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Publication numberUS674636 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 21, 1901
Filing dateSep 13, 1900
Priority dateSep 13, 1900
Publication numberUS 674636 A, US 674636A, US-A-674636, US674636 A, US674636A
InventorsJames Priestman
Original AssigneeJames Priestman
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Heel-cushion.
US 674636 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented May 2|, l90l. J. PRIESTMAN. HEEL cusHlon.

(Application filed' Sept. 13, 1900.)

(No Modal.)

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WTNEEEEIE: INVENTRZ UNITED- STATES PATENT GFFICE.

JAMES PRIESTMAN, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.

HEEL-CUSHION.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 674,636, dated May 21, 1901.

Application filed September 13, 1900. Serial No. 29,978. (No model.)

To @ZZ whom t may concern:

Be it known that I, JAMES PRIEsTMAN, of New York, in the county of New York andY State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Heel-Cushions, of which the following is a specification.

This invention has for its object to provide a simple device for diminishing the shock caused in walking by the heel of the shoe striking the hard ground.

The invention consists in a cushion which may be applied to the heel of any shoe and which is formed of a piece of sheet metal dished in the center and supported 4by a continuous marginal base which rests on the heel of the shoe. The heel of the foot rests on the top of the dished portion, which is nearly flat 'and is divided by a number of radial slits into spring-segments which, being fast to the marginal base at their outer portions, yield when subjected to pressure and constitute the elastic portion of the cushion.

Of the accompanying drawings, Figure 1 represents a longitudinal section of a shoe provided with my improved heel-cushion. Fig. 2 represents a plan View of the preferred form of cushion. Fig. 3 represents a side elevation of the same. Fig. 4 represents a cross-section on line et 4 of Fig. 2. Fig. 5 represents a longitudinal section on line 5 5 of Fig. 2. Fig. 6 represents a plan view of a modified form. Fig. 7 represents a plan View of my improved heel-cushion extended to provide a shank-cushion. Fig. 8 represents a section on line 8 8 of Fig. 7, showing the extended cushion in place on the heel and shank of a shoe. Y

The same reference characters designate the same parts in all the gures.

Referring to the drawings, the heel-cushion a is preferably formed of a piece of sheet metal cut into the shape of a shoe-heel, though it maybe circular in form or of any other suitable shape. The edges of the metal plate are slightly bent, all in the same direction, from the plane of the sheet, so that they form a continuous base or marginal portion b,which supports the cushion when it is in the proper position, whereby the central portion forms a flat crown c, upon which rests the heel of the foot. In my preferred frm of cushion the edge d, which is placed nearest the toe, is straight, extending directly across the shoe from side to side, and from every part of this edge except the end portions the slope to the top of the crown is the same, so that this portion of the plate presents a substantially straight elongated inclined surface. From a point approximately at the center the plate is divided by a number of radiating slits, which extend nearly to the edges of the plate, into vsegments e, which are integral at their outer portions with the edges of the plate and constitute curved springs, having their free ends at that portion of the plate on which rests the wearers heel. Thus the greatest possible resiliency is given to the cushion.

In its operative position the cushion is placed in a shoe, its margin preferably resting on the inner sole. The cushion may be covered by a thin piece h of leather or other suitable material, which serves to keep the metal from contact with the foot of the wearer.

Instead of making the cushion from a single plate I may make the spring-segments e in separate pieces, held in their proper relative positions by aV rim j, Fig. 6, to which they are suitably secured by rivets or otherwise.

This form of heel-cushion is very resilient and does not deteriorate by wear. It also serves to ventilate the shoe, for when the springs are movedinwardly the air confined within the crown of the plate is forced out, and when pressure is removed from the cushion the springs in resuming their normal positions draw air into the cavity again. In this way a flow of air is caused in the shoe at every step.

The cushion may be enameled to prevent it from rusting.

In Figs. 7 and 8 I show a cushion comprising the heel-cushion above described and a shank-cushion s, which is preferably integral with the heel-cushion and is formed to fit the shank portion of the sole immediately in advance of the heel. The cushion s has a series of radiating slits, forming springs, which are relatively arranged like the springs in the heel-cushion and have the same function,

IOO

the springs being surrounded by a continuous marginal seat or base formed to bear on the shank portion of the sole.

I claim- 1. A cushion of the character specified comprising a marginal seat or base and a series of curved springs extending inwardly from said margin and collectively constituting a resilient crowning support, the free ends of the springs constituting the central portion of the support.

2. A cushion of the character specified comprising a crowning sheet-metal plate having a continuous marginal seat or base portion and a series of slits radiating from the central portion of the plate toward the marginal portion, the portions of the plate between said slits constituting springs which dare free at their inner ends.

3. A heel-cushion comprising a crowning sheet-metal plate which has a depressed heelshaped margin anda series of slits radiating from the central portion of the plate toward the margin and forming a series of springs which are free at their inner ends, the forward portion of the plate presenting a substantially straight elongated inclined surface.

4. A combined heel and shank cushion, comprising a heel portion and a shank portion, each having a marginal seat or base and a series of curved springs extending inwardly from said margin and constituting a resilient crowning support.

In testimony whereof I have affixed my sig nature in presence of two Witnesses.

'JAMES PRIESTMAN'.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4709489 *Aug 15, 1985Dec 1, 1987Welter Kenneth FShock absorbing assembly for an athletic shoe
US5918384 *Sep 30, 1996Jul 6, 1999Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US5970628 *Sep 8, 1998Oct 26, 1999Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved heel structure
US6050002 *May 18, 1999Apr 18, 2000Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US6195916Feb 25, 2000Mar 6, 2001Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US6324772Aug 17, 2000Dec 4, 2001Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US6604300Dec 4, 2001Aug 12, 2003Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US6662471Oct 18, 1999Dec 16, 2003Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved heel structure
US6962009Jun 30, 2004Nov 8, 2005Akeva L.L.C.Bottom surface configuration for athletic shoe
US6966129Jun 30, 2004Nov 22, 2005Akeva L.L.C.Cushioning for athletic shoe
US6966130Jun 30, 2004Nov 22, 2005Akeva L.L.C.Plate for athletic shoe
US6968635Jun 30, 2004Nov 29, 2005Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe bottom
US6996923Jun 30, 2004Feb 14, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Shock absorbing athletic shoe
US6996924Jun 30, 2004Feb 14, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Rear sole structure for athletic shoe
US7040040Jun 30, 2004May 9, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Midsole for athletic shoe
US7040041Jun 30, 2004May 9, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with plate
US7043857Jun 30, 2004May 16, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe having cushioning
US7069671Jun 30, 2004Jul 4, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Arch bridge for athletic shoe
US7076892Jun 30, 2004Jul 18, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Shock absorbent athletic shoe
US7082700Aug 3, 2005Aug 1, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with inclined wall configuration
US7089689Aug 3, 2005Aug 15, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with inclined wall configuration and non-ground-engaging member
US7114269May 28, 2003Oct 3, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US7127835Dec 11, 2003Oct 31, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved heel structure
US7155843Aug 3, 2005Jan 2, 2007Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with visible arch bridge
US7380350Jun 30, 2004Jun 3, 2008Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with bottom opening
US7536809Dec 28, 2006May 26, 2009Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with visible arch bridge
US7540099Jun 30, 2004Jun 2, 2009Akeva L.L.C.Heel support for athletic shoe
US7596888Dec 12, 2008Oct 6, 2009Akeva L.L.C.Shoe with flexible plate
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA43B21/32