ś(3-Furyl)
Ia.30 H CH2Ś(2-Thienyl)
Ia.31 H CH2Ś(3-Thienyl)
Ia.32 H Phenyl
Ia.33 H 2-Chlorophenyl
Ia.34 H 3-Chlorophenyl
Ia.35 H 4-Chlorophenyl
Ia.36 H 2-Fluorophenyl
Ia.37 H 3-Fluorophenyl
Ia.38 H 4-Fluorophenyl
Ia.39 H 2-Methylphenyl
Ia.40 H 3-Methylphenyl
Ia.41 H 4-Methylphenyl
Ia.42 H 2-Methoxyphenyl
Ia.43 H 3-Methoxyphenyl
Ia.44 H 4-Methoxyphenyl
Ia.45 H 2-(Methoxycarbonyl)phenyl
Ia.46 H 3-(Methoxycarbonyl)phenyl
Ia.47 H 4-(Methoxycarbonyl)phenyl
Ia.48 H 2-Nitrophenyl
Ia.49 H 3-Nitrophenyl
Ia.50 H 4-Nitrophenyl
Ia.51 H 2-(Dimethylamino)phenyl
Ia.52 H 3-(Dimethylamino)phenyl
Ia.53 H 4-(Dimethylamino)phenyl
Ia.54 H 2-(Trifluoromethyl)phenyl
Ia.55 H 3-(Trifluoromethyl)phenyl
Ia.56 H 4-(Trifluoromethyl)phenyl
Ia.57 H 3-(Phenoxy)phenyl
Ia.58 H 4-(Phenoxy)phenyl
Ia.59 H 2,4-Difluorophenyl
Ia.60 H 2,4-Dichlorophenyl
Ia.61 H 3,4-Difluorophenyl
Ia.62 H 3,4-Dichlorophenyl
Ia.63 H 3,5-Difluorophenyl
Ia.64 H 3,5-Dichlorophenyl
Ia.65 H 2-Pyridyl
Ia.66 H 3-Pyridyl
Ia.67 H 4-Pyridyl
Ia.68 H α-Naphthyl
Ia.69 H Benzyl
Ia.70 H 2-Chlorobenzyl
Ia.71 H 3-Chlorobenzyl
Ia.72 H 4-Chlorobenzyl
Ia.73 H 2-Methoxybenzyl
Ia.74 H 3-Methoxybenzyl
Ia.75 H 4-Methoxybenzyl
Ia.76 CH3 CH3
Ia.77 CH3 C2H5
Ia.78 CH3 CH2CH2ŚCl
Ia.79 CH3 CH2CH2ŚCN
Ia.80 CH3 CH2ŚCOŚOCH3
Ia.81 CH3 CH2ŚCOŚOC2H5
Ia.82 CH3 CH(CH3)ŚCOŚOCH3
Ia.83 CH3 CH2CH2ŚOCH3
Ia.84 CH3 CH2ŚC2H5
Ia.85 CH3 CH2CH2ŚC2H5
Ia.86 CH3 CH(CH3)2
Ia.87 CH3 CH(CH3)ŚC2H5
Ia.88 CH3 CH2ŚCH(CH3)2
Ia.89 CH3 C(CH3)3
Ia.90 CH3 CH(CH3)ŚCH2ŚC2H5
Ia.91 CH3 CH2ŚCH(CH3)ŚC2H5
Ia.92 CH3 CH2CH2ŚCH(CH3)2
Ia.93 CH3 CH2ŚCH═CH2
Ia.94 CH3 CH(CH3)═CH2
Ia.95 CH3 CH2═CHŚCH3
Ia.96 CH3 CH2ŚCŚCH
Ia.97 CH3 CH(CH3)ŚC≡CH
Ia.98 CH3 Cyclopropyl
Ia.99 CH3 CH2-Cyclopropyl
Ia.100 CH3 Cyclopentyl
Ia.101 CH3 CH2-Cyclopentyl
Ia.102 CH3 CH2Ś(1,3-Dioxolanyl)
Ia.103 CH3 CH2Ś(2-Furyl)
Ia.104 CH3 CH2Ś(3-Furyl)
Ia.105 CH3 CH2Ś(2-Thienyl)
Ia.106 CH3 CH2Ś(3-Thienyl)
Ia.107 CH3 Phenyl
Ia.108 CH3 2-Chlorophenyl
Ia.109 CH3 3-Chlorophenyl
Ia.110 CH3 4-Chlorophenyl
Ia.111 CH3 2-Fluorophenyl
Ia.112 CH3 3-Fluorophenyl
Ia.113 CH3 4-Fluorophenyl
Ia.114 CH3 2-Methylphenyl
Ia.115 CH3 3-Methylphenyl
Ia.116 CH3 4-Methylphenyl
Ia.117 CH3 2-Methoxyphenyl
Ia.118 CH3 3-Methoxyphenyl
Ia.119 CH3 4-Methoxyphenyl
Ia.120 CH3 2-(Methoxycarbonyl)phenyl
Ia.121 CH3 3-(Methoxycarbonyl)phenyl
Ia.122 CH3 4-(Methoxycarbonyl)phenyl
Ia.123 CH3 2-Nitrophenyl
Ia.124 CH3 3-Nitrophenyl
Ia.125 CH3 4-Nitrophenyl
Ia.126 CH3 2-(Dimethylamino)phenyl
Ia.127 CH3 3-(Dimethylamino)phenyl
Ia.128 CH3 4-(Dimethylamino)phenyl
Ia.129 CH3 2-(Trifluoromethyl)phenyl
Ia.130 CH3 3-(Trifluoromethyl)phenyl
Ia.131 CH3 4-(Trifluoromethyl)phenyl
Ia.132 CH3 3-(Phenoxy)phenyl
Ia.133 CH3 4-(Phenoxy)phenyl
Ia.134 CH3 2,4-Difluorophenyl
Ia.135 CH3 2,4-Dichlorophenyl
Ia.136 CH3 3,4-Difluorophenyl
Ia.137 CH3 3,4-Dichlorophenyl
Ia.138 CH3 3,5-Difluorophenyl
Ia.139 CH3 3,5-Dichlorophenyl
Ia.140 CH3 2-Pyridyl
Ia.141 CH3 3-Pyridyl
Ia.142 CH3 4-Pyridyl
Ia.143 CH3 α-Naphthyl
Ia.144 CH3 Benzyl
Ia.145 CH3 2-Chlorobenzyl
Ia.146 CH3 3-Chlorobenzyl
Ia.147 CH3 4-Chlorobenzyl
Ia.148 CH3 2-Methoxybenzyl
Ia.149 CH3 3-Methoxybenzyl
Ia.150 CH3 4-Methoxybenzyl
Ia.151 C2H5 C2H5
Ia.152 C2H5 CH2CH2ŚCl
Ia.153 C2H5 CH2CH2ŚCN
Ia.154 C2H5 CH2ŚCOŚOCH3
Ia.155 C2H5 CH2ŚCOŚOC2H5
Ia.156 C2H5 CH(CH3)ŚCOŚOCH3
Ia.157 C2H5 CH2CH2ŚOCH3
Ia.158 C2H5 CH2ŚC2H5
Ia.159 C2H5 CH2CH2ŚC2H5
Ia.160 C2H5 CH(CH3)2
Ia.161 C2H5 CH(CH3)ŚC2H5
Ia.162 C2H5 CH2ŚCH(CH3)2
Ia.163 C2H5 C(CH3)2
Ia.164 C2H5 CH(CH3)ŚCH2ŚC2H5
Ia.165 C2H5 CH2ŚCH(CH3)ŚC2H5
Ia.166 C2H5 CH2CH2ŚCH(CH3)2
Ia.167 C2H5 CH2ŚCH═CH2
Ia.168 C2H5 CH(CH3)═CH2
Ia.169 C2H5 CH2═CHŚCH3
Ia.170 C2H5 CH2ŚC≡CH
Ia.171 C2H5 CH(CH3)ŚC≡CH
Ia.172 C2H5 Cyclopropyl
Ia.173 C2H5 CH2-Cyclopropyl
Ia.174 C2H5 Cyclopentyl
Ia.175 C2H5 CH2-Cyclopentyl
Ia.176 C2H5 CH2Ś(1,3-Dioxolanyl)
Ia.177 C2H5 CH2Ś(2-Furyl)
Ia.178 C2H5 CH2Ś(3-Furyl)
Ia.179 C2H5 CH2Ś(2-Thienyl)
Ia.180 C2H5 CH2Ś(3-Thienyl)
Ia.181 C2H5 Phenyl
Ia.182 C2H5 2-Chlorophenyl
Ia.183 C2H5 3-Chlorophenyl
Ia.184 C2H5 4-Chlorophenyl
Ia.185 C2H5 2-Fluorophenyl
Ia.186 C2H5 3-Fluorophenyl
Ia.187 C2H5 4-Fluorophenyl
Ia.188 C2H5 2-Methylphenyl
Ia.169 C2H5 3-Methylphenyl
Ia.150 C2H5 4-Methylphenyl
Ia.191 C2H5 2-Methoxyphenyl
Ia.192 C2H5 3-Methoxyphenyl
Ia.193 C2H5 4-Methoxyphenyl
Ia.194 C2H5 2-(Methoxycarbonyl)phenyl
Ia.195 C2H5 3-(Methoxycarbonyl)phenyl
Ia.196 C2H5 4-(Methoxycarbonyl)phenyl
Ia.197 C2H5 2-Nitrophenyl
Ia.198 C2H5 3-Nitrophenyl
Ia.199 C2H5 4-Nitrophenyl
Ia.200 C2H5 2-(Dimethylamino)phenyl
Ia.201 C2H5 3-(Dimethylamino)phenyl
Ia.202 C2H5 4-(Dimethylamino)phenyl
Ia.203 C2H5 2-(Trifluoromethyl)phenyl
Ia.204 C2H5 3-(Trifluoromethyl)phenyl
Ia.205 C2H5 4-(Trifluoromethyl)phenyl
Ia.206 C2H5 3-(Phenoxy)phenyl
Ia.207 C2H5 4-(Phenoxy)phenyl
Ia.208 C2H5 2,4-Difluorophenyl
Ia.209 C2H5 2,4-Dichlorophenyl
Ia.210 C2H5 3,4-Difluorophenyl
Ia.211 C2H5 3,4-Dichlorophenyl
Ia.212 C2H5 3,5-Difluorophenyl
Ia.213 C2H5 3,5-Dichlorophenyl
Ia.214 C2H5 2-Pyridyl
Ia.215 C2H5 3-Pyridyl
Ia.216 C2H5 4-Pyridyl
Ia.217 C2H5 α-Naphthyl
Ia.218 C2H5 Benzyl
Ia.219 C2H5 2-Chlorobenzyl
Ia.220 C2H5 3-Chlorobenzyl
Ia.221 C2H5 4-Chlorobenzyl
Ia.222 C2H5 2-Methoxybenzyl
Ia.223 C2H5 3-Methoxybenzyl
Ia.224 C2H5 4-Methoxybenzyl
Ia.225 CH2ŚC2H5 C2H5
Ia.226 CH2ŚC2H5 CH2CH2ŚCl
Ia.227 CH2ŚC2H5 CH2CH2ŚCN
Ia.228 CH2ŚC2H5 CH2ŚCOŚOCH3
Ia.229 CH2ŚC2H5 CH2ŚCOŚOC2H5
Ia.230 CH2ŚC2H5 CH(CH3)ŚCOŚOCH3
Ia.231 CH2ŚC2H5 CH2CH2ŚOCH3
Ia.232 CH2ŚC2H5 CH2ŚC2H5
Ia.233 CH2ŚC2H5 CH2CH2ŚC2H5
Ia.234 CH2ŚC2H5 CH(CH3)2
Ia.235 CH2ŚC2H5 CH(CH3)ŚC2H5
Ia.236 CH2ŚC2H5 CH2ŚCH(CH3)2
Ia.237 CH2ŚC2H5 C(CH3)3
Ia.238 CH2ŚC2H5 CH(CH3)ŚCH2ŚC2H5
Ia.239 CH2ŚC2H5 CH2ŚCH(CH3)ŚC2H5
Ia.240 CH2ŚC2H5 CH2CH2ŚCH(CH3)2
Ia.241 CH2ŚC2H5 CH2ŚCH═CH2
Ia.242 CH2ŚC2H5 CH(CH3)═CH2
Ia.243 CH2ŚC2H5 CH2═CHŚCH3
Ia.244 CH2ŚC2H5 CH2ŚC≡CH
Ia.245 CH2ŚC2H5 CH(CH3)ŚC≡CH
Ia.246 CH2ŚC2H5 Cyclopropyl
Ia.247 CH2ŚC2H5 CH2-Cyclopropyl
Ia.248 CH2ŚC2H5 Cyclopentyl
Ia.249 CH2ŚC2H5 CH2-Cyclopentyl
Ia.250 CH2ŚC2H5 CH2Ś(1,3-Dioxolanyl)
Ia.251 CH2ŚC2H5 CH2Ś(2-Furyl)
Ia.252 CH2ŚC2H5 CH2Ś(3-Furyl)
Ia.253 CH2ŚC2H5 CH2Ś(2-Thienyl)
Ia.254 CH2ŚC2H5 CH2Ś(3-Thienyl)
Ia.255 CH2ŚC2H5 Phenyl
Ia.256 CH2ŚC2H5 2-Chlorophenyl
Ia.257 CH2ŚC2H5 3-Chlorophenyl
Ia.258 CH2ŚC2H5 4-Chlorophenyl
Ia.259 CH2ŚC2H5 2-Fluorophenyl
Ia.260 CH2ŚC2H5 3-Fluorophenyl
Ia.261 CH2ŚC2H5 4-Fluorophenyl
Ia.262 CH2ŚC2H5 2-Methylphenyl
Ia.263 CH2ŚC2H5 3-Methylphenyl
Ia.264 CH2ŚC2H5 4-Methylphenyl
Ia.265 CH2ŚC2H5 2-Methoxyphenyl
Ia.266 CH2ŚC2H5 3-Methoxyphenyl
Ia.267 CH2ŚC2H5 4-Methoxyphenyl
Ia.268 CH2ŚC2H5 2-(Methoxycarbonyl)phenyl
Ia.269 CH2ŚC2H5 3-(Methoxycarbonyl)phenyl
Ia.270 CH2ŚC2H5 4-(Methoxycarbonyl)phenyl
Ia.271 CH2ŚC2H5 2-Nitrophenyl
Ia.272 CH2ŚC2H5 3-Nitrophenyl
Ia.273 CH2ŚC2H5 4-Nitrophenyl
Ia.274 CH2ŚC2H5 2-(Dimethylamino)phenyl
Ia.275 CH2ŚC2H5 3-(Dimethylamino)phenyl
Ia.276 CH2ŚC2H5 4-(Dimethylamino)phenyl
Ia.277 CH2ŚC2H5 2-(Trifluoromethyl)phenyl
Ia.278 CH2ŚC2H5 3-(Trifluoromethyl)phenyl
Ia.279 CH2ŚC2H5 4-(Trifluoromethyl)phenyl
Ia.280 CH2ŚC2H5 3-(Phenoxy)phenyl
Ia.281 CH2ŚC2H5 4-(Phenoxy)phenyl
Ia.282 CH2ŚC2H5 2,4-Difluorophenyl
Ia.283 CH2ŚC2H5 2,4-Dichlorophenyl
Ia.284 CH2ŚC2H5 3,4-Difluorophenyl
Ia.285 CH2ŚC2H5 3,4-Dichlorophenyl
Ia.286 CH2ŚC2H5 3,5-Difluorophenyl
Ia.287 CH2ŚC2H5 3,5-Dichlorophenyl
Ia.288 CH2ŚC2H5 2-Pyridyl
Ia.289 CH2ŚC2H5 3-Pyridyl
Ia.290 CH2ŚC2H5 4-Pyridyi
Ia.291 CH2ŚC2H5 α-Naphthyl
Ia.292 CH2ŚC2H5 Benzyl
Ia.293 CH2ŚC2H5 2-Chlorobenzyl
Ia.294 CH2ŚC2H5 3-Chlorobenzyl
Ia.295 CH2ŚC2H5 4-Chlorobenzyl
Ia.296 CH2ŚC2H5 2-Methoxybenzyl
Ia.297 CH2ŚC2H5 3-Methoxybenzyl
Ia.296 CH2ŚC2H5 4-Methoxybenzyl
Ia.299 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 CH2CH2ŚCl
Ia.300 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 CH2CH2ŚCN
Ia.301 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 CH2ŚCOŚOCH3
Ia.302 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 CH2ŚCOŚOC2H5
Ia.303 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 CH(CH3)ŚCOŚOCH3
Ia.304 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 CH2CH2ŚOCH3
Ia.305 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 CH2CH2ŚC2H5
Ia.306 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 CH(CH3)2
Ia.307 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 CH(CH3)ŚC2H5
Ia.308 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 CH2ŚCH(CH3)2
Ia.309 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 C(CH3)3
Ia.310 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 CH(CH3)ŚCH2ŚC2H5
Ia.311 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 CH2ŚCH(CH3)ŚC2H5
Ia.312 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 CH2CH2ŚCH(CH3) 2
Ia.313 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 CH2ŚCH═CH2
Ia.314 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 CH(CH3)═CH2
Ia.315 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 CH2═CHŚCH3
Ia.316 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 CH2ŚC≡CH
Ia.317 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 CH(CH3)ŚC≡CH
Ia.318 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 Cyclopropyl
Ia.319 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 CH2-Cyclopropyl
Ia.320 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 Cyclopentyl
Ia.321 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 CH2-Cyclopentyl
Ia.322 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 CH2Ś(1,3-Dioxolanyl)
Ia.323 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 CH2Ś(2-Furyl)
Ia.324 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 CH2Ś(3-Furyl)
Ia.325 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 CH2Ś(2-Thienyl)
Ia.326 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 CH2Ś(3-Thienyl)
Ia.327 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 Phenyl
Ia.328 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 2-Chlorophenyl
Ia.329 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 3-Chlorophenyl
Ia.330 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 4-Chlorophenyl
Ia.331 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 2-Fluorophenyl
Ia.332 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 3-Fluorophenyl
Ia.333 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 4-Fluorophenyl
Ia.334 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 2-Methylphenyl
Ia.335 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 3-Methylphenyl
Ia.336 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 4-Methylphenyl
Ia.337 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 2-Methoxyphenyl
Ia.338 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 3-Methoxyphenyl
Ia.339 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 4-Methoxyphenyl
Ia.340 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 2-(Methoxycarbonyl)phenyl
Ia.341 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 3-(Methoxycarbonyl)phenyl
Ia.342 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 4-(Methoxycarbonyl)phenyl
Ia.343 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 2-Nitrophenyl
Ia.344 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 3-Nitrophenyl
Ia.345 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 4-Nitrophenyl
Ia.346 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 2-(Dimethylamino)phenyl
Ia.347 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 3-(Dimethylamino)phenyl
Ia.348 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 4-(Dimethylamino)phenyl
Ia.349 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 2-(Trifluoromethyl)phenyl
Ia.350 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 3-(Trifluoromethyl)phenyl
Ia.351 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 4-(Trifluoromethyl)phenyl
Ia.352 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 3-(Phenoxy)phenyl
Ia.353 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 4-(Phenoxy)phenyl
Ia.354 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 2,4-Difluorophenyl
Ia.355 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 2,4-Dichlorophenyl
Ia.356 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 3,4-Difluorophenyl
Ia.357 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 3,4-Dichlorophenyl
Ia.358 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 3,5-Difluorophenyl
Ia.359 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 3,5-Dichlorophenyl
Ia.360 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 2-Pyridyl
Ia.361 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 3-Pyridyl
Ia.362 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 4-Pyridyl
Ia.363 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 α-Naphthyl
Ia.364 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 Benzyl
Ia.365 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 2-Chlorobenzyl
Ia.366 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 3-Chlorobenzyl
Ia.367 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 4-Chlorobenzyl
Ia.369 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 2-Methoxybenzyl
Ia.369 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 3-Methoxybenzyl
Ia.370 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 4-Methoxybenzyl
Ia.371 CH(CH3)2 CH2CH2ŚCl
Ia.372 CH(CH3)2 CH2CH2ŚCN
Ia.373 CH(CH3)2 CH2ŚCOŚOCH3
Ia.374 CH(CH3)2 CH2ŚCOŚOC2H5
Ia.375 CH(CH3)2 CH(CH3)ŚCOŚOCH3
Ia.376 CH(CH3)2 CH2CH2ŚOCH3
Ia.377 CH(CH3)2 CH(CH3)2
Ia.379 CH(CH3)2 CH(CH3)ŚC2H5
Ia.379 CH(CH3)2 CH2ŚCH(CH3)2
Ia.380 CH(CH3)2 C(CH3)3
Ia.381 CH(CH3)2 CH(CH3)ŚCH2ŚC2H5
Ia.382 CH(CH3)2 CH2ŚCH(CH3)ŚC2H5
Ia.383 CH(CH3)2 CH2CH2ŚCH(CH3)2
Ia.384 CH(CH3)2 CH2ŚCH═CH2
Ia.395 CH(CH3)2 CH(CH3)═CH2
Ia.386 CH(CH3)2 CH2═CHŚCH3
Ia.387 CH(CH3)2 CH2ŚC≡CH
Ia.388 CH(CH3)2 CH(CH3)ŚC≡CH
Ia.389 CH(CH3)2 Cyclopropyl
Ia.390 CH(CH3)2 CH2-Cyclopropyl
Ia.391 CH(CH3)2 Cyclopentyl
Ia.392 CH(CH3)2 CH2-Cyclopentyl
Ia.393 CH(CH3)2 CH2Ś(1,3-Dioxolanyl)
Ia.394 CH(CH3)2 CH2Ś(2-Furyl)
Ia.395 CH(CH3)2 CH2Ś(3-Furyl)
Ia.396 CH(CH3)2 CH2Ś(2-Thienyl)
Ia.397 CH(CH3)2 CH2Ś(3-Thienyl)
Ia.399 CH(CH3)2 Phenyl
Ia.399 CH(CH3)2 2-Chlorophenyl
Ia.400 CH(CH3)2 3-Chlorophenyl
Ia.401 CH(CH3)2 4-Chlorophenyl
Ia.402 CH(CH3)2 2-Fluorophenyl
Ia.403 CH(CH3) 2 3-Fluorophenyl
Ia.404 CH(CH3)2 4-Fluorophenyl
Ia.405 CH(CH3)2 2-Methylphenyl
Ia.406 CH(CH3)2 3-Methylphenyl
Ia.407 CH(CH3)2 4-Methylphenyl
Ia.408 CH(CH3)2 2-Methoxyphenyl
Ia.409 CH(CH3)2 3-Methoxyphenyl
Ia.410 CH(CH3)2 4-Methoxyphenyl
Ia.411 CH(CH3)2 2-(Methoxycarbonyl)phenyl
Ia.412 CH(CH3)2 3-(Methoxycarbonyl)phenyl
Ia.413 CH(CH3)2 4-(Methoxycarbonyl)phenyl
Ia.414 CH(CH3)2 2-Nitrophenyl
Ia.415 CH(CH3)2 3-Nitrophenyl
Ia.416 CH(CH3)2 4-Nitrophenyl
Ia.417 CH(CH3)2 2-(Dimethylamino)phenyl
Ia.416 CH(CH3)2 3-(Dimethylamino)phenyl
Ia.419 CH(CH3)2 4-(Dimethylamino)phenyl
Ia.420 CH(CH3)2 2-(Trifluoromethyl)phenyl
Ia.421 CH(CH3)2 3-(Trifluoromethyl)phenyl
Ia.422 CH(CH3)2 4-(Trifluoromethyl)phenyl
Ia.423 CE(CH3)2 3-(Phenoxy)phenyl
Ia.424 CH(CH3)2 4-(Phenoxy)phenyl
Ia.425 CH(CH3)2 2,4-Difluorophenyl
Ia.426 CH(CH3)2 2,4-Dichlorophenyl
Ia.427 CH(CH3)2 3,4-Difluorophenyl
Ia.426 CH(CH3)2 3,4-Dichlorophenyl
Ia.429 CH(CH3)2 3,5-Difluorophenyl
Ia.430 CH(CH3)2 3,5-Dichlorophenyl
Ia.431 CH(CH3)2 2-Pyridyl
Ia.432 CH(CH3)2 3-Pyridyl
Ia.433 CH(CH3)2 4-Pyridyl
Ia.434 CH(CH3)2 α-Naphthyl
Ia.435 CH(CH3)2 Benzyl
Ia.436 CH(CH3)2 2-Chlorobenzyl
Ia.437 CH(CH3)2 3-Chlorobenzyl
Ia.438 CH(CH3)2 4-Chlorobenzyl
Ia.439 CH(CH3)2 2-Methoxybenzyl
Ia.440 CH(CH3)2 3-Hethoxybenzyl
Ia.441 CH(CH3)2 4-Methoxybenzyl
Ia.442 Ś(CH2)4Ś
Ia.443 ŚCH2ŚCH═CHŚCH2Ś

Other very especially preferred compounds I are those of the formulae Ib to Iz, Iφ, Iλ, Iπ, Iψ and Iζ, in particular

the compounds Ib.1 to Ib.443, which differ from the corresponding compounds Ia.1 to Ia.443 only in that R29 is amino:

the compounds Ic.1 to Ic.443, which differ from the corresponding compounds Ia.1 to Ia.443 only in that X1 is hydrogen:

the compounds Id.1 to Id.443, which differ from the corresponding compounds Ia.1 to Ia.443 only in that X1 is hydrogen and R29=amino:

the compounds Ie.1 to Ie.443, which differ from the corresponding compounds Ia.1 to Ia.443 in that Q is Q5, A1 is oxygen, R7 is difluoromethyl and R8 is methyl:

the compounds If.1 to If.443, which differ from the corresponding compounds Ia.1 to Ia.443 in that X1 is chlorine, Q is Q5, A1 is oxygen, R7 is difluoromethyl and R8 is methyl:

the compounds Ig.1 to Ig.443, which differ from the corresponding compounds Ia.1 to Ia.443 in that Q is Q5, A1 is oxygen and R7+R8 is tetramethylene:

the compounds Ih.1 to Ih.443, which differ from the corresponding compounds Ia.1 to Ia.443 in that X1 is chlorine, Q is Q5, A1 is oxygen and R7+R8 is tetramethylene:

the compounds Ij.1 to Ij.443, which differ from the corresponding compounds Ia.1 to Ia.443 in that Q is Q22, A10 and A11 are oxygen, A12 is sulfur and R32, R33 are methyl:

the compounds Ik.1 to Ik.443, which differ from the corresponding compounds Ia.1 to Ia.443 in that Q is Q22, A10, A11 & A12 are oxygen and R32 & R33 are methyl:

the compounds Im.1 to Im.443, which differ from the corresponding compounds Ia.1 to Ia.443 in that Q is Q27, A13 is oxygen, R34 & R36 are hydrogen and R35 is trifluoromethyl:

the compounds In.1 to In.443, which differ from the corresponding compounds Ia.1 to Ia.443 in that Q is Q27, A13 is oxygen, R34 is hydrogen, R35 is trifluoromethyl and R36 is methyl:

the compounds Io.1 to Io.443, which differ from the corresponding compounds Ia.1 to Ia.443 in that Q is Q27, A13 is oxygen, R34 is hydrogen, R35 is SO2ŚCH3 and R36 is amino:

the compounds Ip.1 to Ip.443, which differ from the corresponding compounds Ia.1 to Ia.443 in that Q is Q32, R37 is chlorine, R35 is difluoromethoxy and R39 is methyl:

the compounds Iq.1 to Iq.443, which differ from the corresponding compounds Ia.1 to Ia.443 in that Q is Q32, R37 is bromine, R38 is difluoromethoxy and R39 is methyl;

the compounds Ir.1 to Ir.443, which differ from the corresponding compounds Ia.1 to Ia.443 in that X1 is chlorine, Q is Q32, R37 is bromine, R38 is difluoromethoxy and R39 is methyl:

the compounds Is.1 to Is.443, which differ from the corresponding compounds Ia.1 to Ia.443 in that Q is Q32, R3 is chlorine, R38 is trifluoromethyl and R39 is methyl:

the compounds It.1 to It.443, which differ from the corresponding compounds Ia.1 to Ia.443 in that Q is Q32, R37 is bromine, R30 is trifluoromethyl and R39 is methyl:

the compounds Iu.1 to Iu.443, which differ from the corresponding compounds Ia.1 to Ia.443 in that X1 is chlorine, Q is Q32, R37 is bromine, R33 is trifluoromethyl and R39 is methyl:

the compounds Iv.1 to Iv.443, which differ from the corresponding compounds Ia.1 to Ia.443 in that Q is Q32, R37 is chlorine, R38 is SO2ŚCH3 and R39 is methyl:

the compounds Iw.1 to Iw.443, which differ from the corresponding compounds Ia.1 to Ia.443 in that Q is Q32, R37 is bromine, R38 is SO2ŚCH3 and R39 is methyl:

the compounds Ix.1 to Ix.443, which differ from the corresponding compounds Ia.1 to Ia.443 in that X1 is chlorine, Q is Q32, R37 is bromine, R38 is SO2ŚCH3 and R39 is methyl:

the compounds Iy.1 to Iy.443, which differ from the corresponding compounds Ia.1 to Ia.443 in that Q is Q38, R40 is chlorine, R41, R43 are hydrogen and R42 is trifluoromethyl:

the compounds Iz.1 to Iz.443, which differ from the corresponding compounds Ia.1 to Ia.443 in that Q is Q39, A1 is oxygen, A15 is sulfur, R44 and R45 are methyl:

the compounds Iφ.1 to Iφ.443, which differ from the corresponding compounds Ia.1 to Ia.443 in that Q is Q40, A16 & A17 are oxygen and R46+R47 form a chain ŚCH2CH2ŚOŚCH2Ś:

the compounds Iλ.1 to Iλ.443, which differ from the corresponding compounds Ia.1 to Ia.443 in that Q is Q40, A16 is sulfur, A17 is oxygen and R46+R47 form a chain ŚCH2CH2ŚOŚCH2Ś:

the compounds Iπ.1 to Iπ.443, which differ from the corresponding compounds Ia.1 to Ia.443 in that Q is Q40, A16 & A17 are sulfur and R46+R47 form a chain ŚCH2C2ŚOŚCH2Ś:

the compounds Iψ.1 to Iψ.443, which differ from the corresponding compounds Ia1 to Ia.443 in that Q is Q40, A16 is oxygen, A17 is sulfur and R46+R47 form a chain ŚCH2CH2ŚOŚCH2Ś:

the compounds Iζ.1 to Iζ.443, which differ from the corresponding compounds Ia.1 to Ia.443 in that Q is Q7, A3 & A4 are oxygen and R9+R10 form a tetramethylene chain:

The uracil substituted phenyl sulfamoyl carboxamides I according to the invention are obtainable by various routes available and known to those skilled to the art, preferably by one of the processes described hereinbelow.

A) Reaction of a benzoic acid derivative II with a sulfamide III, optionally in the presence of a coupling agent such as N,N-carbonyldiimidazole (CDI) or after converting II into the corresponding acid chloride:

N,N′-carbonyldiimidazole (CDI) is added to a solution of the carboxylic acid derivative of formula II in an inert solvent such as tetrahydrofuran. The resulting mixture is stirred under reflux for a sufficient period of time to allow the reaction to come to completion, and is then cooled to room temperature. An optionally substituted sulfamide III is added followed by diazabicycloundecane (DBU) and the mixture is stirred until the reaction is complete. Standard workup and isolation methods give the product in purified form.

The benzoic acid derivatives IIŚand the corresponding carboxylates, which can be saponified in a simply manner to give the free acids IIŚare known from the literature or can be prepared analogously to methods known from the literature.

The methods for saponifying the esters to the benzoic acid derivatives II are sufficiently well known to the skilled artisan; consequently, details are not necessary. By way of example, reference is made to Kocienski, ôProtecting Groupsö. Thieme Verlag 1994, and Greene, Wuts, Protecting groups in organic synthesis, Wiley 1999, and Houben-Weyl, Methoden der organischen Chemie, Vol. E5, Part I (1985), pp. 223 et seq.

In addition to activation to the imidazolones other methods are also suitable.

Various methods are suitable for activating the acids. They can, for example, be converted to the acid chloride by treating them with SOCl2, POCl3, PCl5, COCl2 or (COCl)2. Alternatively, the imidazolide can be prepared by reaction with N,N-carbonyldiimidazole. The methods used are sufficiently well known to the skilled artisan, e.g., from Houben Weyl, Methoden der Organischen Chemie, Vol. E5 (1985), Part 1, pp. 587 et seq. and Vol. E5 (1985), Part II, pp. 934 et seq.

Methods of preparing benzoic acid derivatives II where Q is other than Q21 include those methods described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,872,253, U.S. Pat. No. 5,484,763 and in co-pending patent application Ser. No. 09/368,340 filed Aug. 4, 1999 and incorporated herein by reference thereto.

The precursors required for the synthesis of compounds I in which Q=Q21, such as 2-chloro-5[3,6-dihydro-3-methyl-2,6-dioxo-4-(trifluoromethyl)-1(2H)-pyrimidinyl]-4-fluorobenzoic acid (CAS No. 120890-57-5), are described for example in EP-A 195 346, WO 89/02891, WO 98/08151 and the literature cited therein, or may be produced in the manner disclosed therein.

With regard to the esters of II where Q=Q5, A1=oxygen, R7=difluoromethyl, R8=methyl, X1=fluorine or chlorine and X2=chlorine, reference is made to U.S. Pat. No. 5,035,740 and GB-A 22 53 625; with regard to II where Q=Q5 and where R7 and R8 together with the atoms to which they are attached form a 6-membered ring, such as 2-chloro-4-fluoro-5-(5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-3-oxo-1,2,4-triazolo[4,3-a]pyridin-2(3H)-yl)benzoic acid methyl ester (CAS No. 104799-37-3), reference is made to JP-A 61/069,776. Such compounds are also mentioned in WO 94/22860.

Benzoic acid derivatives II where Q is Q22, A10 & A11=oxygen, A12=oxygen or sulfur, R32 & R33=amino or alkyl, X1=fluorine and X2=chlorine are known from EP-A 584,655 and WO 00/50409, e.g. 2-chloro-5-(3,5-dimethyl-2,6-dioxo-4-thioxo-1,3,5-triazinan-1-yl)-4-fluorobenzoic acid (CAS No. 289882-59-3) and 2-chloro-5-(3,5-dimethyl-2,4,6-trioxo-1,3,5-triazinan-1-yl)-4-fluorobenzoic acid methyl ester (CAS No. 154883-47-3).

Benzoic acid derivatives II and their esters where Q is Q27 are known from WO 97/07104, WO 96/39392, WO 99/14201 and WO 99/52678, e.g. 2-chloro-4-fluoro-5-(5-trifluormethyl-3-pyridazinon-2-yl)benzoic acid (R34=hydrogen, R35=trifluoromethyl, R36=hydrogen, X1=fluorine and X2=chlorine) and 2-chloro-4-fluoro-5-(4-trifluoromethyl-5-trifluoromethyl-3-pyridazinon-2-yl)benzoic acid (CAS No. 259141-58-7; R34 hydrogen, R35=trifluoromethyl, R36=methyl, X1=fluorine, X2=chlorine).

Benzoic acid derivatives II where Q is Q32 are known from EP-A 361,114, WO 92/06962, WO 96/02515, U.S. Pat. No. 6,096,689 and WO 98/38169, e.g. 4-chloro-3-[4-chloro-2-fluoro-5-carboxyphenyl]-5-difluorormethoxy-1-methyl-1H-pyrazole (CAS No. 129631-53-4; Q=Q32, R37=chlorine, R38=difluoromethoxy, R39=methyl, X1=fluorine, X2=chlorine), 4-chloro-3-[4-chloro-2-fluoro-5-carboxyphenyl]-5-trifluoromethyl-1-methyl-1H-pyrazole (CAS-No. 142622-56-8; Q=Q32, R37=chlorine, R38=difluoromethoxy, R39=methyl, X1=fluorine, X2=chlorine), or can be prepared in a manner similar to that described there.

Benzoic acid derivatives II where Q is Q38 are known from WO 95/02580, U.S. Pat. No. 5,783,522 and WO 98/07700, e.g. 2-chloro-5-[3-chloro-5-(trifluoromethyl)-2-pyridinyl]-4-fluorobenzoic acid (CAS No. 188782-31-2), or can be prepared in a manner similar to that described there.

Benzoic acid derivatives II where Q is Q39 are known from WO 99/59983 and DE-A 19 835 943, or can be prepared in a manner similar to that described there.

Benzoic acid derivatives II where Q is Q40 are known from WO 94/10173 and WO 00/01700, or can be prepared in a manner similar to that described there.

Benzoic acid derivatives II where Q is Q5 can be prepared according to U.S. Pat. No. 5,035,740 as follows:

The hydrazines IV are known, e.g, from WO 97/07104 (X1=fluorine), or may be prepared in known manner.

The sulfamides of the formula III are obtainable according to methods known per se, for example analogously to the method described in Ramprecht et al., Angew. Chemie 93, 151 (1981) and Houben-Weyl, Methoden der Organischen Chemie, Vol. E11 (1985), pp. 1019 et seq.

As an example, formula III sulfamides where X3 is hydrogen may be prepared by reaction of S-chlorosulfonamide with an amine HNR1R2:

Formula III sulfamides where X3 is not hydrogen may be prepared by reaction of sulfuryl chloride with an amine HNR1R2 to give the sulfamoyl chloride compound ClŚSO2ŚNR1R2, and reacting said sulfamoyl chloride compound with an amine X3ŚNH2:

B) Displacement of a halide by Q:

Hal=halogen, preferably fluorine, chlorine or bromine.

By this route, an aniline of formula IV is converted to a diazonium salt, then treated with iodine and potassium iodide to give the iodo compound of the formula V. Reaction of formula V compounds with an unsubstituted QH moiety, for example, a uracil of formula Q21H in the presence of a copper(I) catalyst gives a final product of formula Ia. In this way, compounds I according to the invention where Q=Q21 can be obtained, by analogy to the method disclosed by T. Maruyama, K. Fujiwara and M. Fukuhara in J. Chem. Soc., Perkin Trans. 1995 (7), pp. 733-734, where Hal=iodine, and the reaction is carried out with the addition of a Cu(I) source.

However, transition-metal-free methods are also suitable if the substituents Hal, X1 and X2 are properly selected. In this respect, reference is made by way of example to WO 96/39392, which describes methods which are suitable for the manufacture of compounds I where Q=Q27.

The haloaryl precursors V can be obtained by a Sandmeyer reaction from the corresponding anilines (see also formula scheme V). These methods are sufficiently well known to the skilled artisan, so reference is only made here to Houben-Weyl, Methoden der Org. Chemie, Vol. 5/4, 4th edition 1960, pp. 438 et seq.

C) Reaction of an aniline intermediate VI with an oxazinone compound of the formula VII to give a compound I where A is oxygen, X3 is hydrogen, Q is Q21, A8 & A9 are oxygen and R29 is hydrogen, optionally followed by alkylation and hydrolysis:

R29-Hal represents a C1-C6-alkyl, C1-C6-haloalkyl, C3-C7-cycloalkyl, C2-C6-alkenyl, C2-C6-haloalkenyl or C3-C6-alkynyl halide.

Among the methods known for the preparation of oxazinone compounds VII are those described in WO 99/14216.

Formula VI aniline derivatives may be prepared by conventional procedures such as the conversion of the appropriately substituted benzoic acid IX to the corresponding sulfamoyl carboxamide X (see method A) above), which in turn is then nitrated and reduced:

Suitable nitration reagents are for example nitric acid in various concentrations, including concentrated and fuming nitric acid, mixtures of sulfuric and nitric acid, and acetyl nitrates and alkyl nitrates.

The reaction can be carried out either without a solvent in an excess of the nitration reagent or in an inert solvent or diluent, suitable agents being, for example, water, mineral acids, organic acids, halohydrocarbons such as methylene chloride, anhydrides such as acetic anhydride, and mixtures thereof.

The sulfamoyl carboxamide X and the nitration reagent are expediently employed in approximately equimolar amounts; with regard to the yield of X, it may be advantageous to use the nitration reagent in an excess of up to about 10 times the molar amount, based on the amount of X. When the reaction is carried out without a solvent in the nitration reagent, the latter is present in an even greater excess.

The reaction temperature is generally from (−100)░ C. to 200░ C., preferably from (−30) to 50░ C.

The nitrated compounds XI can then be reduced to the aniline derivatives VI.

The reduction is generally carried out by reaction of the nitro compound with a transition metal such as iron, zinc or tin under acidic conditions or with a complex hydride such as lithium aluminium hydride and sodium bordhydride, the reduction being carried out in bulk or in a solvent or diluent.

Examples of suitable solvents areŚdepending on the reducing agent selectedŚwater, alcohols such as methanol, ethanol and isopropanol, or ethers such as diethyl ether, methyl tert-butyl ether, dioxane, tetrahydrofuran and ethylene glycol dimethyl ether.

If a metal is used for reduction purposes, it is preferable to work without a solvent in an inorganic acid, especially in concentrated or dilute hydrochloric acid, or in a liquid organic acid such as acetic acid and propionic acid. However, the acid can also be diluted with an inert solvent, e.g., one of those mentioned above. The reduction with complex hydrides is carried out preferably in a solvent, for example an ether or an alcohol.

The nitrated compound XI and the reducing agent are frequently used in approximately equimolar amounts; to optimize the reaction it may however be advantageous to use either component in an excess of up to about the 10-fold molar amount.

The amount of acid is not critical. So as to reduce the starting compound as completely as possible, it is expedient to use at least an equivalent amount of acid. Frequently, the acid is used in excess, based on the nitrated compound XI.

The reaction temperature is generally from (−30) to 200░ C., preferably from 0 to 80░ C.

For working up, the reaction mixture is as a rule diluted with water and the product is isolated by filtration, crystallization or extraction with a solvent which is substantially immiscible with water, e.g., ethyl acetate, diethyl ether or methylene chloride. If desired, the product VI can then be purified in conventional manner.

The nitro group of compounds XI can also be hydrogenated catalytically with hydrogen. Examples of suitable catalysts to this end are Raney nickel, palladium on charcoal, palladium oxide, platinum and platinum oxide. An amount of from 0.05 to 50 mol % based on the compound XI to be reduced, is generally sufficient.

It is possible to dispense with a solvent, or to use an inert solvent or diluent, e.g., acetic acid, a mixture of acetic acid and water, ethyl acetate, ethanol or toluene. When the catalyst has been separated off, the reaction solution can be worked up as usual to give the product VI. Hydrogenation can be effected at atmospheric or superatmospheric hydrogen pressure.

Further methods and reaction conditions are given in the literature (see, for example, Houben-Weyl, Methoden der Organischen Chemie, nitrogen compounds I, Part 1 (1971), Vol. X/1, pp. 463 et seq.).

Not only the compounds I according to the invention where Q=Q21, but also compounds I where Q=Q7, Q22 or Q40 can be produced from the aniline derivatives VI. To prepare compounds I where Q=Q22, reference is made to the methods described in WO 00/50409 and EP-A 584 655, and to prepare compounds I where Q=Q40, reference is made to the methods taught in WO 94/10173 and WO 00/01700.

The aniline derivatives VI can, however, also be converted in conventional manner (see, for example, WO 97/07104 and Houben-Weyl, Methoden der Organischen Chemie, Vol. E1, nitrogen compounds) to the corresponding hydrazines, from which compounds I where Q=Q5 oder Q27 can be prepared.

Further methods for preparing compounds I according to the invention are given in B÷ger, Wakabayashi Peroxidizing herbicides, Springer Verlag 1999.

D) Reacting a benzoic acid derivative VIII with an electrophilic amination reagent in the presence of a base to give the corresponding N-amino uracil benzoic ester, hydrolyzing said ester to give the benzoic acid II (with Q=Q21; A8 & A9=O; R29=NH2) and converting the latter to the compounds I (A=O; Q=Q21; A8 & A9=O; R29 NH2) by the route described above:

Examples of electrophilic amination reagents are in particular 2,4-dinitrophenylhydroxylamine and O-mesitylenesulfonyl hydroxylamine.

Examples of suitable reaction conditions are given in DE-A 19 652 431.

All the processes described above are expediently carried out under atmospheric pressure or under the inherent pressure of the reaction mixture in question.

As a rule, the reaction mixtures are worked up by methods known per se, for example by removing the solvent, partitioning the residue between a mixture of water and a suitable organic solvent and working up the organic phase to obtain the product.

The uracil substituted phenyl sulfamoyl carboxamides I according to the invention can be obtained from the preparation as isomer mixtures which, if desired, can be separated into the pure isomers by the methods conventionally used for this purpose, eg. by means of crystallization or chromatography on an optically active adsorbate. Pure optically active isomers can, for example, also be prepared from suitable optically active starting materials.

Compounds I with CŚH acidic substituents can be converted into their alkali metal salts in a manner known per se by reaction with a base of the corresponding cation.

Salts of I whose metal ion is not an alkali metal ion can normally be prepared by double decomposition of the corresponding alkali metal salt in aqueous solution.

Other metal salts, such as manganese, copper, zinc, iron, calcium, magnesium and barium salts, can be prepared from the sodium salts in the customary manner, and also ammonium and phosphonium salts by means of ammonia, phosphonium, sulfonium or sulfoxonium hydroxides.

The compounds I and their agriculturally useful salts are suitable as herbicides, both in the form of isomer mixtures and in the form of the pure isomers. The herbicidal compositions comprising I effect very good control of vegetation on non-crop areas, especially at high rates of application. In crops such as wheat, rice, maize, soybeans and cotton they act against broad-leaved weeds and grass weeds without damaging the crop plants substantially. This effect is observed especially at low rates of application.

Depending on the application method in question, the compounds I, or compositions comprising them, can additionally be employed in a further number of crop plants for eliminating undesirable plants. Examples of suitable crops are the following: Allium cepa, Ananas comosus, Arachis hypogaea, Asparagus officinalis, Beta vulgaris spec. altissima, Beta vulgaris spec. rapa, Brassica napus var. napus, Brassica napus var. napobrassica, Brassica rapa var. silvestris, Camellia sinensis, Carthamus tinctorius, Carya illinoinensis, Citrus limon, Citrus sinensis, Coffea arabica (Coffea canephora, Coffea liberica), Cucumis sativus, Cynodon dactylon, Daucus carota, Elaeis guineensis, Fragaria vesca, Glycine max, Gossypium hirsutum, (Gossypium arboreum, Gossypium herbaceum, Gossypium vitifolium), Helianthus annuus, Hevea brasiliensis, Hordeum vulgare, Humulus lupulus, Ipomoea batatas, Juglans regia, Lens culinaris, Linum usitatissimum, Lycopersicon lycopersicum, Malus spec., Manihot esculenta, Medicago sativa, Musa spec., Nicotiana tabacum (N.rustica), Olea europaea, Oryza sativa, Phaseolus lunatus, Phaseolus vulgaris, Picea abies, Pinus spec., Pisum sativum, Prunus avium, Prunus persica, Pyrus communis, Ribes sylvestre, Ricinus communis, Saccharum officinarum, Secale cereale, Solanum tuberosum, Sorghum bicolor (S. vulgare), Theobroma cacao, Trifolium pratense, Triticum aestivum, Triticum durum, vicia faba, Vitis vinifera and Zea mays.

Moreover, the compounds I may also be used in crops which have been made fully or partially tolerant to the action of herbicides due to breeding including genetic engineering methods.

Furthermore, the substituted hydroximic acid derivatives I are also suitable for the desiccation and/or defoliation of plants.

As desiccants, they are especially suitable for desiccating the aerial parts of crop plants such as potatoes, oilseed rape, sunflowers and soybeans. This allows completely mechanical harvesting of these important crop plants.

Also of economic interest is facilitated harvesting, which is made possible by concentrating, over a period of time, dehiscence, or reduced adhesion to the tree, in the case of citrus fruit, olives or other species and varieties of pomaceous fruit, stone fruit and nuts. The same mechanism, ie. promotion of the formation of abscission tissue between fruit or leaf and shoot of the plants, is also essential for readily controllable defoliation of useful plants, in particular cotton.

Moreover, a shortened period of time within which the individual cotton plants ripen results in an increased fiber quality after harvesting.

The compounds I, or the compositions comprising them, can be employed, for example, in the form of directly sprayable aqueous solutions, powders, suspensions, also highly-concentrated aqueous, oily or other suspensions or dispersions, emulsions, oil dispersions, pastes, dusts, materials for spreading or granules, by means of spraying, atomizing, dusting, spreading or pouring. The use forms depend on the intended purposes; in any case, they should guarantee the finest possible distribution of the active ingredients according to the invention.

Suitable inert additives are essentially: mineral oil fractions of medium to high boiling point such as kerosene and diesel oil, furthermore coal tar oils and oils of vegetable or animal origin, aliphatic, cyclic and aromatic hydrocarbons, eg. paraffins, tetrahydronaphthalene, alkylated naphthalenes and their derivatives, alkylated benzenes and their derivatives, alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, propanol, butanol and cyclohexanol, ketones such as cyclohexanone or strongly polar solvents, eg. amines such as N-methylpyrrolidone or water.

Aqueous use forms can be prepared from emulsion concentrates, suspensions, pastes, wettable powders or water-dispersible granules by adding water. To prepare emulsions, pastes or oil dispersions, the substituted hydroximic acid derivatives as such or dissolved in an oil or solvent, can be homogenized in water by means of wetting agent, tackifier, dispersant or emulsifier. However, it is also possible to prepare concentrates composed of active substance, wetting agent, tackifier, dispersant or emulsifier and, if appropriate, solvent or oil, and these concentrates are suitable for dilution with water.

Suitable surfactants are the alkali metal, alkaline earth metal and ammonium salts of aromatic sulfonic acids, eg. ligno-, phenol-, naphthalene- and dibutylnaphthalenesulfonic acid, and of fatty acids, of alkyl- and alkylaryl sulfonates, of alkyl sulfates, lauryl ether sulfates and fatty alcohol sulfates, and salts of sulfated hexa-, hepta- and octadecanols, and of fatty alcohol glycol ether, condensates of sulfonated naphthalene and its derivatives with formaldehyde, condensates of naphthalene, or of the naphthalenesulfonic acids, with phenol and formaldehyde, polyoxyethylene octylphenyl ether, ethoxylated isooctyl-, octyl- or nonylphenol, alkylphenyl and tributylphenyl polyglycol ether, alkylaryl polyether alcohols, isotridecyl alcohol, fatty alcohol/ethylene oxide condensates, ethoxylated castor oil, polyoxyethylene alkyl ethers or polyoxypropylene alkyl ethers, lauryl alcohol polyglycol ether acetate, sorbitol esters, lignin-sulfite waste liquors or methylcellulose.

Powders, materials for spreading and dusts can be prepared by mixing or concomitantly grinding the active substances with a solid carrier.

Granules, eg. coated granules, impregnated granules and homogeneous granules, can be prepared by binding the active ingredients to solid carriers. Solid carriers are mineral earths such as silicas, silica gels, silicates, talc, kaolin, limestone, lime, chalk, bole, loess, clay, dolomite, diatomaceous earth, calcium sulfate, magnesium sulfate, magnesium oxide, ground synthetic materials, fertilizers such as ammonium sulfate, ammonium phosphate, ammonium nitrate, ureas and products of vegetable origin such as cereal meal, tree bark meal, wood meal and nutshell meal, cellulose powders or other solid carriers.

The concentrations of the active ingredients I in the ready-to-use products can be varied within wide ranges. In general, the formulations comprise approximately from 0.001 to 98% by weight, preferably 0.01 to 95% by weight, of at least one active ingredient. The active ingredients are normally employed in a purity of from 90% to 100%, preferably 95% to 100% (according to NMR spectrum).

The formulation examples below illustrate the preparation of such formulations:

I. 20 parts by weight of an uracil substituted phenyl sulfamoyl carboxamide I are dissolved in a mixture composed of 80 parts by weight of alkylated benzene, 10 parts by weight of the adduct of 8 to 10 mol of ethylene oxide and 1 mol of oleic acid N-monoethanolamide, 5 parts by weight of calcium dodecylbenzenesulfonate and 5 parts by weight of the adduct of 40 mol of ethylene oxide and 1 mol of castor oil. Pouring the solution into 100,000 parts by weight of water and finely distributing it therein gives an aqueous dispersion which comprises 0.02% by weight of the active ingredient.

II. 20 parts by weight of an uracil substituted phenyl sulfamoyl carboxamide I are dissolved in a mixture composed of 40 parts by weight of cyclohexanone, 30 parts by weight of isobutanol, 20 parts by weight of the adduct of 7 mol of ethylene oxide and 1 mol of isooctylphenol and 10 parts by weight of the adduct of 40 mol of ethylene oxide and 1 mol of castor oil. Pouring the solution into 100,000 parts by weight of water and finely distributing it therein gives an aqueous dispersion which comprises 0.02% by weight of the active ingredient.

III. 20 parts by weight of an uracil substituted phenyl sulfamoyl carboxamide I are dissolved in a mixture composed of 25 parts by weight of cyclohexanone, 65 parts by weight of a mineral oil fraction of boiling point 210 to 280░ C. and 10 parts by weight of the adduct of 40 mol of ethylene oxide and 1 mol of castor oil. Pouring the solution into 100,000 parts by weight of water and finely distributing it therein gives an aqueous dispersion which comprises 0.02% by weight of the active ingredient.

IV. 20 parts by weight of an uracil substituted phenyl sulfamoyl carboxamide I are mixed thoroughly with 3 parts by weight of sodium diisobutylnaphthalene-α-sulfonate, 17 parts by weight of the sodium salt of a lignosulfonic acid from a sulfite waste liquor and 60 parts by weight of pulverulent silica gel and the mixture is ground in a hammer mill. Finely distributing the mixture in 20,000 parts by weight of water gives a spray mixture which comprises 0.1% by weight of the active ingredient.

V. 3 parts by weight of an uracil substituted phenyl sulfamoyl carboxamide I are mixed with 97 parts by weight of finely divided kaolin. This gives a dust which comprises 3% by weight of the active ingredient.

VI. 20 parts by weight of an uracil substituted phenyl sulfamoyl carboxamide I are mixed intimately with 2 parts by weight of calcium dodecylbenzenesulfonate, 8 parts by weight of fatty alcohol polyglycol ether, 2 parts by weight of the sodium salt of a phenol/urea/formaldehyde condensate and 68 parts by weight of a paraffinic mineral oil. This gives a stable oily dispersion.

VII. 1 part by weight of an uracil substituted phenyl sulfamoyl carboxamide I is dissolved in a mixture composed of 70 parts by weight of cyclohexanone, 20 parts by weight of ethoxylated isooctylphenol and 10 parts by weight of ethoxylated castor oil This gives a stable emulsion concentrate.

VIII. 1 part by weight of an uracil substituted phenyl sulfamoyl carboxamide I is dissolved in a mixture composed of 80 parts by weight of cyclohexanone and 20 parts by weight of Wettol« EM 31 (non-ionic emulsifier based on ethoxylated castor oil; BASE AG). This gives a stable emulsion concentrate.

The active ingredients I, or the herbicidal compositions comprising them, can be applied pre- or post-emergence. If the active ingredients are less well tolerated by certain crop plants, application techniques may be used in which the herbicidal compositions are sprayed, with the aid of the spray apparatus, in such a way that they come into as little contact as possible, if any, with the leaves of the sensitive crop plants while reaching the leaves of undesirable plants which grow underneath, or the bare soil (post-directed, lay-by).

Depending on the intended aim of the control measures, the season, the target plants and the growth stage, the application rates of active ingredient are from 0.001 to 3.0, preferably 0.01 to 1 kg/ha active substance (a.s.).

To widen the spectrum of action and to achieve synergistic effects, the substituted hydroximic acid derivatives I can be mixed and applied jointly with a large number of representatives of other groups of herbicidally or growth-regulatory active ingredients. Suitable components in mixtures are, for example, 1,2,4-thiadiazoles, 1,3,4-thiadiazoles, amides, aminophosphoric acid and its derivatives, aminotriazoles, anilides, (het)aryloxyalkanoic acids and their derivatives, benzoic acid and its derivatives, benzothiadiazinones, 2-aroyl-1,3-cyclohexanediones, hetaryl aryl ketones, benzylisoxazolidinones, meta-CF3-phenylderivatives, carbamates, quinolinecarboxylic acid and its derivatives, chloroacetanilides, cyclohexane-1,3-dione derivatives, diazines, dichloropropionic acid and its derivatives, dihydrobenzofurans, dihydrofuran-3-ones, dinitroanilines, dinitrophenols, diphenyl ethers, dipyridyls, halocarboxylic acids and their derivatives, ureas, 3-phenyluracils, imidazoles, imidazolinones, N-phenyl-3,4,5,6-tetrahydrophthalimides, oxadiazoles, oxiranes, phenols, aryloxy- or hetaryloxyphenoxypropionic esters, phenylacetic acid and its derivatives, phenylpropionic acid and its derivatives, pyrazoles, phenylpyrazoles, pyridazines, pyridinecarboxylic acid and its derivatives, pyrimidyl ethers, sulfonamides, sulfonylureas, triazines, triazinones, triazolinones, triazolecarboxamides and uracils.

Moreover, it may be advantageous to apply the compounds I, alone or in combination with other herbicides, in the form of a mixture with additional other crop protection agents, for example with pesticides or agents for controlling phytopathogenic fungi or bacteria. Also of interest is the miscibility with mineral salt solutions which are employed for treating nutritional and trace element deficiencies. Non-phytotoxic oils and oil concentrates can also be added.

PREPARATION EXAMPLES

In order to facilitate a further understanding of the invention, the following examples are presented to illustrate more specific datails thereof. The term NMR designates nuclear magnetic resonance; HPLC designates high performance liquid chromatography; TLC designates thin layer chromatography; GLC designates gas-liquid chromatography and IR designates infrared spectroscopy.

Example 1 Preparation of 2-Chloro-4-fluoro-5-nitrobenzoic Acid

A solution of 2-chloro-4-fluorobenzoic acid (24.4 g, 0.142 mol) in 150 ml of concentrated sulfuric acid at 0░ C. was treated dropwise with 90% nitric acid (13.2 ml, 20 mol %, 0.284 mol) over a 10 min. period at 10░ C., stirred for 2.5 hours at 0 to 10░ C., poured onto one liter of ice. The white solid was filtered. The filtercake was air-dried and recrystallized from ethyl acetate/heptane to afford the title compound as off-white needles. Yield: 18.0 g (58.1%); identified by NMR spectral analysis.

Example 2 Preparation of 2-Chloro-4-fluoro-5-aminobenzoic Acid

A solution of 2-chloro-4-fluoro-5-nitrobenzoic acid (18.0 g, 0.0824 mol) in 75 ml of acetic acid was heated at reflux temperature. Iron powder (18.4 g, 0.328 mol) was added in several portions and the resulting suspension was cooled to room temperature and diluted with water and ethyl acetate. The mixture was filtered and the filtrate was saved. The organic layer was washed with brine, dried over anhydrous magnesium sulfate and concentrated under reduced pressure to afford the title compound as a tan solid. Yield: 9.00 g (58.1%); mp.: 153-155░ C.; identified by NMR and mass spectral analysis.

Example 3 Preparation of 3-(5-Carboxy-4-choro-2-fluorophenyl)-1,2,3,4-dihydro-6-trifluoromethylpyrimidin-2,4-dione

A mixture of 2-chloro-4-fluoro-5-aminobenzoic acid (8.30 g, 0.04308 mol), 2-dimethylamino-4-(trifluoromethyl)-6H-1,3-oxazin-6-one (9.57 g, 0.0460 mol) and acetic acid was stirred three hours at reflux temperature, diluted with ice water and extracted twice with ethyl acetate. The combined organic layers were washed with brine, dried over anhydrous magnesium sulfate and concentrated under reduced pressure to afford the title compound as a tan solid. Yield: 14.0 g (92.1%); identified by NMR and mass spectral analysis.

Example 4 Preparation of 3-(5-Carboxymethoxy-4-choro-2-fluorophenyl)-1,2,3,4-dihydro-1-methyl-6-trifluoromethylpyrimidin-2,4-dione

A mixture of 3-(5-carboxy-4-choro-2-fluorophenyl)-1,2,3,4-dihydro-6-trifluoromethylpyrimidin-2,4-dione (13.3 g, 0.0377 mol), potassium carbonate (13.0 g, 0.0943 mol), methyl iodide (5.87 ml, 0.0943 mol) and dimethyl formamide (150 ml) was stirred overnight at room temperature and diluted with water (500 ml). The resulting mixture was extracted three times with ethyl acetate. The combined organic layers were washed three times with water, aqueous sodium hydroxide (0.1 N) and brine, dried over anhydrous magnesium sulfate and concentrated under reduced pressure to give a beige solid. Recrystallization of the residue from ethanol-water (250 ml) afforded the title compound as white needles. Yield: 11.5 g (80.4%); mp.: 172-173░ C.; identified by NMR and mass spectral analysis.

Example 5 Preparation of 3-(5-Carbomethoxy-4-chloro-2-fluorophenyl)-1,2,3,4-dihydro-6-trifluoromethylpyrimidin-2,4-dione

Carbonyl diimidazole (2.97 g, 18.4 mmol) was added to a solution of 3-(5-carboxy-4-chloro-2-fluorophenyl)-1,2,3,4-dihydro-6-trifluoromethylpyrimidin-2,4-dione (4.61 g, 13.1 mmol) in tetrahydrofuran and the resulting mixture was heated to reflux temperature, stirred two minutes and cooled to room temperature. Methanol (2.70 ml, 66.6 mmol) was added and the mixture was stirred overnight at room temperature. Subsequently, the mixture was concentrated under reduced pressure and the resultant residue was taken up in methylene chloride. The organic mixture was washed twice with hydrochloric acid (10% aqueous and 5% aqueous) and water. The organic layer was concentrated under reduced pressure to give a brown solid, which was suspended in methylene chloride, followed by filtration. The filtercake was washed three times with methylene chloride, filtered and dried to afford the title compound as a white solid, which was identified by NMR spectral analysis. Yield: 4.27 g (89.0%).

Example 6 Preparation of 3-(5-Carbomethoxy-4-chloro-2-fluorophenyl)-1,2,3,4-dihydro-1-amino-6-trifluoromethylpyrimidin-2,4-dione

To a suspension of 3-(5-carbomethoxy-4-chloro-2-fluorophenyl)-1,2,3,4-dihydro-6-trifluoromethylpyrimidin-2,4-dione (4.24 g, 11.6 mmol) in anhydrous tetrahydrofuran was added potassium carbonate (1.60 g, 11.6 mmol) followed by O-mesitylenesulfonyl hydroxylamine (3.04 g, 14.1 mmol: J. G. Krause, Synthesis, 1972, 140). The resulting mixture was stirred overnight at room temperature and diluted with water. The mixture was extracted four times with ethyl acetate. The combined extracts were dried over anhydrous magnesium sulfate and concentrated under reduced pressure to afford the title compound as a foam, which was identified by NHR spectral analysis. Yield: 4.63 g (>100%).

Example 7 Preparation of 3-(5-Carboxy-4-chloro-2-fluorophenyl)-1,2,3,4-dihydro-1-amino-6-trifluoromethylpyrimidin-2,4-dione

To a solution of 3-(5-carbomethoxy-4-chloro-2-fluorophenyl)-1,2,3,4-dihydro-1-amino-6-trifluoromethylpyrimidin-2,4-dione (1.53 g, 4.01 mmol) in anhydrous methylene chloride was added boron tribromide (1M in methylene chloride, 16.0 ml, 16.0 mmol). The resultant mixture was stirred overnight at room temperature and then diluted with water. The aqueous layer was separated and allowed to stand at room temperature overnight; filtration and drying afforded the title compound as a white solid, which was identified by NMR and mass spectral analysis. Yield: 0.61 g (41.5%).

The original organic layer was concentrated under reduced pressure to a glassy solid, which was triturated with water to afford an additional amount of the title compound as a tan solid, which was identified by NMR and mass spectral analysis. Yield: 0.310 g (21.1t); mp.: 150░ C. (decomposition).

Example 8 Preparation of 3-(5-Carboxy-4-chloro-2-fluorophenyl)-1,2,3,4-dihydro-1-methyl-6-trifluoromethylpyrimidin-2,4-dione

Boron tribromide (84.0 ml, 0.0640 mol, 1M in methylene chloride) was added dropwise to a mixture of 3-(5-carbomethoxy-4-chloro-2-fluorophenyl)-1,2,3,4-dihydro-1-methyl-6-trifluoromethylpyrimidin-2,4-dione (10.7 g, 0.0281 mol) and methylene chloride (150 ml). The resulting mixture was stirred overnight at room temperature and diluted with ice water. The organic layer is saved and the aqueous layer was extracted twice with ethyl acetate. The extracts were combined with the organic layer, washed with brine, dried over anhydrous magnesium sulfate and concentrated under reduced pressure to afford the title compound as a white solid, which was identified by NMR and mass spectral analysis. Yield: 10.2 g (100%); mp.: 240-241░ C.

Example 9 Preparation of S-Chlorosulfonamide

Formic acid (10.8 ml, 0.287 mol) was added dropwise over a two hour period to chlorosulfonyl isocyanate (25.0 ml, 0.287 mol), maintaining the temperature below 20░ C. The resulting suspension was stirred two hours at 20░ C. and diluted with anhydrous toluene (100 ml). The resulting mixture was stirred overnight at ambient temperature and filtered. The filtrate was concentrated under reduced pressure to afford the title compound as an off-white solid, which was identified by IR spectral analysis. Yield: 32.1 g (97.3%).

Example 10 Preparation of N-Methylsulfamide

A solution of S-chlorosulfonamide (3.00 g, 0.0260 mol) in tetrahydrofuran (10 ml) was added dropwise to methylamine (40 ml, 2M in tetrahydrofuran) at 10░ C. The resulting mixture was stirred one hour at 0░ C. and three days at room temperature. The suspension was filtered and the filtrate concentrated under reduced pressure to give a yellow solid. Chromatography on silica gel (9:1 methylene chloride-methanol) afforded the title compound as an off-white solid, which was identified by NMR and mass spectral analysis. Yield: 1.36 g (47.4%).

Examples 11-15 Preparation of N-substituted Sulfamides

Using essentially the same procedure as described in Example 10 hereinabove and substituting the appropriate amine starting material, the following compounds are prepared:

Example R1 R2 mp. [░ C.]
11 H CH2ŚC(CH3)3 Ś
12 CH3 CH2ŚCH═CH2 36-38
13 CH3 benzyl 91-94
14 CH(CH3)2 CH(CH3)2 Ś
15 H H Ś

Example 16 Preparation of O-2,4,5-Trichlorophenyl Sulfamate

A solution of 2,4,5-trichlorophenol (96.0 g, 0.486 mol) in toluene (95 ml) was treated dropwise with chlorosulfonyl isocyanate (67.4 g, 0.476 mol) at 40-55░ C. The resulting mixture was stirred three hours at reflux temperature, cooled to 40░ C. and quenched with water until gas evolution ceases. The suspension was filtered and the filtercake was air-dried to afford the title compound as a white solid, which is identified by NMR and IR spectral analysis. Yield; 118.5 g (90.0%).

Example 17 Preparation of N-Methyl-N-isopropyl Sulfamide

Triethylamine (2.50 ml, 0.0181 mol) was added to a solution of methyl propargylamine (1.55 ml, 0.0181 mol) in acetonitrile. To the resulting mixture was added O-2,4,5-trichlorophenyl sulfamate (5.00 g, 0.0161 mol). The resulting mixture was stirred for one hour at room temperature and filtered through silica gel with methylene chloride. The filtrate was concentrated under reduced pressure to afford a white solid. Chromatography of the residue on silica gel (0.5% methanol-methylene chloride) afforded the title compound, which was identified by NMR spectral analysis. Yield: 1.84 g (68.7%).

Examples 18-52 Preparation of N-Substituted Sulfamides

Using essentially the same procedure as described in Example 17 hereinabove and substituting the appropriate amine starting material, the following sulfamides were prepared:

Example R1 R2 mp. [░ C.]/1H-NMR [ppm]
18 CH3 CH3 Ś
19 CH3 3-chlorobenzyl Ś
20 CH3 CH2ŚC2H5 Ś
21 C2H5 C2H5 39-41
22 H CH(CH3)ŚC2H5 Ś
23 CH3 C2H5 32-34
24 H C(CH3)3 49-53
25 H CH2ŚC2H5 32-35
26 CH3 3-methoxybenzyl Ś
27 CH3 CH2ŚCH(CH3)2 103-104
28 H CH(CH3)2 Ś
29 CH3 CH(CH3)2 63-65
30 H C2H5 Ś
31 C2H5 CH2ŚC2H5 Ś
32 H CH2ŚCH2ŚCH(CH3)2 Ś
33 CH3 CH2ŚCH2-phenyl Ś
34 CH3 phenyl 84-86
35 H CH2ŚC≡CH Ś
36 H CH2Ś(2-furyl) 62-64
37 CH3 CH(CH3)ŚC2H5 Ś
36 H CH2Ś(2-thienyl) 93-96
39 H cyclopentyl 55
40 H 4-methoxybenzyl Ś
41 CH3 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 Ś
42 CH3 CH2ŚCH2ŚCN Ś
43 CH3 CH2Ś(1,3-dioxalanyl) Ś
44 H 4-chlorobenzyl Ś
45 CH3 C(CH3)3 54-57
46 ŚCH2ŚCH═CHŚCH2Ś Ś
47 H cyclopropyl 58-60
48 ŚCH2ŚCH2ŚCH2ŚCH2Ś 84-86
49 CH3 cyclopropyl Ś
50 C2H5 CH(CH3)2 Ś
51 H CH2ŚCH(CH3)2 Ś
52 H CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 Ś
53 CH3 CH2ŚCOŚOC2H5 5.1(br., s, 2H),
4.25(q, 2H), 4.1(s, 2H),
3.0(s, 3H), 1.3(t, 3H)

Example 54 Preparation of 3-(5-(N,N-Dimethyl)sulfamoylcarboxamido-4-chloro-2-fluorophenyl)-1,2,3,4-dihydro-6-trifluoromethylpyrimidin-2,4-dione

To a solution of 3-(5-carboxy-4-chloro-2-fluorophenyl)-1,2,3,4-dihydro-1-methyl-6-(trifluoromethyl)pyrimidin-2,4-dione (1.50 g, 4.09 mmol) in tetrahydrofuran was added N,N′-carbonyldiimidazole (1.00 g, 6.14 mmol). The resulting mixture was stirred one hour at reflux temperature and cooled to room temperature. Dimethyl sulfamide (0.760 g, 6.14 mmol) was added, followed by diazabicycloundecane (0.930 ml, 6.14 mmol) after 10 min. The resulting mixture was stirred overnight at room temperature and then concentrated under reduced pressure. The resultant residue was partitioned between ethyl acetate and hydrochloric acid (2N). The organic layer was saved and the aqueous phase was extracted three times with ethyl acetate. The extracts were combined with the saved organic layer, washed with 10% sodium bicarbonate, dried over anhydrous magnesium sulfate and concentrated under reduced pressure to give a first residue.

The aqueous phase was acidified and extracted with ethyl acetate. The organic layers were dried and concentrated under reduced pressure to give a second residue.

The residues were combined and washed with ethyl acetate to afford the title compound as a white solid, which was identified by NMR and mass spectral analysis. Yield: 0.81 g (42.0%); mp. 213-214░ C.

Examples 55-93 Preparation of 3-(5-(N-Substituted)sulfamoylcarboxamido-4-chlorophenyl)-1,2,3,4-dihydro-6-(trifluoromethyl)pyrimidin-2,4-diones

Using essentially the above same procedure as described in Example 54 and substituting the appropriate sulfamide starting material, the following compounds were obtained:

Example
No. X1 R1 R2 R29 mp. [░ C.]
55 F CH3 3-chlorobenzyl CH3 78-79
56 F H CH3 CH3 232-233
57 F CH3 CH2ŚC≡CH CH3 195-196
58 F H H CH3 141-142
59 F CH3 allyl CH3 189
60 F CH(CH3)2 CH(CH3)2 CH3 81-82
61 F CH3 benzyl CH3 90-91
62 F C2H5 CH2ŚC2H5 CH3 74-76
63 F H CH2ŚC2H5 CH3 206-207
64 F H CH(CH3)ŚC2H5 CH3 221
65 F H C(CH3)3 CH3 115
66 F CH3 C2H5 CH3 215-216
67 F CH3 CH2ŚC2H5 CH3  72
68 F C2H5 C2H5 CH3 210-211
69 F CH3 CH(CH3)ŚC2H5 CH3  74
70 F CH3 3-methoxybenzyl CH3  79
71 F H CH2ŚC≡CH CH3 195-196
72 F H CH2ŚCH2ŚCH(CH3)2 CH3 222-223
73 F CH3 phenyl CH3 104-105
74 F CH3 CH2ŚCH2Śphenyl CH3 90-91
75 F CH3 phenyl NH2 120-142
76 F CH3 CH(CH3)2 NH2 117-120
77 F H CH2Ś(2-thienyl) CH3 127-128
78 F H cyclopentyl CH3 232-233
79 F H CH(CH3)2 CH3 221
80 F H C2H5 CH3 211
81 F H CH2Ś(2-furyl) CH3 178-180
82 F H 4-methoxybenzyl CH3 186-188
83 F CH3 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 CH3 156-157
84 F CH3 CH2ŚCH2ŚCN CH3  99-103
85 F CH3 CH2Ś(1,3-dioxolanyl) CH3 93-96
86 F H 4-chlorobenzyl CH3 95-99
87 F CH3 C(CH3)3 CH3 126
88 F ŚCH2ŚCH═CHŚCH2Ś CH3 231
89 F H cyclopropyl CH3 208
90 F ŚCH2ŚCH2ŚCH2ŚCH2Ś CH3 230
91 F CH3 cyclopropyl CH3 156
92 F C2H5 CH(CH3)2 CH3 146
93 F H CH2ŚCH(CH3)2 CH3 202
94 F H CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 CH3 227
95 H CH3 Phenyl CH3 108-110
96 F CH3 4-(methoxycarbonyl)phenyl CH3 102
97 F C2H5 Phenyl CH3 214-215
98 F CH3 3-Pyridyl CH3 208
99 F CH3 3,4-dichlorophenyl CH3 118
100 F CH3 3-chlorophenyl CH3 183-184
101 F CH3 CH(CH3)2 CH3 93-95
102 F CH3 CH3 NH2 252
103 H CH3 CH2ŚC≡CH CH3 228.2-229.0
104 F CH3 4-(methoxy)phenyl CH3 136-138
105 F CH3 4-chlorophenyl CH3 110-111
106 F CH3 4-nitrophenyl CH3 111-112
107 F CH3 4-methylphenyl CH3 102
108 H H H CH3 143.5-145.8
109 H CH3 CH2ŚC2H5 CH3 187.0-189.5
110 H CH3 C2H5 CH3 245.5-246.0
111 H CH3 CH2ŚCH(CH3)2 CH3 164.1-164.7
112 H C2H5 C2H5 CH3 244.4-245.4
113 H CH3 CH2ŚCH2ŚC2H5 CH3 167.9-172.0
114 H CH3 CH3 CH3 228.8-231.5
115 F CH3 2-methylphenyl CH3 125-127
116 F CH3 3-methylphenyl CH3 187-189
117 F CH3 α-naphthyl CH3 131-133
118 F CH3 2,4-difluorophenyl CH3 118-119
119 F CH3 2-chlorophenyl CH3 133
120 F CH3 2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl CH3  98-106
121 H CH3 4-(phenoxy)phenyl CH3  95
122 F CH3 4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl CH3 133
123 F CH3 4-(diethylamino)phenyl CH3  87
124 F CH3 4-diphenyl CH3 125-133
125 F CH3 CH(CH3)ŚC2H5 NH2 yellow
glass
126 F CH3 C(CH3)3 NH2 yellow
glass
127 F CH3 CH2ŚCH(CH3)2 NH2 yellow
glass
128 F CH(CH3)2 CH(CH3)2 NH2 yellow
glass
129 F CH3 3-(methoxy)phenyl CH3 86
130 H CH3 4-fluorophenyl CH3 120
131 F CH3 3-(dimethylamino)phenyl CH3  85
132 F CH3 3,5-(dichloro)phenyl CH3 104
133 F CH3 CH2ŚCOŚOC2H5 CH3 118-119
134 F CH3 112

Example 135 Preparation of N′-{2-Chloro-4-fluoro-5-[4-(difluoromethyl)-4,5-dihydro-3-methyl-5-oxo-1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl]-benzoyl}-N-isopropyl-N-methylsulfamide

Step 1:

2-(2-Fluoro-4-chloro-5-carbomethoxyphenylhdrazonyl)propionic Acid

A solution of pyruvic acid (3.92 g, 44.5 mmol) in water (4 ml) was added to a mixture of hydrazine x1 (8.00 g, 36.6 mol), ethanol (240 ml) and hydrochloric acid (10% strength, 37 ml). The mixture was stirred for 35 minutes at 45-60░ C., cooled to 30░ C. and filtered. The filtrate was concentrated under reduced pressure to −50% of the original volume and added slowly to water (700 ml). The resultant suspension was stirred for 20 minutes and filtered. The title compound was obtained as a yellow solid. Yield: 9.60 g (90.9%).

Step 2:

2-Chloro-4-fluoro-5-[4,5-dihydro-3-methyl-5-oxo-1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl]-benzoic Acid Methyl Ester

A mixture of the hydrazone from step 1 (9.00 g, 31.0 mmol) and triethylamine (4.35 ml, 31.0 mmol) was heated to 50░ C. and treated with a mixture of azide 12 (7.98 g, 29.0 mmol) and toluene (10 ml). The resultant mixture was stirred for 100 minutes at 50░ C., cooled to room temperature and concentrated under reduced pressure. The residue was partitioned between water and ethyl acetate. The organic layer was dried and concentrated under reduced pressure to give the title compound as an off-white solid, which was used in the next step without further purification. Yield: 6.35 g (71.8%).

Step 3:

2-Chloro-4-fluoro-5-[4-(difluoromethyl)-4,5-dihydro-3-methyl-5-oxo-1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl]-benzoic Acid Methylester

An excess of chlorodifluoromethane (97 g) was bubbled into a mixture of triazolinone from step 2 (7.04 g, 24.6 mmol), tetrabutylammonium bromide (9.67 g, 30.0 mmol), potassium carbonate (16.6 g, 122 mmol) and dimethylformamide (200 ml) in such a way that T<36░ C. over a period of 30 minutes. The mixture was cooled and filtered. The filtrate was concentrated under reduced presssure and the residue partitioned between water and methylene chloride. The organic layer was washed with water, dried and concentrated under reduced pressure to give a dark oil (9.00 g), which was chromatographed on silica gel (eluent: ethyl acetate/hexane) to give the title compound. Yield: 1.48 g (17.9%).

Step 4:

2-Chloro-4-fluoro-5-[4-(difluoromethyl)-4,5-dihydro-3-methyl-5-oxo-1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl]-benzoic Acid (IIba)

A mixture of ester II with Q=Q5; R7=CHF2, A4=O, R8=CH3, X1=F and X2=Cl (0.950 g, 2.83 mmol), acetic acid (10 ml) and hydrochloric acid (6N, 5.0 ml) was stirred for 24 hours at 64-100░ C., cooled to room temperature and concentrated under reduced pressure. The residue was partitioned between methylene chloride and water. The organic layer was washed twice with water, dried and concentrated under reduced pressure to yield the title compound as a pale yellow solid. Yield: 0.42 g (46%); mp.: 132-135░ C.

Step 5:

N′-[[2-Chloro-4-fluoro-5-[4-(difluoromethyl)-4,5-dihydro-3-methyl-5-oxo-1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl]-benzoyl]]-N-isopropyl-N-methylsulfamide

A mixture of acid II (0.370 g, 1.15 mmol), the sulfamide (0.210 g, 1.38 mmol), carbonyl diimidazole (0.244 g, 1.50 mmol), DBU (0.228 g, 1.50 mmol) and tetrahydrofuran was stirred for four days at ambient temperature. The resultant mixture was treated with additional sulfamide (0.150 g, 0.986 mmol) and DBU (0.150 g, 0.986 mmol). The mixture was refluxed for two hours, cooled and concentrated under reduced pressure. The residue was taken up in water and acidified with hydrochloric acid (1 N). The mixture was extracted four times with methylene chloride. The combined extracts were washed with water, dried and concentrated under reduced pressure to give a yellow oil, which was chromatographed on silica gel (eluent: ethyl acetate/hexane), yielding the title compound as an off-white solid. Yield: 0.160+g (30.5%); mp.=118-122░ C.

Example 136 Preparation of N′-{2-Chloro-4-fluoro-5-(5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-3-oxo-1,2,4-triazolo[4,3-a]pyridin-2(3H)-yl)-benzoyl}-N,N-dialkylsulfamide

Step 1:

2-Chloro-4-fluoro-5-(5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-3-oxo-1,2,4-triazolo[4,3-a]pyridin-2(3H)-yl)-benzoic Acid

Boron tribromide (19.4 ml, 19.4 mmol, 1N in methylene chloride) was added dropwise to a mixture of I with A=O, X1=F, X2=Cl, Q=Q5, A4=O and R7+R8=Ś(CH2)4Ś (1.90 g, 5.54 mmol) and methylene chloride (20 ml). The resultant mixture was stirred overnight at room temperature. Water (40 ml) was added dropwise and the mixture stirred for three hours at room temperature. The organic layer was separated and concentrated under reduced pressure to give the title compound as a pale yellow solid. Yield: 1.34 g (77.4%); mp.: 91-94░ C.

Step 2:

N′-{2-Chloro-4-fluoro-5-(5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-3-oxo-1,2,4-triazolo[4,3-a]pyridin-2(3H)-yl)-benzoyl}-N-isopropyl-N-methylsulfenamide

Carbonyl diimidazole (0.500 g, 3.08 mmol) was added to a solution of the compound of step 1 (0.640 g, 2.05 mmol) in anhydrous methylene chloride (15 ml). The resultant mixture was stirred for 30 minutes at room temperature, brought to reflux temperature and immediately cooled to room temperature. The sulfamide (0.370 g, 2.46 mmol) and the DBU (0.470 g, 3.08 mmol) were added and the resultant mixture was stirred overnight at room temperature. The mixture was diluted with ethyl acetate (10 ml) and 3% strength hydrochloric acid (15 ml) and stirred for 10 minutes. Removal of the methylene chloride under reduced pressure gives an aqueous residue which was extracted with ethyl acetate. The combined organic layers were washed with water and brine, and dried over anhydrous magnesium sulfate. Concentration under reduced pressure and recrystallization from methylene chloride yielded a solid, which was taken up in methylene chloride and filtered through a column of basic alumina with methanol/methylene chloride, giving the title compound as a white solid. Yield: 0.360 g (39.4%); mp.: 250-251░ C.

Example 137

Using an identical procedure as described in Example 136 hereinabove and the sulfamide H2NŚSO2ŚN(CH3)-phenyl, the following compound was isolated as a white solid of m.p. 200-201░ C.:

Example 138 Preparation of N′-[2-Chloro-5-(3,5-dimethyl-2,6-dioxo-4-thioxo-1,3,5-triazinan-1-yl)-4-fluorobenzoyl]-N-isopropyl-N-methylsulfamide

A solution of 0.502 g (1.45 mmol) of the acid III with X1=F. X2=Cl, Q=Q22, R32 & R33=CH3, A15 & A16=O and A17=S in 5 ml of tetrahydrofuran was treated with 0.283 g (174 mmol) of N,N-carbonyl-diimidazole at 60░ C. After this solution had been cooled to ambient temperature, a solution of 0.287 g (1.89 mmol) N,N-methyldiisopropylsulfamide and 0.276 g (1.82 mmol) of DBU in 10 ml of tetrahydrofuran was added and the mixture was stirred overnight. After removal of the volatiles under reduced pressure, the crude product was chromatographed on silica gel with ethyl acetate and cyclohexane. Yield: 0.180 mg of the desired product.

1H-NMR (270 MHz; in CDCl3): δ [ppm]=1.25 (d, 6H), 2.95 (s, 3H, SO2ŚNCH3), 3.8 (s, 6H, NCH3), 4.3 (m, 1H), 7.4 (d, 1H, Ar-H), 7.8 (d, 1H, Ar-H), 8.9 (bs, 1H, NH).

Example 139 Preparation of N′-[2-Chloro-4-fluoro-5-(5-trifluoromethylpyridazon-3-on-2-yl)-benzoyl]-N-isopropyl-N-methylsulfenamides

Step 1:

2-Fluoro-4-chloro-5-(5-trifluoromethyl-pyridazin-3-on-2-yl)-benzoic Acid

Pyridazinone ester II with X1=F, X2=Cl, Q=Q27, R34=H, R35=CF3 and R36=H (3 g, 8.56 mmol) was dissolved in anhydrous CH2Cl2 (100 ml). A solution of BBr3 (30 ml, 1 M in CH2Cl2, 30 mmol) was added to the solution and the mixture was stirred at room temperature for 17 hours. Water (50 ml) was added and the mixture stirred vigorously for 3 hours. A rotary evaporator was used to remove the CH2Cl2 and the suspended solid was filtered, washed with water and dried to give 2.76 g of the product as a pale yellow solid. Yield: 95%.

Using an identical procedure, the ester II with X1=F, X2=Cl, Q=Q27, R34=H, R35=CF3 and R36=CH3, shown above, was converted to the corresponding acid III in 97% yield.

Step 2:

N′-{2-Chloro-4-fluoro-5-(5-trifluoromethyl-pyridazon-3-on-2-yl)-benzoyl}-N-isopropyl-N-methylsulfenamides

The carboxylic acid III with X1=F, X2=Cl, Q=Q27, R34=H, R35=CF3 and R36CH3 (0.71 g, 2.10 mmol) was dissolved in anhydrous tetrahydrofuran (15 ml) and CDI (0.51 g, 3.15 mmol) was added as a single portion. The mixture was stirred at room temperature for 30 minutes. The mixture was refluxed for 5 minutes, then cooled to room temperature. The sulfamide (0.32 g, 2.10 mmol) was added, followed by DBU (0.48 g, 3.15 mmol). The reaction was stirred at room temperature for 17 hours. 5% strength HCl (15 ml) and ethyl acetate (10 ml) were added to the reaction, and the mixture was stirred vigorously for 10 minutes. The mixture was extracted with ethyl acetate (3Î15 ml) and the combined extracts were washed with water, dried over MgSO4 and concentrated in a rotary evaporator to give a brown semi-solid. The crude product was purified by chromatography on a basic alumina column (eluted with CH2Cl2, 1%, 2% H3CŚOH/CH2Cl2 then 1% acetic acid/CH2Cl2) to give the final product Ida.xxx (0.45 g) as an off-white solid. Yield: 45%; mp.: 82░ C.

The following compounds were prepared using the same procedure and with the appropriate acid and sulfamide.

Example No. R1 R2 R36 mp. [░ C.]
140 CH3 phenyl H 182
141 CH3 phenyl CH3 74-75
142 CH3 CH(CH3)2 CH3 181-182
143 CH3 CH3 CH3 205-206
144 CH3 CH3 H 184-186

Example 145 Preparation of 4-Chloro-3-[4-chloro-2-fluoro-5-(N-methyl-N-isopropyl)-sulfamoylcarboxamidophenyl]-5-difluorormethoxy-1-methyl-1H-pyrazole

A solution of 3-[5-carboxy-4-chloro-2-fluorophenyl]-4-chloro-5-difluoromethoxy-1-methyl-1H-pyrazole (2.00 g, 5.63 mmol) in tetrahydrofuran was treated with N,N′-carbonyldiimidazole (1.13 g, 6.98 mmol), stirred for 1 hour under reflux, cooled to room temperature, treated with N-methyl-N-isopropylsulfamide (1.10 g, 7.23 mmol), stirred for 10 minutes, treated with diazabicycloundecene (1.06 g, 6.97 mmol), stirred overnight at room temperature and concentrated under reduced pressure. Chromatography on silica gel (cyclohexane/ethylacetate 4:1) gave 0.90 g of the raw product. Further crystallization from cyclohexane/ethylacetate (4:1) yielded 0.45 g (16.4%) of the title compound (analyzed by NMR).

1H-NMR (in CDCl3): δ [ppm]=8.8 (s, 1H, NH), 8.0 (d, 1H), 7.3 (d, 1H), 6.7 (t, 1H), 4.3 (hpt, 1H), 3.8 (s, 3H), 3.0 (s, 3H), 1.2 (d, 6H).

Step 1:

2-Chloro-5-[3-chloro-5-(trifluoromethyl)-2-pyridinyl]-4-fluorobenzoic Acid

5.3 g (13.4 mmol) of isopropyl ester II with A=O, X1=F, X2=Cl, X3=H, Q=Q38, R40=Cl, R41 & R43=H and R42=CF3, dissolved in 25 ml of glacial acid and 125 ml of concentrated HCl were stirred at 70░ C. for 6 hours and at ambient temperature overnight. Then, the reaction mixture was dripped into ice water and the precipiate was filtered off and washed with water. There was obtained 4.1 g as a white solid.

1H-NMR [in (CD3)2SO]: δ [ppm]=9.1 (s, 1H), 8.7 (s, 1H), 8.1 (d, 1H), 7.8 (d, 1H). {Remark: the exchange of the OH proton for those of water resulted in a broad singulett at 3.3 ppm}.

Step 2:

N′-[[2-Chloro-5-[3-chloro-5-(trifluoromethyl)-2-pyridinyl]-4-fluorobenzoyl]]-N-isopropyl-N-methylsulfamide

1.0 g (2.8 mmol) free acid from step 1 was dissolved in 10 ml of tetrahydrofuran, 0.57 g (3.5 mmol) of carbonyldiimidazole was added and the mixture was heated to 60░ C. for 1 hour and cooled to ambient temperature. Then a mixture of 0.55 g (3.6 mmol) of the sulfamide and 0.54 g (3.5 mmol) of 1,8-diazabicyclo[5,4,0]-undecen-7-ene in 10 ml of tetrahydrofuran was added and stirring was continued at room temperature overnight. The solvent was removed and the crude product was subjected to column chromatography with methyl-tert.-butylether and ethyl acetate. The product-containing fraction was dissolved in methyl-tert.-butylether, washed three times with 10% strength HCl and twice with water and dried over Na2SO4. Removal of the solvent gave 0.48 g of the title compound as an oil.

1H-NMR [in (CD3)2SO]: δ [ppm]=9.1 (s, 1H), 8.7 (s, 1H), 7.8-7.7 (m, 2H), 4.1 (m, 1H), 2.7 (s, 3H), 1.1 (m 6H). {Remark: the exchange of the NŚH protons for those of water resulted in a broad singulett at 3.3 ppm}.

Example 146 Preparation of 8-(5′-N-Isopropyl-N-methylsulfamoylcarboxamido-4′-chloro-2′-fluorophenyl)-4-oxo-7,9-dioxo-1,2,8-triaza(4.3.0.)nonane

5.4 g (45.5 mmol) of thionyl chloride was added to a mixture of 12.0 g (36.4 mmol) acid III with X1=F, X2=Cl, Q=Q40, A20 & A21=O, R46+R47=Ś(CH2)3ŚOŚ, and 2 drops of pyridine in 200 ml of 1,2-dichloroethane. After 4 hours at 83░ C., the volatiles were removed under reduced pressure and the crude acid chloride (12.6 g) was used without further purification: 0.44 g (2.87 mmol) of N-isopropyl-N-methylaminosulfamide in 50 ml of tetrahydrofuran was added to a suspension of 0.07 g of NaH (97% purity) in 50 ml of tetrahydrofuran. After 30 minutes at room temperature, 1.0 g (2.87 mmol) of the crude acid chloride was added and the reaction mixture was stirred overnight at ambient temperature and additionally for 2 hours at 50░ C. The solvent was removed under reduced pressure, 1 N HCl and methylene chloride were added and the organic layer was separated. Chromatography on silica-gel gave 0.35 g of the title compound; mp.: 115-120░ C.

USE EXAMPLES FOR THE HERBICIDAL ACTIVITY Example 147 Postemergence Herbicidal Evaluation of Test Compounds

The herbicidal activity of the compounds of the present invention was evaluated by the following tests.

Seedling plants were grown in jiffy flats for about two weeks. The test compounds were dispersed in 80/20 acetone/water mixtures containing 1.0% SUN-IT«II, a methylated seed oil, in sufficient quantities to provide the equivalent of about 0.016 to 0.032 kg per hectare of active compound when applied to the plants through a spray nozzle operating at 40 psi for a predetermined time. After spraying, the plants were placed on greenhouse benches and were cared for in accordance with conventional greenhouse procedures. Approximately two to three weeks after treatment, the seedling plants were examined and rated according to the rating scale (0-9) set forth below. Where more than one test is involved for a given compound, the data are averaged. Results obtained are reported in Table I below. Where more than one test is involved for a given compound, the data are averaged.

HERBICIDE RATING SCALE
Rating % Control as compared to the untreated check
9 100
8 91-99
7 80-90
6 65-79
5 45-64
4 30-44
3 16-29
2  6-15
1 1-5
0  0

The scale is based upon a visual observation of plant stand, vigor, malformation, size, chlorosis and overall plant appearance as compared with a control.

Plant species employed in these evaluations are reported by header abbreviation, common name and scientific name.

PLANT SPECIES EMPLOYED
Header abbreviation Common name Scientific name
ABUTH Velvetleaf Abutilon theophrasti,
Medic.
AMBEL Ragweed, Common Ambrosia artemiisifolia,
L.
CHEAL Lambsquarters Chenopodium album, L.
Common
IPOHE Morningglory, Ipomoea hederacea,
Ivyleaf (L) Jacq.
XANST Cocklebur Xanthium strumariam
ALOMY Blackgrass Alopecurus myosuroides
DIGSA Crabgrass, (Hairy) L Digitaria sanguinalis,
(L) Scop
ECHCG Barnyardgrass Echinochloa crus-
galli, (L.) Beau
SETVI Green foxtail Setaria viridis,
(L.) Beau
GLXMA Soybean Glycine max, (L.)
Merr.
TRZAW Winter wheat Tritium Aestivum, L.
(Winter)
ZEAMX Field corn Zea mays L.

TABLE A
Postemergence Herbicidal Evaluation
Ex. Rate
No. [kg/ha] ABUTH AMBEL CHEAL IPOHE XANST ALMOY DIGSA ECHCG SETVI GLXMA TRZAW ZEAMX
53 0.032 9.0 9.0 8.4 9.0 9.0 3.0 6.6 8.8 7.5 8.4 6.2 7.6
0.016 9.0 8.9 8.1 8.8 9.0 2.3 5.3 8.1 6.4 8.1 5.6 7.2
54 0.032 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 2.0 6.0 8.0 7.0 8.5 6.0 7.5
0.016 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 2.0 5.0 6.0 7.0 8.0 5.5 6.5
55 0.032 9.0 9.0 7.0 9.0 8.0 2.0 6.0 7.0 8.0 8.0 6.0 8.0
0.016 9.0 8.0 7.0 8.0 9.0 2.0 5.0 7.0 7.0 8.0 6.0 8.0
56 0.032 9.0 9.0 7.0 9.Q 9.0 2.0 5.0 7.0 7.0 8.5 5.0 8.0
0.016 9.0 8.0 7.0 9.0 9.0 2.0 3.0 7.0 6.0 8.5 4.0 7.5
57 0.032 5.0 2.0 2.0 4.0 3.0 1.0 2.0 2.0 3.0 6.5 2.5 5.0
0.016 2.0 1.0 1.0 6.0 2.0 0.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 6.0 2.0 2.0
58 0.032 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 3.0 6.0 7.0 8.0 8.5 5.0 8.0
0.016 9.0 9.0 8.0 9.0 9.0 3.0 5.0 6.0 8.0 8.5 4.5 8.0
59 0.032 9.0 9.0 8.0 9.0 9.0 4.0 5.0 7.0 8.0 8.5 4.5 8.0
0.016 9.0 7.0 7.0 9.0 9.0 3.0 4.0 6.0 7.0 8.0 4.0 8.0
60 0.032 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 3.0 7.0 7.0 9.0 8.5 6.0 8.0
0.016 9.0 9.0 8.0 9.0 9.0 3.0 6.0 8.0 8.0 8.5 6.0 8.0
61 0.032 9.0 9.0 8.0 9.0 9.0 1.0 6.0 8.0 9.0 8.5 6.5 7.5
0.016 9.0 9.0 9.0 8.0 9.0 1.0 7.0 7.0 7.0 8.5 6.0 7.5
62 0.032 9.0 9.0 8.0 9.0 9.0 2.0 5.0 7.0 6.0 8.0 6.5 6.5
0.016 9.0 9.0 7.0 9.0 9.0 2.0 5.0 6.0 6.0 8.0 5.5 6.5
63 0.032 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 2.0 4.0 6.0 9.0 8.0 7.0 8.0
0.016 9.0 9.0 7.0 9.0 9.0 2.0 4.0 4.0 7.0 8.0 6.0 7.0
64 0.032 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 5.0 5.0 9.0 9.0 8.0 7.0 8.0
0.016 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 3.0 5.0 9.0 8.0 7.5 6.0 7.5
65 0.032 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 3.0 6.0 9.0 8.0 8.5 6.5 8.0
0.016 9.0 9.0 8.0 9.0 9.0 2.0 6.0 8.0 8.0 8.0 5.5 7.5
66 0.032 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 2.0 6.0 8.0 9.0 9.0 6.5 7.5
0.016 9.0 9.0 8.0 9.0 9.0 1.0 5.0 8.0 8.0 8.0 5.0 7.0
67 0.032 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 3.0 6.0 8.0 8.0 8.5 7.0 7.5
0.016 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 2.0 6.0 8.0 8.0 8.0 6.5 7.5
68 0.032 9.0 9.0 8.0 9.0 9.0 1.0 6.0 8.0 9.0 8.5 5.5 7.5
0.016 9.0 9.0 8.0 9.0 9.0 1.0 6.0 8.0 7.0 8.5 5.0 7.0
69 0.032 9.0 9.0 8.0 9.0 9.0 2.0 6.0 7.0 6.0 8.0 6.5 7.5
0.016 9.0 9.0 8.0 9.0 9.0 1.0 4.0 5.0 5.0 8.0 5.0 7.0
70 0.032 9.0 7.0 7.0 9.0 Ś 1.0 3.0 8.0 5.0 7.5 5.0 7.0
0.016 9.0 5.0 6.0 9.0 Ś 1.0 2.0 4.0 4.0 6.5 4.5 7.0
71 0.032 9.0 9.0 5.0 9.0 Ś 1.0 3.0 3.0 5.0 8.0 4.5 6.5
0.016 9.0 6.0 5.0 8.0 Ś 1.0 2.0 2.0 4.0 8.0 4.5 6.5
72 0.032 9.0 9.0 8.0 9.0 Ś 2.0 4.0 8.0 6.0 8.5 6.5 7.0
0.016 9.0 9.0 8.0 9.0 Ś 1.0 4.0 6.0 5.0 8.5 5.5 7.0
73 0.032 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 Ś 3.0 6.0 7.0 5.0 8.5 6.5 7.5
0.016 9.0 9.0 8.0 9.0 Ś 2.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 8.5 5.5 7.0
76 0.032 9.0 8.0 6.0 9.0 9.0 1.0 4.0 6.0 6.0 7.5 6.0 6.5
0.016 9.0 8.0 6.0 9.0 9.0 1.0 3.0 5.0 5.0 7.5 5.0 5.5
77 0.032 9.0 8.0 7.0 9.0 9.0 1.0 4.0 6.0 6.0 7.5 5.0 6.5
0.016 9.0 8.0 6.0 9.0 9.0 1.0 4.0 4.0 5.0 7.5 4.5 6.0
78 0.032 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 2.0 6.0 9.0 9.0 8.0 6.5 7.0
0.016 9.0 9.0 7.0 9.0 9.0 2.0 5.0 8.0 8.0 7.0 5.5 6.5
80 0.032 9.0 8.0 4.0 9.0 9.0 1.0 4.0 6.0 6.0 8.0 4.0 4.0
0.016 7.0 7.0 3.0 9.0 8.0 0.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 8.0 3.0 1.5
82 0.032 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 2.0 3.0 8.0 7.0 8.5 6.0 6.5
0.016 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 1.0 3.0 7.0 6.0 8.0 5.5 6.5
83 0.032 9.0 8.0 5.0 9.0 9.0 1.0 4.0 8.0 8.0 7.5 5.5 6.0
0.016 9.0 6.0 5.0 8.0 9.0 0.0 3.0 8.0 7.0 7.0 4.5 5.5
84 0.032 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 2.0 6.0 9.0 8.0 8.5 5.5 8.0
0.016 9.0 8.0 7.0 9.0 9.0 1.0 5.0 8.0 7.0 7.0 5.0 7.0

Example 148 Preemergence Herbicidal Evaluation of Test Compounds

The herbicidal activity of the compounds of the present invention was evaluated by the following tests wherein the seeds of a variety of monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants were separately mixed with potting soil and planted on top of approximately one inch of soil in separate pint cups. After planting, the cups were sprayed with the selected aqueous acetone solution containing test compound in sufficient quantity to provide the equivalent of about 0.125 to 0.250 kg per hectare of test compound per cup. The treated cups were then placed on greenhouse benches, watered and cared for in accordance with conventional greenhouse procedures. From two to four weeks after treatment, the tests were terminated and each cup was examined and rated according to the rating system provided in Example 94. When more than one test was performed for a given compound, the data were averaged. The results obtained are shown in Table B.

TABLE B
Preemergence Herbicidal Evaluation
Ex. Rate
No. [kg/ha] ABUTH AMBEL CHEAL IPOBE XANST ALMOY DIGSA ECHCG SETVI GLXMA TRZAW ZEAMX
53 0.25 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 2.7 8.8 8.4 7.3 8.8 2.0 4.3
0.125 9.0 8.9 9.0 9.0 9.0 1.3 8.1 7.5 5.7 8.1 1.3 2.3
54 0.25 9.0 8.0 9.0 1.0 3.0 0.0 6.0 3.0 3.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
0.125 9.0 7.0 9.0 0.0 1.0 0.0 4.0 3.0 2.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
55 0.25 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 7.0 0.0 8.0 9.0 8.0 8.0 2.0 1.0
0.125 9.0 8.0 8.0 8.0 6.0 0.0 8.0 5.0 6.0 8.0 1.0 0.0
56 0.25 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 0.0 7.0 7.0 8.0 9.0 0.0 2.0
0.125 9.0 9.0 9.0 8.0 8.0 0.0 7.0 3.0 4.0 2.0 0.0 0.0
57 0.25 2.0 2.0 8.0 3.0 0.0 0.0 3.0 2.0 1.0 1.0 0.0 0.0
0.125 2.0 2.0 6.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
58 0.25 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 8.0 0.0 3.0 6.0 6.0 9.0 3.0 1.0
0.125 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 5.0 0.0 0.0 4.0 2.0 9.0 0.0 0.0
59 0.25 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 4.0 7.0 3.0 9.0 8.0 0.0 2.0
0.125 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 0.0 0.0 3.0 0.0 4.0 2.0 0.0 0.0
60 0.25 9.0 9.0 9.0 6.0 4.0 0.0 6.0 4.0 9.0 6.0 0.0 0.0
0.125 9.0 9.0 9.0 7.0 0.0 0.0 6.0 0.0 5.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
61 0.25 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 0.0 9.0 7.0 6.0 9.0 3.0 2.0
0.125 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 0.0 6.0 4.0 3.0 9.0 2.0 2.0
62 0.25 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 0.0 7.0 6.0 7.0 9.0 5.0 1.0
0.125 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 0.0 5.0 3.0 3.0 5.0 3.0 1.0
63 0.25 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 Ś 0.0 8.0 9.0 8.0 5.0 0.0 0.0
0.125 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 Ś 0.0 3.0 4.0 4.0 1.0 0.0 0.0
64 0.25 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 Ś 4.0 9.0 7.0 9.0 Ś 3.0 2.0
0.125 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 Ś 0.0 8.0 3.0 8.0 Ś 0.0 0.0
65 0.25 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 Ś 0.0 9.0 9.0 6.0 Ś 1.0 1.0
0.125 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 Ś 0.0 7.0 8.0 3.0 Ś 1.0 0.0
66 0.25 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 Ś 2.0 8.0 8.0 6.0 Ś 1.0 2.0
0.125 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 Ś 0.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 0.0 1.0 1.0
67 0.25 9.0 7.0 9.0 9.0 Ś 0.0 8.0 9.0 8.0 1.0 1.0
0.125 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 Ś 0.0 7.0 8.0 8.0 0.0 0.0
68 0.25 9.0 9.0 8.0 9.0 9.0 0.0 4.0 4.0 8.0 8.0 0.0 2.0
0.125 9.0 9.0 8.0 9.0 9.0 0.0 3.0 3.0 4.0 7.0 0.0 1.0
69 0.25 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 4.0 0.0 3.0 3.0 1.0 3.0 0.0 3.0
0.125 9.0 8.0 9.0 9.0 3.0 0.0 3.0 2.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 2.0
70 0.25 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 0.0 5.0 7.0 5.0 3.0 1.0 0.0
0.125 9.0 9.0 8.0 9.0 8.0 0.0 2.0 2.0 3.0 1.0 0.0 0.0
71 0.25 9.0 8.0 7.0 9.0 7.0 0.0 3.0 3.0 2.0 2.0 0.0 1.0
0.125 9.0 8.0 9.0 9.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
72 0.25 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 2.0 7.0 6.0 8.0 9.0 1.0 0.0
0.125 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 7.0 1.0 2.0 7.0 4.0 8.0 0.0 0.0
73 0.25 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 0.0 3.0 3.0 5.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
0.125 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 3.0 0.0 3.0 0.0 2.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
76 0.25 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 5.0 2.0 3.0 2.0 2.0 3.0 1.0 1.0
0.125 9.0 8.0 8.0 5.0 3.0 0.0 2.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0 1.0
77 0.25 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 8.0 0.0 4.0 3.0 2.0 Ś 0.0 1.0
0.125 9.0 9.0 9.0 7.0 3.0 0.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 1.0 0.0 0.0
78 0.25 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 2.0 8.0 7.0 7.0 5.0 1.0 1.0
0.125 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 1.0 4.0 4.0 5.0 3.0 1.0 0.0
80 0.25 5.0 3.0 8.0 0.0. 1.0 0.0 1.0 3.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
0.125 1.0 1.0 5.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
82 0.25 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 0.0 4.0 4.0 7.0 9.0 1.0 2.0
0.125 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 0.0 4.0 3.0 3.0 9.0 0.0 0.0
83 0.25 9.0 8.0 9.0 8.0 5.0 0.0 9.0 5.0 6.0 4.0 0.0 2.0
0.125 8.0 8.0 9.0 7.0 4.0 0.0 1.0 4.0 3.0 1.0 0.0 0.0
84 0.25 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 1.0 8.0 6.0 7.0 7.0 2.0 1.0
0.125 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 0.0 7.0 5.0 7.0 2.0 0.0 0.0

Example 149

The herbicidal action of the uracil substituted phenyl sulfamoyl carboxamides no. Ij.86, Ip.86 and Iy.86 was demonstrated by the following greenhouse experiments:

The culture containers used were plastic flowerpots containing loamy sand with approximately 3.0% of humus as substrate. The seeds of the test plants were sown separately for each species.

For the post-emergence treatment, the test plants were grown to a plant height of from 3 to 15 cm, depending on the plant habit, and only then treated with the active ingredients which had been suspended or emulsified in water. To this end, the test plants were either sown directly and grown in the same containers, or they were first grown separately as seedlings and transplanted into the test containers a few days prior to treatment. The rate of application for the post-emergence treatment was 15.6 or 7.8 g/ha active ingredient.

Depending on the species, the plants were kept at from 10-25░ C. and 20-35░ C., respectively. The test period extended over 2 to 4 weeks. During this time, the plants were tended, and their response to the individual treatments was evaluated.

Evaluation was carried out using a scale of from 0 to 100. 100 means no emergence of the plants, or complete destruction of at least the aerial parts, and 0 means no damage or normal course of growth.

The plants used in the greenhouse experiments belonged to the following species:

Scientific Name Common Name
Amaranthus retroflexus (AMARE) Redroot pigweed
Pharbitis purpurea (PHBPU) common or tall morningglory
Polygonum persicaria (POLPE) redshank; ladysthumb

At a rate of application of 15.6 or 7.8 g/ha of a.i., compound nos. Ij.86, Ip.86 and Iy.86 showed a very good herbicial action against the abovementioned undesired plants.

DESICCANT/DEFOLIANT ACTIVITY OF THE COMPOUNDS I Example 150 Greenhouse-trials

The test plants used were young cotton plants with 4 leaves (without cotyledons) which had been grown under greenhouse conditions (relative atmospheric humidity 50 to 70%; day/night temperature 27/20░ C.)

The young cotton plants were subjected to foliar treatment to run-off point with aqueous preparations of the active ingredients (with an addition of 0.15% by weight of the fatty alcohol alkoxylate Plurafac« LF 7001), based on the spray mixture). The amount of water applied was 1000 l/ha (converted). After 13 days, the number of leaves shed and the degree of defoliation in % were determined.

1) a low-foam, nonionic surfactant from BASF AG No leaves were shed in the untreated control plants.

Example 151 Field Trials

Field evaluations of preharvest desiccant activity were performed at several different locations using compound Ia.86.

In each experiment treatments was replicated three times in a randomized complete block experimental design. Potatoes were grown using good agronomic practices of each area. Treatments were applied a few weeks before planned potato harvest.

The test compound was formulated as an emulsifiable concentrate (EC) formulation with 120 grams a.i./liter. The formulation was diluted with water, spray adjuvants were added, and the treatment solution was applied to the foliage of potatoes in from 187 to 600 l/ha of total spray volume. Unless indicated otherwise, the treatments also contained 15 v/v of methylated seed oil adjuvant (Hasten or SUN-IT II. In the case of split applications, the second application was made about 1 week after the initial application.

At various intervals after treatment, desiccation of stems and leaves was evaluated separately, on a visual % desiccation scale. In each test the test compound was compared to appropriate commercial standards at the normal rate for each standard for the area.

The results showed that the abovementioned compound is very effective to desiccate the leaves and stems of potato plants.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6849618 *Oct 15, 2003Feb 1, 2005Basf AktiengesellschaftHerbicidal compositions for the desiccation/ defoliation of plants
US7071223 *Dec 30, 2003Jul 4, 2006Pfizer, Inc.Benzamide inhibitors of the P2X7 receptor
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US7375058 *Sep 10, 2002May 20, 2008Basf AktiengesellschaftHerbicidal mixtures based on 3-phenyluracils
Classifications
U.S. Classification514/183, 514/269, 544/53, 544/88, 514/256, 514/241, 544/309, 544/315, 544/335, 544/242, 544/182, 514/274, 544/180, 514/227.2, 544/319
International ClassificationC07D249/08, A01N43/40, A01N43/58, A01N41/02, A01N43/56, A01N43/54, C07D213/61, A01N43/64, C07D237/14, A01N43/653, C07D231/20, A01N43/707, A01N43/90, C07D239/54, C07D249/12, C07D471/04
Cooperative ClassificationC07D213/61, A01N43/653, A01N43/58, A01N43/90, C07D471/04, A01N43/707, C07D249/12, A01N43/40, A01N43/64, A01N43/56, A01N41/02, C07D231/20, C07D237/14, A01N43/54, C07D239/54
European ClassificationC07D231/20, A01N43/40, C07D213/61, C07D249/12, A01N43/56, A01N41/02, A01N43/653, A01N43/707, C07D237/14, A01N43/64, A01N43/90, A01N43/54, A01N43/58, C07D239/54, C07D471/04
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