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Publication numberUS692604 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 4, 1902
Filing dateJun 22, 1901
Priority dateJun 22, 1901
Publication numberUS 692604 A, US 692604A, US-A-692604, US692604 A, US692604A
InventorsEdward J Bourke
Original AssigneeTimothy Cotter, John Mcdonnell, Edward J Bourke
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Moving model for advertising purposes.
US 692604 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

No. 692,604. I

.. Patented Feb. 4, I902. E. -J.' BOURKE. MOVING MODEL FOB ADVERTISING PURPOSES.

(Application filed Juno 22, 1901.)

(No Model.)

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UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

EDWARD J. BOURKE, or KANsAs cITY, MISSOURI, ASSIGNOR OF ONE-HALF To TIMOTHY COTTER AND JOHN MoDONNELL, OF KANSAS oITY, MIS- SOURI.

MOVING MODEL FOR ADVERTISING PURPOSES.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 692,604, dated February 4, 1902. Application filed June 22,1901. Serial N6. 65,567. (No model.)

T at whom it may concern.-

Be it known that I, EDWARD J BOURKE, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Kansas City, in the county of Jackson and State of Missouri, haveinvented new and useful Improvements in Moving Models for Advertising Purposes, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to improvements in IO moving models used for advertising purposes; and the object of my invention is to provide mechanism for causing a dummy figure to move-around an endless path and for moving the legs of said figure in'imitation of walking.

Referring to the accompanying drawings, Figure 1 is a bottom plan view of the mechanism for propelling andoperating the dummy figure, the tracks being broken 06. Fig. 2 is a perspective view of the legs of the fig- 2o ure, the floor and the angle-rails being broken away. Fig. 3 is a transverse section of the two tracks for the supporting-carriages.

3 designates the floor or the bottom of a show-window. Two parallel slots are cut in said floor or bottom, as shown in Fig. 2. Se-

cured to the lower side of the floor or bottom 3 are two parallel tracks 32 and 33, each track being composed of two angle-irons having theirlower flanges directed toward each other,

as shown. Said tracks are directly beneath the aforesaid slots, respectively. Rollers 37 having under flanges, as shown in Fig. 3, are mounted on'spindles screwed into the lower flanges of the rails 32 33. Said rollers sup- 5 port two chains 28 and 29, which are shown broken off in Fig. 1, but which in practice will be endless, as will'the slots in the floor 3.

Rigidly secured to the chains 28 29, respectively, are two carriages 31 and 31, which travel on tracks 32 and 33, respectively. Ex-

tending upwardly from each of said carriages is a rod 34, and said rods are secured to the feet or legs of a dummy figure'27. The legs of this figure are connected pivotally to each 5 other or to a trunk (not shown) at the hips,

so that they may be moved relatively to each other, as in walking. y

The chains 28 andt29 are advanced intermittently and alternately by the mechanism shown in Fig. 1, in which 35 and 36 designate mutilated sprocket-wheels, the teeth of which engage the chains 28 and 29, respections of the chains; but they may of course be located at any part of the track desired.

The sprockets 35 and 36 are rotated continu ously through bevel-gears 38, secured thereto, and bevel-pinions 39, keyed on a shaft 41, on which is a beltpulley 42. Said sprockets are so adjusted on their shafts that when either tively, Chain 28 is held against sprocket 35 of them releases its chain the other one engages its own chain, and thus the chains move alternately, and the model 27 moves substantially as in walking.

Having now fully described my invention, what I claim as new, and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States, is-

1. An advertising apparatus comprising a dummy figure, a pair of traveling carriages supporting the feet of said figure, two endless tracks for said carriages, respectively, each track consisting of a pair of angle-bars separated to form a slot therebctween, two endless chains below and parallel to said tracks,

respectively, flanged wheels or rollers supporting said chains, a connection between.

each-chain and the adjacent carriage, two segmental sprocket-gears for moving said chains respectively intermittently and alternately, in the samedirection, and means for rotating said" sprocketgears continuously; substantially as described.

2. In advertising apparatus, the combina-. tion of aidummy figure having legs pivotally v connected to the trunk, two carriages supporting the respective feet of said figure, two endless tracks on which said carriages run,

two endless chains connected to said carriages, two segmental sprocket-gears for moving said respective chains intermittently and alternately, in the same direction, and means for driving said sprocket-gears continuously, substantially as described.

In testimony whereof I affix my signature in the presence of two witnesses.

EDWARD J. BOURKE. Witnesses:

M. L. LANGE, O. M. VAN DORSTON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2504318 *Feb 21, 1947Apr 18, 1950Freeman Claud WDisplay apparatus
US2586264 *Jun 10, 1946Feb 19, 1952Webb Co Jervis BSingle-and double-track conveyer system
US5443188 *Apr 8, 1994Aug 22, 1995New Dimension Products LtdSystem for simulating human gait
US5501628 *Feb 14, 1994Mar 26, 1996Link Group InternationalCam-operated, synchronized marching soldier trackway
US5687499 *Sep 29, 1995Nov 18, 1997Brnjac; StephenOverhead advertising display system
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationG09F11/23