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Publication numberUS692440 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 4, 1902
Filing dateJun 17, 1901
Priority dateJun 17, 1901
Publication numberUS 692440 A, US 692440A, US-A-692440, US692440 A, US692440A
InventorsByron B Goldsmith
Original AssigneeByron B Goldsmith
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Magazine lead-pencil.
US 692440 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

No. 692,440. Patented Feb. 4, |902.

B. B. GOLDSMITH.

MAGAZINE LEAD PENCIL.

(Application led June 17, 1901.) `(ldo Model.) 2 Sheets-Sheet I.

No. 692,440. Patented Feb. 4, |902.

B. B. GOLDSMITH.

MAGAZINE LEAD PENCIL.

(Application led June 17, 1901.): (No Model.) 2 Sheets-Sheet 2,

d U@ .4 2 d a W Nrrnn STATES ATENT OFFICE.

BYRON B. GOLDSMITH, OF NEXV YORK, N. Y.

MAGAZINE LEAD-PENCIL.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No., 692,440, dated February 4, 1902.

Application tiled 111119 171 1901 To @ZZ whom, t may concern:

Be it known that I, BYRON B. GoLDsMITH, a citizen of the United States, residing at New York, in the county and State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Magazine Lead-Pencils, oi which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to magazine lead-pencils of that class in which a numberof marl;- ing-points are stored within the magazine and suitable mechanism is provided for projecting the marking-points one by one into position for use; and the object of myinvention is to provide a construction which shall render the lead-pencil substantially au tomatic in each of its several operations-that is to say, the object of myinvention is to provide a magazine lead-pencil of the type specified by which the simple pressure of the finger against a part shall cause a markingpoint to be fed into position for use, or shall cause a worn-out marking-point to be ejected from the pencil, or shall cause a markingpoint which has been placed in position for use, but which has not yet been used up, to fall back into the magazine, each as the particular circumstances may require.

- To this end my invention comprises a magazine lead-pencil comprising a magazine with jaws which of themselves are partially open or non-gripping for receiving and holding the marking-point which is to do the writing, a compressor, generally the mantle of the pencil, for compressing the partially-open or nongripping jaws and causing the jaws to grip or clamp the marking-pointin position therein, and a feeding-finger which is moved in relation to the pencil-holding jaws byaspring which acts to press the feeding-finger upon the marking-point with a uniform pressure in the operation of feeding and holding the marking-point in position. By this construction an important object is attained. The pencil-holdin g jaws, which are partially open or non-gripping of themselves,for holding the working markingpoint must naturally be of a shape to prevent the marking-point from falling bodily through the jaws point first and escaping. Otherwise all the markingpoints in the magazine would escape at the time a new point was being fed into position for use. Nor can they have cylindrical walls Serial No. 64,858. (No model.)

and hold the marking-point by mere friction, since otherwise the marking-point would not drop back into the magazine-tube by gravity.

i The jaws are thus made to extend inwardly in a geometrical sense, being usually frustoconical in form, with slits between the jaws, and with a bias which permits them to be compressed upon a lnarkingpoint by the compressor, hutwhich also permits them to be further expanded it a marking-point were to be forced between them by excessive pressure, thus causing them to bind upon a marking-point even when the compressor is out of action. When, then, the feeding-fingert'orces the working marking-point between the partially-open jaws, there would be great liability, in the absence ofthe spring which I use, for such marking-point to be pressed into position with such force as would cause it to still further spread the partially-open jaws. This would cause the marking-point to become bound in the jaws, so that when the lead-pencil is held in a Vertical position, with its point uppermost, and the jaws are freed from the action of the compressor, in order that the working point may fallback into the magazine under the action of gravity, it will be so tightly stuck in the jaws as to fail to fall back. It is, however, as above indicated, an important object of my invention to provide a lead-pencil ot' the class specified in which the marking-pointshall be free to fall back into the magazine and shall not become stuck in the jaws when the pencil is held upright with the point uppermost and pressure on some part causes the pencil-holding jaws 'to move away from the compressor which compresses said jaws upon the marking-point. Such binding of the working marking-point in the pencil-holding jaws by reason of being 'forced between the jaws by too great pressure would prevent the automatic operation of the pencil and canse a corresponding annoyance to the user. Now in my construction the marking-point is always fed into the position which it occupies between the pencil-holding jaws by the force of a spring. This can be exactly regulated and made the same at all times under all conditions of use. I thus secure a construction in which the marking-point is fed between the pencil-holding jaws with such uniform pressure as just IOO to cause the marking-point to take the right position between the jaws without binding it in such position by any undue expansion of the normally non-gripping jaws, which would cause them to really become gripping-jaws even without the aid of the compressor. There results, then, from the construction which I have specified above as defining my invention and which includes a spring the useful function that any marking-point which is in position for writing-that is, any working marking-point-always finds itself in position between the pencil-holding jaws with just sufficient pressure to hold it in proper position, but not with sufficient pressure to further expand the jaws, which would make them grip even without the compressor, and thus prevent the working marking-pointfrom falling back into the magazine under the action of its own gravity at the desired time. This being the case, it will at once be seen that the pencil can be carried around in the pocket of the user withouthavingalead mar ing-point projecting from the point. When the pencil is in the pocket of the user, the marking-point will have withdrawn into the magazine and the lead point will be completely protected from injury; but, what is perhaps more important still, there will be no projecting lead to soil the pocket and the iinger of the owner when he seeks to withdraw the pencil from his pocket. Instead of being compelled to place the pencil in the pocket in a given position it can be dropped into any pocket in any position'. No care is required in putting it in the pocket, in carrying it in the pocket, or in taking it out of the pocket. This is a most important advantage. Now in such a construction of lead-pencil, in which a marking-point can always fall back into the magazine when the pencil-point is held uppermost and pressure is applied to the proper part, it follows, as a converse, that the marking-points in the magazine are at all times ready to drop forward when the pencil is held with its point undermost. Furthermore, my invention contemplates a construction in which the working marking-point can, when dull, be ejected by the action of the feeding-finger on the marking-point behind the working marking point, which drives the Working marking-point out of the clamping-jaws and out of the pencil and drives the marking point behind it in position for use between the clamping-jaws. Now While the feeding-finger and compressor are relatively immovable, the clampingjaws, which are at the end vof the magazine, are movable with relation to both these parts, the construction preferably being one in which the compressor and feeding-linger are held stilland the magazine carrying the pencil-holding jaws is forced outward against the tension of the spring away from these parts. This carries with it the fact that when the clamping-jaws are pushed to the position farthest removed from the compressor,the spring being most tightly compressed, the feedingfinger must be in position to get behind the marking-point which is in contact with the working marking-point in the pencil-jaws. In other words, the feeding-finger at the point of greatest excursion of the pencil-holding jaws and greatest compression of the spring must have two marking-points ahead of it, so that by action on the second point it can force the first or working point out of the pencil-jaws and can force the second markingpoint into position between the jaws. When, now,we consider what happens when the pencil is taken out of the pocket with all the marking-points in the magazine and none between the clamping-jaws, it follows at once that by holding the pencil-point downward and moving the pencil-jaws away from the feeding-finger, so as to enable it to get at its work of feeding a pencil-point in position, the feeding-finger will necessarily get behind two marking-points, so that when the pressure on the spring is released and the clamping-jaws move back toward the feeding-finger we ind one of the marking-points entirely ejected from the magazine and wasted, while the second marking-point is fed into position for use. The construction as thus outlined would therefore have the disadvantage of wasting a marking-point every time the pencil is taken out of the pocket and a marking-point is fed into position. To overcome this defect, I provide a spacing-finger which has a substantially immovable relation with the feeding-finger, but which is situated behind the feeding-linger by a distance equal to the length of a marking-point. This inger is so constructed as to be withdrawn from the general path of the magazine whenl lthe feeding-finger is within the magazine and remains within the magazine when the feeding-finger is withdrawn therefrom. When, therefore, the pencil is held point down after being taken from the pocket, the foremost marking-point engages with the side face of the feeding-iinger and the second marking-point lies on top of the first marking-point. The clampingjaws and magazine being pressed downward, the feeding-linger gradually lets go of the first marking-point, which drops into position between the clamping-jaws. The spacing-iinger, however, at this time contacts with the second markingpoint and keeps it from falling forward. When, now, the clamping-jaws are drawn back toward the compressor and fingers, the spacing-finger gradually moves out of the path of the magazine and the second marking-point and those behind it are allowed to fall forward, so that if occasion required the feeding-finger by another compression of the spring can now act on the second marking-point to drive the working markingpoint from the clamping-jaws when it shall have become sufficiently dulled by use.

Having thus described lthe broad feature of my invention, I have now to describe the specific embodiment in an actual lead-pencil.

IOO

IIO

In the drawings, Figure l represents a complete cross-section ofthe pencil with the clamping-jaws retracted and in position for use. Fig. 2 represents a complete cross-section of the pencil with the clamping-jaws and magazine projected to its full extent from the compressor, the spring being under maximum tension. the feeding and spacing fingers. Figs. t, 5, and 6 show sectional details of the operation of ejecting a worn-out point. Figs. 7, 8, and 9 show sectional details of the operation of retiring a marking-point within the magazine; and Figs. l0, ll, and l2 show the operation offeeding a single new marking-point into position for use after all the marking-points have been withdrawn into the magazine. Fig.

13 shows a modiied shape of pencil-holding The magazine A, which carries the marking-points, is shown in the shape ot' a long cylinder or tube extending from end to end of the pencil. It carries at one end the inwardly-extending or frusto-conical clamping-jaws A, which, as has' been above explained, are partially open when not acted on by the compressor. It has soldered or otherwise secured to it at an intermediatel point tubes A6, having a tiange or disk A5 held therebetween.

The mantle C5 of the lead-pencil is cylindrical and carries at one end the compressor C inthe shape of a nozzle. This compressor or nozzle is telescoped into the end of the mantle C5 and is rigidly secured thereto by solder, a rivet, or the like. The ring or band C is placed or spun upon the mantle and compressor to hide the solder or rivet and to add to the ornamentation ofthe pencil. Manifestly, however, other means ot' securing` the compressor C lto the ma-ntle C5 may be adopt-A ed. The flat disk C2 is also secured in a fixed position inside of the mantle. As shown, this disk C2 is pressed against a contracted end-of the part of the compressor which extends'inside the cylindrical mantle C5 by the spring D. This is a convenient means of securing the parts in position, since they may be assembled and au tomatically held in place, as it were; but other means of rigidly securing the disk C2 in a lixe'd position on the inside of the mantle C5 may naturally be employed.

Soldered to t-he disk C2 is a tube B2, which has stamped in onepiece with it the feedingiinger B. The spacing-finger B might also be stamped out of the metal of the tube B2, but is preferably formed by making it in one piece with a separate collar BS and by slipping the collar over the tube B2 and soldering it or otherwise securing it thereon. The spacing-iinger B' has a projection B4 making a rentrant angle with the iingerB' fora purpose to be described later on.

The magazine-tube A is normally in the position shown in Fig. l, with the clampingjaws A in their retracted position-thatis to Fig. 8 shows a perspective View ofA say, with the clam pin g-jaws in contact with the compressor C and as near as they ever get to the feeding-iin ger B and the spacing-finger B'; This normal position of the parts is brought about by the action of the helical spring D, which at one end rests on the fixed plate C2 and at the other end presses against the plate A5, rigidly secured to the magazine-tube `A by the collars or tubes A6. It is, however, necessary to force the clamping-jaws away from the compressor C and the feeding and spacing fingers B B to the position shown in Fig. 2. To this endl providea tube F, which is reduced in diameter at its outer end, as shown, and which telescopes within a tube C3, rigidly secured to the outer mantle C5 by a bolt C, by solder, by spinning, or any other suitable means. The tube F has acap G, con-` stituting a push-piece, telescoped therein at its outer end, and at its inner end .it presses against the plate A5, secured to the magazinetube A. The marking-points are fed into the magazine-tube from the rear by removing the lcap Gr.l

It will be apparent that by holding the mantle C5 of the pencil in the hand and by pressing with the thumb upon the push-piece or cap G motion `is conveyed to the telescoping tube F and through it to the plate A5 and to the magazine-tube A, thus compressing the spring D. At the same time the other end of the magazine-tube p A is forced to slide through the tube Bcarrying the fe'eding'and spacing fingers, and the clamping-jaws on the eXtreme'end of the magazine-tube are forced away from the compressor or nozzle C at the end ofthe mantle. When the pressure of the thumb on the cap Gis released,the expan-` sion ofthe spring D drives the parts Aback to the position shown in Fig. l. Injorder to prevent lany rotation of the magazine-tube A' within the mantle, I have adopted the simple expedient of stamping out of thermate'rial of Athe tube an outwardly-extending stop'A or tongue A1 and causing 'the same to travel in 'a slot 'B3 of definite length' formed in the jnger-carrying tube B2.

The cooperation of the stop A4 on the movable magazine-tube and of the en ds of the slot B3 on the relatively stationary finger-carrying tubefprevents any rotary motion of the magazine-tube. It is also to be noticed that in the position fshown in Fig. 1 the feeding-finger B lies within theV magazine-tube and holds theworking marking-point in position. The spacing-lngerB, however, lies on the outside of the magazinetube. In the position shown in Fig. 2 the feeding-finger B has been withdrawn through its slot in the magazine-tubeand lies entirely on the outside of the magazine-tube. The

spacing-iingerhas, on the other hand, entered its slot in the magazine-tube, its upwardlyextending point lying within the path ofthe dead. It will further be noticed that the ryeentering angle which the projection Bim'akes with the spacing-finger Bhas a usefulfunction. As seen in Fig. 2theprd'jection` VBllies ICO IIO

on such a slant with reference to the forward edge of the slot in the magazine-tube with which it registers that when this projection B4 comes against the forward edge of the slot it will be forced outward and away from the inside of the tube onto the metal on the outside of the tube, to the position, in fact, which it is shown as occupying in Fig. 1.

The construction of the pencil having thus been made clear, there will be no particular difficulty in understanding its operation, especially when the functions of the pencil as a whole, which have been explained at the outset, are borne in mind. Ve shall consider first the operation of ejecting a worn-out point in Figs. 4, 5, and 6. We shall then consider the operation of retiring the Working marking-point to a position Within the magazine -tube, as shown in Figs. 7, 8, and 9. Finally we shall explain the operation of feeding a marking-pointinto position after the pencil has been taken from the pocket, all the marking-points being supposed to be retired Within the tube.

In Fig. 4 the pencil-point is supposed to be held downward, a marking-point ct being held within the clamping-jaws, and the feedingfinger B acting to hold it in its foremost position. Pressure is now applied upon the capplate G, and the clamping-jaws are projected to a considerable distance below the compressor. The feeding-finger B being Withdrawn from the interior of the magazine-tube by the action of the rear edge of the slot A2, the second marking-point a2 is allowed to drop down on the working marking-point a; but the spacing-finger B now having its reentering projection B4 Within the magazine-tube it acts to hold the marking-point 0,3 away from the marking-point a2, as shown .in Fig. 5. When now pressure upon the push-piece or cap G is released and-the spring D drives the magazine-tube upwardly, the feeding-finger Bpresses `upon the top of the marking-point (t2-and forces this through the magazine-tube. The pressure ofthe marking-point a2 upon themarking-point ct ejects the marking-point ct from the clamping-jaws. At the same time ,the marking-point a2 is forced into position between the clamping-jaws, as shown in Fig. 6. The result is that the marking-point a has been ejected and that the-next fresh marking-point u? has been forced into position between the clamping-jaws with-a uniform amount of pressure, determined by vthe tension of the spring D. It is-now desired to withdraw a marking-point which finds itself in working position between the clampingjaws to the interior of the magazine-tube. This actionV is full-y illustrated in Figs. 7, 8, and 9. The pencil is held 4point uppermost.

The marking-point a is held in its uppermost position by its contact with the feedin g-fin ger B and by the compressor C. Pressure is now applied to the push-piece or cap G, thus driving the clamping-jaws upwardly away from the compressor() and also away from the feedtrated in Figs. 10,11, and 12.

ing-finger B. The marking-point a not having been crowded into position between the clamping-jaws, and these of themselves being non-gri ppin g in character,this marking-point at may now drop down a little. It so drops upon the projection B4 of the spacing-finger B. The position of the parts is as shown in Fig. 8. Pressure upon the cap-plate being now released, the spring D draws the clamping-jaws down toward the compressor. The marking-point a remains stationary by reason of the fact that the projection B4 is under it. The clamping-jaws come down toward it; but some time before the clamping-jaws reach it the rentering projection B4 of the spacingfinger is driven out of the magazine-tube by the action of the slope of the projection B4 against the upper end of the slot A3. At this moment the markingpoint a' drops completely down into the magazine. It will thus be noticed that While the spacing-finger B takes part in the operation of retiring a pencil-point into the magazine, as is shown in Figs. 7, 8, and 9, ithas in this operation of retiring no useful purpose. If the spacingfinger were entirely' out of action during this part of the operation, the only difference would be that the marking-point in position between the clamping-jaws, as shown in Fig. 7, would drop directly back into the magazine -ftube to the position shown in Fig. 9 Without going through the intermediate steps shown in Fg.8. At the same time it is equally evident that this marking-point does no harm inY this retiring operation, this being due to the construction which forces it out of the magazine-tube in the innermost position of the clamping-jaws. v

We have finally to consider the operation of feeding a fresh marking-point into position l*when taking the pencil out of the pocket, all of the marking-points having been retired within the magazine. The operation is illus- In Fig. 1,0 the feeding-finger B is within the magazine-tube and the spacing-finger B is on the outside of the tube. The series of marking-points a a2 a3 lie supported on the side of the feedingfinger B. Pressure is applied to the cap-plate G, and the clamping-jaws are projected from the compressor C. During this operation the feeding-finger B has been withdrawn from lthe interior of the magazine, thus letting go of its hold on the marking-point 0,', which is thereupon dropped into position between the clamping-jaws. On the other hand, the spacing-finger B has entered the magazine and has gripped the marking-point a2, withdrawing it' vwithin or sliding it up the magazinetube. This position of the parts is shown in Fig. 11. Pressure upon the cap Gbeing now released, the spring D forces the clampingjaWs. A toward the compressor C and feeding and spacing fingers B B. The feeding-finger again enters the magazine-tube and forces the marking-point a into a position between the clamping-jaws with the desired amount of TOO IIO

pressure. The spacing-finger B has, on the other hand, kept in touch with the markingpoint Ca2 and prevented it from falling forward until the feeding-finger B had projected into the magazine-tube at a point ahead of the marking-point a2. Therefore the feeding-finger B has had no opportunity to act on the back of the marking-point a?, and thus to eject the marking-point ct' from the clamping-jaws.

As appears from the above, the pencil-holding jaws are of a shape to have an 'inward extension. In the form shown in Fig. lthe jaws are truste-conical, the slant of the cone' providing the inward extension, or I could use the shape of jaws shown in Fig. Al2, in which the marking-point is in theV shape of a cone mounted on a cylinder, and the pencil-holding jaws have an inward extension A20 to act as a stop against the base ot' this cylinder. It will be noticed, however, that the markingpoint in the absence of the compressor fits loosely in the pencil-holding jaws, being prevented from forward motion by the vstop or Aflange A20, but being entirely free to drop backward it' the pencil holding jaws are turned the other end up. Both in the forms shown in Figs. 12`and l the pencil-holding jaws have an inward extension to prevent forward motion of the marking-point except under the action of considerable force in the process of ejecting a worn-out point. So, too, in each of these cases the pencil-holding jaws are non-gripping of themselves in the absence of the compressor to permit the markin'gpoint to fall backwardly. The shape of the jaws with an inward extension is 'thus highly important in my pencil. It prevents the marking-point from escaping through the open end of the jaws except when forced therethrough in the action of ejecting a worn marking-point. At the same time it permits the marking-point to drop back into the magazine when the pencil is held upright and the feeding-lingers are drawn from behind it. It must be understood at the same time that while thejaws will usually be frusto-conical in shape, this being the most eflicient shape7 a frusto-pyramidal shape or other shape 'possessing the same functions-for instance, that shown in Fig. 13-would be comprised within thephraseinwardly-extendingjaws as used by me. The bias of the pencil-holding spring- .jaws is such as not to'cause them to bind upon amarking-point which has been pressed home between the jaws by the feeding-linger apart from the action ofthe compressor. The springjaws are, in fact, so biased that they may be further compressed by the compressor or be further expanded when a marking-point is ejected therethrough. Of themselves and aside from the compressor they are non-gripping in character.

What I claim is- 1. A lead-pencil comprisinga magazine constructed to receive a series of individual marking-points, inwardly-extending spring-jaws communicating therewith, a feeding-finger and a spring for causing the approach of the jaws and finger and thus causing the finger to drive and hold the marking-point in place within the jaws or to eject it, substantially as described'.

2. Alead-pencil comprising a magazinet-ube constructed to receive a series of individual marking-points and communicating with inwardly-extending spring-jaws, afeeding-finger extending within the magazinetube and a spring surrounding the tube for causing 'the approach of the jaws and iinger to drive and hold a marking-point in place between the jaws, or to eject it, substantially as described.

3. A lead-pencil comprisinga magazine constructed to receive a series of individual marking-points, inwardly-extending spring-jaws communicating ltherewith, a feeding-finger, a

compressor, and a spring for causing theapproach of the iinger and compressor and the jaws, whereby 4the linger ejects or drives a marking-point in place and the compressor compresses the jaws thereupon, substantially as described. v

4. A lead-pencil comprising a magazinetube for receiving a series of individual marking-points communicating with inwardly-extendingspring-jaws, non-gripping of themselves, a feeding-finger, and a spring for causing the approach of thejaws and nger,whereby pressure upon the spring permits a marking-point to retire within the magazine and expansion of the spring causes the lingers to eject or drive a marking-point into position, substantially as described.

5. A lead-pencil comprising a magazinetube for receivinga series of individual marking-points communicating with jaws nongripping of themselves, a feeding-finger eX- tendingintoV the tube, a compressor'embracing the jaws, and a spring for causing the approach of the iinger andy compressor and the jaws, whereby the expansion of the spring causes the tingerto eject or drive a markingpointin place and the compressor to compress the jaws thereupon andthe compression of the spring permits a marking-point to drop into the magazine from the non-gripping-jaws, substantially as described.

6. A lead-pencil comprising a mantle, a magazine-tube sliding within the mantlet'or receiving a series of individual markingpoints and provided with inwardly-extending spring-jaws, non-gripping of4 themselves, a feeding-.finger and a compressing-nozzle, each secured in a iiXed position to the mantle, and a` helical spring surrounding the tube for drawing the jaws toward the compressor-nozzle and feeding-finger, substantially as described.

7. A lead-pencil cornprsinga magazine and a' feeding and a spacing Iingermovablein relation thereto, substantially as'described.

S. A lead-pencil comprising a tube constructed to receive a series of individual IOO IIO

marking-points, a feeding and a spacing finger movable therein and a spring for causing relative motion between the tube and ringer, substantially as described.

9. A lead-pencil comprising aslotted magazine-tube, a series of individual markingpoints and a feeding-tinger and a spacing-tinger movable in relation to the tube and constructed to enter and withdraw therefrom in alternation, substantially as described.

l0. A lead-pencil comprising a tube communicating with pencil-holding jaws, constructed to receive a series of individual marking-points, a feeding-finger and a spacing-tinger therebehind, movable in relation to the tube, the construction being such that when the fingers are in their position removed from the jaws the spacing-iinger projects within the tube, substantially as described.

11. A lead-pencil comprising a magazine constructed to receive a series of individual marking-points, spring-jaws non-gripping in themselves communicating therewith, and a feeding and a spacing finger movable in the magazine, whereby a marking-point can be withdrawn into the magazine, a single newV point can be fed into position and a worn point can be ejected, substantially as described.

12. A lead-pencil comprising a magazine constructed to receive a series ot' individual marking-points, spring-jaws non-gripping in themselves communicating therewith, feeding and spacing iingers movable with relation to the jaws, and a spring causing the approaching motion of fingers and jaws, whereby a marking-point can be withdrawn into the magazine, a single new point can be fed into position, and a worn-ont point can be ejected, substantially as described.

13. A lead-pencil comprising a magazine constructed to receive a series of individual marking points and communicating with spring-jaws non-gripping in themselves a feeding-linger and a spacing-finger movable in the magazine, a compressor for the jaws and a spring causing the approaching motion of the jaws and the fingers and compressor whereby a marking-point can be withdrawn into the magazine, a single new point can be fed into position and a worn point can be ejected, substantially as described.

14. A lead-pencil comprising a magazinetube for receivinga series of individual marking-points, pencil-holding jaws communicating therewith, and a spacing-iinger movable in the tube and withdrawable from its interior on motion toward the jaws, substantially as described.

15. A lead-pencil comprising a magazine adapted to receive a series of individual marking-points, pencil-holding jaws non-gripping in themselves,a compressor therefor, a springimpelled push-piece, and means actuated thereby for permitting a marking-point to fall into the magazine from the jaws, substantially as described.

In testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specification in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

BYRON B. GOLDSMITH.

Witnesses:

J. STARK, G. E. FLNN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3526463 *Jan 16, 1969Sep 1, 1970John P ShurcliffMarking instrument
US4219282 *Jun 26, 1978Aug 26, 1980Kuo Chun LiangWriting implement
US4320982 *Sep 12, 1979Mar 23, 1982Kuo Chun LiangWriting implement
US4966478 *Aug 14, 1989Oct 30, 1990Kuo Chun LiangMechanically controlled-writing apparatus with presharpened pencil lead elements
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationB43K21/20