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Publication numberUS6674705 B1
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 09/586,173
Publication dateJan 6, 2004
Filing dateJun 1, 2000
Priority dateJun 1, 2000
Fee statusPaid
Publication number09586173, 586173, US 6674705 B1, US 6674705B1, US-B1-6674705, US6674705 B1, US6674705B1
InventorsD Mitchel Hanks
Original AssigneeHewlett-Packard Company, L.P.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Low cost detection of wobble inversions using a bandpass tuned circuit
US 6674705 B1
Abstract
A tuned circuit is used to detect wobble clock inversions. The tuned circuit reacts to a wobble inversion with a change in amplitude that may be detected by a threshold detector. A bandpass tuned circuit is used to detect wobble clock inversions. The output of the bandpass tuned circuit is input to a saturating high-gain amplifier such as a comparator. The output of the saturating high-gain amplifier reacts to wobble inversions with a half-cycle that has an increased duration as compared to half-cycles without wobble inversions.
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Claims(10)
What is claimed is:
1. A wobble inversion detector, comprising:
a bandpass tuned circuit having an input and a tuned circuit output,
a saturating high-gain amplifier having an output and receiving said tuned circuit outputs, wherein when a wobble signal is applied to said inputs, said amplifier output has at least a half-cycle of increased duration in response to a wobble inversion on said wobble signal.
2. The wobble inversion detector of claim 1 wherein said wobble signal has a monotone wobble frequency and said bandpass tuned circuit has a natural frequency that is approximately said monotone wobble frequency.
3. The wobble inversion detector of claim 2 wherein said bandpass tuned circuit is approximately critically damped.
4. The wobble inversion detector of claim 2 wherein said bandpass tuned circuit comprises:
a first capacitance, a first inductance and a resistance all in series between said input and said tuned circuit output;
a second inductance from a terminal of said first inductance to a common node; and,
a second capacitance between said tuned circuit output and said common node.
5. The wobble inversion detector of claim 1 wherein said saturating high-gain amplifier is a comparator.
6. A method of detecting wobble inversions, comprising:
applying a wobble signal having a monotone wobble frequency to a bandpass tuned circuit having a bandpass output, wherein said bandpass tuned circuit has a natural frequency that is within an octave of said monotone wobble frequency; and,
detecting changes on said bandpass output.
7. The method of claim 6 wherein said tuned circuit is approximately critically damped.
8. The method of claim 6 wherein said bandpass tuned circuit comprises:
a first capacitance, a first inductance and a resistance all in series between said input and said bandpass output;
a second inductance from a terminal of said first inductance to a common node; and,
a second capacitance between said bandpass output and said common node.
9. The method of claim 8 wherein detecting changes on said bandpass output is accomplished with a circuit that includes a high-gain amplifier.
10. The method of claim 9 wherein said high-gain amplifier has an output and said detecting changes includes detecting a half-cycle of increased duration on said output.
Description
CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

A related United States patent applications commonly owned by the assignee of the present document and incorporated by reference in their entirety into this document is being filed in the United States Patent and Trademark Office on or about the filing date of this application. This application Ser. No. 09/586,170 is titled “LOW COST DETECTION OF WOBBLE INVERSIONS USING A TUNED CIRCUIT.”

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates generally to storing data on optical disks. In particular, it relates to detecting digital data written on a clock reference structure formed on a servo track.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Some optical disk standards have a permanent clock reference structure formed continuously along servo tracks. This clock reference structure provides a clock reference signal that is generated by an optical transducer as the clock reference structure passes by the optical transducer as the optical disk rotates. One such optical disk standard is called DVD+RW. DVD+RW is specified by the European Computer Manufacturers Association (ECMA) in several standards and draft standards. Many of these standards and draft standards are available at http://www.ecma.ch or by ordering them from ECMA, 114 Rue du Rhône, CH-1024 Geneva, Switzerland. One such draft standard is titles “120 mm ReWriteable DVD (DVD+RW) Capcity: 4,7 Gbytes and 9,4 Gbytes” dated February 1999 which is hereby incorporated herein by reference.

This draft standard specifies that the rewriteable area contain a phase modulated deviation from the nominal centreline called wobble. This wobble provides a permanent clock reference structure and also contains addressing information called Address-in-Pregroove or ADIP. The ADIP data is placed on the track using bi-phase shift keying (BPSK). In other words, a “0” is represented on the disk by a wobble with a first phase angle and a “1” is represented on the disk by a wobble that is 180° different from that first phase angle. The transitions between these two phases are called wobble inversions.

Accordingly, there is a need in the art for a means of detecting wobble inversions. This means should have good noise immunity and not be sensitive to low frequency shifts of the wobble signal. This means should also be inexpensive to produce and require as little circuitry as possible.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In a preferred embodiment, the invention utilizes a tuned circuit that filters out noise and also generates a transient at the point the wobble inversion occurs. This transient can be cleanly detected to determine the presence of a wobble inversion. The invention is easily tuned to accommodate different wobble frequencies and is well adapted to inexpensive fabrication. The present invention may be implemented as a bandpass tuned circuit whose output is fed to a high-gain saturating amplifier. When a wobble inversion occurs, the output of the saturating high-gain amplifier reacts with a half-cycle that has an increased duration as compared to half-cycles without wobble inversions. The increased duration of this half-cycle can be detected.

Other aspects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the following detailed description, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, illustrating by way of example the principles of the invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a schematic illustration of a tuned circuit suitable for detecting wobble inversions.

FIG. 2 is an illustration of an input wobble signal with a wobble inversion and an output signal from a tuned circuit.

FIG. 3 is a schematic illustration of a comparator fed by a bandpass tuned circuit suitable for detecting wobble inversions.

FIG. 4 is an illustration of an input wobble signal with a wobble inversion and an output signal from a comparator fed by a bandpass tuned circuit.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

FIG. 1 is a schematic illustration of a tuned circuit suitable for detecting wobble inversions. In FIG. 1, the input is shown as VIN. VIN is referenced to a common node. VIN is appied to a first terminal of inductor 102. The second terminal of inductor 102 is connected to a first terminal of resistor 104. The second terminal of resistor 104 is connected to a first terminal of capacitor 106. The second terminal of capacitor 106 is connected to the common node. The output of the tuned circuit of FIG. 1 is shown as VOUT. VOUT is measured between the common node and the first terminal of capacitor 106.

In the preferred embodiment, the values of inductor 102, resistor 104, and capacitor 106 are chosen so that the circuit has a natural frequency marginally below the wobble frequency. For example, for an input wobble signal with a monotone wobble frequency of 265 kHz, the values of the components in the tuned circuit may be chosen so that the natural frequency of the tuned circuit is 112 kHz and the damping factor of the tuned circuit is around 0.71 (critically damped).

FIG. 2 is an illustration of an input wobble signal with a wobble inversion and an output signal from a tuned circuit like that in FIG. 1. As can be seen in FIG. 2, the output signal responds to a wobble inversion in the input wobble signal with a change in amplitude. This change in amplitude may be detected by a threshold detector or a comparator. This change in amplitude may be either an increase in amplitude or a decrease in amplitude. Also shown in FIG. 2 is a possible threshold voltage level that may be chosen to detect wobble inversions as indicated by an increase in amplitude on the output signal.

It should be noted that there is considerable leeway in choosing the values of the components in the tuned circuit. For example, if the natural frequency of the tuned circuit is halved, the tuned circuit will still produce a pronounced response to wobble inversions.

FIG. 3 is a schematic illustration of a comparator fed by a bandpass tuned circuit suitable for detecting wobble inversions. In FIG. 3, the input is shown as VIN. VIN is referenced to a common node. VIN is applied to a first terminal of capacitor 302. The second terminal of capacitor 302 is connected to a first terminal of inductor 304 and a first terminal of inductor 306. The second terminal of inductor 304 is connected to the common node. The second terminal of inductor 306 is connected to a first terminal of resistor 308. The second terminal of resistor. 308 is connected to a first terminal of capacitor 310 and the non-inverting input of comparator 312. The second terminal of capacitor 310 is connected to the common node. The inverting input of comparator 312 is connected to the common node. The output of comparator 312 is VOUT. VOUT is referenced to the common node.

In the preferred embodiment, the values of capacitors 302 and 310, inductors 304 and 306, and resistor 308 are chosen to minimize low frequency and high frequency noise. The comparator processes the signal so as to make a distiction between wobble inversions and regular wobbles. This is shown in FIG. 4.

FIG. 4 is an illustration of an input wobble signal with a wobble inversion and an output signal from a comrparator fed by a bandpass tuned circuit. As can be seen in FIG. 4, the output signal responds to a wobble inversion in the input wobble signal with at least one half-cycle that has an increased duration. This half-cycle of increased duration may be detected a number of ways including detecting a polarity difference from an expected value when the output signal is regularly sampled.

Although several specific embodiments of the invention have been described and illustrated, the invention is not to be limited to the specific forms or arrangements of parts so described and illustrated. The invention is limited only by the claims.

Patent Citations
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Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1"4.7 GByte Re-Writable Disc System Based On DVD-R System," Masayoshi Yoshida, Yoshitaka Shimoda, Hidehiro Ishii, Akiyoshi Inoue. AV&Recording Development Center, Research & Development Group, Pioneer Corporation. IEEE Transactions on Consumer Electronics, vol. 45, No. 4, Nov. 1999. Pp. 1270-1276.
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3"High Frequency Wobbles: A Write Clock Generation Method for Rewritable DVD That Enables Near Drop-In Compatibility with DVD-ROMS," Daniel Abramovitch, David Towner, Craig Perlov, Josh Hogan, Michael Fischer, Carol Wilson, Ilkan Cokgor and Carl Taussig. Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, Storage Technologies Department. ODSC99 For submission to the ODSC. Pp. 1-3.
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6798724 *Jun 1, 2000Sep 28, 2004Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.Low cost detection of wobble inversions using a tuned circuit
US7072265 *May 5, 2004Jul 4, 2006Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.Low cost detection of wobble inversions using a tuned circuit
US7633839Aug 20, 2004Dec 15, 2009Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.Self-sensing active-damping voice coil
US20040218506 *May 5, 2004Nov 4, 2004Hanks D. MithchelLow cost detection of wobble inversions using a tuned circuit
US20060039267 *Aug 20, 2004Feb 23, 2006Hanks Darwin MSelf-sensing active-damping voice coil
Classifications
U.S. Classification369/53.34, G9B/7.025, 369/47.48, G9B/27.027
International ClassificationG11B27/19, G11B7/00, G11B7/007, G11B20/14, G11B27/24, G11B7/005, G11B7/004
Cooperative ClassificationG11B7/0053, G11B27/24, G11B2220/2562, G11B2220/216
European ClassificationG11B27/24, G11B7/005W
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Oct 20, 2000ASAssignment
Owner name: HEWLETT-PACKARD COMPANY, COLORADO
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:HANKS, D. MITCHEL;REEL/FRAME:011199/0487
Effective date: 20000626
Sep 30, 2003ASAssignment
Owner name: HEWLETT-PACKARD DEVELOPMENT COMPANY L.P., TEXAS
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:HEWLETT-PACKARD COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:014061/0492
Effective date: 20030926
Owner name: HEWLETT-PACKARD DEVELOPMENT COMPANY L.P.,TEXAS
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:HEWLETT-PACKARD COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:014061/0492
Effective date: 20030926
Jul 6, 2007FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
Jul 6, 2011FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
Feb 23, 2015FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 12