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Publication numberUS686877 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 19, 1901
Filing dateJan 14, 1901
Priority dateJan 14, 1901
Publication numberUS 686877 A, US 686877A, US-A-686877, US686877 A, US686877A
InventorsBartlett Arkell
Original AssigneeBartlett Arkell
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bag.
US 686877 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

rrnn STATES PATENT OFFICEE BARTLETT ARKELL, OF CANAJOI-IARIE, NEW YORK.

BAG.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 686,877, dated November 19, 1901.

Application filed January 14, 1901. Serial No. 48 ,266. (No model.)

.To cir/ZZ whom, it may concern:

Be it known that I, BARTLETT ARKELL, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Canajoharie, Montgomery county, and State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Bags, of which the following is a specication.

This invention relates to bags, and has for its object to provide a paper bag that shall have the maximum capacity to maintain itself against strains which tend to rupture it.

A further object is to strengthen and protcct such paper bag by inclosing it in an outer bag of textile fabric.

The invention consists of a paper bag having the features hereinafter set forth and With or without an outer inclosing bag of textile fabric.

In the accompanying drawings, forming .part of this specification, Figure l is a perthe constituent fibers run generally in one direction. Such an arrangement of the fibers imparts to the paper the maximum tensile strength in direction of the length of the fibers, but leaves the paper more liable to rupture from strains in a direction transverse to the direction of the fibers. For the purpose of increasingto the maximum the capacity of the paper to maintain itself against transverse strains I form in theF paper a multiplicityv of crinkles, running generally in the same direction as the length of its constituent fibers. These crinkles, by reason of their direction,do not break the fibers, and hence do not diminish the normal strength of the fibers. On the other hand, they enable the paperto stretch when under transverse strains, and so pre- Vent the paper from breaking. When the fabric is under-transverse strain,` the crinkles flatten out or unfold, and when the strain ceases the crinkles draw up again and the paper contracts. Thus by the arrangement of the constituent fibers generally in one direction and a multiplicity of crinkles in the same general direction I impart to the paper fabric thelnaximum capacity to maintain itself against strains, which tend to rupture it.

The fabric is characterized by a pronounced elasticity in a direction transverse to the direction of its crinkles and its constituent fibers.

The bag B is made of the paper fabric A described, the length of the bag corresponding to the direction of the length of the fibers a and crinkles b. The bag b will be found to be the most satisfactory paper bag yet produced for packing flour, sugar, salt, dac. Its great strength in the direction of its constituent fibers and lengthwise of the bag makes the bag secure against rupture when it is filled and lifted or carried by taking hold of it at one end. Its capacity to yield crosswise makes the bag secure against rupture from such sudden strains as are put upon it When the filled'bag is dropped or other bags are piled upon it. These strains tcnd to force the inclosed material outward against the fabric at one or more points and would readily rupture an ordinary paper bag. In the case of my paper bag, however, the force ofsuch strains is absorbed by the yielding or stretching of the paper at the point or points coinciding with the precise locality of the strains. If the strain is not too prolonged and too great, the stretched portion of the paper will contract after the strain ceases.

I prefer to make the bag B of rope-paper, as being most satisfactory because of its strength and price.

The outer bag C may be made of any suitable textile fabric, such as cotton, burlap, dto.

What I claim as new, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is-

1. A bag made of paper'fabric which has the length of its constituent fibers running generally in one direction, said fabric having crinkles running in the same general direction as the length of said fibers, whereby the maximum strength of the fabric in the direction of its fibersis substantially retained, and whereby the capacity of the fabric to maintain itself without breaking against strains ICO in a direction transverse to the direction of the fibers is greatly augmented.

2. A'bag made of paper fabric which has the length of its constituent fibers running `generally in one direction, said fabric having crinkles running in the same general direction as the length of said fibers, whereby the maximum strength of the fabric in the direction of its fibers is substan tially retain ed, and whereby the capacity of the fabric to maintain itself Without breaking against strains in a direction transverse to the direction of the fibers is greatly augmented and an outer textile bag inclosing the paper bag.

3. A bag made of paper fabric which has the length of its constituent fibers running generally in one direction, said fabric having crinkles running in the same general direction as the length of said fibers, whereby the maximum strength of the fabric in the direction of its fibers is substantially retained, and whereby the capacity of the fabric to maintain itself without breaking against strains in a direction transverse to the fibers is greatly augmented, said fibers and crinkles running generally lengthwise of the bag.

4. A bag made of paper fabric which has the length of its constituent bers running generally in one direction, said fabric having crinkles running in the same general direction as the length of said fibers, whereby the maximum strength of the fabric in the direction of its fibers is substantially retained, and

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2493349 *Nov 30, 1946Jan 3, 1950St Regis Paper CoBag with extensile sealed liner and method for making same
US3485281 *Jan 4, 1968Dec 23, 1969Chase Bag CoPlastic lined burlap bag
US3984047 *Oct 15, 1973Oct 5, 1976Mobil Oil CorporationReinforced thin wall plastic bag
US6890102Apr 3, 2003May 10, 2005Kool Wraps, L. L. C.Gift bag with napped filamentary surface
US7018100Dec 14, 2004Mar 28, 2006Kool Wraps, L.L.C.Gift bag with napped filamentary surface
US7118276Mar 12, 2004Oct 10, 2006Kool Wraps, L.L.C.Gift bag with napped filamentary surface
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationY10S383/908, B65D29/02