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Publication numberUS691633 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 21, 1902
Filing dateOct 31, 1901
Priority dateOct 31, 1901
Publication numberUS 691633 A, US 691633A, US-A-691633, US691633 A, US691633A
InventorsMelvin Jincks, Clarence W Stanton
Original AssigneeMelvin Jincks, Clarence W Stanton
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sawbuck.
US 691633 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

' No. 691,633. Patented lan. 2|, I902. m. JINCKS & c. w. STANTON.

8 AW B U G K (Application filed Oct. 31 1901.)

(No Model.)

momma. WASHKNGTON n c snugly upon the buck without requiring the dog-holding means so that it may be convenand arrangement of parts, as will be hereinleast three pairs of crossed leg-standards 1,

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

MELVIN JINOKS AND CLARENCE W. STANTON, OF COHOCTON, NEW YORK.

SAWBUCK.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 691,633, dated January 21, 1902.

Application filed October 31, 1901. Serial no. 80,709. on, model.)

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that we, MELVIN J INOKS and CLARENCE W. STANTON, citizens of the United States, residing at Cohocton, in the county of Steuben and State of New York, have invented a new and useful sawbuck, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to sawbucks, and has for its object to provide for conveniently and effectively holding the material to be cut operator to place his knee upon the log.

It is furthermore designed to arrangethe iently applied to and removed from the log and also manipulated by one of the feet of the operator to draw said means into snug engagement with the log.

Another object is to arrange for folding the log-holding means, so as to reduce the size of the device when not in use. I

With these and other objects in view' the present invention consists in the combination after more fully described, shown in the accompanyingdrawing's, and particularly pointed out in the appended claims, it being understood that changes in the form, proportion, size, and minor details may be made within the scope of the claims Without departing from the spirit or sacrificing any of the advantages-of the invention.

' In the drawings, Figure 1 is a perspective view of a'sawbuck' having the present form of log-holding means applied thereto. Fig. 2

sawbuck to show the connection between the opposite crossed standards thereof.

Like charactersof reference designate corresponding parts in all the figures of the drawlngs.

' In carrying out the present invention itis preferred to provide the sawbuck with at.

2, and 3, respectively, the adjacent pairs of which are connected by the respective crossbars 4, the tops and bottoms of which are recessed or grooved for the reception of the upper and lower tie rods or bars 5, the heads 6 of which are let in flush with the outer side of one of the end pairs of leg-standards, ,the

opposite ends ofthe rods or bars being provided with 'nuts 7, whereby the parts of the sawbuck arefirmly connected, and any looseness therein may be conveniently taken up. The intermediate pair of leg-standards and one of the end pairs rise from a pair of parallel sills 8, which project a suitable distance at one side of the sawbuck and are designed to rest upon the ground. the sills are provided with upstanding posts or uprights 9, between which a treadle is hung, said treadle comprising inner and outer sections 10 and 11, respectively,whic h are connected by means of ahinge-joint 12. The rear' end of the main section 10 is situated between the posts 9 and is provided with a pair of bearing-eyes 13, which pivotally embrace a rod or cross-bar 14, carried by the upper ends of the posts 9. Beneath the treadle-section 10 there isplaced a helical spring 15, which bears in opposite directions against the under side of the treadle, and a plate or platform16, supported upon the sills, whereby the treadle is yieldably supported and is normally 'held in an elevated position. The outer end of the outer treadle-section 11 is provided upon its under side with an antifriction-roller 17, which is designed to travel upon a supporting-plate 18, which has its inner end projected between the sills 8 and pivotally connected to a cross-bar 19.in'any suitable manner.

As best illustrated in Fig. 2, it will be seen that the hinged joint of the treadle is located The outer ends of below and adjacent to the cross-bar of the sawbuck and works between the intermediate pair of standards and the adjacent outer pair of standards.

Moreover, the outer se'c' tion of the treadle and the supporting-plate;

conveniently placing the footthereon, in-

stead of being inclined upwardly at aconsid erable elevation, as would be the case if the treadle were in a single piece.

The outer end portion of the rear treadlesection is provided with a staple or eye 20, to which is loosely connected the lower end of the upstanding shank portion 2i of a hook 22, said hook being of alength to engage over the top of the cross-bar 4: of the sawbuck, so as to hook over a log, as indicated in Fig. 1 of the drawings. A long staple 23 is driven into the back of the cross-bar 4 and receives the shank of the hook, so as to form a slotted guide therefor, against the outerend of which the shank rests, as shown in Fig. 2, so as to.

support the hook at its outer limit when not in use for holding a log in the crotches of the sawbuck. As the hook would not effectually hold a bundle of small sticks in the crotch of the sawbuck, I have provided means especially designed for this purpose, as best illustrated in Fig. 2 of the drawings, and comprising a chain 24, which has one end connected to the staple or eye 20, with its free end portion adapted for adjustable engagement with a swinging hook 25, connected to the inner end portion of the treadle-section 11, whereby the intermediate portion of the chain may be passed over the bundle of sticks, so as to .embrace the same and prevent lateral displacement thereof.

In using the present log-holding means the hook or the chain is engaged over the log or bundle of sticks, and then the operator places one foot upon the treadle section 11 and presses downwardly thereon, thereby to draw the hook of chain into snug engagement with the log or bundle of sticks and hold the latter snugly within the crotch of the sawbuck, whereby it is not necessary for the operator to place one of his knees upon the log. After a portion has been cut off from the log the operator removes his foot from the treadle, so that the latter may be elevated by the spring 15, thereby to loosen the hook or chain, so that the log may be moved in an endwise direction to project the log for another cutting.

Although two pairs of standards are sufficient to form a sawbuck, yet it is desirable to have one or more additional pairs of legstandards, so as to increase the length of the sawback, as the pairs of standards 1 and 2 are rather close to each other.

The arrangement of the log-holding means 'as illustrated in the accompanying drawings is for a right-handed operator, and it will of course be understood that said means would be applied to the other end of the buck for the use of a left-handed operator.

What we claim is- 1. The combination with a sawbuck, of a spring-treadle formed in pivotally-connected sections, one of the latter having a fixed terminal pivotal support, the outer free end of the other treadle-section being normally inclined downwardly and free to slide, and logholding means carried by the treadle.

2. The combination with a sawbuck, having a rear extension, of an intermediatelyjointed spring-supported treadle having one end pivotally connected to the extension and its opposite end inclined downwardly and free to slide during the swinging movement of the treadle, and log-holding means carried by the treadle.

3. The combination with a sawbuck, of supporting-sills therefor projected in rear thereof, a spring-supported treadle having an intermediate pivotal joint and pivotally supported at its rear end upon the sills, the front end of the treadle being free to slide under the swinging movement of the treadle, and log-holding means carried by the treadle.

4. The combination with asawbuck, of supporting-sills therefor projected in rear thereof, a pair of posts rising from the rear end of the sills, a platform in front of the posts, a treadle comprising front and rear sections which are pivotally connected, the outer end of the rear section being pivotally connected between. the posts, and the outer end of the front section being free to slide during the swinging movement of the treadle, an elevating-spring interposed between the platform and the rear treadle-section, and log-holding means carried by the treadle.

5. The combination with a sawbuck, of a flexibly-jointed treadle, a pivotal support for one end of the treadle, an antifriction-roller carried by the opposite free end of the treadle, a plate carried by the buck and disposed for the support of the antifriction-roller, and log holding means carried by the treadle.

6. The combination with a sawbuck, of a flexibly-jointed treadle, a pivotal support for one end of the treadle, an antifriction-roller carried by the opposite free end of the treadle, a vertically-swinging plate pivotally connected with the sawbuck and disposed beneath the free end of the treadle in normal supporting engagement with the antifriction-roller, and log-holdin g means carried by the treadle.

7. The combination with a sawbuck having a lateral extension, of a treadle pivoted thereto and comprising pivotally-connected sections projected between the leg-standards of the buck, the outer treadle-section being capable of being folded upwardly between said leg-standards, and also provided at its outer end with an antifriction supportingroller, and a plate pivoted between the leg-standards and adapted to rest upon the ground forthe support of the roller, said plate also being capable of being folded upwardly and inwardly between the leg-standards, and log-holding means carried by the treadle.

8. The combination with a sawbuck, of supporting-sills therefor projected at one side of the buck, posts rising from the rear end of the sills, a treadle lying between and projected at opposite sides of the leg-standards of the buck, the treadle being provided with an intermediate hinged joint, the rear end of the treadle being pivotally supported between of the cross-bar. being provided with grooves, and tie-bolts piercing the opposite pairs of legstandards and lying in the respective grooves.

In testimony that we claim the foregoing as I our own we have hereto affixed our signatures in the presence of two witnesses.

MELVIN JINOKS. CLARENCE W. STANTON. Witnesses:

FRANK V. FoLT's, CATHERINE L. FOL'IS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3519042 *Jul 26, 1967Jul 7, 1970Franklin W DomresPulp cutting and loading machine
US3688818 *Apr 14, 1970Sep 5, 1972Domres Franklin WPulp cutting and loading machine
US4638885 *Dec 6, 1984Jan 27, 1987Frederick Raymond LCombination sawhorse and sawbuck
US4667714 *Dec 31, 1985May 26, 1987Knutsen Morris NApparatus and method for sawing limbs and the like
US4718652 *May 30, 1986Jan 12, 1988Liebenstein Lowell GSawbuck
US4756351 *May 22, 1987Jul 12, 1988Knutsen Morris NApparatus and method for sawing limbs and the like
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationB25B1/205