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Publication numberUS6614110 B1
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 09/745,966
Publication dateSep 2, 2003
Filing dateDec 22, 2000
Priority dateDec 22, 1994
Fee statusPaid
Publication number09745966, 745966, US 6614110 B1, US 6614110B1, US-B1-6614110, US6614110 B1, US6614110B1
InventorsBenedict G Pace
Original AssigneeBenedict G Pace
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Module with bumps for connection and support
US 6614110 B1
Abstract
An electronic packaging module for inverted bonding of electronic devicss including semiconductor devices, integrated circuits, application specific integrated circuits, electomechanical devices and MEMS is produced with protuberances on the conductive pattern of the substrate. The protuberances are of a soft, ductile metal capable of being metallurgically bonded to the input/output pads of electronic devices. The input/output pads of the devices may be simultaneously bonded to the protuberances of the packaging module.
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Claims(16)
What I claim is:
1. In a rigid, insulating support for one or more electromechanical devices, the insulating support having a conductive pattern of one or more conductive pattern layers for electrical connection to the device(s), the improvement comprising:
metal protuberances protruding from the conductive pattern, the metal protuberances being a soft, ductile metal capable of being metallurgically bonded to the device(s) by welding;
the metal of the protuberances being selected from the group consisting of aluminum, copper, gold, indium, silver, and alloys comprising these metals;
the protuberances being capable of being simultaneously bonded to the device, and
the protuberances being high enough to compensate for the variations due to the camber, planarity and overall size of both the insulating support and the device during the bonding process, and not so high that they collapse and short circuit elements in the device(s).
2. An insulating support for an electromechanical device according to claim 1, wherein the electromechanical device is a miniature electromechanical system (MEMS).
3. An insulating support according to claim 2, wherein the electromechanical device is a semiconductor minature electomechanical system.
4. An insulating support according to claim 2, further comprising a dielectric, insulating layer covering the conductive pattern; the insulating layer having openings to the conductive pattern, and the soft, ductile, metal protuberances protruding from the conductive pattern above the insulating layer.
5. An insulating support according to claim 1, wherein the protuberances are in a pattern corresponding to the input/output and support pads of the electromechanical device(s).
6. An insulating support according to claim 1, wherein the metal protuberances provide physical support for the electromechanical device.
7. An insulating support according to claim 1, wherein the soft, ductile metal is an electrodeposited gold.
8. In a package for one or more electromechanical devices having a rigid, insulating support for the device, the insulating support having a conductive pattern of one or more conductive pattern layers for electrical connection to the device(s), the improvement comprising:
metal protuberances protruding from the conductive pattern, the metal protuberances being a soft, ductile metal capable of being metallurgically bonded to the device(s) by welding;
the metal of the protuberances being selected from the group consisting of aluminum, copper, gold, indium, silver, and alloys comprising these metals;
the protuberances being capable of being simultaneously bonded to the device, and
the protuberances being high enough to compensate for the variations due to the camber, planarity and overall size of both the insulating support and the device(s) during the bonding process, and not so high that they collapse and short circuit elements in the device(s).
9. A package for an electromechanical device according to claim 8, wherein the electromechanical device is a miniature electromechanical system (MEMS).
10. A package according to claim 9, wherein the electromechanical device is a semiconductor minature electomechanical system.
11. A package according to claim 8, further comprising a dielectric, insulating layer covering the conductive pattern of the insulating support; the insulating layer having openings to the conductive pattern, and the soft, ductile, metal protuberances protruding from the conductive pattern above the insulating layer.
12. A package according to claim 8, wherein the protuberances are in a pattern corresponding to the input/output and support pads of the electromechanical device.
13. A package according to claim 8, wherein the metal protuberances provide physical support for the electromechanical device.
14. A package according to claim 8, wherein the soft, ductile metal is an electrodeposited gold.
15. In a rigid, insulating support for one or more electromechanical devices, the insulating support having a conductive pattern of one or more conductive pattern layers for electrical connection to the device(s), the improvement comprising:
metal protuberances protruding from the conductive pattern, the metal protuberances being a soft, ductile metal capable of being metallurgically bonded to the device(s) at a temperature below the melting point of the soft, ductile, metal protuberances;
the protuberances being capable of being simultaneously bonded to the device, and
the protuberances being high enough to compensate for the variations due to the camber, planarity and overall size of both the insulating support and the device during the bonding process, and not so high that they collapse and short circuit elements in the device(s).
16. A rigid, insulating support for one or more electromechanical devices according to claim 15, wherein the metal of the protuberances is selected from the group consisting of aluminum, copper, gold, indium, silver, and alloys comprising these metals.
Description

This is a continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 09/311,081, filed May 13, 1999, now U.S. Pat. No. 6,165,820 which is a division of application Ser. No. 08/906,045, filed Aug. 5, 1997, now U.S. Pat. No. 5,904,499, which is a continuation-in-part of Ser. No. 08/767,160, filed Dec. 16, 1996, now U.S. Pat. No. 5,886,441, which is a continuation of application Ser. No. 08/689,388, filed Aug. 12, 1996, now U.S. Pat. No. 5,627,406, which is a continuation of application Ser. No. 08/361,931, filed Dec. 22, 1994, and now abandoned.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention is related to the fields of electronic interconnections for electronic devices including semiconductor devices, integrated circuits, application specific integrated circuits and electromechanical devices.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Pace, in U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,627,406, 5,793,105, 5,866,441, 5,904,499 and 6,165,820 has disclosed electronic packaging modules for inverted bonding of electronic devices, semiconductor devices, integrated circuits and application specific integrated circuits, and methods of making the modules. The modules are characterized by a substrate or base having a conductive pattern with soft, ductile, metal protuberances on the conductive pattern; and the protuberances being capable of being metallurgically bonded to the input/output pads of electronic devices.

The Controlled Collapse Chip Connection (C4) is a method of flip chip mounting of semiconductor chips. In the C4 process solder bumps are formed on a semiconductor chip. The solder bumps are used to connect the chip to its package, such as a single chip module (SCM) or multichip module (MCM).

The C4 process has been used by only a few large volume manufacturers because it requires specially designed integrated circuits. The contacts of integrated circuits for the C4 process are in a grid over the surface of the chip, not on the perimeter as in the usual integrated circuit. Also the chips must be specially prepared for the user by the integrated circuit manufacturer with a thin layer of chromium and 0.1 mm (4 mil) high bumps of 97 Pb/3 Sn solder over the contacts.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In one aspect the invention is an electronic device package comprising the device and a rigid, insulating substrate which has a conductive pattern. The conductive pattern is electrically connected to the device by soft, ductile, metal protuberances protruding from the conductive pattern of the substrate.

An embodiment of the invention is a circuit module as a first level package for a semiconductor device. The module has a rigid, planar, insulating substrate that has a metallic, conductive pattern of one or more conductive pattern layers. The conductive pattern comprises thick or thin film metal layers. Each conductive pattern layer has an insulating layer over it. The conductive pattern layers are interconnected by metal filled vias in the insulating layers. The substrate has metal contacts that are connected to the conductive pattern, and are capable of making electrical connection to another electronic package or a higher level of electronic packaging. This embodiment of the invention is characterized by an outermost conductive pattern layer, having metal protuberances thereon, the protuberances rising above the surface of the layer, and the protuberances being a soft, ductile metal capable of being metallurgically bonded to the input/output pads of a semiconductor device. The metal protuberances provide connections to input/output pads of a semiconductor device and from the device to the conductive pattern of the electronic packaging module and through the metal contacts to another module or the next level electronic package.

In another embodiment, the invention is an electronic packaging module or circuit module for semiconductor devices. The base of the module is a planar, insulating substrate. The substrate has a metallic, conductive pattern. The conductive pattern has one or more conductive pattern layers. The conductive pattern layers are formed from either thick or thin film layers, or a combination of thick film layers and thin film layers. The substrate also has metal contacts connected to the conductive pattern, and capable of making electrical connection to another electronic package or a higher level of electronic packaging. The layers of the conductive pattern are separated by insulating layers, and the conductive pattern layers are interconnected by metal filled vias in the insulating layers. The outermost, conductive pattern layer has metal protuberances protruding above the surface of the layer. The protuberances are made of a soft, ductile metal capable of being metallurgically bonded to the input/output pads of a semiconductor device or integrated circuit chip, and are capable of providing input/output connections for semiconductor devices through the connections to the conductive pattern of the package or circuit module and through the metal contacts to another electronic package or the next level electronic package.

In another embodiment, the invention is a module that employs as a base a ceramic or glass/ceramic substrate having a standard pattern of conductive feed-throughs. One side of the base is provided with contact pads, balls or pins connected to the feed-throughs, and the other side of the base is provided with a conductive pattern of one or more conductive pattern layers. Selected feed-throughs required by a custom module design are connected to the conductive pattern and feed-throughs not used in the custom module design are isolated by coating with an insulating layer. The conductive pattern is covered with an insulating layer of a dielectric composition. Laser ablation forms openings in the insulating layer covering the conductive pattern. The openings are made in a pattern corresponding to the input/output pads of one or more semiconductor devices or integrated circuit chips. Soft ductile metal is plated into the openings and forms protuberances above the fired layer. The semiconductor devices are metallurgically bonded to the protuberances, making connection through the protuberances to the conductive pattern and through the feed-throughs to the contact pads, balls or pins on the substrate.

In yet another embodiment, the electronic packaging module is a SCM, single chip module with high packaging efficiency. The high packaging efficiency arises since the SCM may be less than 6 mm (0.15 in.) wider than the bare integrated circuit die. The SCM is composed of a planar base with conductive feed-throughs in the base. On one side of the base the conductive feed-throughs are joined to a ball, column, land, or pin grid array. On the other side the feed-throughs are connected to a conductive pattern of thick and/or thin film metal layers. The conductive pattern layers are separated by insulating layers. The topmost, insulating layer has metal filled openings in it. The metal in the openings connects to underlying conductive pattern layer below, and ends above in soft, ductile metal protuberances protruding above the surface of the insulating layer. The protuberances are metallurgically bonded to the input/output pads of a semiconductor device or integrated circuit die. The semiconductor device is connected through the protuberances and the conductive pattern of the module and the feed-throughs of the substrate to a grid array of metal contacts underneath the die, and the area of the substrate having the grid array is inside the perimeter of the integrated circuit chip.

The present invention is also an improved method of forming bumped substrates having metal protuberances suitable for bonding to the input/out pads (I/O's) of semiconductor, electronic and miniature electromechanical devices. The substrates have a conductive pattern. The conductive pattern includes basis metal pads which correspond to the I/O's of the devices.

A further embodiment of the invention is a method of making electrical connections to electro mechanical devices by means of metal protuberances on the conductive pattern of a ceramic substrate. The protuberances both support the device and electrically connect it.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is view of a SCM, single circuit module according to this invention.

FIG. 2 is an exploded view of the SCM of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a view of a MCM, multichip module according to this invention.

FIG. 4 is and exploded view the MCM of FIG. 3.

FIGS. 5a-5 h illustrates the steps in preparing a module according to this invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to a methods of connecting and/or supporting electronic devices. It is a method of forming metal protuberances on the surface of a substrate. The metal protuberances formed according to the method of this invention are capable of providing electrical connections and physical support for the electronic devices. Electronic devices include active and passive components, semiconductor dice and electromechanical devices. Electromechanical devices include relays, shutters, solenoids, accelerators, miniature electromechanical systems (MEMS) and the like. MEMS include, but are not limited to, micro flowmeters, miniature tuning forks, optical shutters, micropumps, miniature metering valves, miniature electromechanical relays, sensors, air-bag sensors and solenoids.

One aspect of the invention comprises a method of forming connections for semi-conductors, electronic and electromechanical devices. The connecting means is an insulating substrate or base that has a conductive pattern. The conductive pattern forms the connection from the device to a package or another assembly. The electronic devices are joined to the conductive pattern by metal protuberances from the conductive pattern.

The electronic packages have planar, insulating substrates. Ceramic substrates comprising aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride, beryllium oxide, boron nitride, cordierite, mullite, silicon carbide and silicon nitride are suitable. Especially suitable are substrates whose thermal expansion characteristics are closely matched to the device, e.g. for semiconductor devices, substrates such as silicon, sapphire and glass/ceramics comprising aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride, beryllium oxide, boron nitride, cordierite, mullite, silicon carbide and silicon nitride are especially suitable.

The conductive patterns of the electronic packages may be prepared using the sputtered metal and high polymer dielectrics characteristic of the MCM-D (Multichip Module-Deposited) technique, but thick or thin film metallization on fired, inorganic dielectrics are preferred.

An important feature of the invention is the formation of metal protuberances on the package joined to the conductive pattern and capable of being metallurgically bonded to the input/output pads of an electronic device (including active components, integrated circuits and ASICs, passive components, electomechanical devices and MEMS). The metal protuberances may be simultaneously bonded to the input/output pads of a semiconductor device, which is a simpler and faster process than the conventional, sequential wire bonding process.

The metal protuberances should be high enough above the surface of the electronic package to form a reliable metallurgical bond with the input/output pads of the device. The protuberances should be greater than 5 μm high, and preferably greater than 10 μm. The protuberances must be high enough to compensate for the variations due to the camber, planarity and overall size of the both the electronic package and the device, and not so high that they collapse and short circuit in the bonding process. On 96% alumina substrates, protuberances as low as 25 μm are effective in bonding semiconductor devices with length and breadth up to 5 mm, and protuberances up to 80 μm are also effective. Smaller protuberances are effective on smoother substrates such as polished 99% alumina ceramics. Still smaller protuberances are effective for still smoother surfaces such as silicon wafers.

The input/output pads of electronic devices are commonly metallized with aluminum or gold. The metal protuberances are capable of metallurgically bonding to the pads by welding processes including thermocompression, thermosonic or ultrasonic welding, or by brazing by soldering.

The metal of the metal protuberances is selected from the group comprising aluminum, copper, gold, indium, lead, silver, tin and alloys of these metals.

Aluminum or gold protuberances are preferred when the metallization of the input/output pads of the semiconductor device is aluminum. Aluminum protuberances are formed by vacuum deposition of aluminum through a shadow mask. Gold protuberances are preferably formed by electrodeposition or electroless deposition. The metallurgical bonds between the gold protuberances and the pads can be formed by thermocompression, thermosonic or ultrasonic bonding. Gold protuberances are also suitable when the metallization of the semiconductor input/output is gold or aluminum. For thermocompression, thermosonic or ultrasonic bonding the metal protuberances should be soft, and ductile.

Indium metal protuberances are suitable for forming metallurgical bonds to gold metallization on the input/output pads. The metal protuberances also may be lead/indium or tin/indium alloys. The alloy metal protuberances are preferably overplated with a layer of pure indium. Indium and indium coated protuberances may be metallurgically bonded to the input/output pads of the semiconductor devices by an indium fusing or soldering process.

In one embodiment the invention, shown in FIG. 1, is a compact, ceramic, chip carrier or SCM, single chip module, 100 with high packaging efficiency. The SCM has a conductive pattern on a ceramic substrate 110 as a base. The base has area array contacts 120 for interconnection to second level packaging and a metal or ceramic frame 150 around the semiconductor device or integrated circuit chip. The area array of contacts may be an irregular array or a regular array such as a ball, pin, pad or column array. A metal or ceramic plug 170 is brazed to the frame to seal the module.

In FIG. 2 the components of the module are shown. The hybrid circuit base 110 has protuberances 130 of a soft, ductile metal. The soft, ductile metal of the protuberances is capable of metallurgically bonding to the I/O's, input/output contacts, of a semiconductor device or integrated circuit chip. A semiconductor device 140 is inverted for bonding so that the I/O's face the protuberances on the hybrid circuit base. The I/O contacts of the device are joined to the soft, ductile, metal protuberances of the hybrid circuit base by soldering or thermocompression, ultrasonic or thermosonic bonding. The I/O contacts are then interconnected by the hybrid circuit conductive pattern to the area grid array.

The frame of the module 150 has a wall thickness of 0.4-1 mm (15-40 mils). The frame fits closely around the integrated circuit die, so that the overall module is only 1.6-6 mm (40-150 mils) bigger than the die. For hermetically sealed modules, the frame is made of ceramic or metal. Ceramic frames are glass bonded to the base, and metal frames are brazed. A ceramic frame will preferably be metallized on its upper surface 160 for brazing to the metal plug.

The plug 170 is inside the frame preferably making contact with the back of the integrated circuit chip. When efficient removal of heat from the integrated circuit chip is required the plug is preferably made of metal or a heat conductive ceramic. Also, the plug preferably is made of an material that matches the thermal expansion of the base and the frame such as a copper/tungsten, nickel/cobalt/iron alloy or beryllia. The plug is soldered or bonded to the frame to seal the module.

When heat removal is not a serious problem, or the heat is removed through the module base, the frame may be closed with a cover that is not in contact with the chip.

When hermetic sealing is not required the integrated circuit may be sealed by molded plastic or a plastic enclosure adhesively bonded to the base, e.g., with an epoxy adhesive.

The embodiments shown in FIGS. 1, and 2 as SCMs (Single Chip Modules) provide a rugged package for full functional testing and/or burn-in of integrated circuits. After the testing and/or burn-in that provides known good die (KGD), the SCM can be mounted in a multichip package with packaging efficiency approaching or exceeding that of a wire-bonded chip,

When SCM packages are sealed or encapsulated in plastic, or hermetically sealed, the length and breadth of the base 110 of the SCM package may be as small as 1.6 mm (40 mils) greater than the length and breadth of the die. Preferably the base is smaller than 6 mm (150 mils) greater than the length and breadth of the die, and more preferably as small as 2.75 mm (70 mils) greater than the length and breadth of the die.

The highest packaging efficiency, and the smallest single chip package for testing and/or burn-in to obtain known good die (KGB), is achieved when the length and breadth of the base 110 are only 0.25 mm greater than, or even the same as, the length and breadth of the die. In this embodiment of the invention, the SCM is not encapsulated in plastic or hermetically sealed with the frame 150 and plug 170. The bond of the device to substrate can be further enhanced by a organic or inorganic adhesive means. The SCM comprises only the base 110 having a conductive pattern and conductive feed-throughs to grid array contacts, and the die 140 metallurgically bonded to metal protuberances 130. After testing and/or burn-in to verify a KGD, SCM may be subsequently mounted in a multichip module, and the whole multichip module sealed by encapsulating in plastic or in a hermetically sealed package.

A MCM, multichip module, embodiment of the invention is shown in FIG. 3. The MCM 300 also has a high packaging efficiency. The MCM has a ceramic, hybrid circuit 310 as a base. The base has area array contacts 320 for interconnection to second level packaging and a metal or ceramic frame 350 around the integrated circuit chips and other components. Metal or ceramic plugs 370 are brazed to the frame to seal the module.

In FIG. 4 the components of the module are shown. The hybrid circuit base 310 has metallic pads 331 for bonding chip capacitors or other components. The hybrid circuit also has protuberances 330 of a soft, ductile metal. The soft, ductile metal of the protuberances is capable of metallurgically bonding to the IOs, input/output contacts, of a semiconductor device or integrated circuit chip. Semiconductor devices 340 and other components 341 are bonded in place. The devices and the other components are interconnected by the hybrid circuit conductive pattern, and connected by the hybrid circuit pattern to the area grid array.

The frame of the module 350 has a minimum wall thickness of 0.4 mm (15 mils). The frame fits closely around the integrated circuit dice and the other components, so that the overall module (FIG. 3, 300) has a high packaging efficiency. For hermetically sealed modules, the frame is made of ceramic or metal. A ceramic frame will preferably be metallized on its upper surface 360 for soldering to the metal plugs.

The plugs 370 fit inside the frame and contact the back of the integrated circuit chips in order to efficiently remove heat from the integrated circuit. The plugs are soldered or bonded to the frame to seal the module.

It will be obvious to those skilled in the art, that, since the chip is against the top of the package, heat sinks, heat exchangers or chill plates mounted on the top of the package will be a more efficient way to remove heat than in conventional “cavity up” packages where the heat has to be removed through the substrate into the next level package, e.g., a printed circuit board.

When heat removal is not a serious problem, or the heat is removed through the module base, the frame may be closed with a cover that is not in contact with the chip.

When hermetic sealing is not required the package may be sealed by molded plastic or a plastic enclosure adhesively bonded to the base, e.g., with an epoxy adhesive.

A disclosure of the steps of the process for manufacturing a single chip or multichip module is presented in FIGS. 5a-5 h.

A planar substrate 510 provided with conductive feed-throughs 520, 521 and terminals 522 for connection to the next level of electronic packaging is illustrated in FIG. 5a. Any suitable electronic insulating material may be used for the substrate 510. Suitable material include silicon, sapphire and ceramics and glass/ceramics comprising alumina, mullite, cordierite, beryllia, aluminum nitride, boron nitride, silicon nitride, silicon carbide and silicon carbide with a small percentage of beryllia.

The feed-throughs 520 and 521 should have good conductivity and preferably maintain a hermetic seal. Refractive metal feed-throughs of tungsten or molybdenum prepared by the co-firing metal pastes in green ceramics provide hermetic feed-throughs.

The feed-throughs are usually arranged in a grid array, but they can be arranged in any convenient pattern. The pad pitch in the grid array may be 0.15-2.5 mm (6-100 mils) as required. A pad pitch between 0.25 and 0.5 mm (10-20 mils) is preferred for SCMs (single circuit modules); a 0.25-1.3 mm (10-50 mils) pad pitch is preferred for MCMs, and 1.3-2.5 mm (50-100 mils) pad pitch is preferred for pin grid arrays. Pins may be attached to the feed-throughs to provide a pin gird array.

A metal layer 513 is applied over the substrate as shown in FIG. 5b.

In one embodiment a layer of thick film metallic paste is applied over the surface of a ceramic substrate. The paste layer may cover the complete planar surface, or only a portion of the surface where metal conductors are required. The metallic paste may be selected from thick film conductor pastes containing copper, gold, platinum, palladium, silver or mixtures and alloys thereof. Copper and gold conductor pastes are preferred. One suitable gold contains 88% gold, 3-4% glass with 8-9% organic binder of ethyl cellulose and terpineol. A suitable copper paste is C7230™ Copper Conductor Paste commercially available from Heraeus Inc., Cermalloy Div., West Conshohocken, Pa. 19428.

The paste on the substrate is dried and fired to convert it to a metallic layer 513. A gold paste is fired in air and a copper paste is fired in a nitrogen atmosphere, both at 850° C. The metal layer is preferably 8-12 μm thick after firing.

Alternatively, the metal layer 513 may be deposited by a thin film technique. A suitable thin film metallization has a bonding layer of titanium/tungsten or chromium and 1-5 μm (40-200 microinches) of copper or gold.

FIG. 5c shows the production of a first conductive pattern layer 514 on the substrate 510. The first conductive pattern layer 514 is shown as an interdigitated voltage and ground plane. The conductive pattern is produced by the procedures of copending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 08/171,696, now U.S. Pat. No. 5,378,313, which is incorporated herein by reference.

An etch resistant image of the first conductive pattern layer is printed over the metal layer with a photoresist. Any photoresist, positive or negative acting, may be used provided it is not soluble in the etchant chosen, has good adhesion to the metal layer, and is capable of resolving 10 μm lines and spaces. One suitable photoresist is AZ 4210™ available from American Hoechst, Branchberg, N.J. The etch resist image leaves exposed a ring isolating each of the feed-throughs that should not be connected to the voltage/ground plane. The portion of the metal layer not covered by resist is etched away. A suitable etchant must remove all traces of the metal between the conductors without serious undercut the conductor edges. A suitable etchant for a gold layer is iodine in an aqueous solution of potassium iodide such as CGE-100™ from Micro Pac Co., Garland Tex. Suitable copper etchants include sodium or ammonium peroxydisulfate solutions at 120-250 g/l, copper (II) chloride at 75-200 g/l, hydrogen peroxide 1-1.5 m/l in 1.5-3 molar sulfuric acid, 0.5-1.5 copper ammonium chloride at a pH of 8-9, and 30-48°Bé ferric chloride with 0.1 to 1.2 m/l hydrochloric acid. Copper etchants are used at temperatures between 15-50° C. depending on the copper paste and etching solution used.

After etching the etch resist is stripped leaving the voltage/ground plane pierced by rings around the feed-throughs for the signal planes. Feed-throughs 521 which make connection to the signal planes are isolated from the voltage and ground plane by insulating rings 515. The rings should isolate the voltage or power grids from the feed-throughs by at least 25 μm (1 mil), preferably by at least 50 μm (2 mils), and more preferably by 125 μm (5 mils). Feed-throughs 520 are voltage and ground connections and are not surrounded by an insulating ring.

A dielectric layer 516 is applied over the conductive pattern layer 514 as shown in FIG. 5d. The dielectric may be an organic dielectric such as or an inorganic dielectric such as a silica or thick film dielectric.

Thick film dielectric layers are formed by coating the conductive pattern layer 514 with a dielectric composition and firing to fuse the dielectric layer. The dielectric layer may be applied by any convenient technique, screen printing, roller coating, doctor blade or as a dry, green film. No dielectric vias need be printed or formed before firing the dielectric. Suitable dielectrics may be selected by methods described in copending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 08/171,696, now U.S. Pat. No. 5,378,313. In order to avoid pinholes in the dielectric layer, especially screen printed dielectric layers, preferably two applications and firings are made of the dielectric composition. Additional coatings and firings may be used as long as the overall thickness of the dielectric layer is not so great that the laser energy required to form a via would damage or destroy the underlying conductor. Preferably the dielectric layer will be at least 10 μm (0.4 mils) thick, more preferably 20 μm thick.

Openings 517 in the dielectric, to accommodate vias between layers, are formed by laser ablation through the dielectric layer. The laser energy is controlled to prevent damage or destruction of the underlying conductors. The quantity of laser energy required, which varies with the composition and thickness of the dielectric layer, can be determined empirically. No via artmaster is required. The X-Y coordinates of the vias are fed to the laser controller. The openings can have a diameter between 10-150 μm (0.4-6 mils) depending on the pitch needed for the conductive pattern.

Many commercially available thick film pastes are suitable for forming the dielectric layer. One suitable screen printable dielectric composition is CERMALLOY IP-9117™ from Heraeus Inc., West Conshohocken, Pa. 19428. The fired dielectric layer must be capable of maintaining its shape without reflow after laser ablation or after firing of subsequent layers. The dielectric layer must absorb the laser energy and form clean vias through the layer with minimum damage or penetration of the underlying conductor. Dielectric compositions which do not efficiently absorb the laser beam require high laser energy that either penetrates through the underlying conductor layer, cracks, burns or blisters the dielectric layer around the via, or forms an elevated ridge around the via.

In one alternative procedure, the conductive pattern layer 514 is coated with a polymer such as polyimide or polybenzocyclobutane forming the dielectric layer 516, and the openings 517 are laser ablated, or photoimaged in the polymer before crosslinking the polymer. In another alternative procedure the conductive pattern layer is coated with a silica as the dielectric layer 516. The openings 517 are laser ablated, or the silica dielectric is covered with a mask, and the openings 517 are formed by chemical or plasma etching.

A second, metal layer is applied that covers the dielectric layer 516 and fills the openings. The second, metal layer may also be a either a thick film or thin film metal layer when the dielectric layer is a fired, inorganic layer. The second, metal layer is a sputtered or vacuum deposited metal when the dielectric layer is a polymer or silica dielectric.

A photoresist image of the X-signal plane is applied to the second layer, and a second, conductive pattern layer 518 is formed by etching. The minimum conductor width will be at least 10 μm (0.4 mil). The minimum spacing between conductors will be at least 10 μm. Preferably the minimum conductor line width and spacing will be 60 μm (2.4 mils).

The second, conductive pattern layer is then covered with a second, dielectric layer. Openings are made in the dielectric layer, and a third, metal layer is applied. The third, metal layer makes connections to the X-signal, conductive pattern layer through the openings as shown in FIG. 5e.

In FIG. 5f a third, conductive pattern layer 519, the Y-signal plane, is shown. The Y-signal, conductive pattern layer is formed from the third conductive metal layer by photolithography.

A third, dielectric layer is applied over Y-signal, conductive pattern layer. Openings to the Y-signal, conductive pattern layer are made through the dielectric layer. The openings have a diameter at least 1 μm (0.4 mils) and less than 150 μm (6 mils), preferably at least 25 μm (1 mil) and preferably less than 75 μm (3 mils). The pitch of the openings matches the pitch of the I/O's (input/output pads) of the integrated circuits, and the pattern of the openings makes a mirror image of the IO pad pattern of the integrated circuit. The openings are filled with a pure, soft, ductile metal. The metal should be soft enough to permit simultaneously welding of the protuberances to the input/output pads of the integrated circuit die without requiring welding pressures so high as to damage the die. Soft, ductile gold is deposited by electroplating or electroless plating. The softness of the gold is dictated by the pressure required to thermocompression, thermosonically or ultrasonically bond to the die. If the pressure is too great it may damage the die. Large dice with many input/output pads require softer gold to minimize gang bonding pressure and reduce the stress on the die. A suitable gold is produced by the Aurall 292 Process, available from LeaRonal Inc., Freeport, N.Y. 11520, USA. The Aurall 292 Gold Process uses a electroplating solution containing 8-16 g/l gold at a pH between 6 and 8, and is believed to contain a phosphonate chelating agent.

As shown in FIG. 5g the metal is deposited to fill the openings and form hemispherical protuberances 530 over the openings that are 10-80 μm (0.4-3 mils) high.

In order to prevent lateral growth of gold deposits, the plating conditions must be tightly controlled. For example, to obtain uniform gold protuberances using the Aurall 292 Gold Process the pH is maintained at 6.8-7.2, the current density is 0.72 amps/dm2, the solution temperature is 26-40° C. (preferably 29-31° C.), and the solution is stirred strongly. If in this plating solution temperature is too high, there is excessive lateral growth; if the temperature is too low, the gold deposit becomes nodular.

In an alternative procedure, the third, dielectric layer is a temporary resist. The openings in the third dielectric layer are made by laser ablation or photoimaging and the temporary resist is stripped after forming the protuberances 530.

FIG. 5h illustrates an integrated circuit chip 540 having gold or aluminum bonding pads 541 being inverted and placed over the module with the bonding pads in position over the protuberances 530, and the all the chip bonding pads simultaneously thermocompression bonded to the module. C4 integrated circuits with Pb/Sn alloys on the I/O pads may also be bonded in a similar manner to the single chip and multichip modules of this invention.

In the final operations (not shown) the module is sealed by applying a frame and a cover or a frame and plug(s) to the module.

In yet another embodiment, the invention comprises a standardized ceramic substrate having cofired refractory metal feed-throughs in a standard area array pattern. A particular conductive pattern may not use all of the feed-throughs. The standard substrate is customized for a particular pattern by isolating the inactive feed-throughs with an insulating layer. The first conductive pattern layer may be formed on the substrate, and the inactive feed-throughs isolated by the first insulating layer. Alternately an insulating layer covers the substrate and the feed-throughs, and openings are laser drilled though the insulating layer exposing the feed-throughs that are required by the customized pattern. The conductive pattern is then applied as described above, the first metallization layer making contact through the openings to the required feed-throughs.

In another embodiment, SCM and MCM packages are provided with “Flat Pack” termination for attachment to the next level package, e.g., a printed circuit board. Flat pack metal contacts maybe positioned on ether the upper or lower surface of the SCM or MCM packages.

When the flat pack metal contacts are positioned on the upper surface of the package, a planar, insulating substrate is provided as the base for the flat pack module. A layer of thin film or thick film metallization is applied to the substrate.

For thick film metallization, a thick film conductor paste may be screen printed on the substrate. The contacts for brazing or soldering of flat pack leads are applied before the thick film metallization layer when refractory metal contacts are used. Platinum/gold or palladium/silver contacts may be applied before or after thick film metallization. The contact pattern is printed around the perimeter of conductive pattern using a paste suitable for brazed or soldered connections such as a refractory metal paste, a palladium/silver or a platinum/gold paste. The thick film metallization is completed by drying and firing the conductor paste on the substrate.

A photoresist is coated over the metal layer. A photoresist image with minimum lines and spaces between 10 μm and 150 μm wide (0.4-6 mils), and corresponding to the conductive pattern of the first layer of a hybrid circuit is printed and developed on the metal layer. The metal not protected by the resist image is etched away. The photoresist is stripped off leaving a metallic conductive pattern. For substrates coated with thin film metallization the etched conductive pattern includes contacts for subsequent brazing or soldering of flat pack leads.

The screen printed contacts slightly overlap selected conductors of the metal conductive pattern.

A thick film dielectric paste is screen printed over the metal conductive pattern. The dielectric paste is printed and fired at least two times to give a dielectric layer approximately 8-12 m thick.

Laser drilled openings are formed in the dielectric layer. The opening diameters are between 10-150 μm (0.4-6 mils). No via artmaster is required, since the positions of all the openings are computed by the design software which was used to drive the laser.

A second layer of metallic conductive paste is printed and fired over the dielectric layer. The metal fills the openings making contact to the first conductive pattern layer. The second conductive pattern layer is formed from the second metal layer by the photolithographic technique described above.

A second dielectric layer is formed over the second conductive pattern layer by the procedure described above. Laser ablated openings are drilled through the second dielectric layer to the second conductive pattern layer below.

Additional conductive pattern layers may applied as required. Each conductive pattern layer is covered by a thick film dielectric layer. Openings to the previously applied conductive pattern layer are made through the dielectric layer by laser drilling.

The final conductive pattern layer also is coated with a dielectric layer. Laser ablated openings to the final conductive pattern layer are made in the dielectric layer. The openings have a diameter between 10 μm (0.4 mils) and 150 μm (6 mils), preferably between 25 μm and 75 μm (1 mil and 3 mils). The pitch of the openings matches the pitch of the I/O's (input/output pads) of the semiconductor devices. The openings are electroplated or electrolessly plated with a soft, ductile metal that fills the openings and forms protuberances over the openings that are 10-80 μm (0.4-3 mils) high.

Flat pack leads are brazed, soldered, thremocompression bonded or welded onto the contacts.

One or more semiconductor devices having gold or aluminum bonding pads are placed over the module with the bonding pads in position over the metal protuberances and the all the chip bonding pads are simultaneously metallurgically bonded to the module. The conductive pattern and the semiconductor device(s) are sealed by encapsulating in plastic, or by enclosing in a plastic, metal or ceramic enclosure.

Flat pack packages with the flat pack contact mounted on the lower surface of the SCM or MCM offer higher packaging efficiency. A substrate with conductive feed-throughs is used. The conductive pattern is connected to the conductive feed-thoughs as shown in FIGS. 1-5. On the other side of the substrate, opposite the conductive pattern, a fan out pattern is provided which fans out from the feed-throughs to the periphery of the substrate. The flat pack contacts are brazed to the fan out pattern on the periphery. With the flat pack contacts underneath the substrate rather than on the top, the dimensions of the package can be reduced by the area required to braze the flat pack connections on a top surface.

The electronic packages and packaging techniques described herein are capable of connecting not only an integrated circuit die with perimeter I/O's, but also an integrated circuit die with I/O's in an array across the die. Such arrays are commonly used for C4 connections and are proposed for integrated circuits having I/O counts too large to be accommodated on the perimeter of the die.

It will be obvious to those skilled in the art that the packages and packaging techniques described herein can be applied not only to a die containing a single integrated circuit, but also to a die containing more than one single integrated circuit. These packages and packaging techniques can also be applied to connect electronic devices including passive components, electromechanical devices especially miniature electromechanical systems (MEMS).

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