Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS6815251 B1
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 09/241,177
Publication dateNov 9, 2004
Filing dateFeb 1, 1999
Priority dateFeb 1, 1999
Fee statusPaid
Also published asUS7061092, US20030064547
Publication number09241177, 241177, US 6815251 B1, US 6815251B1, US-B1-6815251, US6815251 B1, US6815251B1
InventorsSalman Akram, Jerry M. Brooks
Original AssigneeMicron Technology, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
High density modularity for IC's
US 6815251 B1
Abstract
A high density multi-chip module and method for construction thereof, wherein a plurality of integrated circuit dice with at least one row of generally central bond pads is bonded in a staggered flip-chip style to opposite sides of a metallized substrate. The bond pads of each die are positioned over a through-hole in the substrate, and the bond pads are wire-bonded from one side of the substrate to circuitry on the opposing side of the substrate. Application of a glob-top sealant into the through-holes seals the bond pads and bond wires. A ball grid array may be formed in the peripheral area surrounding the dice on one side of the substrate, or an edge connector may be incorporated for connection to an external circuit.
Images(12)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(11)
What is claimed is:
1. A method for forming a high density multi-chip module, comprising:
providing a plurality of integrated circuit semiconductor dice, each semiconductor die of said plurality having an active surface having a plurality of bond pads thereon;
forming a substrate with opposing first and second sides, at least three elongate through-slots extending from said first side to said second side;
forming a pattern of a plurality of electrical conductors associated with said substrate on each of said first side and second side of said substrate, at least one electrical conductor of said plurality of electrical conductors having a connection terminal adjacent a through-slot of said at least three elongate through-slots for connecting said plurality of bond pads of a semiconductor die of said plurality of semiconductor dice to an input/output connector;
connecting said pattern of a plurality of electrical conductors on said first side and said second side of said substrate with conductive vias through said substrate;
forming an input/output connector on said substrate and connecting said input/output connector to said plurality of electrical conductors, said forming an input/output connector comprising forming a ball-grid-array on one of said first and second sides of said substrate in a peripheral area surrounding said plurality of semiconductor dice;
attaching the active surfaces of a plurality of said plurality of semiconductor dice to the first side of said substrate wherein the bond pads thereof are aligned with alternate through-slots of said at least three elongate through-slots for access from the second side of said substrate;
attaching the active surface of at least one semiconductor die of said plurality of semiconductor dice to said second side of said substrate, the plurality of bond pads of said at least one semiconductor die aligned with other alternate through-slots of said at least three elongate through-slots for access from the first side of said substrate;
wire-bonding said plurality of bond pads of each attached semiconductor die of said plurality of semiconductor dice to connection terminals adjacent the alternate through-slots; and
inserting a flowable, hardenable glob-top material into each of said through-slots to encapsulate wires therein, such that said glob-top material extends outwardly toward at least one edge of at least one semiconductor dice adjacent said slot, thereby contacting said at least one edge.
2. The method of claim 1, wherein forming the at least three elongate through-slots comprises forming an elongate stepped surface in said at least three elongate through-slots.
3. The method of claim 2, wherein forming the pattern of the plurality of electrical conductors includes forming conductive connection terminals on said elongated stepped surface.
4. The method of claim 1, wherein a hardenable polymeric material is inserted into each said at least three elongate through-slot.
5. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
performing electrical testing of said plurality of semiconductor dice following wire-bonding thereof and prior to wire encapsulation.
6. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
encapsulating said plurality of dice with a polymeric sealant.
7. A method for forming a high density multi-chip module, comprising:
providing a plurality of integrated circuit dice, each die of said plurality having an active surface with a row of conductive bond pads thereon;
forming a planar substrate with opposing first and second sides, at least three elongate through-slots extending from said first side to said second side;
forming a pattern of electrical conductors associated with said substrate on each of said first and second sides of said substrate and having connection terminals adjacent each of said at least three through-slots for connecting said conductive bond pads to an input/output connector,
connecting said electrical conductor pattern on said first and second sides with conductive vias through said substrate;
forming an input/output connector on said substrate and connecting said input/output connector to said electrical conductors from said conductive bond pads, said forming an input/output connector comprising forming a ball-grid-array on one of said first and second sides of said substrate in a peripheral area surrounding said dice;
attaching the active surfaces of a plurality of said plurality of integrated circuit dice to said first side of said substrate wherein the conductive bond pads thereof are aligned with alternate through-slots of said at least three through-slots for access from the second side of said substrate;
attaching the active surface of at least one of said plurality of dice to said second side of said substrate wherein the conductive bond pads thereof are aligned with other alternate through-slots for access from the first side of said substrate;
wire-bonding said conductive bond pads of each attached die to connection terminals adjacent the corresponding through-slot; and
inserting a flowable, hardenable glob-top material into each of said at least three elongate through-slots to encapsulate wires therein, such that said glob-top material extends outwardly toward at least one edge of at least one semiconductor dice adjacent said at least three elongate through-slots, thereby contacting said at least one edge.
8. The method of claim 7, wherein forming the at least three elongate through-slots comprises forming an elongate stepped surface in each said at least three elongate through-slots.
9. The method of claim 8, wherein forming the pattern of electrical conductors includes forming conductive connection terminals on said elongate stepped surface.
10. The method of claim 7, further comprising:
performing electrical testing of said dice following wire-bonding thereof and prior to wire encapsulation.
11. The method of claim 7, further comprising:
encapsulating said dice with a polymeric sealant.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

This invention relates generally to integrated circuit (IC) or semiconductor devices. More particularly, the invention pertains to integrated circuit configurations which provide high density modules for mounting on circuit boards and other host apparatus.

2. State of the Art

Integrated circuit semiconductor devices (IC's) are small electronic circuits formed on the surface of a wafer of semiconductor material such as silicon. The IC's are fabricated in plurality as part of a wafer. The wafer is then subdivided into discrete IC chips or dice, and then further tested and assembled for customer use through various well-known individual die testing and packaging techniques, including lead frame packaging, Chip-On-Board (COB) packaging, and flip-chip packaging (FCP). Depending upon the die and wafer sizes, each wafer is divided into a few dice or as many as several hundred or more than one thousand discrete dice, each of which becomes an IC package.

the continuing demand for miniaturization has resulted in the development of integrated circuits on dice of very small size. The corresponding miniaturization of external circuitry has not proceeded at the same rate. Thus, there is a need for devices (including the interconnecting circuitry) of increasingly greater density.

Multi-chip modules have typically followed the convention of earlier, single chip packages, in that the reverse sides of bare dice or chips are mounted on a substrate such as a printed circuit board (PCB), leaving the active surface exposed for wire-bonding to the substrate or lead frame. Such is exemplified in U.S. Pat. No. 4,873,615 of Grabbe. Typically, dice are attached to one side only of the substrate, as in U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,992,840, and 4,992,850 of Corbett et al.

Where the device encompasses dice on both sides of the substrate, the reverse sides of the dice are conventionally attached to the substrate, as illustrated in U.S. Pat. No. 5,239,198 of Lin et al.

Stacked groups of packaged devices, often called cubes, have been developed, as exemplified in U.S. Pat. No. 5,016,138 of Woodman, U.S. Pat. No. 5,128,831 of Fox, III et al., U.S. Pat. No. 5,291,061 of Ball, U.S. Pat. No. 5,420,751 of Burns, U.S. Pat. No. 5,455,445 of Kurtz et al., U.S. Pat. No. 5,602,420 Ogata et al., and U.S. Pat. No. 5,637,912 of Cockerill et al. In these references, each non-conductive substrate has one or more IC dies attached to one side only, or when dies are attached to both sides of the substrate, not more than one die is so attached on its active surface. In variants where there is no existing substrate between adjacent dice or packages, the packages have peripheral external leads.

In U.S. Pat. No. 5,291,061 of Ball and U.S. Pat. No. 5,323,060 of Fogal et al., multiple dice are stacked and wire-bonded to circuitry on a substrate which progressively longer wires.

Dice having bond pads, i.e. on the active surface, complicate the construction of multi-chip modules, particularly when wire-bonding is the connection method of choice. As taught in U.S. Pat. No. 5,012,323 of Farnworth, U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,422,435, 5,495,398 and 5,502,289 of Takiar et al., and U.S. Pat. No. 5,600,183 of Gates, Jr., bonding with wire or other conductors necessitates that the stacked dice be of progressively smaller size.

In U.S. Pat. No. 4,996,587 of Hinrichsmeyer et al. and U.S. Pat. No. 5,107,328 of Kinsman, a package is shown with a die within a recess in a carrier. The carrier has shelves which extend over the die, leaving a slot through which the die is wire-bonded to conductive traces on the opposite surface of the shelves. U.S. Pat. No. 5,677,569 of Choi et al. shows a stacked package in which holes in the substrate permit wire-bonding of die pads to the upper surface of the substrate.

In U.S. Pat. No. 5,438,224 of Papagerorge et al. and U.S. Pat. No. 5,477,082 of Buckley, III et al., a pair of dice is shown and attached on its active surfaces to opposite sides of an intermediate layer such as a substrate. In both references, the terminals on the dice are directly coupled to terminals on the same side of the intermediate member by e.g. solder balls. The opposed dice are shown as being coextensive.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In one aspect, the invention comprises a method for forming a high density multi-chip module (MCM) from a plurality of integrated circuit (IC's) in the form of bare dice with one or more rows of conductive bond pads. The bond pads of each die are preferably formed in a row or rows generally spanning the active surface. The dice are mounted on opposing sides of a substrate in a staggered flip-chip style and wire-bonded through to conductors on the opposite side of the substrate. Metallization in the form of conductive leads on both surfaces of the substrate is thus connected by wire bonds to the dice and to an electrical Input/Output (I/O) means such as a ball-grid array (BGA), edge connector, etc. for connection to an external circuit.

In another aspect, the invention comprises the multi-chip module formed by the method.

In one preferred form, an array of solder balls is formed on one surface of the substrate, in the peripheral area surrounding the die or dice mounted on that surface. Alternatively, a pin-grid array may be used. The multi-chip module may be readily attached by surface mounting on a circuit board, for example.

In another preferred form, an edge connector such as a socket connector as well-known in the art may be used.

The bonded wires within the through-slots in the substrate are preferably surrounded with a “glob-top” sealant material following testing. Thus, the wire connections are sealed by glob-top on one side of the substrate and buy the die bonding material on the opposite side of the substrate. A minimum amount of glob-top material is required.

The module construction permits testing of each die after wire-bonding and easy removal and replacement of a defective die, if necessary, without removal of any encapsulant material. The construction is such that the bonded conductive wires are, prior to glob top application, protected from physical damage by their location within through-slots in the substrate and between or adjacent opposing dies. The opportunity for damaging during die testing or die replacement prior to wire encapsulation is greatly reduced.

The module of the invention has a high density, inasmuch as it is formed as an array of bare dice rather than encapsulated packages of greater size. Dice are mounted on both sides of a substrate to form the module, and coplanar dies may be closely spaced, leaving room enough for forming the wire-bonds within the through-slots.

The method of the invention may be employed to surface mount bare dice on e.g. a printed circuit board of an electronic component.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The invention is illustrated in the following exemplary figures, wherein the drawings are not necessarily to scale.

FIG. 1 is a perspective upper view of a high density IC module of the invention;

FIG. 2 is a perspective lower view of a high density IC module of the invention;

FIG. 3 is a top view of a high density IC module of the invention, in an intermediate stage of fabrication;

FIG. 4 is a bottom view of a high density IC module of the invention, in an intermediate stage of fabrication;

FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional edge view of a high density IC module of the invention, as taken along line 55 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 is a cross-sectional edge view of a high density IC module of the invention, as taken along line 66 of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a partial cross-sectional view of another embodiment of a high density IC module of the invention;

FIG. 8 is a partial cross-sectional view of another embodiment of a high density IC module of the invention;

FIG. 9 is a top view of a high density IC module of the invention, in an intermediate stage of fabrication;

FIG. 10 is a bottom view of a high density IC module of the invention, in an intermediate stage of fabrication;

FIG. 11 is a perspective top view of another embodiment of a high density IC module of the invention.

FIG. 12 is a cross-sectional edge view of another embodiment of a high-density IC module of the invention;

FIG. 13 is a cross-sectional edge view of another embodiment of a high-density IC module of the invention;

FIG. 14 is a cross-sectional edge view of another embodiment of a high-density IC module of the invention; and

FIG. 15 is a cross-sectional edge view of another embodiment of a high cross-sectional edge view of another embodiment of a hight-density IC module of the invention; -density IC module of the invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE ILLUSTRATED EMBODIMENTS

An exemplary embodiment of the invention is illustrated in drawing FIGS. 1 through 8 and is shown as a high density module 10 having two IC dies 12A, 12B mounted on a first side 16 of a substrate 20. One IC die 14A is shown on the opposite (second) side 18 of the substrate, in a staggered position relative to dies 12A, 12B. While the figures show a total of three dies 12A, 12B, 14A (referred to collectively as “disc 12, 14” respectively) in the module, any number may be mounted to substrate 20 to form a dense IC module for use as a memory device, for example. In a spacially balanced module, the numbers of dice on the first and second sides 16, 18 will differ by one.

The dice 12, 14 are attached to the substrate 20 by an adhesive layer 38, which may be any non-conductive adhesive or adhesive tape as known in the art.

Each of the IC dies 12A, 12B and 14A is a bare (unpackaged) die with one or more adjacent rows of bond pads 22 on an active side 24. In drawing FIGS. 1 and 2, the bond pads 22 of dies on the opposite side are not visible, being covered by a flowable, hardenable, polymeric glob-top 40. In drawing FIGS. 5 and 8, two rows of bond pads 22 are shown spanning the minor dimension 26 of the dies (See FIG. 1). Alternatively, the bond pads 22 may be configured in a row or rows anywhere on the active surface 24, but preferably along a centerline 42 of a major dimension 28 or minor dimension 26, or even at an oblique angle with the major dimension. Preferably, the dice 12, 14 should be aligned so that the rows of bond pads 22 are in a parallel, spaced apart relationship.

The substrate 20 is shown with elongated through-slots 30A and 30B, each through-slot passing through the substrate between the first side 16 and the second side 18. The through-slots 30A, 30B are configured to provide access from the opposite side 18 of the substrate 20 for wire-bonding the bond pads 22 to connection sites 32 of a conductor pattern 34A, 34B on the substrate. The dice 12A and 12B are spaced a distance 36 apart, leaving room for the through-slot 30C therebetween.

As shown in drawing FIGS. 2 and 4 through 8, die 14A is mounted on the opposite side 18 of the substrate 20 between through-slots 30A and 30B. Like dice 12A and 12B, die 14A has its active surface 24 bonded to the substrate 20. Through-slot 30C encompasses the bond pads 22 of die 14A and is configured to provide access to the bond pads from the first side 16 of the substrate 20, i.e. from the side opposite the side to which the die 14A is attached.

Conductor patterns 34A, 34B are incorporated on each side 16, 18, respectively, of the substrate 20, having connection sites 32A, 32B adjacent each through-slot 30A, 30B, 30C (referred to collectively as through-slots 30) for wire-bonding to bond pads 22 with conductive wires 44. The conductor patterns 34A, 34B and connection sites 32 are not shown in drawing FIGS. 1 through 4 for the sake of clarity, but are depicted in drawing FIGS. 5 through 8.

An exemplary conductor pattern 34A is shown on first substrate side 16 in drawing FIG. 9. The conductor pattern 34A has connection sites 32A for wire-bonding to die 14A (not shown in FIGS. 9 and 10) through through-slot 30C. In the example shown, the conductors 35A of conductor pattern 34A are also connected to solder balls 50 on side 18 (see FIG. 2) which comprise input/output connections for connecting the dice 12, 14 to external circuitry. The solder balls 50 comprise a ball-grid-array in a peripheral area 46 surrounding the die or dice. The balls are configured to be surface mounted to conductive traces on a larger substrate such as a circuit board, not shown. The input/output connections may also comprise a pin-grid-array (PGA), such an array being well known in the art.

The conductor pattern 34A on side 16 of the substrate 20 is interconnected with the solder balls 50 or with conductor pattern 34B on side 18 by conductive vias 48 passing through the substrate.

The conductor pattern 34B has connection sites 32B for wire-bonding to dice 12A and 12B (not shown in FIGS. 9 and 10) through the through-slots 30A and 30B, respectively. In the example shown, the conductors 35B of conductor pattern 34B have outer ends 52B which are connected to solder balls 50 on the same side 18 (see FIG. 2).

As shown in drawings FIGS. 1 through 10, the module 10 has a separated solder ball 50 conductively connected to each bond pad 22 of the three dice 12A, 12B, 14A. Where the dice are to have common conductors, the number of solder balls 50 or other input/output connection lines will be much decreased.

A socket type connector 54 may be used instead of the ball-grid-array of balls 50, or pin-grid-array. As shown in drawing FIG. 11, a socket type connector 54 may be provided which permits vertical placement of the module on a circuit board, or cable connection. The conductor patterns 34A, 35B will vary from those of drawing FIGS. 9 and 10 in that the conductors 35A and 35B will extend to the socket type connector 54 rather than to an array of solder balls 50. Methods for making such patterns and connections are well known in the art.

Turning now specifically to drawing FIGS. 5 through 8, several variations in the through-slot configuration are illustrated.

A simple through-slot configuration in drawing FIGS. 5 and 6 has flat walls 56. The walls 56 are shown as parallel, but in an alterative arrangement, they may be beveled relative to each other. The through-slots 30A, 30B and 30C are shown with wires 44 bonded to bond pads 22 and connection sites 32A, 32B on substrate sides 16 and 18, respectively. The slot width 62 is such that it exposes the bond pads 22 and permits entrance of a wire bonding machine head for bonding the conductive wires 44. The slot length 60 exceeds the length of the row of bond pads 22, providing space for performing the wire-bonding.

Drawing FIGS. 7 and 8 correspond generally to drawing FIG. 5, but show different through-slot configurations, and do not show the glob-top 40. As depicted in drawing FIG. 7, through-slot 30C is formed with outwardly extending stepped surfaces 58 in opposed walls 56. These stepped surfaces 58 face the opposite side 16 of the substrate 20, and connection sites 32A on the stepped surfaces 58 are wire-bonded to bond pads 22 on die 14A with wires 44. In this configuration, stepped surfaces 58 are only slightly recessed from the substrate side 16.

In drawing FIG. 8, each through-slot step 58 is positioned much deeper in the substrate 20, shortening the length of the wires 44.

In drawing FIGS. 7 and 8, the wires 44 are effectively buried within the substrate 20, making them less prone to physical damage during handling of the module.

The method of making the module 10 of the invention comprises the following steps:

A plurality of integrated circuit dice 12, 14 is procured or fabricated. The integrated circuit dice 12, 14 are formed with an active surface 24 with one or more rows of conductive bond pads 22 thereon.

A planar substrate 20 having first side 16 and opposing side 18 is formed, and at least through-slots 30 are formed in the substrate wherein each through-slot has a length 60 and width 62 sufficient to expose the rows of bond pads 22 of a die 12 or 14 bonded to the substrate to overlie the through-slot. The through-slot may be of uniform width 62, or may include a stepped surface(s) 58.

Conductive patterns 34A, 35B are formed on sides 16,18, respectively, of the substrate 20, such as by a lithographic metallization process or by other methods known in the art. The conductive patterns 34A,34B include conductors 35A having one end configured as a wire-connecting site 32 adjacent a through-slot 30, and the other end is configured for attachment to an input/output connection. Where the through-slot 30 is stepped, the wire-connecting sites 32 are positioned on the stepped surfaces 58.

The formation of the through-slots 30 and the conductive patterns 34A, 34B may be in any order.

An input/output connection means is added to the module 10 and may comprise an array of solder balls 50 or pins, or may be a socket type edge connector 54.

Dice 12, 14 are then mounted on both sides 16, 18 of the substrate 20 with an adhesive layer 38. Each die is mounted so that all of its bond pads 22 to be connected are positioned within a through-slot 30 and are thus exposed on the opposite side of the substrate 20 between two other dice for wire-bonding.

Bond pads 22 of each die 12, 14 are wire-bonded by conductive wires 44 to the connecting sites 32 of the conductor patterns 34A, 34B.

Typically, each die 12, 14 and/or all dice collectively are tested for operability before the through-slots 30 are filled with glob-top 40 to encapsulate and seal the wires 44 therein and spaces between adjacent dice 12, 14.

Optionally, the module, including the otherwise exposed die surfaces and substrate, may be encapsulated with a polymeric material.

The module 10 as described has a highly density. The effective density increases as the number of dice 12, 14 is increased. Both sides of the substrate 20 are utilized, and the modulus 10 so formed may be surface bonded to both sides of a printed circuit board (PCB), for example. Furthermore, the method may be used as chip-in-board (COB) technology for attaching a plurality of bare dice 12, 14 to a mother board without prior encapsulation.

The wire protection provided by the through-slots 30 and dice 12, 14 enables the module 10 to be electrically tested prior to glob-top encapsulation without endangering the wires 44. This also enables easy and rapid removal and replacement of any defective die.

The method requires minimal glob-topping.

Additional advantages and modifications will readily be recognized by those skilled in the art. Therefore, the invention in its broader aspects is not limited to the specific details, and representative devices, shown and described herein, but includes various modifications which may be made without departing from the spirit or scope of the general inventive concept and embodiments as defined by the appended claims and their equivalents.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4649418Sep 22, 1983Mar 10, 1987U.S. Philips CorporationData card and method of manufacturing same
US4725924Apr 9, 1986Feb 16, 1988Em Microelectronic-Marin SaElectronic unit especially for microcircuit cards and card comprising such a unit
US4731645Jun 12, 1986Mar 15, 1988U.S. Philips CorporationConnection of a semiconductor to elements of a support, especially of a portable card
US4748495Aug 8, 1985May 31, 1988Dypax Systems CorporationHigh density multi-chip interconnection and cooling package
US4873615Sep 23, 1987Oct 10, 1989Amp IncorporatedSemiconductor chip carrier system
US4991000Aug 31, 1989Feb 5, 1991Bone Robert LVertically interconnected integrated circuit chip system
US4992849Feb 15, 1989Feb 12, 1991Micron Technology, Inc.Directly bonded board multiple integrated circuit module
US4992850Feb 15, 1989Feb 12, 1991Micron Technology, Inc.Memory array
US4996587Mar 23, 1990Feb 26, 1991International Business Machines CorporationIntegrated semiconductor chip package
US5012323Nov 20, 1989Apr 30, 1991Micron Technology, Inc.Double-die semiconductor package having a back-bonded die and a face-bonded die interconnected on a single leadframe
US5016138Sep 18, 1989May 14, 1991Woodman John KThree dimensional integrated circuit package
US5045921Dec 26, 1989Sep 3, 1991Motorola, Inc.Pad array carrier IC device using flexible tape
US5107328Feb 13, 1991Apr 21, 1992Micron Technology, Inc.Packaging means for a semiconductor die having particular shelf structure
US5128831Oct 31, 1991Jul 7, 1992Micron Technology, Inc.High-density electronic package comprising stacked sub-modules which are electrically interconnected by solder-filled vias
US5137836May 23, 1991Aug 11, 1992Atmel CorporationMethod of manufacturing a repairable multi-chip module
US5155067Mar 26, 1991Oct 13, 1992Micron Technology, Inc.Packaging for a semiconductor die
US5182632Dec 2, 1991Jan 26, 1993Tactical Fabs, Inc.High density multichip package with interconnect structure and heatsink
US5239198Jul 2, 1992Aug 24, 1993Motorola, Inc.Overmolded semiconductor device having solder ball and edge lead connective structure
US5239747Sep 18, 1991Aug 31, 1993Sgs-Thomson Microelectronics, Inc.Method of forming integrated circuit devices
US5255156Sep 6, 1991Oct 19, 1993The Boeing CompanyBonding pad interconnection on a multiple chip module having minimum channel width
US5280192Jan 29, 1992Jan 18, 1994International Business Machines CorporationThree-dimensional memory card structure with internal direct chip attachment
US5280193May 4, 1992Jan 18, 1994Lin Paul TRepairable semiconductor multi-package module having individualized package bodies on a PC board substrate
US5291061Apr 6, 1993Mar 1, 1994Micron Semiconductor, Inc.Multi-chip stacked devices
US5323060Jun 2, 1993Jun 21, 1994Micron Semiconductor, Inc.Multichip module having a stacked chip arrangement
US5365409Jun 4, 1993Nov 15, 1994Vlsi Technology, Inc.Integrated circuit package design having an intermediate die-attach substrate bonded to a leadframe
US5378981Feb 2, 1993Jan 3, 1995Motorola, Inc.Method for testing a semiconductor device on a universal test circuit substrate
US5418687Feb 1, 1994May 23, 1995Hewlett-Packard CompanyWafer scale multi-chip module
US5420751Oct 8, 1993May 30, 1995Staktek CorporationUltra high density modular integrated circuit package
US5422435May 22, 1992Jun 6, 1995National Semiconductor CorporationStacked multi-chip modules and method of manufacturing
US5424652Jun 10, 1992Jun 13, 1995Micron Technology, Inc.Method and apparatus for testing an unpackaged semiconductor die
US5438216Aug 31, 1992Aug 1, 1995Motorola, Inc.Light erasable multichip module
US5438224Dec 1, 1993Aug 1, 1995Motorola, Inc.Integrated circuit package having a face-to-face IC chip arrangement
US5448165Jan 8, 1993Sep 5, 1995Integrated Device Technology, Inc.Electrically tested and burned-in semiconductor die and method for producing same
US5455445Jan 21, 1994Oct 3, 1995Kulite Semiconductor Products, Inc.Multi-level semiconductor structures having environmentally isolated elements
US5461544Jun 1, 1994Oct 24, 1995Sgs-Thomson Microelectronics, Inc.Structure and method for connecting leads from multiple chips
US5465470Aug 31, 1994Nov 14, 1995Lsi Logic CorporationFixture for attaching multiple lids to multi-chip module (MCM) integrated circuit
US5468655Oct 31, 1994Nov 21, 1995Motorola, Inc.Method for forming a temporary attachment between a semiconductor die and a substrate using a metal paste comprising spherical modules
US5475317Apr 21, 1995Dec 12, 1995Epi Technologies, Inc.Singulated bare die tester and method of performing forced temperature electrical tests and burn-in
US5477067Aug 31, 1993Dec 19, 1995Hitachi, Ltd.Semiconductor IC device having a RAM interposed between different logic sections and by-pass signal lines extending over the RAM for mutually connecting the logic sections
US5477082Jan 11, 1994Dec 19, 1995Exponential Technology, Inc.Bi-planar multi-chip module
US5480840Aug 18, 1994Jan 2, 1996At&T Global Information Solutions CompanyMulti-chip module with multiple compartments
US5484959Dec 11, 1992Jan 16, 1996Staktek CorporationHigh density lead-on-package fabrication method and apparatus
US5495398Jun 5, 1995Feb 27, 1996National Semiconductor CorporationCircuit assembly
US5502289Mar 13, 1995Mar 26, 1996National Semiconductor CorporationCircuit assembly
US5600183Nov 15, 1994Feb 4, 1997Hughes ElectronicsMulti-layer film adhesive for electrically isolating and grounding an integrated circuit chip to a printed circuit substrate
US5602420Apr 27, 1995Feb 11, 1997Hitachi, Ltd.Stacked high mounting density semiconductor devices
US5637912May 31, 1996Jun 10, 1997International Business Machines CorporationThree-dimensional monolithic electronic module having stacked planar arrays of integrated circuit chips
US5677569Oct 27, 1995Oct 14, 1997Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.Semiconductor multi-package stack
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7095104 *Nov 21, 2003Aug 22, 2006International Business Machines CorporationOverlap stacking of center bus bonded memory chips for double density and method of manufacturing the same
US7105915 *May 4, 2000Sep 12, 2006David FinnChip carrier a chip module and method of manufacturing the chip module
US7112473 *Dec 30, 2003Sep 26, 2006Dongbuanam Semiconductor Inc.Double side stack packaging method
US7352058Nov 1, 2005Apr 1, 2008Sandisk CorporationMethods for a multiple die integrated circuit package
US7511371 *Nov 1, 2005Mar 31, 2009Sandisk CorporationMultiple die integrated circuit package
US7514297Oct 31, 2007Apr 7, 2009Sandisk CorporationMethods for a multiple die integrated circuit package
US7926220Aug 19, 2009Apr 19, 2011Larry HolmbergStabilizing device mount and method
US7939920 *Sep 3, 2008May 10, 2011Sandisk CorporationMultiple die integrated circuit package
US8030135Apr 27, 2009Oct 4, 2011Sandisk Technologies Inc.Methods for a multiple die integrated circuit package
US8384200Feb 22, 2006Feb 26, 2013Micron Technology, Inc.Semiconductor device assemblies including face-to-face semiconductor dice and systems including such assemblies
Classifications
U.S. Classification438/107, 438/125, 257/E23.175, 438/106, 257/E25.011, 257/678
International ClassificationH01L23/538, H01L25/065
Cooperative ClassificationH01L24/48, H01L2924/15321, H01L2224/73215, H01L2224/32225, H01L2924/15311, H01L25/0652, H01L2224/73265, H01L2225/06589, H01L23/5386, H01L2224/4824, H01L2924/14
European ClassificationH01L23/538G, H01L25/065M
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Apr 18, 2012FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
Apr 25, 2008FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
Mar 25, 2008CCCertificate of correction
Feb 1, 1999ASAssignment
Owner name: MICRON TECHNOLOGY, INC., IDAHO
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:AKRAM, SALMAN;BROOKS, JERRY M.;REEL/FRAME:009744/0862;SIGNING DATES FROM 19990108 TO 19990111