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Publication numberUS6779250 B2
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 10/100,789
Publication dateAug 24, 2004
Filing dateMar 19, 2002
Priority dateJul 9, 1999
Fee statusPaid
Also published asUS6240622, US6357107, US6446327, US6612019, US6646534, US6701607, US6760967, US6762478, US6817087, US6822545, US6825747, US6850141, US6900716, US6910260, US6948230, US6976300, US7158004, US7388462, US20010016976, US20010018794, US20010022019, US20010023530, US20020095768, US20020095769, US20020095770, US20020095771, US20020095772, US20020095773, US20020095774, US20020095775, US20020095776, US20020095777, US20020095778, US20020097132, US20020100161, US20020101320, US20050122199
Publication number100789, 10100789, US 6779250 B2, US 6779250B2, US-B2-6779250, US6779250 B2, US6779250B2
InventorsKie Y. Ahn, Leonard Forbes
Original AssigneeMicron Technology, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Integrated circuit inductors
US 6779250 B2
Abstract
The invention relates to an inductor comprising a plurality of interconnected conductive segments interwoven with a substrate. The inductance of the inductor is increased through the use of coatings and films of ferromagnetic materials such as magnetic metals, alloys, and oxides. The inductor is compatible with integrated circuit manufacturing techniques and eliminates the need in many systems and circuits for large off chip inductors. A sense and measurement coil, which is fabricated on the same substrate as the inductor, provides the capability to measure the magnetic field or flux produced by the inductor. This on chip measurement capability supplies information that permits circuit engineers to design and fabricate on chip inductors to very tight tolerances.
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Claims(36)
What is claimed is:
1. A method comprising:
boring a plurality of holes in a substrate; and
fabricating a conductive path linking the plurality of holes, wherein boring includes irradiating the substrate.
2. A method comprising:
boring a plurality of holes in a substrate; and
fabricating a conductive path linking the plurality of holes wherein boring a plurality of holes in the substrate comprises:
positioning a drill on the substrate; and
drilling a hole in the substrate.
3. A method comprising:
boring a plurality of holes in a substrate; and
fabricating a conductive path linking the plurality of holes wherein boring a plurality of holes in the substrate comprises:
aiming a laser at the substrate; and
burning a hole in the substrate.
4. A method comprising;
boring a number of substantially parallel holes in a substrate having a coating;
depositing a conductive path linking the number of holes and operable for inducing a magnetic flux in the coating, wherein boring includes irradiating the substrate.
5. The method of claim 4, wherein depositing a conductive path comprises:
filling the holes with a conductive material; and
connecting the holes with a conductive material.
6. A method comprising:
drilling a plurality of holes in a substrate;
filling the plurality of holes with a conductive material to form a plurality of conductive segments; and
interconnecting the plurality of conductive segments to form a coil.
7. The method of claim 1, wherein fabricating the conductive path includes passing a conductor through the plurality of holes.
8. The method of claim 7, wherein the conductive path forms a coil surrounding a portion of the substrate.
9. The method of claim 1, including:
forming a magnetic film atop the substrate; and
traversing the magnetic film with a portion of the conductive path.
10. The method of claim 4, including:
filling the holes with a first conductive material; and
connecting the first conductive material with segments of a second conductive material.
11. The method of claim 4, wherein the first conductive material is aluminum or copper.
12. The method of claim 4, including forming the segments of the second conductive material so that a number of the segments of the second conductive material traverse the coating.
13. The method of claim 4, including forming the coating from a magnetic film.
14. The method of claim 13, including forming an insulating layer over the magnetic film.
15. The method of claim 6, further including:
coating a portion of the substrate; and
traversing the coating with a number of the plurality of conductive segments.
16. The method of claim 15, including forming the coating as a magnetic film.
17. The method of claim 16, including forming an insulating layer over the magnetic film and over the number of conductive segments.
18. A method of forming an inductor, comprising:
coating a portion of a surface of a substrate with a magnetic film;
boring a plurality of through holes adjacent the magnetic film that pass through the substrate; and
forming a conductive path integral with the substrate by forming first conductive segments in the through holes and forming second conductive segments that connect to the first conductive segments to form a coil.
19. The method of claim 18, including forming the first conductive segments and the second conductive segments of a single metal.
20. The method of claim 18, wherein a portion of the second conductive segments are planar and traverse the magnetic film.
21. The method of claim 18, wherein boring the plurality of through holes includes irradiating the substrate with a laser.
22. The method of claim 18, wherein boring the plurality of through holes includes drilling the holes in the substrate with a drill bit.
23. A method of forming an inductor integral with a semiconductor substrate, comprising:
forming a plurality of holes in the semiconductor substrate that connect opposing surfaces of the substrate; and
interweaving a conductor through the plurality of holes to form a coil surrounding a portion of the substrate, wherein forming the plurality of holes includes irradiating the semiconductor substrate.
24. A method of forming an inductor integral with a semiconductor substrate, comprising:
forming a plurality of holes in the semiconductor substrate that connect opposing surfaces of the substrate; and
interweaving a conductor through the plurality of holes to form a coil surrounding a portion of the substrate, wherein the coil has an inductance, and further comprising:
forming a magnetic film on one of the surfaces of the substrate; and traversing the magnetic film with a portion of the coil so as to increase the inductance of the coil.
25. The method of claim 24, further including forming an insulator layer over the magnetic film and the portion of the coil traversing the magnetic film.
26. A method of forming an inductor integral with a semiconductor substrate, comprising:
forming a plurality of holes in the semiconductor substrate that connect opposing surfaces of the substrate; and
interweaving a conductor through the plurality of holes to form a coil surrounding a portion of the substrate, wherein forming the plurality of holes includes drilling the holes with a laser.
27. A method of forming an inductor integral with a semiconductor substrate, comprising:
forming a plurality of holes in the semiconductor substrate that connect opposing surfaces of the substrate; and
interweaving a conductor through the plurality of holes to form a coil surrounding a portion of the substrate, wherein forming the plurality of holes includes drilling the holes with a drill bit.
28. The method of claim 24, wherein forming the plurality of holes includes etching the substrate with a dry etch process.
29. A method of forming an inductor comprising;
forming a coating on a portion of a surface of a substrate;
forming a plurality of holes through the substrate adjacent opposing edges of the coating; and
forming a conductive coil that passes through the plurality of holes and is operable to induce a magnetic flux in the coating, wherein forming the plurality of holes includes irradiating the substrate.
30. A method of forming an inductor comprising:
forming a coating on a portion of a surface of a substrate;
forming a plurality of holes through the substrate adjacent opposing edges of the coating; and
forming a conductive coil that passes through the plurality of holes and is operable to induce a magnetic flux in the coating, wherein forming the coating includes depositing a magnetic film.
31. A method of forming an inductor, comprising;
boring a plurality of holes in a semiconductor substrate; and
forming a conductive coil integral with the substrate, the conductive coil having segments passing through the plurality of holes, wherein boring includes irradiating the substrate.
32. A method of forming an inductor, comprising;
boring a plurality of holes in a semiconductor substrate; and
forming a conductive coil integral with the substrate, the conductive coil having segments passing through the plurality of holes, including boring the plurality of holes so as to form a conductive coil having a triangular cross-section.
33. The method of claim 31, including forming the plurality of holes so as to form a conductive coil having a rectangular cross-section.
34. A method of forming an inductor, comprising;
boring a plurality of holes in a semiconductor substrate; and
forming a conductive coil integral with the substrate, the conductive coil having segments passing through the plurality of holes, wherein boring the plurality of holes includes irradiating the substrate with a laser.
35. A method of forming an inductor, comprising;
boring a plurality of holes in a semiconductor substrate; and
forming a conductive coil integral with the substrate, the conductive coil having segments passing through the plurality of holes, wherein boring the plurality of holes includes drilling the substrate with a drill bit.
36. The method of claim 32, wherein boring the plurality of holes includes etching the substrate with a dry etchant.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION(S)

This application is a division of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/821,240, filed on Mar. 29, 2001, now U.S. Pat. No. 6,357,107 which is a division of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/350,601, filed on Jul. 9, 1999, now issued as U.S. Pat. No. 6,240,622, the specifications of which are incorporated herein by reference.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to inductors, and more particularly, it relates to inductors used with integrated circuits.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Inductors are used in a wide range of signal processing systems and circuits. For example, inductors are used in communication systems, radar systems, television systems, highpass filters, tank circuits, and butterworth filters.

As electronic signal processing systems have become more highly integrated and miniaturized, effectively signal processing systems on a chip, system engineers have sought to eliminate the use of large, auxiliary components, such as inductors. When unable to eliminate inductors in their designs, engineers have sought ways to reduce the size of the inductors that they do use.

Simulating inductors using active circuits, which are easily miniaturized, is one approach to eliminating the use of actual inductors in signal processing systems. Unfortunately, simulated inductor circuits tend to exhibit high parasitic effects, and often generate more noise than circuits constructed using actual inductors.

Inductors are miniaturized for use in compact communication systems, such as cell phones and modems, by fabricating spiral inductors on the same substrate as the integrated circuit to which they are coupled using integrated circuit manufacturing techniques. Unfortunately, spiral inductors take up a disproportionately large share of the available surface area on an integrated circuit substrate.

For these and other reasons there is a need for the present invention.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The above mentioned problems and other problems are addressed by the present invention and will be understood by one skilled in the art upon reading and studying the following specification. An integrated circuit inductor compatible with integrated circuit manufacturing techniques is disclosed.

In one embodiment, an inductor capable of being fabricated from a plurality of conductive segments and interwoven with a substrate is disclosed. In an alternate embodiment, a sense coil capable of measuring the magnetic field or flux produced by an inductor comprised of a plurality of conductive segments and fabricated on the same substrate as the inductor is disclosed.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1A is a cutaway view of some embodiments of an inductor of the present invention.

FIG. 1B is a top view of some embodiments of the inductor of FIG. 1A.

FIG. 1C is a side view of some embodiments of the inductor of FIG. 1A.

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional side view of some embodiments of a highly conductive path including encapsulated magnetic material layers.

FIG. 3A is a perspective view of some embodiments of an inductor and a spiral sense inductor of the present invention.

FIG. 3B is a perspective view of some embodiments of an inductor and a non-spiral sense inductor of the present invention.

FIG. 4 is a cutaway perspective view of some embodiments of a triangular coil inductor of the present invention.

FIG. 5 is a top view of some embodiments of an inductor coupled circuit of the present invention.

FIG. 6 is diagram of a drill and a laser for perforating a substrate.

FIG. 7 is a block diagram of a computer system in which embodiments of the present invention can be practiced.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

In the following detailed description of the preferred embodiments, reference is made to the accompanying drawings which form a part hereof, and in which is shown by way of illustration specific preferred embodiments in which the invention may be practiced. These embodiments are described in sufficient detail to enable those skilled in the art to practice the invention, and it is to be understood that other embodiments may be utilized and that logical, mechanical and electrical changes may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention. The following detailed description is, therefore, not to be taken in a limiting sense, and the scope of the present invention is defined only by the appended claims.

FIG. 1A is a cutaway view of some embodiments of inductor 100 of the present invention. Inductor 100 includes substrate 103, a plurality of conductive segments 106, a plurality of conductive segments 109, and magnetic film layers 112 and 113. The plurality of conductive segments 109 interconnect the plurality of conductive segments 106 to form highly conductive path 114 interwoven with substrate 103. Magnetic film layers 112 and 113 are formed on substrate 103 in core area 115 of highly conductive path 114.

Substrate 103 provides the structure in which highly conductive path 114 that constitutes an inductive coil is interwoven. Substrate 103, in one embodiment, is fabricated from a crystalline material. In another embodiment, substrate 103 is fabricated from a single element doped or undoped semiconductor material, such as silicon or germanium. Alternatively, substrate 103 is fabricated from gallium arsenide, silicon carbide, or a partially magnetic material having a crystalline or amorphous structure. Substrate 103 is not limited to a single layer substrate. Multiple layer substrates, coated or partially coated substrates, and substrates having a plurality of coated surfaces are all suitable for use in connection with the present invention. The coatings include insulators, ferromagnetic materials, and magnetic oxides. Insulators protect the inductive coil and separate the electrically conductive inductive coil from other conductors, such as signal carrying circuit lines. Coatings and films of ferromagnetic materials, such as magnetic metals, alloys, and oxides, increase the inductance of the inductive coil.

Substrate 103 has a plurality of surfaces 118. The plurality of surfaces 118 is not limited to oblique surfaces. In one embodiment, at least two of the plurality of surfaces 118 are parallel. In an alternate embodiment, a first pair of parallel surfaces are substantially perpendicular to a second pair of surfaces. In still another embodiment, the surfaces are planarized. Since most integrated circuit manufacturing processes are designed to work with substrates having a pair of relatively flat or planarized parallel surfaces, the use of parallel surfaces simplifies the manufacturing process for forming highly conductive path 114 of inductor 100.

Substrate 103 has a plurality of holes, perforations, or other substrate subtending paths 121 that can be filled, plugged, partially filed, partially plugged, or lined with a conducting material. In FIG. 1A, substrate subtending paths 121 are filled by the plurality of conducting segments 106. The shape of the perforations, holes, or other substrate subtending paths 121 is not limited to a particular shape. Circular, square, rectangular, and triangular shapes are all suitable for use in connection with the present invention. The plurality of holes, perforations, or other substrate subtending paths 121, in one embodiment, are substantially parallel to each other and substantially perpendicular to substantially parallel surfaces of the substrate.

Highly conductive path 114 is interwoven with a single layer substrate or a multilayer substrate, such as substrate 103 in combination with magnetic film layers 112 and 113, to form an inductive element that is at least partially embedded in the substrate. If the surface of the substrate is coated, for example with magnetic film 112, then conductive path 114 is located at least partially above the coating, pierces the coated substrate, and is interlaced with the coated substrate.

Highly conductive path 114 has an inductance value and is in the shape of a coil. The shape of each loop of the coil interlaced with the substrate is not limited to a particular geometric shape. For example, circular, square, rectangular, and triangular loops are suitable for use in connection with the present invention.

Highly conductive path 114, in one embodiment, intersects a plurality of substantially parallel surfaces and fills a plurality of substantially parallel holes. Highly conductive path 114 is formed from a plurality of interconnected conductive segments. The conductive segments, in one embodiment, are a pair of substantially parallel rows of conductive columns interconnected by a plurality of conductive segments to form a plurality of loops.

Highly conductive path 114, in one embodiment, is fabricated from a metal conductor, such as aluminum, copper, or gold or an alloy of a such a metal conductor. Aluminum, copper, or gold, or an alloy is used to fill or partially fill the holes, perforations, or other paths subtending the substrate to form a plurality of conductive segments. Alternatively, a conductive material may be used to plug the holes, perforations, or other paths subtending the substrate to form a plurality of conductive segments. In general, higher conductivity materials are preferred to lower conductivity materials. In one embodiment, conductive path 114 is partially diffused into the substrate or partially diffused into the crystalline structure.

For a conductive path comprised of segments, each segment, in one embodiment, is fabricated from a different conductive material. An advantage of interconnecting segments fabricated from different conductive materials to form a conductive path is that the properties of the conductive path are easily tuned through the choice of the conductive materials. For example, the internal resistance of a conductive path is increased by selecting a material having a higher resistance for a segment than the average resistance in the rest of the path. In an alternate embodiment, two different conductive materials are selected for fabricating a conductive path. In this embodiment, materials are selected based on their compatibility with the available integrated circuit manufacturing processes. For example, if it is difficult to create a barrier layer where the conductive path pierces the substrate, then the conductive segments that pierce the substrate are fabricated from aluminum. Similarly, if it is relatively easy to create a barrier layer for conductive segments that interconnect the segments that pierce the substrate, then copper is used for these segments.

Highly conductive path 114 is comprised of two types of conductive segments. The first type includes segments subtending the substrate, such as conductive segments 106. The second type includes segments formed on a surface of the substrate, such as conductive segments 109. The second type of segment interconnects segments of the first type to form highly conductive path 114. The mid-segment cross-sectional profile 124 of the first type of segment is not limited to a particular shape. Circular, square, rectangular, and triangular are all shapes suitable for use in connection with the present invention. The mid-segment cross-sectional profile 127 of the second type of segment is not limited to a particular shape. In one embodiment, the mid-segment cross-sectional profile is rectangular. The coil that results from forming the highly conductive path from the conductive segments and interweaving the highly conductive path with the substrate is capable of producing a reinforcing magnetic field or flux in the substrate material occupying the core area of the coil and in any coating deposited on the surfaces of the substrate.

FIG. 1B is a top view of FIG. 1A with magnetic film 112 formed on substrate 103 between conductive segments 109 and the surface of substrate 103. Magnetic film 112 coats or partially coats the surface of substrate 103. In one embodiment, magnetic film 112 is a magnetic oxide. In an alternate embodiment, magnetic film 112 is one or more layers of a magnetic material in a plurality of layers formed on the surface of substrate 103.

Magnetic film 112 is formed on substrate 103 to increase the inductance of highly conductive path 114. Methods of preparing magnetic film 112 include evaporation, sputtering, chemical vapor deposition, laser ablation, and electrochemical deposition. In one embodiment, high coercivity gamma iron oxide films are deposited using chemical vapor pyrolysis. When deposited at above 500 degrees centigrade these films are magnetic gamma oxide. In an alternate embodiment, amorphous iron oxide films are prepared by the deposition of iron metal in an oxygen atmosphere (10−4 torr) by evaporation. In another alternate embodiment, an iron-oxide film is prepared by reactive sputtering of an Fe target in Ar+O2 atmosphere at a deposition rate of ten times higher than the conventional method. The resulting alpha iron oxide films are then converted to magnetic gamma type by reducing them in a hydrogen atmosphere.

FIG. 1C is a side view of some embodiments of the inductor of FIG. 1A including substrate 103, the plurality of conductive segments 106, the plurality of conductive segments 109 and magnetic films 112 and 113.

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional side view of some embodiments of highly conductive path 203 including encapsulated magnetic material layers 206 and 209. Encapsulated magnetic material layers 206 and 209, in one embodiment, are a nickel iron alloy deposited on a surface of substrate 212. Formed on magnetic material layer layers 206 and 209 are insulating layers 215 and 218 and second insulating layers 221 and 224 which encapsulate highly conductive path 203 deposited on insulating layers 215 and 218. Insulating layers 215, 218, 221 and 224, in one embodiment are formed from an insulator, such as polyimide. In an alternate embodiment, insulating layers 215, 218, 221, and 224 are an inorganic oxide, such as silicon dioxide or silicon nitride. The insulator may also partially line the holes, perforations, or other substrate subtending paths. The purpose of insulating layers 215 and 218, which in one embodiment are dielectrics, is to electrically isolate the surface conducting segments of highly conductive path 203 from magnetic material layers 206 and 209. The purpose of insulating layers 221 and 224 is to electrically isolate the highly conductive path 203 from any conducting layers deposited above the path 203 and to protect the path 203 from physical damage.

The field created by the conductive path is substantially parallel to the planarized surface and penetrates the coating. In one embodiment, the conductive path is operable for creating a magnetic field within the coating, but not above the coating. In an alternate embodiment, the conductive path is operable for creating a reinforcing magnetic field within the film and within the substrate.

FIG. 3A and FIG. 3B are perspective views of some embodiments of inductor 301 and sense inductors 304 and 307 of the present invention. In one embodiment, sense inductor 304 is a spiral coil and sense inductor 307 is a test inductor or sense coil embedded in the substrate. Sense inductors 304 and 307 are capable of detecting and measuring reinforcing magnetic field or flux 309 generated by inductor 301, and of assisting in the calibration of inductor 301. In one embodiment, sense inductor 304 is fabricated on one of the surfaces substantially perpendicular to the surfaces of the substrate having the conducting segments, so magnetic field or flux 309 generated by inductor 301 is substantially perpendicular to sense inductor 304. Detachable test leads 310 and 313 in FIG. 3A and detachable test leads 316 and 319 in FIG. 3B are capable of coupling sense inductors 304 and 307 to sense or measurement circuits. When coupled to sense or measurement circuits, sense inductors 304 and 307 are decoupled from the sense or measurement circuits by severing test leads 310, 313, 316, and 319. In one embodiment, test leads 310, 313, 316, and 316 are severed using a laser.

In accordance with the present invention, a current flows in inductor 301 and generates magnetic field or flux 309. Magnetic field or flux 309 passes through sense inductor 304 or sense inductor 307 and induces a current in spiral sense inductor 304 or sense inductor 307. The induced current can be detected, measured and used to deduce the inductance of inductor 301.

FIG. 4 is a cutaway perspective view of some embodiments of triangular coil inductor 400 of the present invention. Triangular coil inductor 400 comprises substrate 403 and triangular coil 406. An advantage of triangular coil inductor 400 is that it saves at least a process step over the previously described coil inductor. Triangular coil inductor 400 only requires the construction of three segments for each coil of inductor 400, where the previously described inductor required the construction of four segments for each coil of the inductor.

FIG. 5 is a top view of some embodiments of an inductor coupled circuit 500 of the present invention. Inductor coupled circuit 500 comprises substrate 503, coating 506, coil 509, and circuit or memory cells 512. Coil 509 comprises a conductive path located at least partially above coating 506 and coupled to circuit or memory cells 512. Coil 509 pierces substrate 503, is interlaced with substrate 503, and produces a magnetic field in coating 506. In an alternate embodiment, coil 509 produces a magnetic field in coating 506, but not above coating 506. In one embodiment, substrate 503 is perforated with a plurality of substantially parallel perforations and is partially magnetic. In an alternate embodiment, substrate 503 is a substrate as described above in connection with FIG. 1. In another alternate embodiment, coating 506 is a magnetic film as described above in connection with FIG. 1. In another alternate embodiment, coil 509, is a highly conductive path as described in connection with FIG. 1.

FIG. 6 is a diagram of a drill 603 and a laser 606 for perforating a substrate 609. Substrate 609 has holes, perforations, or other substrate 609 subtending paths. In preparing substrate 609, in one embodiment, a diamond tipped carbide drill is used bore holes or create perforations in substrate 609. In an alternate embodiment, laser 606 is used to bore a plurality of holes in substrate 609. In a preferred embodiment, holes, perforations, or other substrate 609 subtending paths are fabricated using a dry etching process.

FIG. 7 is a block diagram of a system level embodiment of the present invention. System 700 comprises processor 705 and memory device 710, which includes memory circuits and cells, electronic circuits, electronic devices, and power supply circuits coupled to inductors of one or more of the types described above in conjunction with FIGS. 1A-5. Memory device 710 comprises memory array 715, address circuitry 720, and read circuitry 730, and is coupled to processor 705 by address bus 735, data bus 740, and control bus 745. Processor 705, through address bus 735, data bus 740, and control bus 745 communicates with memory device 710. In a read operation initiated by processor 705, address information, data information, and control information are provided to memory device 710 through busses 735, 740, and 745. This information is decoded by addressing circuitry 720, including a row decoder and a column decoder, and read circuitry 730. Successful completion of the read operation results in information from memory array 715 being communicated to processor 705 over data bus 740.

Conclusion

Embodiments of inductors and methods of fabricating inductors suitable for use with integrated circuits have been described. In one embodiment, an inductor having a highly conductive path fabricated from a plurality of conductive segments, and including coatings and films of ferromagnetic materials, such as magnetic metals, alloys, and oxides has been described. In another embodiment, an inductor capable of being fabricated from a plurality of conductors having different resistances has been described. In an alternative embodiment, an integrated test or calibration coil capable of being fabricated on the same substrate as an inductor and capable of facilitating the measurement of the magnetic field or flux generated by the inductor and capable of facilitating the calibration the inductor has been described.

Although specific embodiments have been illustrated and described herein, it will be appreciated by those of ordinary skill in the art that any arrangement which is calculated to achieve the same purpose may be substituted for the specific embodiment shown. This application is intended to cover any adaptations or variations of the present invention. Therefore, it is manifestly intended that this invention be limited only by the claims and the equivalents thereof.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification29/604, 29/605, 29/603.1, 257/E27.046, 29/606
International ClassificationH01F27/28, H01F17/00, H01L27/08, H01F37/00
Cooperative ClassificationY10S257/924, H01F17/0033, H01F27/2804, H01F37/00, H01L27/08
European ClassificationH01F17/00A4, H01F27/28A, H01F37/00, H01L27/08
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