Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS6657334 B1
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 09/713,654
Publication dateDec 2, 2003
Filing dateNov 15, 2000
Priority dateOct 23, 2000
Fee statusLapsed
Also published asEP1334549A1, EP1334549A4, US6831430, US20040104700, WO2002035689A1
Publication number09713654, 713654, US 6657334 B1, US 6657334B1, US-B1-6657334, US6657334 B1, US6657334B1
InventorsJonathan Sidney Edelson
Original AssigneeBorealis Technical Limited
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
High phase order motor with mesh connected windings
US 6657334 B1
Abstract
A high phase order induction machine drive system is disclosed. This has an inverter system for the synthesis of a plurality of phases of alternating current output, and a N-phase induction motor (N is greater than 3). The motor is connected to the inverter terminals so that each motor phase is electrically connected to a first inverter terminal and a second inverter terminal S+1 inverter terminals distant from the first inverter terminal in order of electrical phase angle (S in the skip number). The phase angle difference between the pair of inverter terminals to which each motor phase is connected is identical for each motor phase.
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(46)
I claim:
1. A high phase order induction machine drive system, comprising
a) an inverter system for the synthesis of a plurality of phases of alternating current output, each phase electrically connected to at least one inverter terminal, and
b) an induction motor comprising N phases, where N is greater than 3, connected mesh to said inverter terminals, said mesh characterized in that:
each motor phase is electrically connected to:
(i) a first inverter terminal, and
(ii) a second inverter terminal S skipped terminals distant from said first inverter terminal in order of electrical phase angle, where S is the skip number and represents the number of skipped terminals;
and the phase angle difference between the two inverter terminals to which each motor phase is connected is identical for each motor phase.
2. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 1 wherein said phase angle difference is approximately 120 electrical degrees.
3. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 1 wherein N is a multiple of 3, and S=N/3.
4. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 1 wherein said alternating current output is selectable between a fundamental frequency component and a fundamental frequency component multiplied by three.
5. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 1 wherein said alternating current output comprises a variable proportion of a fundamental frequency component and a third harmonic frequency component.
6. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 1 wherein N=17 wherein S=5.
7. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 1 wherein said inverter output comprises a variable degree of a third harmonic component superimposed upon the fundamental frequency component.
8. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 1 wherein S=(N−3)/2, and wherein said alternating current output is variable between: an increase in the phase angle difference in response to a signal to increase the impedance of the motor, a decrease in the electrical phase difference as a response to a signal to decrease the impedance of the motor, and a minimum phase angle difference corresponding to the fundamental frequency.
9. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 1 wherein S=0, and wherein said alternating current output is variable between: an increase in the phase angle difference in response to a signal to decrease the impedance of the motor, a decrease in the phase angle difference as a response to a signal to increase the impedance of the motor, and a minimum phase angle difference corresponding to the fundamental frequency.
10. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 1 wherein N is odd.
11. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 10 wherein S=(N−3)/2.
12. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim wherein N is any even number greater than 4 and wherein said mesh connection comprises a plurality of mesh subsets wherein each subset comprises an odd number of phases.
13. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 12 each of said subsets having a skip number of N/3, if N is a factor of 3; and (N/3)−1, rounded to the nearest integer, if N is not a factor of 3.
14. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 13 wherein said alternating current output comprises a variable proportion of a fundamental frequency component and a third harmonic frequency component.
15. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 12 wherein said subsets having a skip number of (N−3)/2.
16. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 12 wherein said alternating current output comprises harmonic frequency components.
17. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 12 wherein said alternating current output comprises harmonic components superimposed upon a fundamental frequency component.
18. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 17 wherein said harmonic comprise only odd order harmonics.
19. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 12 wherein each of said subsets having a skip number of N/3, if N is a factor of 3; and (N/3)−1, rounded to the nearest integer, if N is not a factor of 3.
20. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 12 wherein said inverter output comprises a harmonic frequency component.
21. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 20 wherein said harmonic frequency component is an odd harmonic.
22. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 20 wherein said harmonic frequency component is third harmonic.
23. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 1 wherein said alternating current output comprises a fundamental frequency component and a harmonic frequency component.
24. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 23 wherein said harmonic frequency is an odd harmonic frequency.
25. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 23 wherein said harmonic frequency is third harmonic frequency.
26. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 12 wherein said alternating current output is variable between: substantially fundamental frequency output, substantially harmonic frequency output, and a combination of fundamental frequency output with superimposed harmonic frequency output.
27. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 1 wherein said alternating current output comprises a square wave component.
28. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 1 wherein S=0.
29. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 1 wherein N≧9.
30. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 1 wherein said motor having 18 phases divided into two subsets of nine phases, wherein each subset having a separate mesh connection with a skip number of 3 within that subset.
31. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 1 wherein said motor is a linear induction motor.
32. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 1, wherein said motor phases comprise a single inductor per slot.
33. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 1 wherein N is not a multiple of 3, and wherein S=(N/3)−1 rounded to the nearest integer.
34. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 1 wherein said inverter output comprises a harmonic frequency component.
35. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 34 wherein said harmonic frequency component is an odd harmonic.
36. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 34 wherein said harmonic frequency component is third harmonic.
37. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 34 wherein said alternating current output comprises a fundamental frequency component and a harmonic frequency component.
38. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 37 wherein said harmonic frequency is an odd harmonic frequency.
39. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 37 wherein said harmonic frequency is third harmonic frequency.
40. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 1 wherein said alternating current output is variable between: substantially fundamental frequency output, substantially harmonic frequency output, and a combination of fundamental frequency output with superimposed harmonic frequency output.
41. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 1 wherein said inverter system is further able to multiply the phase angle difference by a multiplicative factor in response to a signal to increase the impedance of the motor.
42. The high phase order induction machine drive system of claim 1 wherein said inverter system is able to increase the phase angle difference in response to a signal to increase the impedance of the motor.
43. A high phase order induction motor having more than three phases, connected to inverter output elements with a mesh connection, said mesh characterized in that: each motor phase is electrically connected to a first inverter terminal and a second inverter terminal S skipped inverter terminals distant from the first inverter terminal in order of electrical phase angle, where S is the skip number, and the phase angle difference between the pair of inverter terminals to which each motor phase is connected is identical for each motor phase.
44. The high phase order induction machine of claim 43 wherein N is the number of phases of the motor, and wherein N is odd and wherein S=(N−3)/2.
45. The high phase order induction motor of claim 43 wherein S=0.
46. The high phase order induction motor of claim 43 wherein N is the number of phases of the motor, and wherein S=(N/3)−1, rounded to the nearest integer.
Description

This application claims the benefit of a Provisional Application No. 60/242,622 Filed Oct. 23, 2000.

TECHNICAL FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to motors and their inverter drives.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

An induction motor is commonly driven by an inverter. An inverter is a device capable of supplying alternating current of variable voltage and variable frequency to the induction motor, allowing for control of machine synchronous speed and thus of machine speed. The inverter may also be used with AC induction generators, and can cause an AC induction motor to act as a generator for braking applications.

In many cases, the cost of the inverter is considerably greater than the cost of the motor being supplied. It is thus necessary to minimize the size of the inverter power electronics in order to control system cost.

Whereas the induction machine itself may have substantial overload capability, and may carry currents of the order of five to ten times full rated current for periods measured in minutes, the overload capability of the inverter electronics is severely limited. Exceeding the voltage or current ratings of the inverter electronics will swiftly cause device failure.

Commonly, inverter electronics is specified such that it can tolerate 150% of nominal full load current for 1 minute, and for any given motor, and inverter will be selected which has the same nominal current capability as that of the motor.

Voltage is set internally by the inverter system or by the rectified supply voltage. Voltage overload is normally not specified, and will cause near instantaneous destruction of semiconductor elements. The voltage ratings of the semiconductors instead set the maximum output voltage of the inverter system, and an inverter will be selected which has a maximum output voltage that matches the operating voltage of the motor at full speed.

With any reasonably sized inverter, substantial motor overload capabilities remain untapped.

In many traction application, there is limited available electrical power. Thus requirements for high overload capability can only be met at low speed, where high torque is required for starting, but reduced speed means that mechanical power output is still low. Such low speed torque requirements require high current to flow though the motor, but do not require high operating voltage. It is thus possible to trade high speed operating capability for low speed overload capability at the design stage of a motor drive system.

By increasing the number of series turns in the motor windings, higher slot current may be achieved with the same terminal current, thus permitting the same inverter to provide greater overload current to the motor. This increase in overload capability comes at a substantial cost. The increased number of series turns means that the motor operating voltage is increased, operation at high speed is prevented.

The number of series turns in a motor is thus related to induction machine impedance, or current versus voltage relation. Normally, an induction machine will have a fixed relationship between synchronous speed and impedance, characterized by the Volts/Hertz ratio. For a given inverter and machine frame, a machine wound with a higher Volts/Hertz ratio will have a lower maximum speed, but higher peak low speed torque.

It is thus necessary to provide for an induction machine drive system in which the induction machine presents a variable Volts/Hertz ratio to the inverter. For high speed operation, the Volts/Hertz ratio would be adjusted to a low value, in order to maintain a suitable induction machine operational voltage. For low speed operation, the Volts/Hertz ratio would be adjusted to a higher value, so as to permit high overload torque operation.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

From the foregoing it will be appreciated that a serious need exists for a motor drive system that has variable impedance. The present invention provides a drive system that can achieve high torque overload at low speeds whilst also being capable of providing sufficient voltage for high speed applications. In the present invention a high phase order induction machine is used with each phase terminal separately connected to an inverter output. The windings of the induction machine are wound as full span connected windings, and the motor terminals are connected with a mesh connection to produce a low impedance output. The inverter is capable of operating with a variable phase sequence that changes the effective impedance of the motor.

A technical advantage of the present invention is that impedance may be electronically varied.

A further technical advantage is that a motor may achieve substantially high torque at low speeds, whilst also being able to operate at high speeds.

A yet further technical advantage is that an inverter output may be better exploited by a motor.

Further technical advantages will become apparent from a consideration of the figures and the ensuing descriptions.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

For a more complete explanation of the present invention and the technical advantages thereof, reference is now made to the following description and the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 illustrates how the winding terminals of a polyphase motor may be connected to a polyphase inverter.

FIG. 2 illustrates a plurality of ways in which the polyphase inverter may be connected to a polyphase motor.

FIG. 3 illustrates how winding terminals of a motor connected to a polyphase inverter in a particular fashion may be driven by the inverter with various phase angles.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

In the method and apparatus of the present invention, a high phase order induction motor is connected to a high phase count inverter. Rather than using a star connection for the high phase count machine, the motor is connected mesh, meaning that the two winding terminals of each motor phase are each connected to separate inverter output terminals, whilst each inverter output terminal is connected to two motor phase terminals. The three phase mesh connection is well known in the art, and is commonly known as a delta connection.

In an induction machine, each phase winding set can be described by two terminals. There may be a larger number of terminals, but these are always grouped in series or parallel groups, and the entire set can be characterized by two terminals. In a star connected machine, one of these terminals is driven by the inverter or power supply, while the other terminal is connected to the machine neutral point. All current flows through one terminal, through the neutral point into other windings, and though the driven terminals of the other phases. In a mesh connected machine, these two terminals are connected directly to two different supply points. An example of how this may be done is shown in FIG. 1, in which the stator slots 4 are shown as straight lines running down the inside of the stator, and inverter terminals 2, are shown as circles, alongside which is marked phase angles of each of the inverter terminals. Electrical connections 3 between the winding terminals in stator slots 4 and inverter terminals 2 are represented by dashed lines. Two winding halves are displayed opposite one another, and are actually joined to one another, although this is not shown. The configuration describes a 9 phase machine connected with an S=3 connection—identical to FIG. 2e.

In contrast to three phase systems, in which there are only three inverter terminals and six motor windings terminals, in a high phase count system with N phases, there are N inverter terminals and 2N motor windings terminals. There are thus a substantial number of choices for how an N phase system may be mesh connected. This set of choices is greatly reduced by rotational symmetry requirements, specifically each winding must be connected to two inverter terminals with the same electrical angle difference between them as for every other winding.

A simple graphical schematic of the permissible inverter to motor windings connections may thus be described for a polyphase motor having N phases. In the following embodiment, N is equal to 9, but it is to be understood that this limitation is made to better illustrate the invention; other values for N are also considered to be within the scope of the present invention. FIG. 2a shows 9 evenly spaced terminals 4 and a center terminal 6. Each of the terminals 4 represent one end of a motor winding 1 and the center terminal 6 represents the other end of the motor winding. An inverter 5 has 9 terminals 2, which are connected to one of the terminals 4 of each of the motor windings 1 via electrical connectors 3 as shown.

Permissible connections of the 9 phase windings are either from the center point, to each of the 9 points on the circle (this being the star connection shown as FIG. 2a) or from each of the 9 points to another point S skipped points distant in the clockwise direction, where S represents the number of skipped points (inverter terminals). This latter is shown in FIGS. 2b-a; in FIG. 2b motor winding 1 is represented by a line, and in FIGS. 2c-e inverter 5 and electrical connectors 3 have been omitted for the sake of clarity. It will be noted that for each S from 0 to 3 there is a corresponding S from 4 to 7 that produces a mirror image connection.

FIG. 2 shows all permissible connections for a 9 phase system from S=0 to S=4 as well as the star connection. Noted on the star connection diagram.(FIG. 2a) are the relative phase angles of the inverter phases driving each terminal. For a given inverter output voltage, measured between an output terminal 2 and the neutral point, 6 each of these possible connections will place a different voltage on the connected windings. For the star connection, the voltage across the connected windings is exactly equal to the inverter output voltage. However, for each of the other connections (FIGS. 2b-c), the voltage across a winding is given by the vector difference in voltage of the two inverter output terminals 2 to which the winding 1 is connected then this phase difference is large, then the voltage across the winding will be large, and when this phase difference in small, then the voltage across the winding will be small. It should be noted that the inverter output voltage stays exactly the same in all these cases, just that the voltage difference across a given winding will change with different connection spans. The equation for the voltage across a winding is given by:

2*sin(phasediff)/2)*Vout

where phasediff is the phase angle difference of the inverter output terminals driving the winding, and V is the output to neutral voltage of the inverter.

Thus, referring to FIG. 2, when S=0, the phase angle difference is 40 and the voltage across a winding is 0.684 Vout. When S=1 (FIG. 2c), the phase angle difference is 80 degrees, and the voltage across the winding is 1.29 Vout. When S=2 (FIG. 2d), the phase angle difference is 120 degrees, and the voltage across the winding is 1.73 Vout. Finally, when S=3 (FIG. 2e), the phase angle difference is 160 degrees, and the voltage across the winding is 1.97 Vout. For the same inverter output voltage, different connections place different voltage across the windings, and will cause different currents to flow in the windings. The different mesh connections cause the motor to present a different impedance to the inverter.

As disclosed above, in an induction machine, each motor winding set can be described by two terminals. There may be a larger number of terminals, but these are always grouped in series or parallel groups, and the entire set can be characterized by two terminals. Thus whilst FIG. 2 discloses a single motor winding 1 connected to terminals 4 and 6, it is to be understood that this limitation is made to better illustrate the invention; multiple phase windings connected between the terminals are also considered to be within the scope of the present invention.

To deliver the same power to the motor, the same voltage would have to be placed across the windings, and the same current would flow through the windings. However, for the S=0 connection, to place the same voltage across the windings, the inverter output voltage would need to be much greater than with the S=3 connection. If the inverter is operating with a higher output voltage, then to deliver the same output power it will also operate at a lower output current. This means that the S=0 connection is a relatively higher voltage and lower current connection, whereas the S=3 connection is a relatively lower voltage, higher current connection.

The S=0 connection is desirable for low speed operation, where it increases the overload capabilities of the drive, and permits much higher current to flow in the motor windings than flow out of the inverter terminals. The S=3 connection is desirable for high speed operation, and permits a much higher voltage to be placed across the windings than the inverter phase to neutral voltage. This change in connection is quite analogous to the change between star and delta connection for a three phase machine, and may be accomplished with contactor apparatus. However the number of terminals renders the use of contactors to change machine connectivity essentially impracticable.

There is, however, an additional approach available with high phase order inverter driven systems.

The inverter, in addition to being an arbitrary voltage and current source, is also a source of arbitrary phase AC power, and this output phase is electronically adjustable. Any periodic waveform, including an alternating current may be described in terms of amplitude, frequency, and phase; phase is a measure of the displacement in time of a waveform. In a polyphase inverter system, phase is measured as a relative phase displacement between the various outputs, and between any pair of inverter terminals, an electrical phase angle may be determined. In the case of conventional three phase systems, this electrical phase angle is fixed at 120 degrees. However in polyphase systems this phase angle is not fixed. Thus, while the machine terminals 1 . . . 9 may be fixed in their connection to inverter terminals 1 . . . 9, the phase relation of the inverter terminals connected to any given motor winding terminals is not fixed. By changing the inverter phase relation, the impedance that the motor presents to the inverter may be changed. This may be done without contactors.

Fundamental phase relation is both the relative electrical angle of each winding terminal and relative phase relation of the currents driving each winding terminal, such that the stator develops the lowest pole count without discontinuities. In a two pole machine, driving with fundamental phase relation causes the electrical angle f each winding terminal, as well as the phase angle of the currents driving each winding terminal, to be equal to the physical angle of the winding slot associated with that winding terminal. In a four pole machine, the phase angle is equal to double the physical angle of the slot, and in general for an N pole machine the electrical angle between any two slots, and the electrical phase relation of the currents driving those two slots, is equal to N/2 times the physical angle between those two slots.

With reference to FIG. 3, a 9 phase machine is connected to the inverter system using the S=3 mesh. One terminal of each of two windings 1 is connected to each inverter terminal 2. When driven with ‘first order’ phase differences, then the results are as described above for the S=3 mesh. However, if the phase angles are adjusted by multiplying each absolute phase reference by a factor of three, then the phase differences placed across each winding become the same as those found in the S=2 case, although the topological connectivity is different. If the phase angles are adjusted by a multiplicative factor of five, then the voltages across windings become like those of the S=1 case, and with a multiplicative factor of seven, the voltages become like those of the S=0 case. A multiplicative factor of nine causes all phases to have the same phase angle, and places no voltage difference across the winding.

These changes in phase angle are precisely the changes in phase angle used to change the operating pole count of a high phase order induction machine, as described in others of my patent applications and issued patents.

If a high phase count concentrated winding induction machine is operated by an inverter, but is connected using a mesh connection, then changes in pole count of the machine will be associated with changes in machine effective connectivity. These changes in effective connectivity permit high current overload operation at low speed, while maintaining high speed capability, without the need for contactors or actual machine connection changes.

Of particular value are machines connected such that the fundamental, or lowest pole count, operation is associated with a relative phase angle across any given winding of nearly, but not exactly, 120 degrees. In these cases, altering the output of the inverter by changing the absolute phase angles by a multiplicative factor of three, which may also be described as operation with the third harmonic will result in the relative phase angle across any given winding becoming very small, and causing large winding currents to flow with low inverter currents. A particular example would be a 34 slot, 17 phase machine, wound with full span, concentrated windings, to produce a two pole rotating field. The winding terminations are connected to the inverter using the S=5 mesh. The relative phase angle of the inverter outputs placed across any given winding would be 127 degrees, and the voltage placed across this winding relative to the inverter output voltage is 1.79 times the inverter output voltage. If the machine is then operated with a third harmonic waveform, it will operate as a six pole machine. The relative phase angle across any given winding is now 127*3mod 360=21 degrees, and the voltage placed across the winding relative to the inverter output voltage is 0.37 times the inverter output voltage. Simply by changing the inverter drive angles, the Volts/Hertz relationship of the motor is increased, and inverter limited overload capability is enhanced.

To determine the ideal S, the number of skipped inverter terminals between the winding terminals of each phase of the motor, which would result in the greatest change of impedance when the inverter drives the motor with substantial third harmonic, one would use the formula (N/3)−1, rounded to the nearest integer, for values of N (number of phases in motor) not divisible by 3. When N is divisible by 3, one would use the formula N/3 to determine the skip number.

Other connectivity is certainly possible. The connection described above will tend to maximize machine impedance for the third harmonic, but will actually decrease machine impedance for en fifth harmonic. A connection that most closely approximates full bridge connection, e.g. the S=7 connection for the 17 phase machine described above, will show gradually increasing machine impedance for the 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th, 13th, and 15th harmonics This may be of particular benefit, for example, with machines operated with square wave drive. Operation with high pole counts is not generally considered preferable, however it may be of benefit in the particularly desirable case of operating at high overload and low speed. The number of slots is not restricted, nor are the number of phases or poles. In order to determine the value of S (skip number) in the winding to inverter connections, one may use the formula (N−3)/2, when N (number of motor phases) is an odd number. When N is even by may be divided into subsets of odd phase counts, the formula may similarly be used for the odd subsets.

The general principal of the present invention may be utilized for the operation of high phase order induction machines including motors, generators, and motor/generators, and may also be utilized for different loads which require variable frequency supply, e.g. induction heating applications. Also, saturation of single harmonics are not required, and an exceedingly variable impedance may be produced by the gradual and increasing superimposition of harmonic content, for example, of the third harmonic.

The present invention has been described with regard to rotary induction motors, however it may be implemented with linear induction motors too, using similar techniques for changing winding impedance. Where the windings of a linear or also of a rotary induction motor comprise single inductors instead of coils, then inverter output phase angle may be altered by an even multiplicative factor in order to effect impedance changes. In some cases, the inverter may even multiply each phase angle by a fractional factor to vary the impedance of the motor.

The present invention has been described as a way of connecting a polyphase motor to a polyphase inverter. Furthermore, there have been described methods of electrically varying the impedance, and methods to design the windings to inverter connections in order to optimize such impedance variation. In this way, the same motor may act as though it has a high number of series turns for low speed operation, being supplied with high voltage and low current, yet still be able to reach high speeds as though the motor has relatively few series turns. However, an additional facet of the present invention provides for a plurality of inverter to windings connections to be set up in the same machine. Arrangements can include series turns able to instead be connected in parallel (with suitable switches etc), which mechanical variation to result in a mechanical change of impedance e.g. in 9 phase machine, S=0 and S=3 could both be independently connected or available to be connected. Contactors or switches would be arranged in each terminal to change the way the windings are connected to the inverter terminals based on the dual arrangements set up in the machine. This is an example of another way in which the motor impedance may be controlled according to the present invention.

The word “terminal” has been used in this specification to include any electrically connected points in the system—this may be a screw, for example, or any electrical equivalent, for example, it may simply comprise a wire connecting two components in a circuit.

In a similar sense, inverter output elements are commonly half bridges, but they may alternatively comprise other switching elements. One embodiment of the present specification has described two winding terminals connected to a single inverter terminal. The single inverter terminal referred to is intended to also include electrical equivalents, such as a device made of two inverter terminals that are electrically connected together.

Thus, it is apparent that there has been provided, in accordance with the present invention, a method and apparatus for a high phase order motor with mesh connected windings that satisfies the advantages set forth above. Thus, the mesh connection and the implementation techniques of the present invention may be used in virtually all motor applications.

While this invention has been described with reference to numerous embodiments, it is to be understood that this description is not intended to be construed in a limiting sense. Various modifications and combinations of the illustrative embodiments will be apparent to persons skilled in the art upon reference to this description. It is to be further understood, therefore, that numerous changes in the details of the embodiments of the present invention and additional embodiments of the present invention will be apparent to, and may be made by, persons of ordinary skill in the art having reference to this description. It is contemplated that all such changes and additional embodiments are within the spirit and true scope of the invention as claimed below.

All publications and patent applications mentioned in this specification are indicative of the level of skill of those skilled in the art to which this invention pertains. All publications and patent applications are herein incorporated by reference to the same extent as if each individual publication or patent application was specifically and individually indicated to be incorporated by reference.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6064172 *Feb 11, 1997May 16, 2000Power Superconductor Applications CorporationMethod and apparatus for detection, classification and reduction of internal electrical faults in alternating current propulsion machinery using synchronous detection scheme
US6153953 *Aug 5, 1998Nov 28, 2000Japan Servo Co., Ltd.Multi-phase PM-type stepping motor
US6175272 *Dec 19, 1997Jan 16, 2001Nikon CorporationPulse—width modulation system
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7075265 *Apr 3, 2003Jul 11, 2006Borealis Technical LimitedHigh phase order electrical rotating machine with distributed windings
US7375483Oct 23, 2006May 20, 2008Borealis Technical LimitedMesh connected brake array for electrical rotating machines
US7469858Oct 6, 2004Dec 30, 2008Borealis Technical LimitedGeared wheel motor design
US7852037Apr 5, 2006Dec 14, 2010Borealis Technical LimitedInduction and switched reluctance motor
US7891609Aug 29, 2007Feb 22, 2011Borealis Technical LimitedTurnaround methods
US7928683Jun 21, 2005Apr 19, 2011Borealis Technical LimitedHigh phase order AC machine with short pitch winding
US7983804Aug 29, 2007Jul 19, 2011Borealis Technical LimitedSystem for minimization of aircraft damage on collision
US8198746Sep 11, 2007Jun 12, 2012Borealis Technical LimitedChimney turbine
US8220740Nov 6, 2008Jul 17, 2012Borealis Technical LimitedMotor for driving aircraft, located adjacent to undercarriage wheel
US8258665Dec 13, 2005Sep 4, 2012Borealis Technical LimitedMotor winding
US8532957Feb 11, 2008Sep 10, 2013Borealis Technical LimitedAircraft weight estimation method
US8712603Aug 2, 2005Apr 29, 2014Borealis Technical LimitedAircraft drive
US8849480Mar 1, 2013Sep 30, 2014Honeywell International Inc.Aircraft gross weight and center of gravity validator
US9120565Jul 16, 2012Sep 1, 2015Borealis Technical LimitedMethod for enhancing pilot efficiency and aircraft safety during ground travel
US9139294 *Mar 1, 2006Sep 22, 2015Borealis Technical LimitedMotor controller
US9169025Feb 27, 2013Oct 27, 2015Borealis Technical LimitedMethod for inflight deicing of landing gear and wheel bays in aircraft with onboard drive means
US9193449Aug 22, 2012Nov 24, 2015Borealis Technical LimitedMethod for optimizing operation of aircraft ground travel drive system
US9205758Dec 6, 2012Dec 8, 2015Borealis Technical LimitedElectric vehicle traction control system and method
US9233752Jul 29, 2012Jan 12, 2016Borealis Technical LimitedDrive system with harmonic drive for self-propelled aircraft wheel
US9280155Dec 2, 2012Mar 8, 2016Borealis Technical LimitedAircraft ground travel traction control system and method
US9302541Jan 17, 2014Apr 5, 2016Borealis Technical LimitedSprag clutch assembly for aircraft drive wheel drive system
US9327830Aug 13, 2015May 3, 2016Borealis Technical LimitedMotor controller
US9334047Feb 8, 2012May 10, 2016Borealis Technical LimitedMethod and system for the powered self push back of an aircraft
US9340303Jul 11, 2014May 17, 2016Borealis Technical LimitedAircraft gate parking and servicing method
US9394059Aug 14, 2014Jul 19, 2016Borealis Technical LimitedMethod for monitoring autonomous accelerated aircraft pushback
US9428265May 24, 2011Aug 30, 2016Borealis Technical LimitedIntegrated vehicle wheel motor structured to manage heat
US9475574 *Sep 14, 2012Oct 25, 2016Borealis Technical LimitedHeat dissipation system for aircraft drive wheel drive assembly
US9493033May 1, 2013Nov 15, 2016Borealis Technical LimitedAircraft wheel bearing arrangement
US9511853May 24, 2012Dec 6, 2016Borealis Technical LimitedMotor and gearing system for aircraft wheel
US9522728Jan 6, 2015Dec 20, 2016Borealis Technical LimitedSpace-maximizing clutch arrangement for vehicle drive wheel
US9533756Nov 3, 2014Jan 3, 2017Borealis Technical LimitedMethod for defining and controlling aircraft taxi profile
US9555884 *Feb 19, 2013Jan 31, 2017Borealis Technical LimitedMethod for improving ground travel capability and enhancing stealth in unmanned aerial vehicles
US9567068Jan 9, 2015Feb 14, 2017Borealis Technical LimitedTorque transmission in an aircraft drive wheel drive system
US9567069Jan 30, 2015Feb 14, 2017Borealis Technical LimitedAircraft drive wheel drive system with torque coupling clutch assembly
US9623986Feb 4, 2015Apr 18, 2017Borealis Technical LimitedAircraft passenger boarding system
US9650129Dec 19, 2013May 16, 2017Borealis Technical LimitedControl of ground travel and steering in an aircraft with powered main gear drive wheels
US20050218863 *Apr 3, 2003Oct 6, 2005Edelson Jonathan SHigh phase order electrical rotating machine with distributed windings
US20060273686 *Apr 12, 2006Dec 7, 2006Edelson Jonathan SHub motors
US20070042854 *Oct 6, 2004Feb 22, 2007Edelson Jonathan SGeared wheel motor design
US20070124847 *Sep 7, 2006Jun 7, 2007Seongjun YoonHand-packing instrument in the form of gloves
US20070158497 *Oct 4, 2006Jul 12, 2007Edelson Jonathan SGeared wheel motor design
US20070282491 *Aug 2, 2005Dec 6, 2007Cox Isaiah WAircraft Drive
US20080007070 *Sep 11, 2007Jan 10, 2008Edelson Jonathan SChimney turbine
US20080042507 *Oct 12, 2007Feb 21, 2008Edelson Jonathan STurbine starter-generator
US20080054733 *May 11, 2005Mar 6, 2008Edelson Jonathan SSlotless Ac Induction Motor
US20080059053 *Aug 29, 2007Mar 6, 2008Isaiah Watas CoxTurnaround methods
US20080103642 *Aug 29, 2007May 1, 2008Cox Isaiah WSystem for minimization of aircraft damage on collision
US20080129137 *Dec 13, 2005Jun 5, 2008Jonathan Sidney EdelsonMotor Winding
US20080131287 *Oct 31, 2005Jun 5, 2008Carrier CorporationVsd Control
US20080147252 *Mar 1, 2006Jun 19, 2008Janice Ilene BayerMotor Controller
US20080312870 *Feb 11, 2008Dec 18, 2008Isaiah Watas CoxAircraft weight estimation method
US20090114765 *Nov 6, 2008May 7, 2009Isaiah Watas CoxMotor for driving aircraft, located adjacent to undercarriage wheel
US20090302787 *Apr 5, 2006Dec 10, 2009Jonathan Sidney EdelsonInduction and switched reluctance motor
US20100219788 *Jun 21, 2005Sep 2, 2010Borealis Technical LimitedHigh phase order AC Machine with Short Pitch Winding
US20120274251 *Apr 29, 2011Nov 1, 2012Danfoss Drives A/SHarmonic noise reduction
US20130214089 *Feb 19, 2013Aug 22, 2013Borealis Technical LimitedMethod for improving ground travel capability and enhancing stealth in unmanned aerial vehicles
US20130240665 *Mar 14, 2013Sep 19, 2013Borealis Technical LimitedMethod for improving efficiency of airport deicing operations
US20140061374 *Oct 24, 2012Mar 6, 2014Isaiah W. CoxMethod for increasing landing gear effective life and aircraft landing cycles
US20150159968 *Sep 14, 2012Jun 11, 2015Borealis Technical LimitedHeat dissipation system for aircraft drive wheel drive assembly
US20150217872 *Jul 25, 2014Aug 6, 2015Isaiah W. CoxMethod for slot creation at an airport
US20160052624 *Feb 3, 2012Feb 25, 2016Borealis Technical LimitedMethod of Operating Aircraft Drive To Move an Aircraft Under Adverse Ground Conditions
US20160122008 *Nov 3, 2014May 5, 2016Borealis Technical LimitedRoller Traction Drive System for an Aircraft Drive Wheel Drive System
WO2006065988A2 *Dec 13, 2005Jun 22, 2006Borealis Technical LimitedMotor winding
WO2006065988A3 *Dec 13, 2005Aug 10, 2006Borealis Tech LtdMotor winding
WO2013186635A2May 1, 2013Dec 19, 2013Borealis Technical LimitedAircraft wheel bearing arrangement
WO2014153182A2Mar 14, 2014Sep 25, 2014Joseph CoxCockpit control system for controlling ground travel in aircraft equipped with engine-free electric taxi system
WO2014184608A2Dec 19, 2013Nov 20, 2014Borealis Technical LimitedControl of ground travel and steering in an aircraft with powered main gear drive wheels
Classifications
U.S. Classification310/68.00R, 310/166
International ClassificationH02K17/12, H02P27/00, H02K3/28
Cooperative ClassificationH02P27/00, H02K3/28, H02K17/12
European ClassificationH02K3/28, H02P27/00, H02K17/12
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jan 3, 2002ASAssignment
Owner name: BOREALIS TECHNICAL LIMITED GIBRALTAR COMPANY, GIBR
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:EDELSON, JONATHAN SIDNEY;REEL/FRAME:012452/0399
Effective date: 20010712
Jun 18, 2007REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed
Nov 29, 2007FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
Nov 29, 2007SULPSurcharge for late payment
Jul 11, 2011REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed
Dec 2, 2011SULPSurcharge for late payment
Year of fee payment: 7
Dec 2, 2011FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
Jul 10, 2015REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed
Dec 2, 2015LAPSLapse for failure to pay maintenance fees
Jan 19, 2016FPExpired due to failure to pay maintenance fee
Effective date: 20151202