Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS6582206 B2
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 09/808,108
Publication dateJun 24, 2003
Filing dateMar 15, 2001
Priority dateMar 16, 2000
Fee statusLapsed
Also published asDE10012904A1, DE10012904B4, DE50109995D1, EP1134415A2, EP1134415A3, EP1134415B1, US20010043872
Publication number09808108, 808108, US 6582206 B2, US 6582206B2, US-B2-6582206, US6582206 B2, US6582206B2
InventorsEberhard Schluecker
Original AssigneeLewa Herbert Ott Gmbh + Co.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Diaphragm chucking with elasticity adjustment
US 6582206 B2
Abstract
A diaphragm pump with hydraulically powered diaphragm that is so chucked on a circulating rim between a pump lid and a pump housing in a predetermined radial chucking area and with a predetermined press-on force between the pump lid and the pump housing that the press-on force will be below a flow limit of the diaphragm material. At least one elastic part is provided additionally in the chucking area. That part is so designed that it will elastically compensate for any reductions occurring during the operation of the diaphragm pump in the press-on pressure in the chucking area of the diaphragm between the pump lid and the pump housing.
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(6)
I claim:
1. Diaphragm pump comprising:
a hydraulic power source,
a single layer diaphragm hydraulically powered by said hydraulic power source and chucked at a circulating rim between a pump lid and a pump housing in a predetermined radial chucking area and with a predetermined press-on force between the pump lid and the pump housing so that the press-on force will be below the flow limit of the diaphragm material, and
in the chucking area, only one elastic part in a shape of only one axially acting profile ring located between said diaphragm and said pump lid for achieving a desired elasticity adjustment that elastically compensates for any reductions occurring during the operation of the diaphragm pump in the press-on force in the chucking area of the diaphragm between the pump lid and the pump housing, the elastic part being a lip seal.
2. Diaphragm pump according to claim 1, wherein the elastic part extends in a circumferential direction over an entire circumference of the diaphragm.
3. Diaphragm pump according to claim 1, wherein the elastic part is made as an integral part of the diaphragm.
4. Diaphragm pump according to claim 1, wherein the diaphragm is made of PTFE or PE.
5. Diaphragm pump according to claim 1, wherein the diaphragm includes a protective layer consisting of PTFE.
6. Diaphragm pump according to claim 1, wherein said one elastic part is spaced radially inwardly from an outermost edge of the diaphragm.
Description
FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to a diaphragm pump with a hydraulically powered diaphragm.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Growing environmental protection requirements, combined with strict legal requirements, can be met mostly only with the help of hermetically sealed process systems. Non-leaking fluid machines such as, for example, pumps and condensers, are of the utmost importance in this connection. Diaphragm pumps constitute an optimum solution, especially for delivering toxic, hazardous, annoying, sensitive, abrasive, corrosive fluids as well as for aseptic conditions. The diaphragm, as the central element, performs the double function of static seal and displacers in the form of an elastic delivery chamber wall. The static diaphragm seal is the basis for the hermetic tightness of diaphragm pumps. The diaphragm furthermore transmits the oscillating stroke motion of a drive through the fluid that is to be delivered, as a result of which, it is not only the pulsating delivery that materializes, but there is also an interaction with the fluid masses in the pipeline system. In the case of diaphragm pumps with hydraulic diaphragm drive, the oscillating motion of a drive member is transmitted via a hydraulic seal—which comprises a hydraulic fluid—to the diaphragm. The hydraulically driven diaphragm always works with balanced pressure and need withstand only deflection stresses.

PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) proved effective in diaphragm pump engineering due to its outstanding chemical stability and the good physical properties so that it became the standard material for diaphragms. Customary diaphragm designs are pure PTFE diaphragms with rotationally symmetrical shaft contour or flat contour and PTFE as protective layer on elastomer diaphragms.

The limit for the use of PTFE as diaphragm for diaphragm pumps currently is found at a delivery pressure of 350 bar and a temperature of 150 C. The reasons for these limitations are found in the cold-flow resistance that is no longer adequate and the tight sealing pressure of the PTFE in the diaphragm chucking. By means of design measures, for example, by means of a suitable ribbed structure, it has been possible to counteract the cold flow within limits. The ribbing prevents the diaphragm material from flowing out of the diaphragm chucking. As a result, one can raise the flow limit in the diaphragm chucking to values that are far above the yield stress from the tensile test.

Above 350 bar, there is also the fact that the parts between which the diaphragms are chucked, that is to say, the pump as such and the chuck drive housing are deformed by the change of pressure in the pump, which results in a certain “respiration” in the chucking. This term “respiration” refers to a decrease of the press-on pressure between the pump lid and the pump housing in the chucking area of the diaphragm, a decrease that keeps recurring possibly periodically during the operation of the diaphragm pump. The respiration increases with increasing pressure and growing structural size. The potential for elasticity adjustment by way of the diaphragm, however, is very limited so that this likewise creates a limit for any increases in the pressure and the structural size. Furthermore, the constantly recurring stress change of the diaphragm due to respiration constitutes a severe mechanical stress or dynamic alternating stress and after a corresponding span of time leads to the fatigue of the diaphragm material and finally to a destruction of the diaphragm. This action mechanism has so far not been recognized in this form.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The object of the invention therefore is to provide a diaphragm pump of the kind mentioned above, which eliminates the above-mentioned disadvantages and which can be used also at higher delivery pressures and higher operating temperatures with a long diaphragm service life. At the same time, the idea is to counteract the negative effect of “respiration” of the pump head in the area of the diaphragm chucking.

In the invention-based diaphragm pump, there is provided in the chucking area additionally at least one elastic part that is so designed that it will elastically adjust any reductions occurring during the operation of the diaphragm pump in the press-on pressure in the chucking area of the diaphragm between the pump lid and the pump housing.

This design offers the following advantage: the diaphragm pump is suitable also for high pressure, for example, above 350 bar, and for higher temperatures, for example, over 150 C. because deformations of pump lid and pump housing occurring in this area and possibly leading to a decline in the press-on pressure in the chucking area are effectively compensated. At the same time, a cold flow strength and tight sealing pressure of the diaphragm material that under certain operating conditions might possibly no longer be sufficient is also compensated. In other words, the invention-based arrangement increases the elasticity of the diaphragm in the chucking area so that the minimum pressure required for a tight seal is preserved in the chucking area of the diaphragm also in case of deformation of the parts that are involved in the chucking area. The elastic part that is provided according to the invention does not have any sealing function here; instead, it serves for the compensation of fluctuations in the press-on pressure in the chucking area of the diaphragm.

The elasticity reserves of a diaphragm packet are increased by virtue of the fact that the diaphragm comprises two or more material layers with at least one elastic part being arranged between at least two layers. Here, the elastic part, for example, is made as an elastic intermediate layer or as elastic intermediate ring.

The elastic part is advantageously made as a weft in order to ensure a fluid-conducting connection between the internal chamber between the two material layers of the diaphragm and a diaphragm rupture sensor.

The elastic part extends over the entire circumference of the diaphragm so as to compensate for any material deformations over the entire chucking area within the direction of circumference.

The elastic part can be arranged on one side or on both sides of the diaphragm.

In a preferred embodiment, the elastic part comprises one or several elastomer O-rings. As an alternative, the elastic part is made as a lip seal.

The elastic part is an integral part of the diaphragm for simple and quick assembly.

In a practical manner, the diaphragm is made of PTFE or PE or, as an alternative, it is made of an elastomer with a protective layer consisting of PTFE.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The invention will be explained in greater detail below with reference to the drawings.

FIG. 1 shows a profile of a diaphragm pump.

FIG. 2 shows a detailed profile view of a first embodiment of the invention-based elastic part.

FIG. 3 shows a second embodiment of the elastic part.

FIG. 4 shows a third embodiment of the elastic part.

FIG. 5 shows a fourth embodiment of the elastic part.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

As one can see in FIG. 1, the illustrated diaphragm pump comprises a diaphragm 10 that separates a delivery chamber 12 from a hydraulic chamber 14. As a drive, there is provided a piston 16 which, when in operation, oscillates around a constant central position of the piston. By way of example, piston 16 is shown in the position of the central piston position. The oscillating motion of piston 16 is transmitted via a hydraulic fluid in hydraulic chamber 14 to diaphragm 10, which performs a corresponding oscillating motion around a central position. In this way, fluid is suctioned from a suction side 22 of the diaphragm pump and is discharged again on a delivery side 24. Hydraulic chambers 14 are connected with a hydraulic storage chamber 30 via a pressure-limiting overpressure valve 26 and a refill valve 28 made as a flow valve. Furthermore, supporting surfaces 31, 33 are provided, laterally delimiting a work chamber of diaphragm 10. Here, the number 31 designates the supporting surface on the side of the hydraulic portion and the number 33 refers to the supporting surface on the side of the delivery chamber.

Diaphragm 10 is chucked between a pump lid 34 and a pump housing 36 in a predetermined radial chucking area 38 and is preferably supported by rib structures in the pump parts 34 and 36. In addition to diaphragm 10, an elastic element 40 is arranged in chucking area 38, as one can see, for example, in FIGS. 2 to 5. This elastic element 40 compensates for “respiration” in chucking area 38 at every point in time and ensures the pressure required for a tight seal. As a result, even at high pressure and temperature stresses going beyond the permissible stresses of known diaphragm pumps, one can ensure adequate surface area pressure of the diaphragm chucking 38.

The diaphragm chucking 38, designed according to the invention, thus comprises an elasticity compensation because the elastic part 40 is provided in chucking area 38 of diaphragm 10.

In the first embodiment shown in FIG. 2, the elastic part 40 is made as a lip ring that is arranged on one side or, as shown in FIG. 2, on both sides of diaphragm 10 in chucking area 38.

In the modified embodiment according to FIG. 3, a lip ring of elastic part 40 is made in one piece with diaphragm 10 so that upon insertion of diaphragm 10, the elastic part 40 will automatically be arranged and mounted in chucking area 38.

In the other embodiment according to FIG. 4, the elastic part is made as an elastomer O-ring 42 and is arranged around the entire circumference in chucking area 38.

In the embodiment according to FIG. 5, diaphragm 10 has two material layers 44, 46 between which there is a space 48 that, for example, is in fluid-conducting connection with a diaphragm rupture sensor, not shown. The elastic part here is made as intermediate ring or intermediate layer 50 and is arranged in chucking area 38 between material layers 44, 46 of diaphragm 10. In this way, diaphragm 10, so to speak, is positioned in a “floating” manner. The elasticity reserve of the diaphragm packet layers 44, 46 is increased as a result and the required minimum pressure is preserved in the chucking area even in case of any possibly occurring part deformations. In order to ensure the fluid-conducting connection between space 48 and a possibly present diaphragm rupture sensor, the intermediate ring or intermediate layer 50 is made as a weft. The diaphragm rupture sensor then records the fluid that enters the space 48 as a result of the diaphragm rupture, which fluid then penetrates through the gaps in the weft all the way to the diaphragm rupture sensor.

In FIGS. 2-5, the number 32 refers to the middle of diaphragm 10, which at the same time can be considered as the rotationally symmetrical axis.

The elastic part can also be made in the shape of at least one or several axially acting profile rings to achieve the desired elasticity adjustment.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2242582 *Sep 29, 1938May 20, 1941Leo L WilliamsFuel pump
US4275997 *Aug 9, 1979Jun 30, 1981Parker-Hannifin CorporationHydraulic pump with proportional pressure controller
US4430048 *Dec 29, 1981Feb 7, 1984Lewa Herbert Ott Gmbh & Co.Diaphragm pump with a diaphragm clamped in pressure-balancing arrangement
US4741360 *Sep 14, 1987May 3, 1988Tom Mcguane Industries, Inc.Fuel pressure regulator
US4760690 *Nov 20, 1986Aug 2, 1988Viscosuisse SaProcess for the production of a weft fiber of polyester-poy
US4781535 *Nov 13, 1987Nov 1, 1988Pulsafeeder, Inc.Apparatus and method for sensing diaphragm failures in reciprocating pumps
US4862731 *Jul 20, 1988Sep 5, 1989Expertek, Inc.Fuel tank leak detection apparatus
US5188515 *Jun 3, 1991Feb 23, 1993Lewa Herbert Ott Gmbh & Co.Diaphragm for an hydraulically driven diaphragm pump
US5217797 *Feb 19, 1992Jun 8, 1993W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc.Chemically resistant diaphragm
US5279504 *Nov 2, 1992Jan 18, 1994Williams James FMulti-diaphragm metering pump
US5438913 *May 6, 1994Aug 8, 1995Almatec Techische Innovationen GmbhDiaphragm for a pump with pressurized bead
US5560279 *Mar 16, 1995Oct 1, 1996W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc.Pre-failure sensing diaphragm
US5860793 *Apr 30, 1996Jan 19, 1999Pulsafeeder, Inc.Diaphragm metering pump with push to prime air bleeder valve
US6126403 *Dec 22, 1997Oct 3, 2000Yamada T.S. Co., Ltd.Diaphragm pump
US6173959 *Feb 13, 1997Jan 16, 2001Mikuni Adec CorporationDiaphragm-holding synthetic resin assembly
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6899530 *Oct 31, 2002May 31, 2005Wanner Engineering, Inc.Diaphragm pump with a transfer chamber vent with a longitudinal notch on the piston cylinder
US7090474 *May 16, 2003Aug 15, 2006Wanner Engineering, Inc.Diaphragm pump with overfill limiter
US7169229 *Feb 11, 2003Jan 30, 2007Fastar, Ltd.Moving head, coating apparatus
US8454324 *Oct 20, 2009Jun 4, 2013Precision Dispensing Systems LimitedPump
US8596648 *Oct 22, 2010Dec 3, 2013Oshkosh CorporationPump for vehicle suspension system
US8821130 *Jul 16, 2013Sep 2, 2014Oshkosh CorporationPump for vehicle suspension system
US9482218 *Sep 3, 2010Nov 1, 2016Quanta Fluid Solutions Ltd.Deformable membrane pump for dialysis machine
US9581153Jul 25, 2014Feb 28, 2017Oshkosh CorporationPump for vehicle suspension system
US20030111011 *Feb 11, 2003Jun 19, 2003Gibson Gregory M.Moving head, coating apparatus
US20040086398 *Oct 31, 2002May 6, 2004Wanner Engineering, Inc.Diaphragm pump
US20040182977 *Jan 29, 2004Sep 23, 2004Sondra WeissRod clamp
US20040228748 *May 16, 2003Nov 18, 2004Wanner Engineering, Inc.Diapharagm pump
US20070140873 *Mar 18, 2005Jun 21, 2007Precision Dispensing Systems LimitedPump
US20100104458 *Oct 20, 2009Apr 29, 2010Precision Dispensing Systems Limitedpump
US20110189029 *Feb 2, 2011Aug 4, 2011Van De Velde PeterHydraulic fluid control system for a diaphragm pump
US20120098215 *Oct 22, 2010Apr 26, 2012Oshkosh CorporationPump for vehicle suspension system
US20120275943 *Sep 3, 2010Nov 1, 2012James CoatesPump
US20130243622 *May 2, 2013Sep 19, 2013Precision Dispensing Systems LimitedPump
US20150030466 *Aug 22, 2012Jan 29, 2015Cummins Emission Solutions, Inc.Urea Solution Pumps Having Leakage Bypass
CN1788162BMay 13, 2004Nov 10, 2010旺纳工程股份有限公司隔膜泵
WO2004104415A3 *May 13, 2004May 12, 2005Wanner EngineeringDiaphragm pump
Classifications
U.S. Classification417/395, 417/383, 92/104, 92/96
International ClassificationF04B43/067, F04B43/00
Cooperative ClassificationF04B43/067, F05C2225/04, F04B43/0063
European ClassificationF04B43/00D8B, F04B43/067
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jul 9, 2001ASAssignment
Owner name: LEWA HERBERT OTT GMBH + CO., GERMANY
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:SCHLUECKER, EBERHARD;REEL/FRAME:011961/0934
Effective date: 20010423
Oct 2, 2006FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
Jan 31, 2011REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed
Jun 24, 2011LAPSLapse for failure to pay maintenance fees
Aug 16, 2011FPExpired due to failure to pay maintenance fee
Effective date: 20110624