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Publication numberUS670588 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 26, 1901
Filing dateSep 1, 1900
Priority dateSep 1, 1900
Publication numberUS 670588 A, US 670588A, US-A-670588, US670588 A, US670588A
InventorsWinfield E Hinsdale
Original AssigneeWinfield E Hinsdale
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Siphon water-closet.
US 670588 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented May. 26, 19m.

No.v 670,588.

' w E. HmsnALE.

SIPHON WATER CLDSET.

(Appnqmon mea sept. 1, 1900.5

(No Model.)

' number of angular curves or offsets sucient A closet of this type designed especially for use UNED STATES ATEINT OFFICE,

WINFIELD E. HINSDALE, OF NEWy YORK, N. Y.

SIPHON WATER-CLOSET.

SPECIFICATION formingpart of Letters Patent No. 670,588, dated March 26, 1901.

Application filed September 1, 1900. Serial No, 28,819. (No model.)

To @ZZ whom, t 77mg/ concern:

Be it known that I, WINFIELD E. HINSDALE, a citizen of the United States, residing at New York, borough of Manhattan, county and State of New York, have made a new and useful Invention in Siphon VVater-Closets,V of which the following is a specification.

My invention is directed particularly to an improvement in that type of Siphon waterclosets-in which the siphon effect is produced by giving to the siphon part of the closet a to offer to the outiiowing Hushing-water an obstruction of such a nature as to enable it (the siphon) to thoroughly drain and Hush the basin with'the limited amount of Water Which is usually admitted therein at each operation; and it has for its object to devise a waterby children or persons of abnormally short stature.

The invention will be fully understood by` referring to the accompanying drawing, which is asectional view of my improved watercloset and attached parts, illustrating also in sectional view the ioor to which the closet and parts are secured.

In the construction of siphon water-closets which utilize one trap or water seal and are more or less dependent in their operation upon the force of a jet controlled either upon the ejector or injector principle in the usual way by forcing the contents ofthe closet-bowl into the up-leg of the siphon and outfiow passage over the overflow-dam, it is necessary to provide in the down-leg of the siphon and outlet passage several curves or offsets in order to produce the necessary retarding effect on the falling water and -in order to allow the comparatively small volume of water used in flushing the closet-bowl to in elfect lill the down-leg of the siphon and outlet passage, so as to thereby cause the usual result of a long-leg siphon. These curves or offsets in the down-leg` of thesiphon and outlet passage cause the falling Water to pass with numerous angular deections from side to side or fromvone curve or offset to another and to assu me in each instance a sheet-like form in the outlet-passage, thereby preventing the ingress of air from below to the crown phon-closets.

or top of the Siphon-passage and effecting a perfect vacuum at each operation. In existing forms of siphon water-closets therefore it is customary to constructy the bowl, the entire siphon, and the outlet with these curves orv offsets of one integral piece of earthenware, and inasmuch as the diameter of the siphon and outlet is necessarily not less than three and one-half inches it has not been found pos- '.sible to make a structure with a height of less than fifteen and one-half or sixteen inches,-

thus makingit practicallyi m possible to utilize this type of closet for the use of children or persons of abnormally short stature.

My improvement contemplates the construction of a siphon water-closet of theVt-ype described in two parts and so arranged that the closet-bowl and upper part of the siphon p proper are of earthenware and integral and tion, such as will enable others skilledin the,

art to construct and use the same, B represents an earthenware closet-bowl having the usual inlet I for the tiushing-water, an eJector J, and a siphon S of the required curva` ture and diameter provided with an np-leg L and down-leg L', D being the overiiow-dam between said legs. In the lower end of this structure is cast the proper seat, adapted to make a unionl with a metal iiange-ring R, secured in an opening directly in the floor F,

, said metal flange-ring and the seat being substantially like that disclosed in a prior patent, No. 628,004, granted to me by the United States Patent Office on the 4th day of July, 1899.

L2 is a separable or independent outlet constituting a continuation of the down-leg L of the si phon S and having double curves or Oifsets similar in all respects to the corresponding double curves or offsets of existing types of si- This outlet Lzis preferably of metal and is secured by screw-threads at its upper end directly to the internally-screwthreaded fiange-ringR and is reverselycurved, as shown, with relation to the down-leg L', its

angular deflection of the outllowing wateras` it flows from curve to curve effects a perfect vacuum without the aid of other devices.

I do not limit my improvement to the eS- pecial details of construction described in the specification and illustrated in the accompanying drawing, as I believe I am broadly en titled to claim a siphon water-closet adapted for use by children or persons of abnormally short stature, in which closet the curvilinear or oiset si phon effect is obtained b v a two-part Structure, the lower part of which is located below the tloor upon which the bowl of the closet is seated and so curved relatively to the down-leg of the Siphon that at each operation the bowl is drained without the aid of additional vacuum devices, traps, or other means, and my claims are generic as to this feature.

I am aware that a water-closet has heretofore been devised in which the earthenware bowl is seated directly on the floor and to which is secured 4beneath the door a trap, the down-leg of the siphon of the bowl being operatively connected with the supply-pipe for flushing the closet, the arrangement being such that a vacuum is produced at each operation by the agency of the connection between the down-leg of the si phon and the su pply-pipe, as disclosed in United States patent to Bunting, No. 331,610, dated December l, 1885; also, that it is old in the art to discharge the contents of the bowl of a watercloset by the action of a valveless siphon having a seal or dip of greater diameter than the siphon and constituting a Weir-chamber or false trap, as disclosed in patent to Waring, No. 266,404, dated October 24:, 1882, and I make no claim hereinafter broad enough to include such structures, my claims being dis'- tinctly limited to a structure in which the drainage of the bowl is eected without the aid of extraneous means, as hereinbefore described.

Having thus described myinvention, what I claim, and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States, is

l. A siphon watercloset consisting of a bowl and a siphon outlet-passage constructed in two parts, the bowl part being adapted to rest directly upon the floor and the curvilinear or offset oi' the down-legof the siphon being located below the floor and so curved relatively to the siphon that the angular deflection of the outtlowing water drains the bowl, substantially as described.

2. An earthen ware siphon water-closcthaving a bowl and a siphon outlet-passage, said bowl being adapted to rest directly upon the floor; in combination with a separable or inthat the angular deflection of the outliowing 7.o

water drains the bowl, substantially as described.

3. A sipbon water-closet consisting of a bowl and a siphon outlet-passage constructed in two parts, so curved relatively to each other that the outilowing water drains the bowl without the aid of other means, the bowl part being adapted to rest directly upon the floor .and the curvilinear or offset of the down-leg of the siphou being located below the floor; 8o

in combination witha {lange-ri ng adapted to secure said parts together, substantially as described.

4. An earthen ware siphon water-closet having a bowl and a siphon outlet-passage, said bowl beingr adapted to rest directly upon the floor; in combination with aseparable or independent outlet constituting a continuation of the down-leg secured below the floor, said outlet having` double curves or offsets so ar- 9c ranged relatively to each other and the downleg of the siphon that the angular deflection of the outdowing water drains the bowl, together with a flange-ring adapted to secure said parts together,substan tially as described.

5. A water -closet having a siphon constructed in two parts, one part only of said siphon being integral with the bowl of the closet with the bottom of the bowl resting directly upon the floor and the other part seroo cured thereto but located beneath the floor upon which the bowl is sustained both of' said parts being so curved relatively to each other that the angular deflection ot the water as it passes therethrough drains the bowl without the aid of other means, substantially as described.

6. An earthen ware water-closet embodying a bowl and one part only of the siphon'in one integral piece, the bottom of the bowl being 11o adapted to rest directly upon the floor; the second part of said siphon being constructed of metal, but located beneath the floor and secured directly below the first part, the two parts of said siphon being so curved relatively r 15 to each other that the angular deilection of the outflowing water drains the bowl, substantially as described.

In testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specification in the presence of izo two subscribing witnesses.

l/VINFIELD E. HINSDALE.

Witnesses:

C. J. KINTNER, M. F. KEATING.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3149346 *May 7, 1962Sep 22, 1964Springer Clarence AToilet unit
US3643267 *May 4, 1970Feb 22, 1972Arthur L WinterMethod and means for maintaining the throat plastic-type closet bend spaced from cement flooring and for securing a water closet thereto
US5819326 *Apr 6, 1995Oct 13, 1998Toto Ltd.Connecting apparatus for a toilet and a drainpipe
US6108826 *Mar 6, 1998Aug 29, 2000Toto Ltd.Adjustable trap for a toilet stool
US7424755 *Aug 10, 2007Sep 16, 2008Montgomery Robert DAesthetic, multipurpose, cabinetry assembly for use within a lavatory and method of installation
US8011029 *May 22, 2008Sep 6, 2011Lixil CorporationDrain socket
Classifications
International ClassificationE03D11/08
Cooperative ClassificationE03D11/08, E03D2201/30
European ClassificationE03D11/08