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Publication numberUS655255 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 7, 1900
Filing dateAug 12, 1899
Priority dateAug 12, 1899
Publication numberUS 655255 A, US 655255A, US-A-655255, US655255 A, US655255A
InventorsHerbert F W Lyouns
Original AssigneeHerbert F W Lyouns
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Exhibition structure.
US 655255 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

No. 655,255. Patented Aug. 7,1900.

H. F. W. LYDUNS.

EXHIBITION STRUCTURE.

1 (Application filed Aug. 12, 1899.) (No Model.)

4 8heats-Sheet I.

WITNESSES [NVENTOR r. I Z r JQWDQ @4454. yflifimjawzs' L norms PETERS co. mmaummwumucrdu. a. c.

(No Model.)

Patented Aug. 7, 1900.

H. F. W. LYOUNS.

4 Sheets-Sheet 3 EXHIBITION STRUCTURE (Application filed Aug. 12, 1899.)

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(Application filed Aug. 12, 1899.) (No Model.) 4 Sheets-Sheet 4.

THE uonms vsrzns co., monru ma. WASNINOYON. n. c.

me" m:

PrrrENr OFFICE.

HERBERT r. w. LYoUNs, or BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS.

EXHIBlTl jONI: STRUCTURE.

wimmer forming an of Letters Patent no. 655,255, dated August 7, 1900.

V Application filed A gu t 12 1899. Serial No. 727,046. (No model.)

To all whom it may concern: s

Be it known that I, HERBERT F. W. LYOUN S,

V a citizen of the United States, residing at BOS- ton, in the county of Suffolk and State of Mas,- sachusetts, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Exhibition Struc tures, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to an exhibition structure which combines a number of cooperating features with a scenic railway and other means for traversing the structure and for illuminating it.

The construction of the invention will be fully described hereinafter and defined in the appended claims in connection with the accompanying drawings, which form a part of this specification;

In the drawings, Figure 1 isa View in perspective of the invention as an entirety. Fig. 2 is a central vertical section thereof, showing the elevator-shafts and spiral strairways.

Fig. 3 is a side elevation illustrating how the outlines of geographical'divisions of land are to be illuminated. Fig. 4 is a plan view of the supporting-base of thest'ructure. Fig.5 is a transverse detail sectional view of one of the cars employed, and Fig. 6 is a detail side elevation of one of the cars.

The reference-numeral 1 designates a base or foundation, from each corner of which rises a column 2. As shown in Fig. 4, it is designed to finish and ornament the base of the structure. Atthe center of the base is located a mound of earth 3, representing an island surroundedby a pond 4, which in turn is bounded by a circular pavement 5, constitntin g a promenade or walk. Suitable lawns or flower-beds 6 are located between the corner pillars or columns, and the island 3 is connected to the mainland (represented by the numeral 7) by radially-disposed bridges 8.

9 represents the superstructure of the invention, consisting of a hollow sphere of; metal, preferably sheet metal, and supported upon the four columns 2.

Before describing the invention further it i or exhibition-booths, a. While of course the invention will not be restricted'to any parplates supported upon a steel framework, and

its exterior surface is so formed as to present the surface of the earth in relief and painted to represent land and water. The globe should have a diameter of six hundred feet; but this diameter may be varied according to the amount of space available, and the dimensions of the pillars and other parts of the structure will be proportioned accordingly. The interior of the globe'9 is divided by horizontal partitions 10 into a number of floors or stories, and centrally through these floors extends an elevator-shaft 11, within which may be suitably arranged any required nu mber of elevators.

an elevator-shaft 12, surrounded by a spiral stairway 13. I also provide a central pillar 14, within which are also arranged an elevator-shaft 15 and spiral stairway 16.

17 designates a spirally-disposed tunnel or framework constituting the support or bed of a railway track or tracks, upon which trains of electrically-propelled cars are adapted to travel. The tunnel 17 consists of a floor or base 18, a side wall19, and atop or cover 20. The shell of the globe constitutes the outer wall of the tunnel, and said shell is formed with openings 21, which are so relatively disposed as to describe a spiral corresponding to the spiral tunnel, thus permittingpassengers on the trains to view the sui'rounding country as the trains ascend 0rdescend.

In Figs. 5 and 6 I have shown a cross-section and elevation of a car 22, the Wheels of which;

travel on the rails 23. p

24: designates a platform or landing, it being designed to provide a number of stations at which passengers may alight to inspect the Within each of the pillars or columns 2 is above another, as shown in Figs. 5 and 6, thus affording an unobstructed View through the openings or Windows "21'to all the occupants;

of the car.

At the center of the top ofthe globe, corresponding to the location of the North Pole, I provide a tower 26, having a door and any. desired number of windows 27.

28, above which an electricli'ghtor lights are located to illuminatethe tower.

The numerals 29 and 30 designate passageways through which access may be had to the 1 central elevator-shaft. As illustrated in Figs. 1 and 3, it is de-i sign'edto represent upon the outer surface of the globe correct outlines of the hemispheres andcoutinents of the World and, if desired, 1 the 'locat-ionof the principal countries, cities, rivers, and mountain-ranges, and, as shown 3 in Fig. '3, the outlines of the continents will l be illuminated by electric lights 31, thus im- 5 parting to the structure at night a brillianti and highly-attractive appearance.

The space within the globe will be divided by suitable partitions into rooms, hallways, f

and exhl'bitlon booths or apartments, and an important feature ofthe invention is tolocate these various roomsaud apartments in such This tower, is hollow and provided with a'spi'ral stairway cations in the details of the structuremay be resorted to, the foregoing-description=and accompanying drawings being merelyillustra .hollow sphere constituting a casing, having delineated uponits outersurface outlines or maps ofpontinents, hemispheres, 2950:; and a spiral railway-tunnel within the sphere, said --casiug being formed with openings spirally disposed, following the spiral course of the tunnel within thecasing.

2. \An exhibition structure-comprising a hollow-sphere constituting a casing, having its interior subdivided into compartments, audits outer surface provided with the outlines of continents, hemispheres, &c and -a spiralsupport secured adjacent to the inner surface of the spherical casing, said casing being formed with openings d isposed spirally around the casing following the-spiral course of the railwa -tu'nnel within the casing,

} 3. An exhi ition structure comprising hollo-w .supportingspillars; ua h'olloxw ,g-lobe supported-0n said pillarsand having its interior div ded. 11113010011180! compartments; and a spiral tunnel or frameworksecured within the hollow globe adjacent to the =i n ner surrelation to the outllnes ou the outer surface of thegl'obe as to permitthe products of any particularcountry or city to be exhibited adjacent .to the location of suchcountry or city u -pon z t-he Jmap delineated upon the sur'faceo'f the globe. Thus an important educational result is accomplished, the visitor being euabled "to associate in his mind the peculiar products of different countries with the geographical locations ofsuch countries.

It will be obvious, owing to the nature of the invention, that a great variety of modifi-,

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2961718 *Jan 21, 1955Nov 29, 1960Max BerzGarage
US5765326 *Jan 11, 1996Jun 16, 1998Schuster; SiegfriedGlobated builiding structure
US7677949 *Oct 13, 2006Mar 16, 2010Mc Millan Arthur GConstruction kit for constructing a play structure
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationY10S362/809, E04B9/32