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Publication numberUS676578 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 18, 1901
Filing dateApr 25, 1900
Priority dateApr 25, 1900
Publication numberUS 676578 A, US 676578A, US-A-676578, US676578 A, US676578A
InventorsCharles C Ely
Original AssigneeCharles C Ely
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bag.
US 676578 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented lune l8, l90l. C. C. ELY.

BAG.

{Application filed Apr. 25, 1900.)

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(No Model.)

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No. 676,578. Patentod lune l8, IBM.

6. C. ELY. BAG.

(Application filed Apr. 25, 1900.)

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UNITED STATES PATENT FFICE.

CHARLES C. ELY, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.

BAG.

SPEGIFIGATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 676,578, dated June 18, 1901.

Application filed April 25, 1900. Serial No. 14,217. (No model.)

To all whom it may concern):

Beit known that 1, CHARLES C. ELY, of New York, county of New York, State of New York, have invented an Improvementin Bags, of which the following description, in connection with the accompanying drawings, is a specification, like numerals on the drawings representing like parts.

This invention relates to bags, and more especially to that class thereof employed as receptacles for containing clothing, furs, and similar articles, which demand protection from moths and dust.

The invention involves as one of its features a bag having its upper end permanently closed and its lower end open, means connected with said bag to sustain the same from a suitable support, a temporary closing device for the lower open end of the bag, and means in the bag from which clothing, 820., can be hung. As the upper end of the bag is closed, it is not necessary to remove said bag from a hook to obtain access to the interior thereof, for this may be readily accomplished through the open bottom by removing the temporary closing device, which latter, however, is of such a construction that when in place it absolutely excludes the entrance 'of dirt and insects to the inside of the bag. As the under side of the bag is open, garments, for example, after they are inserted therein can be more readily reached to remove an y wrinkles or folds that may be therein.

The improved bag involves certain other peculiar features of construction, which may be employed in connection either with a bag having an open or closed upper end.

In the drawings, Figure 1 is a front view of a bag involving my improvements in one em bodiment thereof, a portion of the upper end of the bag being removed. Fig. 2 is a transverse sectional view in the line 2 2, Fig. 1. Fig. 3 is a similar View, the section being taken in the line 3 3, Fig. 1. Fig. 4 is a front view of a closing device for the open end of the bag. Fig. 5 is a cross-section. Fig. 6 is a front View of a difierent kind of clip, bail, and suspender. Figs. 7 and 8 are similar views, also showing modifications of the same devices. Fig. 9 is a view corresponding to Fig. 4. and shows a different type of closure. Fig. 10 is a cross-section 'of the same. Fig.

11 is a view corresponding, respectively, to Figs. 4 and 9 and showing another form of closure; and Fig. 12 is a cross-section of the same. I

The improved device involves in its construction a bag adapted to receive the clothing or other articles to be protected from the ravages'of insects, and it may be of any ma terial, size, or shape. That shown is of substantially rectangular form, and its upper end is illustrated as closed, access being had to the interior thereof through the normally open bottom.

The bag is denoted by 15, and canvas is a suitable material from which it can be made.

In the bag represented in Fig. 1 the upper closed end thereof, approximately at its center, receives a clip, as 16, ordinarily made of sheet metal and conveniently secured in place by rivets, as 17, passing through the jaws or branches of the clip and headed at the opposite ends thereof. The rivets also pass through the material of the bag.

It is desirable to hold the bag out fiat, and for this'purpose I have shown a bar 18 received within the fold at the upper end of the bag, as indicated in Fig. 2, and located between the outwardly bulged or rounded portions 19 and 19 of the jaws of the clip." In this way the clip holds the bar in proper position, avoiding the necessity of stitching or otherwise securing it in place. The length of the bar is substantially equal to the Width of the bag and, as previously set forth, holds the same out fiat under all conditions, so as to prevent the wrinkling of garments therein when the bag is suspended from a hook. The clip has in combination therewith a bail, as 20, which may be of wire, the inturned lower ends of which are introduced into the substantially tubular upper end 21 of the clip. The bail forms a convenient device by which the bag as a whole can be suspended from a hook or peg.

The bag interiorly thereof is preferably provided with means from which articles of clothing can be hung, and I have shown for this purpose in Figs. 1 and 2 a suspender or tab, as 22, which may be made from any suitable material, such as heavy canvas or metal. The upper end of the suspender or tab 22 is located between the upper folded end of the bag and between the jaws of the clip, being conveniently secured in place by the rivets 17. The suspender or tab 22 maybe provided with an opening, as 23, to receive the hook of a garment-hanger.

Iprovide means to close the open lower end of the bag, and in Fig. 4 have shown in detail a device for this purpose, the same comprising in its construction a plate or strip, as 25, usually of sheet metal, having the bail 26 connected thereto, the downturned portions 27 and 28 of the bail being united to the opposite upper corners of the strip 25.

The bag has in proximity to its mouth or open end and in its opposite sides stiffeners, as 29 and 30, stitched therein and the width of which approximates that of the strip 25, such stiffeners being usually made of paperboard or other light material and facilitating the folding of the lower end of the bag about the temporary closure.

Clothing having been placed in the bag 15, the lower end of the same will be drawn through the space between the bar 26 and the upper side of the strip 25 and then passed around the strip 25, with the lower end of the bag or that part thereof having the stiffeners between the strip and the body of the bag. In other words, the lower end of the bag is folded once upon the strip 25, and by reason of its construction the opening to the bag is positively closed and the bail prevents the bag from being unwound.

In Fig. 6 I have shown a different form of clip for the upper end of the bag, said clip being denoted by 31 and extending entirely across the bag and being secured thereto by a line of rivets, as 32. These rivets also pass through the centrally-disposed suspenderor tab 33 in the bag and hold the same in place. The part 33 may be made of canvas folded upon itself, an eye, as 34, being received between the folds of the same. The upper side oE-ihe clip 31 is rolled to receive a rod, as 35, such rolled portion being out out, as at 36, to receive the loops 37 at the lower end of the bail 38, said loops embracing the rod 35.

In Fig. 7 the clip illustrated is denoted by 40, and it may be fastened to the bag by rivets, as 41, a suspender or tab, as 42, being secured between the branches of the clip and held in place by said rivets 41. The sus pender 42 has connected therewith an eye 43, to. which a garment-hanger can be connected. The clip 40, like the one last described, does not extend entirely across the bag but it has a rolled portion 44 to receive the bar 45 in the bag, which bar extends entirely across the bag to hold the same out flat, as is the case with the one previously described. The clip 40 is cut out, as at 46, to receive eyes, as 47, upon the branches of a bail 48, which en circle the bar 45.

In Fig. 8 the suspender or tab 52 is stitched in the bag substantially centrally thereof, and the upper closed end of said bag with the suspender therein is placed over the bar 51, extending entirely across said bag, and it is stitched, as at 50, through back and front, holding the suspender firmly, inclosing the bar, and separating the bag proper from the portion holding the bar and the bail. The suspeuder receives an eye, as 54, to which a garment-hanger can be connected. The upper end of the bag and the suspender inclosed therein are cut out, as at 55, to receive the eyes 56 upon the branches of a bail, as 57.

In Fig. 9 I have shown a closing device for the lower end of the bag. The strip or por tion 60, which receives the lower end of the bag, is, however, trough or substantially U- shaped in cross-section. Otherwise the con-. struction is the same.

In Figs. 11 and 12 another construction is illustrated, the strip 61 having the U-shaped iece 62 provided below the same at opposite P ends thereof and the longer branches of which are united by the cross-bar 63. The fold at the lower end of the bag is received between the strip 61 and the cross-bar 63.

Having fully described my invention, what I claim, and desire to secure by Letters Pat= cut, is-

1. A bag having one end open and its op posite end permanently closed, said closed end being provided with means to suspend said bag from a support with its open end down, means within the bag at its closed end upon which clothing can be hung, and a removable closing device for the open end of the bag,said closing device being independent from the supporting means.

2. A bag having one end open and its op posite end permanently closed, suspending means for the bag permanently attachedto the closed end, means permanently'attached to the inside of the bag at its closed end on which clothing can be hung, and means independent from the suspending means for closing the open end of the bag, said closing means comprising a strip having a bail constructed to enable the open end of the bag to pass between the bail and the strip and be folded upon the latter.

3. A bag having one end open and its opposite end permanently closed, means on the inside of the bag at the closed end on which I clothing may be hung, said closed end being provided with means to hold the bag flat, means to suspend the bag from a support with its open end down, and a removable closing device for the open end of the bag, said closing device being independent from the supporting means and comprising a strip having a hail, the bag when closed having its lower end passed through the bail and entirely around the strip, the open end of the bag being tucked between the body of the bag and the strip.

4. A bag having one end open and its opposite end permanently closed, a clip embracing the bag at its closed end and permanently IIO secured thereto, a suspender secured between the branches of the clip, and means connected with the clip for suspending the bag with its open end down.

5. A bag having one end open and its opposite end permanently closed, a clip embracing .the bag at its closed end and permanently secured thereto, a suspendersecnred between the branches of the clip, means connected with the clip for suspending the bag with its open end down, and a removable closing device for the open end of the bag. v

G. A bag having one end open and its opposite end permanently closed, a clip embracing the bag at its closed end, rivets uniting the clip to the bag, a suspender secured between the branches of the clip and held in place by said rivets, means connected with the clip for suspending the bag with its open end down,

and removable means for closing the open end 20 of the bag.

7. A bag having one end open and its opposite end permanently closed, a clip embracing the bag at its closed end, rivets for securing theclip in place, a suspender secured between the branches of said clip and held in place between said rivets, and a bar extend ing entirely across the upper end of said bag and serving to hold the same in a flat condition.

In testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specification in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

CHARLES C. ELY.

Vitnesses:

FREDK. S. J AoKsoN, THEO. F. SANDERS.

Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA47G25/54