Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS678612 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 16, 1901
Filing dateAug 3, 1900
Priority dateAug 3, 1900
Publication numberUS 678612 A, US 678612A, US-A-678612, US678612 A, US678612A
InventorsPaul J Daemicke
Original AssigneePaul J Daemicke
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Refrigerator.
US 678612 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

No. 678,6I2. Patented luly I6, 190i.

1 P. J. DAEMISKE.

BEFREGERATOB.

(Application filed Aug. 3, 1900.) (No Model.) 3 Sheets-Sheet l.

a0 Wivgeggeg, 71 I lizvent 7".

T21: Nonms Pztzns co, FMDTO-LITNQ. WASHINGTON, u. c.

3 Sheets-Sheet 2.

Patented luly l6, [90L P. J. DAEMICKE.

REFRIGERATOR.

(Application filed Aug. 8, 1900.)

(N 0 Model.)

77-2i72e55e5,

CJlgM MMW "rm: News PETFRG co. Mo'ruumm msuwcmu. 11c

m. 678,6l2. Patented July as, mm. P. .1. DAEMICKE.

REFRIGERATOR. (Application filed Au 3, 1900.

(No Model.)

3 Sheets-Sheet 3.

Jay. &.

m: -onms PETEKS co, mo'mumu, wAsnmmou, n. c

PAUL J. DAEMICKE, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS.

REFRIGERATOR.

T0 aZZ whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, PAUL J. DAEMICKE a citizen of the United States, residing at Chicago, county of Cook, State of Illinois, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Refrigerators, of which the following is a specification, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, forming a part thereof.

Figure 1 is a vertical axial section of my rotary refrigerator, section being made at the line 1 1 on Fig. 4. Fig. 2 is ahorizontal section at theline 2 2 on Fig. 1. Fig. 3 is an elevation, partly sectional, section being made at the line 3 3 on Fig. 4. Fig. 4 is a horizontal section at the line 44on Fig. 1. Fig. 5 is a detail elevation of a door closing one of the compartments of the refrigerator. Fig. 6 is a detail section at the line 6 6 on Fig. 3 across one compartment. Fig. 7 is a detail horizontal section at one corner, showing special construction in one compartment and the regular construction in the adjoining compartment. Fig. 8 is a vertical section of a bottle-cooler fitted for one of the compartments. Fig. 9 is a perspective of a removable false bottom and ice-lifter for the central ice-receptacle.

My improved refrigerator is preferably a rotatable structure on a fixed base; but Whether or not it is made rotatable it comprises a central cooling-chamber, which in the specific structure illustrated is designed to be used as a central ice-receptacle, and storage-chambers grouped about the same and encompassing it. table. The rotating element is a cabinet comprisinga bottom A and sides A A, joined to the bottom and together therewith making a tight polygonal box having as many sides as may be desired, being shown hexago: nal in the drawings. The corner-posts A A &;c., extend up from the several corners of the hexagonal bottom and support a hexagonal upper structure comprising the sides A and apertured top A closed by the lid A. Both the bottom hexagonal box'and the upper hexagonal structure have metal lining a the former constituting a receptacle 0. for water of liquefaction and the latter constituting an upper cooling-chamber, which in the specific structure illustrated is designed to be used I have shown it rota-- SPECIFICATION forming part Off Letters Patent No. 678,612, dated July 1 6, 1901.

' Application filed August3, 1900. Serial N0.25,759. (No model.)

as an upper ice-receptacle a The side walls A of the upper ice-receptacle a are double, having the inner elements a and the interspaces a which constitute air-fines extending through said walls from the storagechambers, hereinafter described, to the upper part of the upper ice-receptacle a. The metal lining of the upper ice-receptacle is applied to the inner surface of the inner wall element a of said wall.

B is a central cylinder constituting an icereceptacle. It is joined securely to the bottom A, an annular angled flange Z) being provided for that purpose, as seen in Fig. 1. This central ice-receptacle is made of perforated or reticulated metal, affording free air circulation.

N is a perforated and flanged dislcconsti tuting a false bottom for the central ice-receptacle. It has arms N, extending upward and provided at the upper end with hooks N by means of which the false bot-tom may be suspended within the ice-receptacle B when the latter is to be filled with clear ice. (See Fig. 3.) The ice may be withdrawn by lifting the false bottom by means of the side bars N.

C C O, &c., are radial sheet-metal partitions which extend from the central ice-receptacle B to the severalangles of the struc ture, the corner-posts A A &c., at these an= gles being preferably metal-faced on their inner side, said metal facing being continuous with the metal lining a of the water and upper ice receptacles and the metal partitions G O G, 850., being joined by soldering to said metal lining of the corner-posts and similarly joined to the central ice-receptacle B These partitions thus greatly stiffen and strengthen thestructure. Theseveralstorage-chambers c c, &c., formed by the partitions O O, &c., are closed at the outer side by doors D D D, &c., which are glazed, the entire door, excepting the framework, consisting of three glass plates d r l, with intervening spaces, thus both insulating the chambers and preventing the surface condensation of moisture thereon. The chambers c c are separated from the upper ice-receptacle a by any convenient form of ice-rack. I have shown a woven-Wire rack D for that purpose. The

ice-rack is supported upon the upper ends of the partitions C O C, and in the absence of any provision to the contrary the water of liquefaction drips from the ice directly into and through the several chambers c and accumulates in the water-receptacle a at the bottom. Whenever it is desired to use any chamber 0 for the storage of material which should not be exposed to the falling water, I interpose at the top of such chamber, underneath the ice-rack, a drip-pan E, which is suitably flanged to obtain support upon the upper ends of the partitions and slightly depressed inside the lateral flanges in order to be checked laterally by said partitions. Whenever by reason of the nature of the contents of any chamber it is especially desirable to keep it dry, I interpose a shield F at the inner narrower end of such chamber, immediately outside the perforated wall of the central ice-receptacle, and in addition place the drip-pan E at the top of the chamber, as shown in Fig. 1, with its inner end overhanging the upper end of such shield, so that the drip-water from the ice, which is diverted to Ward the center, is discharged between such shield and the central ice-receptacle, and thus reaches the water-receptacle at the bottom without causing either danger of moistening the contents of the storage-chambers or the absorption of moisture, which might otherwise occur if the iee in the central icereceptacle were directly exposed through the perforated wall of said receptacle.

For the purpose of draining off the clear water which accumulates in the receptacle a 43 der at the same time to provide for the drainage of the water of liquefaction and prevent the same from accumulating beyond a cer tain desired height in the Water-receptacle, I provide a structurewhich will now be described.

/ To the bottom'YYof the rotary cabinet I secure a plate G, having a central hollow boss or hub G, extending both up and down from the plate, the bottom plank A of the cabinet being apertured to permit the upper extension of the boss to protrude therethrough, the metal lining of the water-receptacle being soldered to the boss where the latter protrudes through said lining. The height of this boss above the inner surface of the bottom of the receptacle A is that at which it is desired to maintain the water of liquefaction in said receptacle for the purpose of Watersealing the lower ends of said chambers from each other and providing water insulation for said chambers at the bottom against the outer temperature. For the fixed base I employ an integral casting II, having a central aperture adapted to receive the downwardlyextending portion of the boss G, and thereby center the rotary cabinet upon the base. In order to take the weight of the rotary cabi net and facilitate its rotation, I employa spi-' der comprising acentral hub h, with the ra-' dial arms 71 having at their ends tapered rollers 71 for which corresponding annular tracks 9 and h are provided on the lower side of the plate G and upper side of the base H, respectively, as seen in Fig. 1. This particular expedient for providing roller-bearings for a rotary cabinet is not part of my'invention and, being a familiar device, need not be further described in detail. At the center of the base H, I provide a water-pocket H, encompassing the axis of the rotary cabinet and the lowerend of the aperture through which the hub or hollow boss G protrudes, so that said boss, operating as an overflowduct, discharges into said water-pocket. For the purpose of facilitating the connection of the plate G, by means of the hollow boss G, to the base H, at the center of the latter, and prevent the accidental disconnection of the parts I use a cotter-pin G for which asuitable aperture is made through thelower end of the boss G, and in order to insert said cotter-pin, notwithstanding the presence of the water-pocket H surrounding the axis of that part of the structure, I make a lateral opening h into said water-pocket at the level of the cotter-pin and insert the pin by way of such opening through the end of the boss G, closing the opening by a plug H after the pin is in place.

When it is desirable to produce a lower temperature than can be produced by the use of ice alone in the central ice-receptacle and in the upper ice-receptacle above the storagechambers or to cool the storage -chambers more rapidly than can be done with ice alone, I employa tubular shell K of suitable diameter to be inserted down within the central ice-receptacle B, fitting the same as closely as may be conveniently done, such shell being of suitable length to extend substantially to the top of the upper ice-chamber when its bottom rests upon the upper end of the boss G. This shell, which constitutes an imperforate lining for the central ice-receptacle, has a rigid drain-tube 7c projecting from the bottom and adapted to pass into the hollow boss G when said shell is inserted into the central ice-receptacle, as seen in Fig. 1. A reticulated false bottom K may be employed in this shell to cover the aperture or mouth leading into the drain-tube. This shell may be packed with any freezing mixture, as salt and ice, and then inserted, as described, within the central ice-receptacle, with its draintube projecting and fitting with reasonable tightness in the aperture through the boss G, thus constituting a freezing-cartridge calculated to produce a lower temperature in the chambers around it than would be produced by the melting ice alone in the central icereceptacle. involving the drain-duct from the shell K is to separate the salt water which will result from such mixture from the clear water which will come from the ice in the upper,

icereceptacle, and the salt water is thus discharged directly into the central pocket H of the plate H. lVhen this freezing-cartridge is employed, the drain-duct 7t thereof practi' cally closes the passage through the boss G, and other drainage must be provided for the clear water which drips from the ice in the upper receptacle, and for this purpose I provide an annular water-pocket H extending all around the base H, connecting by a small duct H with the central pocket H, and an overflow-pipe J, which extends from the water-level of the chamber 0 directly through th e bottom into said annular water-pocket H pocket H to carry away the drainage-water which is derived from both sources, preventing it from accumulating above the level of the intake-mouth of said pipe, which becomes thus the water-level of said pocket, below which the lower end of the boss G and the lower end of the drain-pipe J project, so that said passages are both Water-sealed or trapped at their lower ends, preventing the inflow of air into the refrigerator.

One storage-chamber in my refrigerator is arranged to cool bottled goods, and for that purpose it has a false front L, located just inside the door of said chamber, said false front having apertures Z Z, 850., through which bottles may be inserted radially with respect to the chamber and lodged upon suitable rods Z extending across the chamber ata distance.

back from the false front. The water of liquefaction from the ice-chamber above falling through the bottle-chamber thus arranged flows over all the bottles therein, and since such water is at a temperature substantially 32 Fahrenheit when it drips from the ice this arrangement adapts it to produce the utmost cooling eifect possible, while the structure of the false front, whose apertures are at all times closed by the bottles occupying the same, prevents the loss of cold air when the door is opened to withdraw or insert a bottle. The apertures may be filled with empty bottles as the new ones are withdrawn; but I prefer to employ trapdoors or drop-valves L 13, die. suspended by their upper edges above each of the bottle-apertures,

so that theinsertion of a bottle readily swings the trap-door up and permits the bottle to enter, while the withdrawal of a bottle permits the trap-door to fall and close the aperture.

For other bottled or canned goods which by reason of their size or shape or any other reason cannot be conveniently inserted through the false front of the chamber last described, and thus become exposed to the cold water, I provide a bottlecooler consist- The purpose of the construction A pipe H connects with this annular ing of an open-topped vessel M,of sheet metal, adapted to be placed in any one of the chambers upon any shelf thereof, adapted to re ceive the drip-water directly from the icechamber above. The depth of this vessel is a little more than that to which it is desired to immerse the articles placed therein. The water falling from the ice at a temperature of 32 is lighter than it afterward becomes while rising to a temperature of 39. It is desirable to avoid losing this coldest water, and therefore desirable to avoid taking the overflow from the top of the vessel. If the vessel is filled with bottles or cans and allowed to remain without change of contents until they are thoroughly cooled, it will usually happen that the warmest water in the vessel will not be Warmer that 39 and will be at the bottom. Under such circumstances it is desirable to take the overflow-water from the bottom of the chamber. WVhen, however, the contents of the vessel are frequently changed, the cold bottles or cans being re moved and warmer ones being put in their place, the temperature of the water is liable to rise considerably above 39 Fahrenheit, and such warmer water will be found at some point above the bottom, and in order to take the warmest water out by way of the overflow the intake of the overflow-pipe must be at such point above the bottom as may be found by observation to contain the warmest water, and for perfect adaptability to circumstances it is desirable to be able to vary the height of the intake-mouth. For this purpurse I employ a two-part telescoping duct M the upper section M being attached to the vessel and discharging through the wall near the top and the lower section telescoping tightly with the upper, so as to retain its position, having a finger-piece m by which it may be readily adjusted to locate the intake-mouth at the lower end of said telescoping section at any desired level. i

For the purpose of affording cold storage for such articles as cheese, which are liable to taint other articles in the same or other communicating receptacle,l provide one compartment or storage-chamber with a metal lining or false wall,constituting substantially an open-front box or case T, which is shaped in cross-section as seen in Fig. 4, so that it may be inserted through the door-opening of the compartment'and secured by screws t to the corner-strips V, which are first secured in position in the angle between the partitions O and the corner-posts A The frame of the door of this compartment shuts tightly against the forward edge of the sides, top, and bottom of the case T, and thus completes it as an in closure without any communication with the remaining chambers of the cabinet. The upper and lower bars of the frame of the door of this compartment have ventilating apertures 01 (Z controlled by slides 01 d, which permit ventilation of the case T to any desired extent. The top of the case T is covdescribed.

ered with wood T to prevent it from becoming so cold by direct radiation as to prevent the warm air in the case from rising to the top and passing out through the ventilatingapertures in the upper part of the door, as The drippan E at the top ofthis particular compartment of the cabinet is arranged to deliver thedrip-water down inside the compartment outside the case 'lthat is, in the narrowspace left between the partitions O and the side walls of the case T-the design being that the water shall flow down on the outer sides of the case, and so cool the lateral walls on its way to the water-receptacle at the bottom of the cabinet.

I claim 1. A refrigerator, consisting of a revoluble cabinet comprising ice and storage chambers, and a receptacle for water of liquefaction, and a fixed base on which such cabinet is sup ported and revolved; the base having a wator-pocket encompassing the axis, and the cabinet having an overflow drain-pipe from the waterreceptacle having its receivingmouth elevated above the bottom of the receptacle and its discharge-mouth overhanging the water-pocket in the base throughout the revolution of said cabinet.

2. A refrigerator, consisting of a revoluble cabinet comprising ice and storage chambers, and a receptacle for water of liquefaction, an overflow-pipe from such receptacle whose overflow-point determines the. water-level thereof; a fixed base on which the revoluble cabinet is supported,said base having a waterpocket encompassing the axis and having an overflow drain-pipe by which the water-level is maintained in such pocket; the overflowpipe from the water-receptacle in the cabinet having its discharge-mouth protruded down into said water-pocket, below the water-level thereof.

3. A refrigerator, consisting of a revoluble cabinet comprising ice and storage chambers, and a receptacle for water of liquefaction; a fixed base, on which the revoluble cabinet is supported, having a central water-pocket and an overflow drain-pipe from the water-receptacle of the revoluble cabinet having its receiving-mouth elevated above the bottom of said receptacle and extending out through the bottom of said cabinet, at the center thereof, and discharging into the central Waterpocket of the base.

4. A refrigerator, consisting of a revoluble cabinet comprising ice and storage chambers, and a receptacle for water of liquefaction, and having a central stem extending from the bottom downward; and a fixed base having a central aperture which receives the stem of the cabinet and which centers the cabinet on the base; a water-pocket on the base under such central aperture, the central stem of the cabinot being tubular, whereby it serves to conduct the drainage from the cabinet into said central water-pocket of the base.

5. A refrigerator, consisting of a revoluble cabinet, comprising ice and storage chambers and a receptacle for water of liquefaction derived from the ice, and a receptacle for a freezing mixture separate from the ice-chamber; a fixed base on which said cabinet is supported; and an overflow drain-pipe leading from the water-receptacle; the cabinet having a-hollow stem by which it is centered in the base, said base having a water-pocket under the hollow stem, and under the end of said overflow drain-pipe the freezing-mixture receptacle, having a drain pipe which discharges into said hollow stem.

6. A refrigerator, consisting of a revoluble cabinet, comprising ice and storage chambers and a receptacle for water of liquefaction; a fixed base upon which said cabinet is supported, the cabinet having a hollow central stem by which it is centered on said base; antifriction devices and tracks for the same 'on the bottom of the cabinet and on the fixed base respectively concentric about said hollow stem; said stem extending up into the cabinet and opening therein above the bot tom of the water-receptacle and constituting an overflow drain-pipe for the water-receptacle; whereby the water is carried out through the center of the base.

7. In a refrigerator, in combination with the revoluble cabinet having a hollow central stem constituting a drain-pipe, a fixed base on which said revoluble cabinet is centered by said stem, said base having a water-pocket underneath the stem, said water-pocket having a lateral aperture provided with a removable plug, and a retaining pin inserted through the lower end of the tubular stem, below the bearing of the latter in the fixed base, to retain the parts in connection to permit the insertion of the retaining-pin.

8. A refrigerator, consisting of a fixed base and a horizontally-revoluble cabinet supported and centered on such base, and compris ing a central ice-receptacle,and storage-chambers surrounding such central receptacle; and a receptacle for water of liquefaction at the lower part, the fixed base having a waterpocket encompassing the axis, and the revoluble structure having an overflow drain-pipe whose discharge-mouth extends into such water-pocket, below the water-level thereof.

9. A refrigerator, consisting of a fixed base and a horizontally-revoluble cabinet supported and centered on such base, comprising a central ice-receptacle, storage-chambers completely encompassing the ice-receptacle, and a receptacle for the water of liquefaction at the lower part, extending underneath the storage-chambers, the base havinga water-pocket with an overflow maintaining a water-level, the revoluble cabinet having an overflow drain-pipe which overhangs and intrudes into said water-pocket to a point below the waterlevel of such pocket.

10. A refrigerator, comprising a revoluble cabinet, having a central ice-receptacle and storage-chambers separated by vertical partitions trending from the central receptacle outward; and a receptacle for water of liquefaction extending underneath the storagechambers, and provided with a trapped overflow; the vertical partitions between the chambers being extended below the waterlevel of such water-receptacle; whereby the several chambers are water-sealed from each other at the bottom.

11. Arefrigerator, consisting of a fixed base and a horizontally-revoluble cabinet supported and centered-on such base, comprising a central ice-receptacle, storage-chambers separated by vertical partitions and together encompassing such central receptacle, and a receptacle for water of liquefaction extending under the storage chambers, the partitions between such chambers extending below the water-line of such water-receptacle; whereby such chambers are water-sealed from each other at the lower end; the base having a water-pocket encompassing the axis, and the revoluble cabinet having an overflow drain-pipe whose discharge end overhangs such water pocket throughout the entire revolution of such revoluble cabinet.

12. Arefrigerator, consisting of a fixed base and a horizontally-revoluble cabinet supported and centered on such base, comprising a central ice-receptacle, vertically-partitioned storage-chambers encompassing such receptacle, an additional ice-receptacle extending above the storage-chamber; and a receptacle for the water of liquefaction, extending underneath the storage-chambers and provided with an overflow drain-pipe by which the Water-1evel is maintained, the partitions-between the storage-chambers being extended below such water-level; the base having a Water-pocket into which the drain'pipe discharges.

13. Arefrigerator, comprisinga central icereceptacle'; vertically epartitioned storagechambers encompassing such receptacle; a receptacle for water of liquefaction extending underneath the storage-chambers; an upper ice-chamber extending above the storagechambers, the ice-rack or reticulated bottom of said upper ice-chamber constituting the top or upper boundary of the storage-chambers; and a removable drip-pan interposed between the upper ice-chamber and astoragechamber located underneath the same to divert the water of liquefaction past such storage-chamber on its way to the water-receptacle.

14. Arefrigerator, comprising a'central icereceptacle having its inclosing walls perforated or reticulated; vertically-partitioned storage-chambers encompassing such receptacle; a receptacle for water of liquefaction, extending underneath the storage-chambers; an upper ice-chamber extending above the storage-chambers, the ice-rack or reticulated bottom of said upper ice-chamber constituting the ceiling or upper boundary of the storage-chambers; a removable imperforate shield interposed between the partition-walls bounding the storage-chambers near the perforated or reticulated wall of the central ice-chamber, forming a vertical passage between said reticulated wall and said shield from the top to the bottom of such storage-chambers; and

a removable drip-pan interposed between the upper ice-chamber and said storage-chambers to divert the water of liquefaction into said vertical passage formed by such shield.

15. A refrigerator, comprising a central icereceptacle; a plurality of storage-chambers in a group,encompassing the central receptacle; a receptacle for water of liquefaction underneath all the storage-chambers; an upper ice-chamber above the storage-chambers, the ice-rack or reticulated bottom of such upper ice-chamber constituting the top of the storagechambers and permitting the free passage of cold air and water of liquefaction from the ice downward into such storagechambers; the outer wall of such upper icecham ber having air-fines extending in it from the storage-chambers to the upper part of said upper ice-chamber.

16. A refrigerator, comprising a centralicereceptacle having reticulated Walls; storagechambers separated by vertical partitions, and together encompassing such central icereceptacle; a receptacle for water of liquefaction extending underneath the several storage-chambers; an upper ice-chamber extending above the storage-chambers; the icesupport thereof being a rack or screen which separates the ice-chamber from the storagechambers below it, permitting the water of liquefaction to pass from said ice-chamber above the storage-chambers to the water-receptacle below the same, outside said central ice-receptacle; and a removable, imperforate-bottomed shell adapted to contain a freezing mixture and to be inserted Within said reticulated central ice-receptacle and when thus inserted to extend up within the upper ice-chamber; whereby the freezing mixture is separated from the clear ice and from the water of liquefaction derived from such ice.

'17. A refrigerator, comprising a central icereceptacle, vertically partitioned storagechambers encompassing said receptacle, a receptacle for the Water of liquefaction underneath such storage-chambers, an upper icechamber above the storage-chambers, an imperforate receptacle for a freezing mixture, adapted to be inserted within such central ice-receptacle and constitute a lining for the same, and having extending from the bottom a drainage-duct; the receptacle for water of liquefaction having at the center an upstanding hollow boss through which the drainageducts of said imperforate receptacle may extend; and an independent overflow drainduct leading from the water-receptacle.

l8. Arefrigerator, comprisingacentralicereceptacle; storage -chambers surrounding such receptacle; a receptacle for water of IIO liquefaction extending under the ice-recep-' having its overflow-point substantially at the level of the top of said boss; and a receptacle for freezing mixture adapted to be inserted at will into and removed from said central ice-receptacle, and having a drain-duct leading from its bottom, adapted to extend down into the hollow boss; and a base having a water; pocket into which both said drainducts extend, whereby they are trapped at the lower end in the water of liquefaction, delivered therethrough.

19. A refrigerator, comprising a central icereceptacle; storagechambers surrounding suchcentral receptacle; a receptacle for water of liquefaction underneath the storagechambers; an upper ice-chamber above the storage-chambers, one of said chambers bein g provided with bottle-rack and open above freely into the upper ice-chamber; whereby the water of liquefaction in said upper chamber falls directly onto the bottles in its way to the lower water-receptacle.

20. Arefrigerator, comprising a centralicereceptacle; storagechambers surrounding such central receptacle; a receptacle for water of liquefaction underneath the storagechambers; an upper ice-chamber above the storage-chambers, one of the latter having a vertical outer false front, apertures to constitute a bottle-rack whose apertures are occupied by bottles inserted thereinto endwise toward the central receptacle; said chamber being open freely to the ice-chamber above the same; whereby the bottles are exposed to the drip-water from the ice, and are protected by the false front from exterior air when the outer door is opened.

21. In a refrigerator, a storage-chamber for bottles, which has an independent door for acoessand a false front back of such door having apertures for bottles to be inserted endwise and occupy such apertures, in combination with an ice-chamber above such bottle-chamber, arranged with apertured floor or ice-rack to permit the free drip of the water of liquefaction through the bottle-chamber, and a receptacle for the water of liquefaction at the bottom of the latter, provided with a trap for overflow.

22. Arefrigerator, comprisinga central icercceptacle; storage chambers surrounding such central receptacle; a receptacle for water of liquefaction underneath the storagechambers; an upper ice-chamber above the storage-chambers, one of said chambers being provided with a false front constituting a bottle-rack, the apertures whereof are adapted to be occupied and substantially closed by the bottles inserted therein; and trap-doors or valves extended on the inside of such false front at the upper sides of the apertures respectively, adapted to be swung aside or upward by insertion of the bottles into the apertures, and to drop and close the apertures when the bottles are withdrawn.

23. A refrigerator,comprising a central icereceptacle; storage chambers surrounding such central receptacle, separated from each other by vertical partitions; a receptacle for Water of liquefaction extending underneath said chambers, having an overflow drainpipe by which a water-level is maintained, the vertical partitions between the chambers extending into said water receptacle to a point below the water-level thereof, whereby said water-chambers are water-sealed from each other at the bottom; an upper ice-receptacle above the storage-chambers, one of the latter having free communication at the top with the upper ice-receptacle, having a vertical outer false front apertured to constitute a bottle-rack, the apertures being adapted to be occupied and substantially closed by the bottles inserted endwise thereinto.

24. In a refrigerator, in combination with a storage chamber and an icereceptacle above the same,with which the storage-cham-.

ber has free communication at the top, a bottle-cooler, consisting of an open-top vessel adapted to occupy the chamber, such cooler having an overflow drain duct opening through the wall thereof near the top, and having its intake-mouth near the bottom of said cooler; whereby the water is withdrawn from the bottom part of said cooler, and the water-level is maintained near the top.

%5. In a refrigerator having a storage-chamber and an ice-receptacle above the same, adapted to deliver water of liquefaction down into such storage-chamber, an open-top bot-' tle-co0ler having an overflow-duct comprising twotelescoping members, the upper mem her being fixed with respect to the vessel and discharging outward near the top of the lat ter, and the lower member being adapted to be telescoped onto the upper, to vary the level of the lower end or intake-mouth; where= by the overflow or excess water is delivered from said receptacle through the discharge near the top, and is taken from a point in the height of said vessel variable at will by telescoping said members.

26. A refrigerator, comprising a revoluble cabinet having a central ice-receptacle and storage-chambers separated by radial vertical partitions and together completely encom passing such central receptacle; each separate storage-chamber having an independent door for access at the side remote from the central ice-receptacle.

27. In arefrigerator,a cooling-chamber and a plurality of storage-chambers cooled thereby; one of said storage-chambers havin g within it a case constituting a false wall or lining for the same exposed directly to the cold air from the cooling-chamber, such case having no air communication with the other chainbers of the refrigerator, means closing it against exterior access, and means affording it direct exterior ventilation when thus closed.

28. In a refrigerator,a cooling-chamber and a plurality of storage-chambers cooled thereby; one of said storage-chambers having within it a case constituting a false Wall or lining for such chamber, such chamber having a door at one side, the case being open at that side and having its edges abutting against the inner surface of the door, whereby when the door is closed it completely closes the gate, the door having ventilating-apertures for such case.

29. In a refrigerator,a cooling-chamber and a storage-chamber underneath the same and adapted to be cooled thereby by the descent of the cooling element from the cooling-chamher; a case within the storage-chamber constituting a false Wall or lining for the top, bottom and several sides of such chamber; a deflector above such case, between the same and the cooling-chamber, to deflect the cooling element to the sides of the case, whereby the top is insulated from said element; and

ventilating-passages leading from said case to the exterior air.

30. In a refrigerator, in combination with an upper ice-chamber and a storage-chamber below the same in position to receive the drip from the ice, a case, constituting a false lining for the storage-chamber and completely inclosed therefrom without communication with the storage or ice chamber, said case having an exterior door and Ventilation-passages from its upper part leading to the exterior air without communication with other storage-chambers; the top of said case being provided with an insulated covering, and a deflector above said case to deflect the dripwater from the top of the case, causing it to be discharged down outside of the same.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand, at Chicago, Illinois, in the presence of two witnesses, this 24th day of July, A. D. 1900.

PAUL J. 'DAEMICKE. In presence ofp CHAS. S. BURTON, ADNA H. 'BoWEN, Jim

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4258966 *Oct 6, 1978Mar 31, 1981Acme Visible Records, Inc.Bearing system and locking mechanism for rotary storage cabinet
US4899968 *Nov 16, 1988Feb 13, 1990Sces Enterprises, Inc.Storage and access apparatus for cylinderical objects
US5058393 *Feb 22, 1990Oct 22, 1991Dyment LimitedDisplay apparatus for indirectly refrigerating food and beverage items
US7334425Nov 8, 2004Feb 26, 2008Emed JohnsonRotative tri-module refrigeration unit
Classifications
International ClassificationF25D3/04
Cooperative ClassificationF25D3/04
European ClassificationF25D3/04