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Publication numberUS6599462 B1
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 09/364,615
Publication dateJul 29, 2003
Filing dateJul 29, 1999
Priority dateJun 11, 1997
Fee statusPaid
Publication number09364615, 364615, US 6599462 B1, US 6599462B1, US-B1-6599462, US6599462 B1, US6599462B1
InventorsManouchehr Miraki
Original AssigneeAdvanced Cardiovascular Systems, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Balloon catheter having non-bonded integral balloon and methods for its manufacture
US 6599462 B1
Abstract
A method for manufacturing balloon catheters, and the catheters manufactured thereby. In accordance with the method, a workpiece comprising a tube-within-a-tube is placed within a mold, and a first region of the outer tube is distended into contact with the mold to form a seamless balloon of a desired configuration. The distension of the first region of the outer tube may be facilitated by electron beam irradiation, heating and/or longitudinal drawing of the workpiece concurrently with the introduction of a pressurized fluid into the space between the inner surface of the outer tube and the outer surface of the inner tube so as to exert the required outwardly distending pressure against the first region of the outer tube. When the method is utilized to form a “monorail” type of catheter, the inner tube need extend through only a distal portion of the outer tube, and the proximal end of the inner tube is coupled to an aperture formed in the sidewall of the outer tube to create a “monorail” type of a guide wire lumen. Alternatively, when used to form an over-the-wire type of catheter, the inner tube will extend through the entire length of the outer tube, and a proximal guidewire entry connector or port will be located on the proximal end of the catheter body to facilitate passage of the guidewire through the lumen of the inner tube.
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Claims(20)
What is claimed is:
1. A method of manufacturing a balloon catheter, said method comprising the steps of:
a) providing a workpiece which comprises:
i) an outer tube having a proximal end, a distal end, a longitudinal axis, a hollow lumen extending longitudinally therethrough, an outer surface, and an inner surface; and,
ii) a inner tube disposed within at least a portion of the lumen of the outer tube, adjacent at least the distal end of the outer tube, said inner tube having a proximal end, a distal end, a longitudinal axis, a hollow lumen extending longitudinally therethrough, an outer surface and an inner surface;
wherein a portion of the outer surface of the inner tube is connected to a portion of the inner surface of the outer tube;
b) softening a first region of said outer tube to permit said first region to be distended;
c) causing the softened first region of the outer tube to distend; and
d) causing the distended first region of the outer tube to return to a non-softened state, said distended first region thereby forming a balloon on said catheter body.
2. The method of claim 1 wherein the workpiece provided in step a, is formed of polyethylene.
3. The method of claim 1 wherein the workpiece provided in step a, has an inner tube which extends through substantially the entire length of the outer tube, such that said workpiece may be utilized to form an over-the-wire type catheter body.
4. The method of claim 1 wherein said method further comprises the steps of:
forming a side wall aperture in the outer tube of said workpiece, between the proximal and distal end thereof; and,
causing the inner tube to be coupled to said side wall aperture such that said inner tube forms a guidewire lumen which extends from said side wall aperture to the distal end of said inner tube lumen.
5. The method of claim 1 wherein step b, comprises:
irradiating said first region of said outer tube to cause said first region to soften.
6. The method of claim 1 wherein step b, comprises:
heating the first region of said outer tube to cause said first region to soften.
7. The method of claim 1 wherein step b, comprises:
irradiating said first region of said outer tube to soften said first region; and, thereafter,
heating said first region of said outer tube to facilitate distension thereof.
8. The method of claim 7 wherein said irradiation of said first region of said outer tube is accomplished by casting electron beam radiation on said first region of said outer tube.
9. The method of claim 1 wherein step b, comprises:
irradiating said first region of said outer tube to soften said first region;
placing said first region of said outer tube in a mold, said mold having an inner surface of a configuration analogous to the intended configuration of the balloon on said balloon catheter;
and wherein step c, of said method comprises:
causing a pressurized fluid to be introduced between the outer surface of the inner tube and the inner surface of the outer tube so as to cause the first region of the outer tube to distend outwardly into contact with the inner surface of said mold.
10. The method of claim 9 wherein step c, further comprises:
longitudinally drawing said workpiece concurrently with the introduction of said pressurized fluid.
11. The method of claim 10 wherein the step of “longitudinally drawing said workpiece” comprises:
applying a pulling force to the distal end of said workpiece, so as to cause the first region of the workpiece to lengthen while the fist region of said outer tube undergoes distension.
12. The method of claim 11 wherein the first region of the workpiece is caused to lengthen by an amount equal to one half the original length of said first region.
13. The method of claim 1 further comprising the step of:
e) mounting a proximal connector assembly on the proximal end of said workpiece, said proximal connector assembly comprising a rigid body having a balloon fluid inflation port in communication with said outer tube lumen to facilitate infusion and withdrawal of balloon inflation fluid into and out of said balloon.
14. The method of claim 1 wherein the workpiece includes at least one web within the outer tube lumen interconnecting the inner and outer tubes, and including distending at least a portion of the web extending within the softened first region.
15. The method of claim 14 including separating at least a portion of the web extending within the softened first region.
16. A method of manufacturing a balloon catheter, said method comprising the steps of:
a) providing a workpiece which comprises:
i) an outer tube having a proximal end, a distal end, a longitudinal axis, a hollow lumen extending longitudinally therethrough, an outer surface, and an inner surface; and
ii) an inner tube disposed within at least a portion of the lumen of the outer tube, adjacent at least the distal end of the outer tube, said inner tube having a proximal end, a distal end, a longitudinal axis, a hollow lumen extending longitudinally therethrough, an outer surface and an inner surface;
b) irradiating a first region of said workpiece to soften the portion of said outer tube which is within said first region;
c) inserting a first rigid mandrel into the lumen of the inner tube, such that said mandrel extends through said first region;
d) placing a mold adjacent the outer surface of the first region of the outer tube, said mold having an inner surface, said inner surface being shaped to the desired shape of said balloon;
e) closing off the distal end of the lumen of the outer tube, thereby preventing fluid from leaking out of the distal end of the lumen of the outer tube;
f) introducing pressurized fluid into the lumen of the outer tube, outboard of the outer surface of the inner tube to exert outward distending pressure against the first region of the outer tube;
g) concurrently, i) heating and ii) longitudinally drawing said first region of said workpiece while introducing said pressurized fluid, thereby facilitating distention of said first region into contact with the inner surface of said mold to form a balloon of the desired configuration on said workpiece;
h) terminating the introduction of pressurized fluid into the lumen of the outer tube;
i) removing said mold;
j) trimming the distal end of the outer tube and the distal end of the inner tube, as necessary, to cause the distal end of the inner and outer tubes to be substantially coterminous;
k) inserting a second rigid mandrel into the distal end of the lumen of the inner tube;
l) fusing the distal end of the outer tube to the distal end of the inner tube to form a distal closure of the lumen of the outer tube lumen, wherein the second rigid mandrel is inserted, while allowing the distal end of the inner tube lumen to remain open;
m) removing the second rigid mandrel from the inner tube lumen.
17. The method of claim 16 further comprising the step of:
mounting a proximal connector assembly on the proximal end of said workpiece, said proximal connector assembly comprising a rigid body having a balloon fluid inflation port in communication with said outer tube lumen to facilitate infusion and withdrawal of balloon inflation fluid into and out of said balloon.
18. The method of claim 16 wherein said method is utilized to manufacture an over-the-wire type of balloon catheter, and wherein the inner tube of the workpiece provided in step a, extends substantially through the entire length of the outer tube thereof.
19. The method of claim 18 further comprising the step of:
n) mounting a proximal connector assembly on the proximal end of said workpiece, said proximal connector assembly comprising a rigid body having a balloon inflation port in communication with said outer tube lumen to facilitate infusion and withdrawal of balloon inflation fluid into and out of said balloon, and a guide wire passage port in communication with the inner tube lumen to facilitate passage of a guide wire therethrough.
20. The method of claim 16 wherein said method is utilized to manufacture a monorail type balloon catheter, and wherein said method further comprises the steps of:
forming a sidewall aperture in the outer tube between the proximal and distal ends thereof;
causing the inner tube to be coupled to said sidewall aperture such that said inner tube forms a guidewire lumen which extends from said sidewall aperture to the open distal end of the inner tube lumen.
Description

This application is a divisional of application Ser. No. 08/873,071, filed Jun. 11, 1997, now U.S. Pat. No. 5,951,513.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention pertains generally to medical equipment and more precisely to balloon catheters including, but not necessarily limited to, percutaneous transluminal balloon angioplasty catheters.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

i. Typical Balloon Catheter and Procedures

Various types of balloon catheters are utilized in modern clinical medicine. Balloon catheters designed for transluminal angioplasty procedures usually incorporate a single dilation balloon formed on an outer surface of the catheter. The dilation balloon is sized and configured such that inflation of the balloon will effect dilation of an obstructive lesion within a blood vessel or other anatomical passageway. Balloon dilation angioplasty has become a widely accepted method of treating obstructions of the coronary and/or peripheral arteries.

A typical balloon angioplasty catheter comprises an elongate pliable catheter body having a proximal end, a distal end and at least one working lumen extending longitudinally through the catheter body to facilitate infusion of radiographic contrast media or other fluids. An inflatable dilation balloon is mounted on the outer surface of the catheter body, near the distal end thereof. A balloon inflation tube or lumen extends through the catheter body, from a balloon inflation port on the proximal end of the catheter, to the dilation balloon. The working lumen of the catheter may serve as a guide wire passage lumen, or a separate guide wire lumen may be provided apart from the working lumen through which fluids are infused. The guide wire lumen may extend through all, or a portion, of the catheter body to facilitate advancement of the balloon catheter over a prepositioned guide wire. Depending on whether the guide wire lumen extends through all or just a portion of the length of the catheter may be classified as a “monorail” catheter. Further descriptions of the typical “monorail” and “over-the-wire catheter are as follows:

i. Monorail Catheters

In a “monorail” style catheter, a guide wire lumen extends through only a distal portion of the catheter, typically from a distal tip aperture to a proximal aperture formed in the side wall of the catheter body. Accordingly, as the catheter is advanced over the prepositioned guide wire, the proximal end of the guide wire will emerge from the side wall aperture such that the proximal portion of the guide wire remains outside of the catheter body as the catheter is advanced to its desired operative site. If it becomes necessary or desirable to exchange the balloon dilation catheter, the proximally exposed portion of the guide wire can be manually held and stabilized by the operator while the first catheter is removed and a second catheter is slid over the pre-positioned guide wire. Since the length of the catheter that must be passed over the guide wire is lessened in the “monorail” type of arrangement, it is typically easier for the operator to manually stabilize the guide wire during the exchange procedure and the need for a proximal extension or excessively long guide wire is eliminated.

ii. Over-the-Wire Catheters

The “over-the-wire” style of angioplasty catheter incorporates, a guide wire lumen which extends substantially through the entire length of the catheter. The guide wire lumen is separate from the balloon inflation lumen.

iii. Typical PTCA Procedure

In a typical percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) procedure a separate guiding catheter is initially inserted into a femoral artery or other peripheral artery. The guiding catheter is then advanced through the aorta to a position whereat the distal end of the guiding catheter is located adjacent or within the ostium of the coronary to be entered. Thereafter, if a over-the-wire guide wire is inserted into the lumen of a balloon dilation catheter, and both wire and balloon catheter are advanced through the lumen of the guiding catheter. Thereafter, the guide wire is advanced into the obstructed coronary artery to a point where the distal end of the guide wire extends through the obstructive lesion. Thereafter, the balloon dilation catheter is advanced over the guide wire to a point where the dilation balloon is positioned within the obstructive lesion. Thereafter, the dilation balloon is inflated one or more times to dilate of the obstructive lesion, thereby relieving the obstruction of the coronary artery. After the lesion has been dilated, the dilation balloon is fully deflated and the balloon catheter, guiding catheter and guide wire are removed.

iv. Methods of Manufacturing Balloon Catheters

It is desirable that balloon dilation catheters, especially those of the type utilized for the above-described PTCA procedures, be constructed such that the dilation balloon is sufficiently strong to exert the required dilatory pressure against the offending lesion without causing rupture or disruption of the balloon. Also, because such balloon catheters are typically disposable items which are not intended to be reused, it is desirable that such catheters be manufactured as economically as possible to limit the expense associated with their clinical use.

The prior art has included methods for manufacturing balloon dilation catheters whereby the proximal and distal ends of the dilation balloon are affixed or bonded to the outer surface of a flexible cardiovascular catheter. However, such affixation or bonding of the balloon to the catheter typically results in the formation of seams or fusions which could fail or rupture during use.

There remains a need in the art for the development of new methods for manufacturing balloon catheters to eliminate the existence of catheter-balloon seams or fusions which could be subject to failure or leakage.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention provides a method of manufacturing balloon catheters such that a balloon if formed as an integral portion of the catheter, without the need for fusing, bonding or affixing a separate balloon, or portion thereof, to the catheter body.

In accordance with the present invention there is provided a method for forming a balloon catheter. The basic method comprises the steps of:

a. providing an outer tube which has a proximal end, a distal end, a longitudinal axis, a hollow lumen extending longitudinally therethrough, an outer surface and an inner surface;

b. providing an inner tube which extends through at least a portion of the lumen of the outer tube, said inner tube having a proximal end, a distal end, a longitudinal axis, a hollow lumen extending longitudinally therethrough, an outer surface and an inner surface, the distal end of said inner tube being substantially co-terminus with the distal end of said outer tube;

c. causing the distal end of said outer tube to be sealed to the distal end of said inner tube;

d. causing a first region of said outer tube to become radially distended, to thereby form a balloon at said first region.

By the above-set-forth procedure, radial expansion of a specific region or segment of the outer tube serves to form the balloon on the outer surface of the catheter. The balloon formed by this method is integral of and continuous with the catheter body. There exists no seam, bond or fusion between the balloon and the catheter body. The open lumen of the inner tube may be used as a guide wire lumen or working lumen. The proximal end of the inner tube may be accessible at the proximal end of the catheter (i.e., an “over-the-wire” catheter) or may be accessible through an aperture formed in the side wall of the catheter body (i.e., a “monorail” catheter.

Further in accordance with the present invention, there are provided over-the-wire and monorail type balloon catheters manufactured by the above-set-forth method. Such catheters may include balloon dilation catheters of the type useable to perform balloon dilation angioplasty, or, any other type of balloon catheter used in clinical, industrial, research or other applications.

Further objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art upon reading and understanding of the following detailed description, and consideration of the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an over-the-wire balloon catheter manufactured in accordance with the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a longitudinal sectional view of the distal portion of the balloon catheter shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view through line 33 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is a longitudinal section view through line 44 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of a monorail-type balloon catheter manufactured in accordance with the present invention.

FIG. 6 is a longitudinal section view of the distal portion of the monorail catheter of FIG. 5.

FIG. 6a is a cross sectional view through line 6 a6 a of FIG. 6.

FIG. 6b is a cross sectional view through line 6 b6 b of FIG. 6.

FIG. 7 is a longitudinal section view through line 77 of FIG. 6.

FIGS. 8a-8 g are step-wise schematic showings of a preferred balloon catheter manufacturing method in accordance with the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

The following detailed description and the accompanying drawings are provided for purposes of describing and illustrating presently preferred embodiments of the invention only and are not intended to limit the scope of the invention in any way.

FIGS. 1-4 shows an over-the-wire balloon catheter 10 a formed in accordance with the present invention. As shown, the catheter 10 a comprises an elongate pliable catheter body 12 a having a balloon 14 a formed near the distal end thereof, and a proximal Y connector 16 a formed on the proximal end thereof.

The catheter body 12 a is preferably formed of an extruded polyethylene tube-within-a-tube which comprises an outer tube 20 a, an inner tube 22 a and first and second connecting webs or frenula 24 a. The webs or frenula 24 a form connections between the outer surface OS1 of the inner tube 22 a and the inner surface IS2 of the outer tube 20 a. Such webs or frenula 24 a are positioned on directly opposite sides of the inner tube 22 a and are of equal length so as to hold the inner tube 22 a in a coaxially centered position within outer tube 20 a. Luminal space 26 a exists between the inner surface IS2 of the outer tube 20 a and the outer surface OS1 of the inner tube 22 a, on either side of the webs 24 a.

The distal ends of the inner tube 22 a and outer tube 20 a are substantially coterminous, as shown, and are welded, fused, bonded, adhered or otherwise sealed together to form a substantially solid distal portion DP of the catheter body 12 a, thereby, preventing fluid from passing from the luminal space 26 a out of the distal end of the catheter 10 a.

A balloon 14 a is formed near the distal end of the catheter 10 a by radial distension of a region R1 of the outer tube 20 a, near the distal end thereof. Such radial distension of the region R1 of the outer tube 20 a may cause webs or frenula 24 a to tear or separate within the region R, as shown. Or, such webs or frenula 24 a may merely distend, but remain intact to act as inflation limiting webs which will help to deter over inflation and possible rupture of the balloon. As a result, there is created a substantially cylindrical balloon 14 a which is formed integrally of with and continuous with the outer tube 20 a, thereby avoiding any need to seal or bond the balloon to the catheter body 12 a.

The proximal connector 16 a positioned on the proximal end of the catheter 12 a incorporates a first furcation or arm 30 and a second furcation or arm 32. The first furcation or arm 30 of the proximal connector 16 a is coupled to and continuous with the lumen 23 a of the inner tube 22 a. By such arrangement, the proximal end of guide wire may be inserted into the distal end aperture 34 a of the inner tube lumen 23 a, and may be advanced through the entire length of the catheter 12 a such that the proximal end of the guide wire will emerge out of the first furcation or arm 30 of the proximal connector 16 a. Thus, because a guide wire may extend through substantially the entire length of the catheter 10 a, such catheter 10 a shown in FIGS. 1-4 is considered to be an over-the-wire type of catheter.

The second furcation or arm 32 of the proximal connector 16 a is connected to and continuous with the luminal spaces 26 a which exist between the outer surface OS1 of the inner tube 22 a and the inner surface IS2 of the outer tube 20 a. By such arrangement, balloon inflation fluid injected or withdrawn through second furcation or arm 32, will flow through luminal spaces 26 a and into or out of the interior of the balloon 14 a. Because the distal portion DP of the outer tube 20 a is fused, bonded, adhered or otherwise sealed to the distal portion DP of the inner tube 22 a, such balloon inflation fluid will be contained within the catheter 10 a and will be prevented from leaking out of the distal end of the catheter body 12 a.

An alternative “monorail” type of catheter is shown in FIGS. 5-8.

With reference to FIGS. 5-8, there is provided a monorail catheter 10 b comprising an elongate pliable catheter body 12 b having a balloon 14 b formed near the distal end thereof and a proximal connector 16 b mounted on the proximal end thereof.

The pliable catheter body 12 b comprises an outer tube 20 b having an inner surface IS2 and an outer surface OS2. A guide wire passage aperture 40 is formed in the sidewall of the outer tube 20 b. The guide wire passage aperture may be any distance from DE, but in most adult PCTA catheters it is preferably about 40-150 mm from the distal end of the catheter body 12 b. A second tube 22 b extends longitudinally through a distal segment of the lumen 2 b of the outer tube 20 b. The proximal end of the inner tube 22 b is fused, adhered or otherwise held in juxtaposition to the guide wire passage aperture 40 formed in the side wall of the outer tube 20 b, as shown. The distal end of the inner tube 22 b is substantially co-terminus with the distal end of the outer tube 20 b. The distal portions DP of the inner tube 22 b and outer tube 20 b are fused, bonded, adhered or otherwise sealed together to prevent fluid from passing through lumen 26 b out of the distal end of the catheter body 12 b.

The inner tube 22 b has an outer surface OS1 and an inner surface IS1. The inner surface IS1 of the inner tube 22 b defines a hollow lumen 23 b which extends through the inner tube 22 b and opens through the distal end of the catheter body 12 b, as shown. By such arrangement, the proximal end of a guide wire GW may be inserted into the distal end opening of the lumen 23 b of the inner tube 22 b and advanced in the proximal direction such that the proximal end of the guide wire GW will emerge out of guide wire passage aperture 40, thereby allowing the catheter to pass through only a distal portion of the catheter body 12 b. Thus, the configuration of the catheter 12 b shown in FIGS. 5-8 is of the “monorail” catheter type.

A straight proximal connector 16 b is positioned on the proximal end of the catheter body 12 b. Such proximal connector 16 b has a hollow inner bore which is coupled to and continuous with the lumen 26 b of the outer tube 20 b. By such arrangement, balloon inflation fluid which is infused into, or withdrawn from, proximal connector 16 b will flow through the outer tube lumen 26 b, around the outer surface OS1 of the inner tube 22 b and into or out of interior of the balloon 14 b.

The balloon 14 b comprises a radially distended region R1 of the outer tube 20 b. Such radially distended region R1 of the outer tube 20 b is, in the embodiment shown, of substantially cylindrical configuration. Such cylindrical configuration is achieved, as described herebelow, by the positioning of a cylindrical balloon form member about the first region of the outer tube prior to radial distension thereof. It will be appreciated that many other configurations of the balloon may also be achieved by using different configurations of a form member positioned about the first region of the outer tube such that, when the first region of the outer tube undergoes radial distension, it will come into contact with the surrounding balloon form member, thereby causing the balloon to assume the form or configuration of the surrounding form member or mold.

A Preferred Manufacturing Method

In accordance with the present invention, a preferred method for manufacturing the balloon catheter 10 is shown in FIGS. 8a-8 b. In particular, FIGS. 8a-8 b depict the formation of an over the wire balloon catheter 10 a using a tube-within-a-tube type of construction as shown in FIGS. 1-4 hereof. It will be appreciated, however, that the manufacturing method described herebelow may also be utilized to form a “monorail” type catheter of the type shown in FIGS. 5-8 hereof.

FIGS. 8a-g show a step-by-step method of manufacturing the catheter body 12 of a balloon catheter of the present invention.

As shown in FIG. 8a, the initial workpiece is the rudimentary catheter body 12. This workpiece 12 is preferably formed of extrudeable polyethylene material, and comprises an inner tube 22 disposed within an outer tube 20. Connection members, such as webs or frenula 24 extend between the outer surface of the inner tube 22 and the inner surface of the outer tube 20 so as to hold the inner tube 22 in a coaxially centered position within the lumen 26 of the outer tube.

As shown in FIG. 8a, an electron beam irradiation apparatus EBA is utilized to pass electron beam radiation onto the first region FR of the outer tube 20. This first region FR is the portion of the outer tube 20 which is to be subsequently formed into the catheter balloon. Such irradiation results in softening of the first region FR of the outer tube 20 which is to subsequently be formed into the balloon.

Thereafter, as shown in FIG. 8b, a rigid mandrel M, such as a stainless steel rod, is inserted into the lumen 23 of the inner tube 22 to maintain the original size and configuration of the inner tube 22 during the subsequent procedure.

Thereafter, as shown in FIG. 8c, the distal portion of the catheter body 12 is inserted into a suitable mold, preferably a glass mold GM having an internal configuration which is analogous to the intended configuration of the balloon to be formed. An annular clamp CL is applied to distal end of the catheter body 12 to exert radially inward pressure or compression of the inner surface of the outer tube 20 against the outer surface of the inner tube 22, and the inner surface of the inner tube 22 against the rigid mandrel M which is inserted therein. In this regard, the clamp CL is applied in a manner which forms a gas tight seal of the lumenal space 26 of the outer tube 20, at the distal end of the catheter body. This prevents leakage of gas from the lumenal space 26 during the subsequent steps of the manufacturing process.

Thereafter, as shown in FIG. 8d, a heating apparatus HA is utilized to apply heat through the glass mold GM, so as to warm the first region FR of the workpiece 12 positioned within the glass mold GM. Concurrently with the application of heat from the heating apparatus HA, a pressure source PS is utilized to pass positive pressure fluid (e.g., compressed air) into the lumenal space 26 between the outer surface of the inner tube 22 and the inner surface of the outer tube 20. Such positive pressure fluid causes the softened and heated first region FR of the outer tube 20 to undergo outward radial expansion within the surrounding glass mold, as shown. Also concurrently therewith, a pulling element PE is used to draw or pull the distal end of the workpiece 12 in the distal direction, thereby lengthening the heated first region FR of the workpiece which resides within the glass mold GM and causing the heated first region FR of the outer tube 20 and inner tube 22 to become extruded, and decreased in thickness. In the preferred method, the increase L2 in length of the workpiece 12 preferably equals to approximately one half (½) of the length L1 of the first region FR of the workpiece 12.

As shown in FIG. 8e, after the concurrent radial distension and longitudinal drawing have been completed, the first region FR of the outer tube 20 will have distended and conformed to the shape of the surrounding inner surface of the glass mold GM. At this time, the heating apparatus HA is removed or turned off and the catheter body 12 is permitted to cool. The clamp CL is removed from the distal end of the catheter body 12, and the positive pressure is released from the lumenal space 26 thereby allowing the newly created balloon 14 to become deflated.

As shown in FIG. 8f, the workpiece 12 is removed from the glass mold GM and the rigid mandrel M is removed. A cutting apparatus is utilized to cut the distal end of the workpiece 12, thereby removing the portion of the distal end which had previously been compressed within the clamp CL.

Thereafter, as shown in FIG. 8g, a second rigid mandrel M2 is inserted into the distal end of the lumen 23 of the inter tube 20, and a second heating apparatus HA2 is utilized to heat-fuse or thermally weld the distal end of the outer tube 20 to the distal end of the inner tube 22, thereby completing the transformation of the original workpiece into a catheter body 12 having a smooth distal tip through which the inner tube lumen 23 opens.

Thus, the steps of the method shown in FIGS. 8a-8 g result in the formation of a balloon catheter body 12 of an over-the-wire catheter of the type shown in FIGS. 1-4 of this patent application.

It will be appreciated that the invention has been described herein with reference in terms of presently preferred or exemplary embodiments only. No effort has been made to exhaustivly describe each and every embodiment in which the device of the present invention may take physical form, or by which the method of the present invention may be practiced. Indeed, it will be appreciated by those skilled in the art, that various modifications, additions, deletions and changes may be made to the herein-described preferred embodiments without departing from the intended spirit and scope of the present invention.

Patent Citations
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US5315747 *Oct 30, 1992May 31, 1994Pameda N.V.Method of preparing a balloon dilatation catheter
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6752954 *Jun 14, 2001Jun 22, 2004Sumitomo Electric Fine Polymer, Inc.Roller producing method
US7261850 *Jun 30, 2004Aug 28, 2007Cordis CorporationMethods of making balloon catheter tip
US8034280Sep 1, 2009Oct 11, 2011Boston Scientific Scimed, Inc.Balloon catheters and methods for manufacturing balloons for balloon catheters
US8187523 *Sep 9, 2009May 29, 2012Covidien AgMethod for manufacturing a cuff on plastic tube provided with an external sheath
WO2006112941A2 *Feb 16, 2006Oct 26, 2006Cytori Therapeutics IncResorbable hollow devices for implantation and delivery of therapeutic agents
Classifications
U.S. Classification264/456, 264/512, 264/163, 264/532, 264/516, 264/152, 264/480, 264/573, 264/479, 264/535
International ClassificationA61M25/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61M2025/0183, A61M25/1029, A61M2025/0004, A61M2025/1063
European ClassificationA61M25/10G1
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Nov 4, 2003CCCertificate of correction