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Publication numberUS6859080 B2
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 10/434,584
Publication dateFeb 22, 2005
Filing dateMay 8, 2003
Priority dateJul 17, 2002
Fee statusLapsed
Also published asUS6836167, US20040012422, US20040012424
Publication number10434584, 434584, US 6859080 B2, US 6859080B2, US-B2-6859080, US6859080 B2, US6859080B2
InventorsKathy L. Peng
Original AssigneeIntel Corporation
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Systems to control signal phase
US 6859080 B2
Abstract
A phase locked loop that may use UP and/or DN signals having programmable active state durations to control the speed of a clock signal.
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Claims(23)
1. A system comprising:
an amplifier to receive a first signal and to amplify the first signal;
a clock generator to output a clock signal and to adjust a phase of the clock signal based on a phase control signal;
a phase comparator to receive the clock signal and the first signal and to provide an indication of when the clock signal lags the first signal;
a phase controller to receive the indication and to selectively provide the phase control signal to the clock generator to control an amount to change the phase of the clock signal in response to the indication, wherein the phase control signal is based on N bits of the first signal, wherein N is an integer and wherein
the phase controller is to determine at least one of type or width properties of the phase control signal, and
the type consists of UP or DN; and
a decoder to output a data signal, wherein the decoder comprises logic to generate the data signal by sampling the first signal based on the clock signal; and
a data processor to receive the data signal from the decoder.
2. The system of claim 1, wherein the data processor comprises logic to perform media access control in compliance with IEEE 802.3.
3. The system of claim 1, wherein the data processor comprises logic to perform optical transport network de-framing in compliance with ITU-T G.709.
4. The system of claim 1, wherein the data processor comprises logic to perform optical transport network de-wrapping in compliance with ITU-T G.709.
5. The system of claim 1, wherein the data processor comprises logic to perform forward error correction processing in compliance with ITU-T G.975.
6. The system of claim 1, further comprising an interface.
7. The system of claim 6, further comprising a switch fabric coupled to the interface.
8. The system of claim 1, further comprising an optical-to-electrical converter to convert optical signals into electrical signals and provide electrical signals to the amplifier as the first signal.
9. The system of claim 1, wherein the phase controller comprises:
a signal processor to selectively determine type and width properties of the phase control signal in response to the indication; and
a signal generator to provide the phase control signal based upon the type and width properties.
10. The system of claim 1, wherein the phase controller is to determine the type and width properties based upon a ratio defined approximately by (a) a number of times the clock signal lags the first signal over (b) number of transitions of the first signal during N bits of the first signal.
11. The apparatus of claim 1, wherein the phase controller is to determine the type and width properties by using a ratio and wherein the ratio is defined by 2*(LAG/TRAN)−1, wherein
LAG comprises a number of times the clock signal lags the first signal during N bits of the first signal, and
TRAN comprises a total number of transitions of the first signal during N bits of the first signal.
12. The system of claim 11, wherein the phase control signal comprises both UP and DN signals in an active state followed by a duration when only one of the UP or DN signals is in an active state and wherein the width comprises the duration when only one of the UP or DN signals is in an active state.
13. The system of claim 1, wherein the phase comparator comprises an Alexander type phase detector.
14. The system of claim 1, wherein the first signal comprises an input data signal.
15. A system comprising:
an amplifier to receive a first signal and to amplify the first signal;
a clock generator to output a clock signal and to adjust a phase of the clock signal based on a phase control signal;
a phase comparator to receive the clock signal and the first signal and to provide an indication of a phase relationship between the clock signal and the first signal;
a phase controller to receive the indication and to selectively provide the phase control signal to the clock generator to control an amount to change the phase of the clock signal in response to the indication, wherein the phase control signal is based on N bits of the first signal, wherein N is an integer and wherein
the phase controller is to determine at least one of type or width properties of the phase control signal, and
the type consists of UP or DN; and
a decoder to output a data signal, wherein the decoder comprises logic to generate the data signal by sampling the first signal based on the clock signal; and
a data processor to receive the data signal from the decoder.
16. The system of claim 15, wherein the data processor comprises logic to perform media access control in compliance with IEEE 802.3.
17. The system of claim 15, wherein the data processor comprises logic to perform optical transport network de-framing in compliance with ITU-T G.709.
18. The system of claim 15, wherein the data processor comprises logic to perform optical transport network de-wrapping in compliance with ITU-T G.709.
19. The system of claim 15, wherein the data processor comprises logic to perform forward error correction processing in compliance with ITU-T G.975.
20. The system of claim 15, further comprising an interface.
21. The system of claim 20, further comprising a switch fabric coupled to the interface.
22. The system of claim 15, wherein the phase controller comprises:
a signal processor to selectively determine type and width properties of the phase control signal in response to the indication; and
a signal generator to provide the phase control signal based upon the type and width properties.
23. The system of claim 15, wherein the phase controller is to determine the type and width properties based upon a ratio defined approximately by (a) a number of times the clock signal lags the first signal over (b) number of transitions of the first signal during N bits of the first signal.
Description

The present patent application is a Divisional of prior application Ser. No. 10/198,579, filed Jul. 17, 2002, entitled TECHNIQUES TO CONTROL SIGNAL PHASE.

FIELD

The subject matter herein generally relates to the field of phase locked loops.

DESCRIPTION OF RELATED ART

Phase locked loop (PLL) devices can be used to match the phase of a clock signal with that of an input signal. FIG. 1 depicts an example PLL device. The clock generator 110 outputs a clock signal (shown as CLK). A phase comparator 120 compares the phase of an input signal (shown as INPUT) with that of signal CLK. The phase comparator 120 may output an UP or a DN pulse. The UP and DN pulses may control the charge pump 130. When signal CLK is behind the signal INPUT, phase comparator 120 outputs an UP pulse to charge pump 130 to instruct the charge pump 130 to provide more charge to the clock generator 110 to increase the speed of the signal CLK (over time) to match the phase of CLK with that of INPUT. Conversely, when the signal CLK is ahead of the signal INPUT, phase comparator 120 outputs a DN pulse to charge pump 130 to instruct charge pump 130 to remove charge from the clock generator 110 to decrease the speed of the signal CLK (over time). The charge pump 130 may add or remove an amount of charge in proportion to the width of respective UP and DN pulses.

Phase comparator 120 may output UP and DN pulses having fixed duration active states. For example, FIG. 2 depicts sample waveforms of UP and DN pulses having fixed duration active states. Use of fixed width UP and DN pulses may not accurately match the phase of the signal CLK with that of the signal INPUT.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 depicts an example PLL device.

FIG. 2 depicts sample UP and DN pulses generated by a phase comparator.

FIG. 3 depicts an example of a receiver system in which some embodiments of the present invention may be used.

FIG. 4 depicts an example implementation of the present invention, in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 5 depicts an example implementation of a phase controller, in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.

FIGS. 6A and 6B depict examples of control signals having programmable widths that a phase controller may output, in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.

Note that use of the same reference numbers in different figures indicates the same or like elements.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Some embodiments of the present invention may be used where phase locked loops are used. For example, FIG. 3 depicts an example of a receiver system 20 that may use some embodiments of the present invention. Some implementations of receiver system 20 may use an optical-to-electrical converter (“O/E”) 22 to receive optical signals from an optical network and convert optical signals into electrical signals. Amplifier 24 may amplify electrical signals received from O/E 22. Although reference has been made to optical signals, the receiver 20 may, in addition or alternatively, receive electrical signals from an electrical signal network. Re-timer system 25 may regenerate data and clock signals transmitted by the electrical signals. For example, re-timer system 25 may use a phase locked loop. With respect to data and/or clock signals provided by re-timer system 25, data processor 26 may perform media access control (MAC) management in compliance for example with Ethernet, described for example in versions of IEEE 802.3; optical transport network (OTN) de-framing and de-wrapping in compliance for example with ITU-T G.709; forward error correction (FEC) processing, in accordance with ITU-T G.975; and/or other layer 2 processing. Interface 28 may provide intercommunication between data processor 26 and other devices such as a microprocessor, memory devices, and/or a switch fabric (not depicted). Interface 28 may be compliant, for example, with PCI, Ethernet, and/or InfiniBand.

The examples described with respect to FIG. 3 by no means limit the systems in which some embodiments of the present invention may be used. For example, some embodiments of the present invention may be used by the LXT 11001 and LXT 35401 transceiver products available from Intel Corporation.

In accordance with an embodiment of the present invention, FIG. 4 depicts an example implementation of the present invention in re-timer system 400. Re-timer system 400 may include a clock generator 410, phase comparator 420, phase controller 430, charge pump 440, loop filter 445, and decoder 450. In one embodiment, phase controller 430 controls the amount that re-timer system 400 changes the phase of signal RCLK. For example, in one implementation, phase controller 430 may generate programmable duration UP and/or DN signals to control the magnitude of charge that charge pump 440 adds to or removes from the clock generator 410. Re-timer system 400 may be implemented as any of or a combination of: hardwired logic, software stored by a memory device and executed by a microprocessor, firmware, an application specific integrated circuit (ASIC), and/or a field programmable gate array (FPGA).

One advantage of re-timer system 400 over the PLL described with respect to FIG. 1 may be that re-timer system 400 more accurately matches the phase of a clock signal with that of an input signal. Another advantage of re-timer system 400 may be that re-timer system 400 introduces less jitter into a phase adjusted clock signal than the PLL described with respect to FIG. 1. Another advantage may be that re-timer system 400 may be more adaptable for use in systems that use a charge pump with slow on-off speed and the charge pump is not able to output as small a level of current as desired.

Phase comparator 420 may indicate whether signal RCLK is leading or lagging signal INPUT. Phase comparator 420 may be implemented as an Alexander (“bang-bang”) type filter. One implementation of an Alexander phase detector may be described, for example, in Electronic Letters by J. D. H. Alexander in an article entitled, Clock Recovery From Random Binary Signals, Volume 11, page 541-542, October 1975.

In accordance with an embodiment of the present invention, phase controller 430 may output to charge pump 440 programmable width UP and/or DN signals. Signal UP may correspond to a command to increase the frequency of the signal RCLK whereas signal DN may correspond to a command to decrease the frequency of the signal RCLK. In response to the UP and DN signals, charge pump 440 may respectively add charge to or remove charge from clock generator 410. The amount of charge added to or removed from the clock generator 410 may be proportional to the duration of (a) the active states of UP or DN signals or (b) the net difference in time between the active states of UP and DN signals.

In one implementation, every N bits of signal INPUT, phase controller 430 may output either (a) one UP or DN signal having an active state for the programmed width or (b) both the UP and DN signals in active states and the programmed width is the duration when only one of the UP or DN signals is active. The UP or/and DN signals may be used to control the speed-up and slow-down of the frequency of signal RCLK.

In response to the addition or removal of charge, clock generator 410 may respectively increase or decrease the frequency of the signal RCLK. Clock generator 410 may output clock signal RCLK and a 180 degree out-of-phase version of the signal RCLK (shown as RCLK180). In one implementation, clock generator 410 may be implemented as a voltage controlled oscillator. Clock signals RCLK and RCLK180 may have frequencies of either a full-rate (i.e., one cycle per bit of signal INPUT) or 1/X bit rate of signal INPUT, where X is an integer. In the case where signal RCLK has a frequency of 1/X the bit rate of signal INPUT, multiple versions of signal RCLK may be provided, where the phases of the versions are separated by one bit of signal INPUT. Similarly, in the case where signal RCLK180 has a frequency of 1/X the bit rate of signal INPUT, multiple versions of signal RCLK180 may be provided, where the phases of the versions are out-of-phase by one-half () bit to corresponding versions of RCLK. In this example, use of signals RCLK and RCLK180 having frequencies of 1/X the bit rate of signal INPUT may allow the phase controller 430 to output UP and/or DN signals having widths in increments of less than one bit of signal INPUT.

In one implementation, a filter 445 may be used to control a frequency range over which charge pump 440 may change the charge content of clock generator 410. For example, filter 445 may implement a desired transfer function to convert the charge addition or removal from charge pump 440 to a VCO control voltage. The VCO control voltage may control the rate and range of speed changes of the clock signals output by the clock generator 410.

FIG. 5 depicts an example implementation of phase controller 430 in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention. One embodiment of phase controller 430 may include a signal processor 510 and signal generator 520. Signal processor 510 may receive an integer N lead and/or lag indicators from phase comparator 420. Signal processor 510 may determine a type of phase control signal (e.g., UP and/or DN) (shown as TYPE) and the duration of the active state of such phase control signal (shown as WIDTH) for phase controller 430 to output. In accordance with an embodiment of the present invention, signal generator 520 may output to charge pump 440 UP and/or DN signals having TYPE and WIDTH parameters provided by signal processor 510. Signal generator 520 may use signals RCLK and RCLK180 in order to time the duration of UP and/or DN signals.

For example, in one implementation, phase controller 430 may use any integer number N of bits of signal INPUT to determine TYPE and WIDTH parameters. In one implementation, variable N is ten (10) although phase controller 430 may use other number of bits. Although one implementation of phase controller 430 has been described as using ten (10) bits of signal INPUT to program UP and/or DN signals, phase controller 430 may use less than ten (10) bits of signal INPUT or other number of bits that may be set according to desired performance and design requirements.

In accordance with an embodiment of the present invention, to determine TYPE and WIDTH parameters, one implementation of the phase controller 430 may use the variable “ratio” and relationships in the following table.
Variable ratio=2*(LAG/TRAN)−1, where

    • LAG=the number of times the signal RCLK lags the signal INPUT during the previous N bits of signal INPUT, and
    • TRAN=total number of transitions of signal INPUT during the previous N bits of signal INPUT.

Width of signal
Value of variable Type of signal (bits of signal
ratio (UP/DN) INPUT)
0 ≦ ratio < 0.2 UP 0
0.2 ≦ ratio < 0.6 UP {fraction (1/2 )}
Ratio ≦ 0.6 UP 1
−0.2 < ratio < 0 DN 0
−0.6 < ratio ≦ −0.2 DN {fraction (1/2 )}
Ratio ≦ −0.6 DN 1

The values provided in the preceding table are only one implementation and may be varied depending on desired design characteristics. In other implementations, the ratio may be determined by considering lead relationships or both lead and lag relationships.

FIG. 6A depicts an example of UP and DN signals having programmable widths that phase controller 430 may output. In another implementation, phase controller 430 may output both the UP and DN signals in active states and the programmed width is the time when only one of the UP or DN signals is active. For example, FIG. 6B shows an example where the desired TYPE is DN and the WIDTH is the time when only the DN signal is active.

Decoder 450 may receive the signal INPUT and signal RCLK180. Decoder 450 may sample signal INPUT according to transitions of signal RCLK180 and output the sampled signal as signal OUTPUT. Signal OUTPUT may correspond to a regenerated version of signal INPUT.

Although some description has been made with respect to phase locked loops, the teachings provided herein can be applied to any situations where signal phases are compared and matched. For example, delay locked loops may use embodiments of the present invention. The drawings and the forgoing description gave examples of the present invention. The scope of the present invention, however, is by no means limited by these specific examples. Numerous variations, whether explicitly given in the specification or not, such as differences in structure, dimension, and use of material, are possible. The scope of the invention is at least as broad as given by the following claims.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7765425 *Mar 21, 2006Jul 27, 2010GlobalFoundries, Inc.Incrementally adjustable skew and duty cycle correction for clock signals within a clock distribution network
US7770049 *Aug 3, 2010Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.Controller for clock skew determination and reduction based on a lead count over multiple clock cycles
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Classifications
U.S. Classification327/163, 327/262, 327/299, 327/294, 327/157
International ClassificationH03L7/089
Cooperative ClassificationH03L7/089, H03L7/0891
European ClassificationH03L7/089, H03L7/089C
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Sep 1, 2008REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed
Feb 22, 2009LAPSLapse for failure to pay maintenance fees
Apr 14, 2009FPExpired due to failure to pay maintenance fee
Effective date: 20090222