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Publication numberUS679978 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 6, 1901
Filing dateNov 25, 1898
Priority dateNov 25, 1898
Publication numberUS 679978 A, US 679978A, US-A-679978, US679978 A, US679978A
InventorsFrank W Merrick
Original AssigneeFrank W Merrick
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Seam-closing strip.
US 679978 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

( No Model.)

(Application filed. N v. g5, 199s.

Patented Aug. 6,

V UNITE STATES PAT NT, OF IC FR NK w; ME'RRIeK, on BoSToN, MASSACHUSETTS.

SEAM-VCLOSING STRI'PQ SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 679,978, dated August 6, 1901. Application filed November 25, 189i!- Serial No. 697,318- (No model.)

To all zohom it may concern:

l 3e it known that I, FRANK W; MERR'ICK, a citlzen of the United States, residing at Bostl], in the county of Sufiolk and State of 5 Massachusetts, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Seam-Closing Strips, of which the following is a specification, reference beinghad therein to the accompanying'drawings.

In the manufacture of articles from leather or similar material-as, for example, in the manufacture of boots and shoes-closingstrips are introduced into certain seams such, for instance, as the back seam of a shoe is and the seam up the leg of a bootin order to give a finish and prevent the thread of the stitches from showing in the seam when the finished side of the article isviewed. The

closing-strip is laid in position between the two pieces of leather or other material which are to be stitched together, usually at or near their edges, and the Sewing then is elfected, the stitches passing through all three. The stock then is turnedthat is, the two 2 5 pieces of leather or other material are spread apart into substantially the same plane with each'otherand the seam is beaten out, and thereby flattened. When the completed Seam is viewed from the exterior or finished side of the boot, shoe, or other article, the edge of the closing-strip is visible and gives a finish to, the Seam. V In the manufacture of some classes of articlesfine work, for i nstaucethe closing-strip which is employed is so thin and narrow and also so flexible or pliable that, although the sewing-machine by which the stitching is performed is provided with a welt-guide for use in introducing the closinga strip, the needle in descending is liable to defleet the'strip more orless completely laterally when its point strikes the same, so that the needle either penetrates the strip we near the edge of the latter or does not carry the thread. through the strip at all. One aim of my invention is to obviate this tendency of the seamclosing strip to become deflected laterally by the action of the needle byproviding a seam-closing strip so shaped that ordinarily instead of becoming misplaced by the tendency of the needle-point tooccasion deflection of the strip the strip shall be caused by the action of the needle-point in striking showii,

thereagainst to seek its proper position in the Seam, so that the line of stitches shall pass through the strip at a proper distance from the edges of thelatter. Sometimes the closing-strip employed is so very thin and in consequence the edges of the same and the pieces of leather between which the strip is secured lie so closely and flatly together that when the seam is beaten out all three edges are pressed over together to one side or the other and lie superimposed instead of becoming separated or spread out from one another in a completely flattened out condition. Another aim of my invention isto obviate such disadvantageous result by making provision to oceasion a tendency of the edges to open or separate at the back of the seam sufiiciently to insure the complete and proper Spreading andflattening of thepseam in the course of the beating-out operation.

The invention will be described firstwith reference to the accompanying drawings, in

which I have illustrated the same, and afterward will be particularly pointed out and clearly defined in the claims at the close of this specification.

Figure 1 of the drawings Shows,on a considerably-enlarged scale, a short length of scamclosing strip embodying my'invention. Fig.

2 is a view representing a cross-section of Fig. 1. Fig. 3 is a view representing in crosssection a slightly-modified form of closlngstrip. Fig. 4 is a sectional View on a scale which is somewhat largerthan is ordinary in practice, showing a seam made with the aid of the closing-strip of Figs. 1 and 2.

Having reference'to Fig. 4, l and 2 designate what may be said to represent two pieces of leather, only the portions thereof which are at and immediately adjacent the seam being 3 designates the closing-strip, which is introduced between the said piecesl jand 2 at the edges of the latter, andt designates the line of Stitches passing through the said pieces of leather and the strip and fastening all three together. 5 designates the edge of the closing-strip which is visible on the side of the seam which is meant to be exposed to view.--

In accordance with my invention I groove .the closing-strip longitudinally, as at 6, be-

tween the side edges thereof, lhe grooving is well defined, as shown in the drawings.

- When now the pieces 1 and 2 of Fig. 4la're laid flat together with the closing-strip 3 between them and are fed tothe needle of the the said point by its action against the'sides of the groove deflecting the strip slightly, but sufficiently to'accomplish the desired result. The breadth and form of the grooving may vary somewhat inpractice. 1 It may be either narrow, as'in Figs. 1, 2, and 4, or ,as in Fig. 3, in which last-mentioned figure the depth is greatest next the side of the strip which is exposed in the seam and gradually diminishes toward the opposite side. The stitching 4, Fig. 4, draws the pieces 1 and 2 tightly together on the opposite faces of strip 3, the eifect being to compress portions of pieces 1 and 2 slightly into the grooving of strip 3, more or less after the fashion which is meant to be indicated inFig. 4. .At the back of the scam the free edges of pieces 1 and 2 are spread or separated by-the lower side of strip 3, .with more or less tendency to diverge, after the fashion which is sought to be indicated in Fig. 4, and hence in the operati n by which the seam is beaten out the spreafili'ng apart-and flattening of the back of the seam are efiect'ed readily and uniformly. In preparing the closing-strip for sale in the market I preferably round the side 5 thereof, as in the drawings.

I claim as my invention'-.

1. The improved seam-closing strip comprising the narrow strip having the longitudinal grooving, as at 6 in the surface thereof formed intermediately of the .width thereof, substantiallyas described. j g

2. The combination with the pieces of leather or other material, 1, 2, of the closingstrip 3 placed between the said pieces and having the longitudinal grooving at 6,and the line of stitching 4 uniting the three and passing through the grooved portion of the said strip, all substantially as described.

In testimony whereof I affix my signature in presence oftwo witnesses.

Witnesses:

CHAS. F. RANDALL, WILLIAM A. COPELAND.

' FRANK W. MERRICK.

Referenced by
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US7472961Jul 29, 2004Jan 6, 2009Casual Living Worldwide, Inc.Woven articles from synthetic yarns
US7476630Apr 1, 2005Jan 13, 2009Casual Living Worldwide, Inc.Woven articles from synthetic self twisted yarns
US7700022Sep 28, 2005Apr 20, 2010Casual Living Worldwide, Inc.Woven articles from synthetic self twisted yarns
US7823979Jan 30, 2009Nov 2, 2010Casual Living Worldwide, Inc.Woven articles from synthetic yarn
US7892989Jul 29, 2004Feb 22, 2011Casual Living Worldwide, Inc.Woven articles from synthetic self twisted yarns
US8052907Apr 20, 2010Nov 8, 2011Sun Isle Usa, LlcWoven articles from synthetic self twisted yarns
US20050106966 *Jul 29, 2004May 19, 2005Sun Isle Casual Furniture, LlcWoven articles from synthetic yarns
US20050106974 *Jun 29, 2004May 19, 2005Larry SchwartzCoreless synthetic yarns and woven articles therefrom
US20050106975 *Jul 29, 2004May 19, 2005Sun Isle Casual Furniture, LlcWoven articles from synthetic self twisted yarns
US20050191923 *Apr 1, 2005Sep 1, 2005Sun Isle Casual Furniture, LlcWoven articles from synthetic self twisted yarns
US20060021668 *Sep 28, 2005Feb 2, 2006Sun Isle Usa, LlcWoven articles from synthetic self twisted yarns
US20060099867 *Dec 21, 2005May 11, 2006Sun Isle Usa, LlcWoven articles from synthetic self twisted yarns
US20060116041 *Dec 9, 2004Jun 1, 2006Sun Isle Casual Furniture, LlcYarn having lateral projections
US20090134685 *Jan 30, 2009May 28, 2009Casual Living Worldwide, Inc. D/B/A Bji, Inc.Woven articles from synthetic yarn
US20100242253 *Apr 20, 2010Sep 30, 2010Casual Living Worldwide, Inc. D/B/A Bji, Inc.Woven articles from synthetic self twisted yarns
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA41D27/24, B29C65/10