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Publication numberUS6875742 B2
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 09/971,902
Publication dateApr 5, 2005
Filing dateOct 5, 2001
Priority dateOct 10, 2000
Fee statusLapsed
Also published asUS7335642, US20020103124, US20050164942, WO2002030442A2, WO2002030442A3
Publication number09971902, 971902, US 6875742 B2, US 6875742B2, US-B2-6875742, US6875742 B2, US6875742B2
InventorsPeter R. Oeltgen, Paul D. Bishop, Craig J. McClain, Shirish Barve
Original AssigneeZymogenetics, Inc., University Of Kentucky Research Foundation
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method for treating cytokine mediated hepatic injury
US 6875742 B2
Abstract
A method of modulating cytokine mediated hepatic injury by administering compound-D SEQ ID NO:1 to a mammal. A concentration of the compound in the range of about 0.5 mg/kg to about 20 mg/kg in a physiologically acceptable formulation blocks a cytokine cascade. A therapeutic method of modulating cytokine mediated acute inflammatory, trauma induced and toxin induced hepatic injury, particularly via tumor necrosis factor modulation, is thus disclosed.
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Claims(9)
1. A method for treating a bacterial infection related hepatic injury in a mammal comprising administering a pharmaceutically effective concentration of the peptide shown in SEQ ID NO:1 for a duration to treat hepatic injury related to the bacterial or viral infection.
2. The method of claim 1 wherein the bacterial infection is caused by an organism selected from the group consisting of Staphylococcus species, Streptococcus species, Neisseria species, Salmonella species, Shigella species, Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, Klebsiella species, Proteus species, Enterobacter species, Bacteroides species, Brucella species, Francisella tularensis, Listeria monocytogenes, Acinetobacter species, Streptobacillus moniliformis, Vibrio species, Helicobacter pylori, Pseudomonas species, Haemophilus species, Bordetella pertussis.
3. The method of claim 1 wherein said compound is administered prior to said response.
4. The method of claim 1 wherein said compound is administered subsequent to said response.
5. The method of claim 1 wherein said compound is administered substantially concurrently with said response.
6. The method of claim 1 wherein said compound is administered in the formulation selected from the group consisting of a solution, an emulsion and a suspension.
7. The method of claim 1 wherein said compound is administered parenterally.
8. The method of claim 1 wherein said compound is administered at a concentration in the range of about 0.5 mg/kg to about 20 mg/kg.
9. The method of claim 1 wherein said compound is administered at least until hepatic function normalizes.
Description

This application claims the benefit of U.S. application Ser. No. 60/238,991, filed Oct. 10, 2000.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The invention relates to the use of compounds to attenuate or prevent cytokine mediated hepatic injury.

BACKGROUND

Hepatic injury can be caused by a number of different agents including viruses such as Hepatitis A, B, C, D and E, both gram positive and gram negative bacteria, chemical agents such as ethanol, carbon tetrachloride and lead, and by physical trauma resulting in ischemia (ischemic hepatitis) injuries as can occur in right-sided congestive heart failure. It is now believed that all of these types of hepatic injury are caused at least in part by the liver's inflammatory or cytokine response to these agents. The inflammatory response of the liver results in the overexpression of a cascade of inflammatory/acute phase cytokines, such as interleukin-1 (IL-1), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), IL-6, IL-8 and transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ). It is now believed that it is the cascade of these cytokines which is the ultimate cause of much of the hepatic injury resulting from these agents. Thus, there is a need for a therapeutic agent which can be useful in alleviating or modulating the inflammatory response associated with liver disease or injury.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention fills this need by providing a method of treating or preventing a cytokine mediated hepatic injury in a mammal comprised of administering a pharmaceutically effective amount of a peptide having the sequence Tyr-D-Leu-Phe-Ala-Asp-Val-Ala-Ser-Thr-Ile-Gly-Asp-Phe-Phe-His-Ser-Ile-NH2 SEQ ID NO: 1, hereinafter referred to as compound D, to said mammal. The hepatic injury can be an acute inflammatory reaction, as a result of a viral or bacterial infection or a chemical agent such as ethanol, lead, carbon tetrachloride or acetaminophen, or from trauma resulting in ischemia or reperfusion injury in the liver.

The present invention is also directed to a method of treating a viral or bacterial infection-related hepatic damage in a mammal comprised of administering a pharmaceutically effective amount of compound D SEQ ID NO: 1 to said mammal.

The present invention is also directed to a method of treating alcohol induced liver injury in a mammal comprised of administering a pharmaceutically effective amount of compound D SEQ ID NO: 1 to said mammal.

Preferably, compound D SEQ ID NO:1 is administered in a pharmaceutical composition at a dosage of from about 0.5 mg/kg to about 20 mg/kg per body weight of the mammal.

Preferably, the mammal is a human.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

A compound used to treat cytokine-mediated hepatic injury is a peptide having the sequence Tyr-D-Leu-Phe-Ala-Asp-Val-Ala-Ser-Thr-Ile-Gly-Asp-Phe-Phe-His-Ser-Ile-NH2 SEQ ID NO:1, hereinafter referred to compound-D. The peptide may be produced by a number of methods, such as using an automated peptide synthesizer, through recombinant molecular techniques, or isolated from a naturally occurring source, as is known to one skilled in the art. Compound-D SEQ ID NO:1 has a molecular weight of 1,902 daltons. Compound-D SEQ ID NO:1 is insoluble in water or saline, but may be solubilized by adding 100 μM of a solution comprised of ethanol, propylene glycol, and 1 N NaOH in a 1:1:1 ratio, with sterile physiological saline then used to obtain the appropriate concentration. The initial alkaline pH is adjusted to 7.4 with 1 N HCl.

Compound-D SEQ ID NO:1 that has been solubilized may be administered by parenteral means, for example, by intravenous injection. For administration into a mammal, a dose of about 1-20 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) is useful. For administration into a tissue or organ preservation solution, a concentration of about 100 μM is useful.

Compound-D SEQ ID NO:1 may be administered directly into a mammal, either alone or in combination with other substances.

The above agent is administered to a mammal to modulate cytokine activation by blocking one or more steps in the cytokine cascade. The agent may be formulated for administration in an aqueous based liquid such as phosphate buffered saline to form an emulsion, or may be formulated in an organic liquid such as dimethylsulfoxide to form a solution. The solution or emulsion may be administered by any route, but it is preferably administered parenterally such as by intravenous, intramuscular, intradermal or intraperitoneal injections. A preferred dose is in the range of about 0.5-20 mg of compound-D SEQ ID NO:1 per kg of body weight of the mammal. The time of administration of the agent is preferably prior to initiation of cytokine activation. However, the agent may be administered concurrently with another agent that induces cytokine activation or even subsequent to an agent that induces cytokine activation and still produce a protective effect.

Administration of compound-D SEQ ID NO:1 should be continued on a daily basis until hepatic function returns to normal and is maintained at normal levels, preferably for at least one to two days. Hepatic injury can be determined by elevated levels of hepatic enzymes, as well as by depressed albumin levels (less than about 35 g/liter). Hepatic function is routinely monitored by quantitating serum levels of hepatic enzymes such as alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (normal<35 U/L), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) (normal<30 U/L), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) (normal≦100 U/L) and gamma glutamyltransferase (GGT) (normal≦45 U/L for males, ≦30 U/L for females), as well as bilirubin, both conjugated (normal≦0.2 mg/deciliter) and total (normal≦1.0 mg/deciliter) bilirubin. Compound-D SEQ ID NO:1 modulation of hepatocyte cytokine activation may be used therapeutically in a variety of hepatic injury processes. As used herein, the term hepatic injury broadly encompasses all types of injury such as hepatic trauma, physical and/or chemical insult, stress, inflammation, toxicity, disease and so on. For example, the inventive agents can be used in treating hepatic injury due to alcoholic liver disease, acetaminophen toxicity, cadmium toxicity, lead poisoning, bacteremia due to, for example, Staphylococcus species, Streptococcus species, Neisseria species, Salmonella species, Shigella species, Escherichia coli, Clostridium perfringens, Klebsiella species, Proteus species, Enterobacter species, Bacteroides species, Brucella species, Francisella tularensis, Listeria monocytogenes, Acinetobacter species, Streptobacillus moniliformis, Vibrio species, Helicobacter pylori, Pseudomonas species, Haemophilus species, Bordetella pertussis, viral infections due to, for example, influenza viruses, adenoviruses, paramyxoviruses, rubella viruses, polioviruses, hepatitis viruses, herpesviruses, rabies viruses, human immunodeficiency viruses and papilloma viruses, as well as trauma, ischemia reperfusion injury and metabolic liver disease.

While the specific mechanism of action of compound-D SEQ ID NO:1 on the modulation of cytokine mediated hepatic injury such as acute inflammatory reactions, trauma and toxin induced biological responses is unknown, these agents exhibit a specific and reproducible effect on decreasing hepatotoxicity.

A treatment for attenuating and/or preventing cytokine mediated acute inflammatory, trauma induced and toxin induced hepatic injury is thus disclosed. Compound-D SEQ ID NO:1, administered at a concentration of about 0.5 mg/kg to about 20 mg/kg, inhibits hepatic injury and result in decreased lethality of an injured animal.

It should be understood that the embodiments of the present invention shown and described in the specification are only preferred embodiments of the inventors who are skilled in the art and thus are not limiting in any way. Therefore various changes, modifications or alterations to these embodiments may be made or resorted to without departing from the spirit of the invention and the scope of the following claims.

Patent Citations
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US5656420Feb 24, 1995Aug 12, 1997University Of Kentucky Research FoundationMethod for employing the delta opioid dadle to extend tissue survival time during ischemia
US6103722May 18, 1998Aug 15, 2000The Medical College Of Wisconsin Research Foundation Inc.Ischemic preconditioning
US6380164 *Jan 23, 2001Apr 30, 2002University Of Kentucky Research FoundationModulating a cytokine mediated hepatic injury response in a mammal comprising administering a deltorphin (heptapeptide) selected from deltorphin i, deltorphin ii, and combinations thereof to mammal
WO1999056766A2Apr 30, 1999Nov 11, 1999Univ Kentucky Res FoundMethod for treating ischemia
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7335642 *Mar 22, 2005Feb 26, 2008University Of Kentucky Research FoundationAdministering a peptide having the amino acid sequence Tyr-D-Leu-Phe-Ala-Asp-Val-Ala-Ser-Thr-Ile-Gly-Asp-Phe-Phe-His-Ser-Ile-NH2 to treat viral infections; inflammation, reaction to toxin of ethanol, lead, carbon tetrachloride or acetaminophen, or from trauma resulting in ischemia; reperfusion injuries
US7705119Jun 6, 2007Apr 27, 2010University Of Kentucky Research FoundationA Deltorphin-E polypeptide having a specific amino acid sequence and acarrier; antishock agents; opiod receptor agonists; nucleotide sequence;hypertensive agents; antiinflammatory agents; antiischemic agents; surgery;restoring perfusion to organs and tissues; prophylaxis
Classifications
U.S. Classification514/2.6, 514/937, 530/302, 530/300, 514/894, 514/893, 514/2.8, 514/2.7, 514/3.7, 514/2.4
International ClassificationA61K38/10
Cooperative ClassificationY10S514/894, Y10S514/937, Y10S514/893, A61K38/10
European ClassificationA61K38/10
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
May 28, 2013FPExpired due to failure to pay maintenance fee
Effective date: 20130405
Apr 5, 2013LAPSLapse for failure to pay maintenance fees
Nov 19, 2012REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed
Oct 13, 2008REMIMaintenance fee reminder mailed
Oct 6, 2008FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
Sep 18, 2007ASAssignment
Owner name: UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY RESEARCH FOUNDATION, KENTUC
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:ZYMOGENETICS, INC.;REEL/FRAME:019834/0609
Effective date: 20070917
Aug 30, 2005CCCertificate of correction
Oct 5, 2001ASAssignment
Owner name: UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY RESEARCH FOUNDATION, KENTUC
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:OELTGEN, PETER R.;MCCLAIN, CRAIG J.;BARVE, SHIRISH;REEL/FRAME:012255/0039;SIGNING DATES FROM 20010925 TO 20010928
Owner name: ZYMOGENETICS, INC., WASHINGTON
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