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Publication numberUS6843028 B2
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 10/759,780
Publication dateJan 18, 2005
Filing dateJan 16, 2004
Priority dateSep 24, 1999
Fee statusPaid
Also published asCA2385637A1, CA2385637C, DE60012768D1, DE60012768T2, DE69924538D1, DE69924538T2, EP1222343A1, EP1222343A4, EP1222343B1, EP1418284A1, EP1418284A8, EP1418284B1, US6742310, US20040144042, WO2001023684A1
Publication number10759780, 759780, US 6843028 B2, US 6843028B2, US-B2-6843028, US6843028 B2, US6843028B2
InventorsKevin William Weeks
Original AssigneeWeeks Peacock Quality Homes Pty. Ltd.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Truss tie-down method and apparatus
US 6843028 B2
Abstract
A tie-down connecting elements (30) for tying down a truss relative to a wall frame is fixed between the webs (12) of the upper and lower Z-shaped chords (10) and includes a tongue portion (34) which extends downwardly through a slot (50) formed in the lower flange (16) of the lower chord (10) of the truss.
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Claims(2)
1. A method of anchoring a truss comprising a top and a bottom chord to a building frame, the method including:
forming a longitudinal slot in the bottom chord of the truss;
fastening a connecting element to the truss, the connecting element being sandwiched at least in part between the top and bottom chords and including a portion extending downwardly through the longitudinal slot;
forming a transverse slot in a top plate of the building frame;
passing the downwardly extending portion of the connecting element through the transverse slot; and
fastening the downwardly extending portion of the connecting element to a stud of the building frame.
2. A truss and wall frame assembly, the truss including top and bottom chords, a longitudinal slot being formed in the bottom chord, a connecting element being sandwiched at least in part between the top and bottom chords, a downwardly projecting portion of the connecting element being received through a transverse slot formed in a top plate of the wall frame, the downwardly projecting portion of the connecting element being directly fixed to a stud of the wall frame.
Description

This is a Continuation application of Ser. No. 10/088,623 filed Mar. 19, 2002, now U.S. Pat. No. 6,742,310 which is a U.S. National Phase of PCT/AU00/01141, filed Sep. 20, 2000, which claims priority of Australian Provisional Patent Application PQ 3074, filed Sep. 24, 1999.

TECHNICAL FIELD

This invention relates to a truss tie-down method, and to a truss tie-down apparatus particularly suited for use with a truss in which the upper and lower chords nest and locate one within the other in an inverted relationship at the eave line of the truss.

A truss in which the upper and lower chords nest and locate one within the other in an inverted relationship at the eave line of the truss is known from the present applicant's International Patent Application PCT/AU98/00316 published 5 Nov. 1998 which is hereby incorporated in its entirety by cross-reference.

A full understanding of the present invention requires reference to International Patent Application PCT/AU98/00316.

BACKGROUND ART

It is known from the present applicant's PCT/AU98/00316 to provide a pair of like-sectioned, generally Z-shaped chords each having a vertical web, a horizontal minor flange which terminates in a vertical return, and (an oppositely directed) horizontal major flange which terminates in a vertical return.

From PCT/AU98/00316 it is known to invert one of the two like-sectioned chords so that the chords may nest one within the other at the eave line with the respective webs abutting (and easily fixable together by a bolt or the like) and with each of the minor flanges and returns nested within the major flange and return of the other chord.

The present invention provides a tie-down methodology and apparatus particularly but not exclusively suited for use with the truss system disclosed in International Patent Application PCT/AU98/00316.

DISCLOSURE OF INVENTION

According to one aspect the invention resides in a truss tie-down method for use with a truss in which like-sectioned upper and lower chords nest one within the other in an inverted relationship at the eave line of the truss, and in which each of the chords includes a vertical web, a minor flange extending from one end of the web in a first horizontal direction, and a major flange extending from the other end of the web in a horizontal direction opposite to the first direction and terminating in a vertical return, wherein one chord is inverted relative to the other chord such that the respective vertical webs are closely adjacent and such that each minor flange nests within the major flange and return of the other chord, the method including:

forming a slot in the major flange of the lower chord; and

locating a connecting element between the closely adjacent webs of the chords, the connecting element extending downwardly through the slot formed in the major flange of the lower chord and being adapted to be connected to a wall frame or the like.

According to another aspect the invention resides in a truss including:

like-sectioned upper and lower chords which nest one within the other in an inverted relationship at the eave line of the truss, and in which each of the chords includes a vertical web, a minor flange extending from one end of the web in a first horizontal direction, and a major flange extending from the other end of the web in a horizontal direction opposite to the first direction and terminating in a vertical return, wherein one chord is inverted relative to the other chord such that the respective vertical webs are closely adjacent and such that each minor flange nests within the major flange and return of the other chord, a slot being formed in the major flange of the lower chord;

a connecting element located between the closely adjacent webs of the upper and lower chords and including a portion extending through the slot, said portion adapted for connection to a wall frame or the like.

According to a further aspect the invention resides in a method of anchoring a truss to a building frame, the method including:

forming a slot in a chord of the truss;

fastening a connecting element to the truss, the connecting element including a portion extending downwardly through the slot; and

fastening the downwardly extending portion of the connecting element to the building frame.

According to another aspect the invention resides in a truss including: top and bottom chords meeting at an eave line;

a slot formed in the bottom chord;

a connecting element for fastening the truss to a building frame, the connecting element including a portion extending downwardly through the slot.

According to another aspect the invention resides in a connecting element for fastening a truss to a building frame, the connecting element including:

a tongue portion adapted to extend through a slot in a chord in a truss;

shoulder portions adapted to seat on the chord adjacent the ends of the slot; and

an aperture for receiving a fixing element.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

Reference will now be made to the accompanying Figures which illustrate preferred embodiments of the invention and in which:

FIG. 1 is a vertically exploded view of a pair of like-sectioned Z-shaped chords adapted to nest one within the other in an inverted relationship at the eave line of a truss;

FIG. 2 is horizontally exploded view of the upper and lower chord with a connecting element sandwiched therebetween via a bolt and nut arrangement;

FIG. 3 is an assembled view of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a sectioned view of FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of an alternative connecting element for the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 2 to 4;

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of another alternative connecting element for the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 2 to 4;

FIG. 7 is a horizontally exploded view of a second embodiment of the invention in which the connecting element is adapted for connection to the upper chord at two points and to the lower chord at two points;

FIG. 8 is an assembled and sectioned view of FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of an alternative connecting element for the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 7 and 8; and

FIG. 10 is a perspective view of another connecting element for the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 7 and 8.

BEST MODE

With reference firstly to FIG. 1 there is shown a pair of like-sectioned substantially Z-shaped chords which are adapted to nest one within the other in an inverted relationship at the eave line of a truss.

For further description of the shape of the chord per se, the reader is directed to International Patent Application No. PCT/AU98/00316.

As described in PCT/AU98/00316, the lower chord is usually horizontal and the upper chord is inclined at a pitch prescribed by the architect or builder. When nested together, the upper and lower chords are easily interconnected via a fixing element such as a bolt which passes through the webs of the respective chords.

Referring to FIG. 1, the reference numerals include either a “u” or “l”, designating “upped” and “lower”. respectively.

Each chord 10 comprises a web 12, minor flange 14 which terminates in a return 20, and major flange 16 which terminates in a return 18. The vertical web 12 is connected to the horizontal major flange 16 via an inclined or divergent web portion 22.

Referring now to FIG. 2, a connecting element 30 is in use sandwiched between the web 12 u of upper chord 10 u and the web 12 l of lower chord 10 l.

The connecting element 30 includes an upper head portion 32 in which is defined a pressed region 38 through which an aperture 40 is formed. Connecting element 30 also includes a downwardly extending tongue portion 34 which includes apertures 42 which in use receive screws for fixing the connecting element 30 to a wall frame or the like (not illustrated in FIG. 2).

The connecting element 30 also includes a pair of shoulders 36 which effectively define the boundary between upper head portion 32 and lower tongue portion 34 of the connecting element 30.

As shown in ghosted line in FIG. 2, the connecting element 30 is in use located such that the tongue portion 34 extends downwardly through a slot 50 formed in the major flange 16 l of the lower chord 10 l. As shown, the shoulders 36 of the connecting element 30 seat on the major flange 16 l of the lower chord 10 l adjacent the ends of the slot 50.

As shown, the web 12 u of the upper chord and the web 12 l of the lower chord are both pressed and punched so as to be complementary in shape to assist in locating of the chords and connecting element relative to each other and also to improve shear strength between the chords and connecting element.

As shown, bolt 44 seats in a pressed region 52 formed in the web 12 u of the upper chord. The bolt 44 extends in use through the web 12 u of the upper chord, then through the head portion 32 of the connecting element 30 and then through the web 12 l of the lower chord. Nut 46 is provided to co-operate with bolt 44.

As will be readily apparent, a protruding or bossed region is defined on the opposite side of web 12 u from pressed region 52. This bossed region is received in pressed region 38 of the connecting element. Similarly, the bossed region formed on the opposite side of the connecting element 30 is received in the pressed region formed in lower web 12 l.

A significant benefit of the present invention is the fact that the connecting element 30 is located centrally of the upper and lower chords. Accordingly, tongue portion 34 of the connecting element 30 extends downwardly from a position which is central of the truss thereby transferring loads directly without any twisting or bending loads. This provides significant structural benefits.

Referring now to FIGS. 3 and 4, there is shown the assembled truss with connecting element including the tongue portion 34 of the connecting element extending downwardly from the truss.

Referring now to FIGS. 5 and 6 there are illustrated alternative embodiments of connecting element 30. In FIG. 5, the shoulder regions 36 have been corrugated to improve strength and to provide a greater bearing or contact surface between the shoulders of the connecting element and the major flange 16 l of the lower chord. Similarly, in FIG. 6, the shoulders have been pressed in oppositely directed scalloped shapes.

Referring to FIG. 7, there is illustrated a second embodiment of the invention in which the connecting element 30 is bolted to the lower chord at two locations, and to the upper chord at two locations. For this purpose, the connecting element 30 includes an additional pair of apertures 26 and 28. Aperture 26 is formed in a pressed region 24 which aligns with a similar pressed region and aperture formed in the lower chord. In contrast, aperture 28 is slot-shaped and is adapted to cooperate with an aperture formed in the upper chord which is not surrounded by a pressed region.

As will be readily appreciated, the slotted nature of aperture 28 allows the pitch of the upper chord, and hence roof, to be varied within a limited range.

Referring to FIGS. 7 and 8, it will be noted that the wall frame has been illustrated in the form of a vertical stud 56 and a horizontal top plate 48. Top plate 48 is suitably slotted at 54 to receive the downwardly extending tongue portion 34 of connecting element 30 so that the tongue portion 34 can be readily fixed to the stud via the illustrated screws. Again, it is emphasised that the central location of the connecting element relative to the truss allows loads to be directly applied to the stud without twisting or rotation.

Finally, referring to FIGS. 9 and 10, there are illustrated alternative connecting elements akin to FIGS. 5 and 6. Specifically, FIG. 9 illustrates an arrangement in which the shoulders of the connecting element are corrugated and FIG. 10 illustrates an embodiment in which the shoulders are scalloped in opposite directions.

It will, of course, be realised that the above has been given by way of illustrative example(s) of the invention. Any variations, modifications, or omissions, as would be apparent to persons skilled in the art, are deemed to fall within the broad scope of this invention.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8720129Feb 8, 2012May 13, 2014Simpson Strong-Tie Company, Inc.Component hoist clip
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/92.2, 52/93.2, 403/345, 52/696, 52/639, 403/256
International ClassificationE04B1/58, E04B7/02, E04C3/11, E04C3/04, E04B1/24, E04C3/07, E04B7/04
Cooperative ClassificationE04C2003/0486, E04C3/07, E04C3/11, E04B2001/2448, E04B2001/2415, E04C2003/0434, E04C2003/0421, E04C2003/0491, E04B7/045, E04C2003/0482, E04B2001/2418, E04B7/022
European ClassificationE04B7/02A, E04C3/11, E04B7/04C, E04C3/07
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Feb 24, 2014ASAssignment
Effective date: 20131002
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:WEEKS PEACOCK QUALITY HOMES;REEL/FRAME:032277/0790
Owner name: WEEKS HOLDINGS PTY LTD, AUSTRALIA
Jan 13, 2014ASAssignment
Owner name: WEEKS HOLDING PTY LTD, AUSTRALIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:WEEKS PEACOCK QUALITY HOMES;REEL/FRAME:031946/0637
Effective date: 20131002
Oct 10, 2012FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8
Oct 10, 2012SULPSurcharge for late payment
Year of fee payment: 7
Sep 3, 2012REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed
Jul 15, 2008FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
Dec 20, 2007ASAssignment
Owner name: WEEKS HOLDINGS PTY LTD, AUSTRALIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:WEEKS PEACOCK QUALITY HOMES PTY LTD;REEL/FRAME:020279/0386
Effective date: 20070926
Dec 9, 2004ASAssignment
Owner name: WEEKS PEACOCK QUALITY HOMES PTY. LTD., AUSTRALIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:WEEKS, KEVIN WILLIAM;REEL/FRAME:015439/0622
Effective date: 20020202
Owner name: WEEKS PEACOCK QUALITY HOMES PTY. LTD. 712-714 SOUT
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:WEEKS, KEVIN WILLIAM /AR;REEL/FRAME:015439/0622