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Publication numberUS6575315 B2
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 09/896,683
Publication dateJun 10, 2003
Filing dateJun 29, 2001
Priority dateJun 29, 2001
Fee statusLapsed
Also published asUS6758355, US20030000905, US20030192848
Publication number09896683, 896683, US 6575315 B2, US 6575315B2, US-B2-6575315, US6575315 B2, US6575315B2
InventorsRichard L. Zidek
Original AssigneeRichard L. Zidek
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Display rack with repositionable shelf
US 6575315 B2
Abstract
A display rack includes an upright that supports a crosspiece and one or more shelves. Each shelf includes two clips, and each clip includes a lip element configured to fit over and to engage an upper surface of the crosspiece, and a spring element configured to snap-lock against a lower, opposed side of the crosspiece. The first and second clips are positioned on the shelf such as the shelf is mountable on the crosspiece in three different positions: a first position, in which each clip is disposed on a respective side of the upright; a second position, in which both clips are disposed on a first side of the upright; and a third position, in which both clips are disposed on the other side of the upright.
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Claims(3)
What is claimed is:
1. A display rack comprising:
a base;
at least one upright secured to the base;
at least one crosspiece secured to the upright, said crosspiece comprising a first part extending on a first side of the upright and a second part extending on a second, opposed side of the upright, wherein the crosspiece comprises a wire loop comprising a first end portion on the first side of the upright and a second end portion on the second side of the upright;
at least one shelf comprising first and second clips, each clip comprising a respective lip element configured to fit over and to engage a first side of the crosspiece, and a respective spring element configured to snap-lock against a second, opposed side of the crosspiece;
said first and second clips positioned on the shelf such that the shelf is mountable on the crosspiece in each of three positions:
a first position, in which both spring elements are snap-locked against the crosspiece with the first clip disposed on the first side of the upright and the second clip disposed on the second side of the upright;
a second position, in which at least the second spring element is snap-locked against the first part of the crosspiece with both the first and second clips disposed on the first side of the upright; and
a third position, in which at least the first spring element is snap-locked against the second part of the crosspiece with both the first and second clips on the second side of the upright;
wherein each clip comprises a set of tabs protruding into a space bounded by the wire loop, at least some of said set of tabs are positioned to mechanically interfere with the wire loop when the shelf is mounted on the crosspiece in at least the second and third positions, thereby limiting sliding movement of the shelf along the crosspiece away from the upright.
2. The invention of claim 1 wherein said loop forms an upper and lower horizontal member on each of said first and second sides of the uprights, wherein said upper horizontal member is positioned above said lower horizontal member, and wherein each lip element is configured to fit over and to engage one of said upper and lower horizontal members, and each spring element is configured to snap-lock against the other of said upper and lower horizontal members.
3. The invention of claim 1 wherein each lip element is positioned to engage an upper side of the crosspiece, and wherein each spring element is positioned to engage a lower side of the crosspiece.
Description
BACKGROUND

The present invention relates to display racks, and in particular to display racks that can be assembled in multiple configurations in a simple and reliable manner.

Carrigan U.S. Pat. No. 5,272,991 discloses a display rack in which wire shelves are mounted in place on horizontally extending bars. In the disclosed display rack, each of the bars defines a constant cross section, and each of the shelves includes a C-channel shaped to receive one of the bars. The shelves are assembled onto respective bars by telescopically sliding them into position from one end of the bar. As shown on the front page of the Carrigan patent, the shelves can be positioned in any of various positions with respect to the bar.

The sliding action used to install the shelves on the bar in the Carrigan patent requires a shelf to be moved horizontally beyond the end of the bar in order to remove the shelf from the bar. This may not be convenient in all applications.

SUMMARY

By way of general introduction, the preferred embodiment described below includes at least one shelf that has first and second clips. Each clip has an upper lip element configured to fit over and engage an upper side of a crosspiece, and a spring element configured to snap-lock against a lower, opposed side of the crosspiece. The shelf can be mounted on the crosspiece in any one of three positions: a first position, in which the two clips are disposed on opposite sides of an upright that supports the crosspiece; a second position, in which both of the clips are disposed on a first side of the upright; and a third position, in which both of the clips are disposed on a second side of the upright.

This display rack provides a simple and effective arrangement for adjustably mounting the shelf in any one of the three desired positions on the crosspiece.

This section has been provided by way of general introduction, and it should not be used to narrow the scope of the following claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is an exploded perspective view of a display rack that incorporates a preferred embodiment of this invention.

FIG. 2 is an exploded perspective view of one of two clips mounted to the back of the shelf of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary rear perspective view of the shelf of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary top plan view of the shelf of FIG. 1.

FIGS. 5 and 6 are fragmentary side sectional views of the shelf of FIG. 1 during installation (FIG. 5) and after installation has been completed (FIG. 6) on the crosspiece of FIG. 1.

FIGS. 7, 8 and 9 are schematic rear elevational views showing the shelf of FIG. 1 mounted to the crosspiece of FIG. 1 in first, second and third positions, respectively.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PRESENTLY PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Turning now to the drawings, FIG. 1 shows an exploded perspective view of a display rack 10. The view of FIG. 1 shows only a single shelf 34, though in actual practice more than one shelf 34 is typically used.

The display rack 10 includes a base 12 that supports a vertically extending post 14. For example, the base 12 can be formed as a metal plate, and the post 14 can be formed as a rigid C-channel that is welded in place to the base 12.

An upright 16 is releasably secured to the post 14. For example, the upright 16 can be formed as a box channel that telescopically receives the post 14. A threaded fastener such as a thumb screw 15 can be threaded to the upright 16 to secure the upright 16 releasably in place on the post 14. This arrangement allows the user to adjust the height of the upright 16 relative to the base 12.

The upright 16 supports one or more crosspieces 17. In this example, each of the crosspieces 17 includes a respective wire loop having first and second parts 18, 20 on respective sides of the upright 16. The crosspiece 17 defines an upper side 22 and a lower side 24, and each of the parts 18, 20 includes a respective end portion 26, 28. The wire loop of the first part 18 bounds a space 30, and the wire loop of the second part 20 bounds a space 32.

The display rack 10 also includes one or more shelves 34, and each of the shelves 34 includes first and second clips 36, 38 disposed in side-by-side relationship on a rear portion of the shelf 34.

FIG. 2 provides an exploded perspective view of one of the clips 36, 38. As shown in FIG. 2, each clip includes an upper lip element 40 and a lower spring element 42. In this example, the lip element 40 is formed as part of a C-channel, and the spring element 42 is secured to the C-channel, as for example with a rivet 43. Tabs 44, 46 are bent out of the plane of the clips 36, 38, such that the tabs 44, 46 extend away from the shelf 34 of FIG. 1.

FIGS. 3 and 4 provide rear and top views, respectively, showing the relationship between the various elements of the clips 36, 38 and the shelf 34.

FIGS. 5 and 6 show two steps in installing or removing the shelf 34 from the crosspiece 17, as viewed from the side. As shown in FIG. 5, the lip element 40 is first placed over the upper side 22 of the crosspiece 17, with the shelf 34 angled upwardly. In this position the spring element 42 is disposed forwardly of the lower side 24 of the crosspiece 17. Next, the shelf 34 is rotated about the lip element 40 from the position of FIG. 5 to that of FIG. 6. In this position, the spring element 42 fits around and snap-locks against the lower side 24 of the crosspiece 17. The tabs 44, 46 (only tab 44 is shown in FIGS. 5 and 6) fit into one of the spaces 30, 32 bounded by the crosspiece 17.

When it is desired to remove the shelf 34 from the crosspiece 17, the spring element 42 is moved downwardly from the position shown in FIG. 6, thereby releasing the shelf 34 for rotation about the lip element 40 to the position of FIG. 5, where it can be lifted and removed from the crosspiece 17.

FIGS. 7, 8 and 9 show three alternative positions in which the shelf 34 can be mounted on the crosspiece 17. FIGS. 7-9 show the display rack 10 from the rear, and side-specific reference numerals are therefore reversed in FIGS. 7-9 as compared with FIG. 1.

In the first shelf position 60 shown in FIG. 7, the shelf 34 is positioned with the clips 36, 38 on respective sides 48, 50 of the upright 16. In this position the first and second clips 36, 38 are secured to the first and second parts 18, 20 of the crosspiece 17, respectively. Tab 44 of the clip 38 is positioned to mechanically interfere with the end 28, thereby preventing any sliding movement of the shelf 34 to the left as shown in FIG. 7. Similarly, the tab 46 of the first clip 36 is positioned to mechanically interfere with the first end 26, thereby preventing any substantial sliding movement of the shelf 34 to the right, as shown in FIG. 7.

FIG. 8 shows the shelf 34 mounted in a second position 70 on the crosspiece 17. In this second position, the second clip 38 is snap-latched in place on the first part 18 of the crosspiece 17. Tab 46 of the second clip 38 mechanically interferes with the first end portion 26, thereby preventing any substantial sliding movement of the shelf 34 to the right, as shown in FIG. 8. The tab 44 of the second clip 38 or another structural part of the second clip 38 mechanically interferes with the upright 16 to prevent any substantial sliding movement of the shelf 34 to the left in the view of FIG. 8. Note that in this example, the first clip 36 is not engaged with the crosspiece 17, and the right-hand portion of the shelf 34 is cantilevered beyond the crosspiece 17 in the view of FIG. 8.

FIG. 9 shows the shelf 34 mounted in a third position 80, in which the first clip 36 is snap-locked to the second part 20 of the crosspiece 17. In this third position the second clip 38 is not engaged with the crosspiece 17, and the left-hand portion of the shelf 34 is cantilevered beyond the crosspiece 17 in the view of FIG. 9. The tab 44 of the first clip 36 mechanically interferes with the second end portion 28, thereby preventing any substantial sliding movement of the shelf 34 to the left in the view of FIG. 9. The tab 46 or some other portion of the first clip 36 mechanically interferes with the upright 16 to prevent any substantial sliding movement of the shelf 34 to the right in the view of FIG. 9.

It should be apparent from the foregoing description that the display rack 10 can easily be assembled and disassembled with the shelf 34 in any one of the first, second, and third positions 60, 70, 80. The tabs 44, 46 or other parts of the clips 36, 38 prevent any substantial undesired sliding movement of the shelf 34 along the crosspiece 17 in all three positions. A simple rotational movement is all that is required to latch shelf 34 in position on the crosspiece 17 and to remove the shelf 34 from the crosspiece 17, and all cumbersome telescoping sliding movements are eliminated.

Of course, many changes and modifications can be made to the preferred embodiment described above. For example, the upright 16 can take any desired structural form, and can be formed as a plate, a rod, a C-channel, or another shape in an alternative embodiment. The base 12 can be formed as a plate or a wire frame, or alternatively the base can include a socket or a post intended to receive a mating structure. The crosspiece 17 can be formed in one or more parts using any suitable structural element. For example, the crosspiece can be formed as a plate or a channel. The clips 36, 38 may be formed from multiple parts that are separately mounted to the shelf. For example, the lip elements 40, spring elements 42, and tabs 44, 46 can all be separately mounted to the shelf 34, without intermediate structures such as that provided by the illustrated channel. Alternatively, the clips 36, 38 may correspond to laterally-spaced portions of a single structural element such as a plate or a channel. The shelf 34 can be a wire shelf as illustrated, or it can include solid or apertured plates. The shelf may or may not have raised walls and a raised back.

Materials can be varied widely, depending on the application, though C-1050 (annealed, tensile 74200) spring steel for the spring clip and cold-rolled mild steel for the remaining elements have been found suitable.

As used herein the term “set” is intended broadly to encompass one or more elements.

The foregoing detailed description has discussed only a few of the many forms that this invention can take. This detailed description is therefore intended by way of illustration and not limitation. It is only the following claims, including all equivalents, that are intended to define the scope of this invention.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification211/205, 211/90.03, 211/106, 211/175
International ClassificationA47F5/06, A47F5/01
Cooperative ClassificationA47F5/06, A47F5/01
European ClassificationA47F5/06, A47F5/01
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jun 29, 2001ASAssignment
Owner name: ASTORIA WIRE PRODUCTS, INC., ILLINOIS
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:ZIDEK, RICHARD L.;REEL/FRAME:011963/0007
Effective date: 20010629
Oct 10, 2006FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
Jan 17, 2011REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed
Jun 9, 2011SULPSurcharge for late payment
Year of fee payment: 7
Jun 9, 2011FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
Jan 16, 2015REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed
Jun 10, 2015LAPSLapse for failure to pay maintenance fees
Jul 28, 2015FPExpired due to failure to pay maintenance fee
Effective date: 20150610