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Publication numberUS697925 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 15, 1902
Filing dateMar 24, 1902
Priority dateMar 24, 1902
Publication numberUS 697925 A, US 697925A, US-A-697925, US697925 A, US697925A
InventorsEleazer Kempshall
Original AssigneeKempshall Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Billiard-ball.
US 697925 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

No. 697,925. Patented Apr. l5, I902.

E. KEMPSHALL.

BILLIARD BALL.

(Application filed Man 24, 1902.)

(No Model.)

Inventor:

Eleazerlfengwfiall By 835 fitter-nay llnrrn rates ATlENT OFFICE.

ELEAZER KEMPSHALL, OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS, ASSIGNOR TO THE KEMPSIIALL MANUFACTURING COMPANY, A CORPORATION OF NEW JERSEY.

BlLLIARD-BALL.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 697,925, dated April 15, 1902.

Application filed March 24,1902. Serial No. 99,715. (No model.)

To (all whom, it may concern:

Be itknown that I, ELEAZER KEMPSHALL, a citizen of the United States, residin gin Boston, in the county of Sn folk and State of Massachusetts, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Billiard-Balls, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to playing-balls, and in particular to balls for use in the game of billiards; and its object is to simplify and improve the construction and to increase the durability and efficiency thereof.

In the accompanying drawings, Figure 1 shows my improved ball, partly in section. Fig. 2 shows a hollow metal sphere which I preferably use for the core of the ball. Fig. 5 shows a rubber envelop with which I cover the core shown in Fig. 2. Fig. 4 illustrates a process of finishing the ball.

In the several views similar parts are designated by similar characters of reference.

For the core I preferably employ a hollow metal sphere 1, which is preferably of about one-half the diameter of the completed ball, although it may be made larger orsmaller, if desirable, and may be made of other substances than metal and does not need to be hollow in every way in practicing my invention so long as it performs the necessary functions. Upon this core I mold a solid softrubber envelop 2, preferably highly vulcanized, and this I provide, either at the molding thereof or subsequently, with a series of pits 3, preferably throughout the surface of the envelop and extending about half-way through the interior of the envelop, as illustrated at Fig. l. These pits may have any suitable form; but a conical form, as illustrated, is preferred. The diameter of the rubber envelop is preferably one and a half times that of the core 1, although it may be varied within the scope of myimprovements. Upon the ball thusformedlplace thick hemispherical segments 4; and 5 of celluloid and place the whole withinheatingand compressing dies 6 and '7. The heat of the dies renders the celluloid plastic, and the dies being powerfully brought together force the plastic material into the pits 3, as at 8, and also preferably place the rubber under a high de I maintain the presgree of compression.

sure upon the ball until the shell cools and hardens, so that when the ball is removed from the press the shell powerfully grips the rubber envelop and permanently holds the same under compression. This compression is increased with the passage of time, owing to the gradual curing and consequent shrinkage of the celluloid, so that the rubber sphere becomes more powerfully gripped and the ball is improved. Thus I produce a ball which has a hard substantial shell upon a cushion backing, the shell being keyed upon the rub ber sphere in such manner that it is impossible for a blow to disrupt the shell from the ball. My improved ball has a high degree of stability, especially when subjected to light blows. Moreover, the principal part of the weight as made by my improvements is lo cated near the exterior of the ball, this being due to the use of the hollow sphere 1, for which I prefer to use a rigid steel shell which is inexpensive to manufacture. The material of the completed shell A, Fig. 1, should be of high-quality celluloid or other pyroxylin compound and fine and dense in character, so as to present a true and even surface and resistance throughout the ball, that it may give the same response to the same blow wherever struck.

It will be seen that the shell A, which penetrates the pits 3, carries the envelop within when struck, by reason of the prongs or barbs 8, in a manner much more effectual and with better results than if the shell A were merely placed upon the rubber sphere. The ball is hence extremely effective and well adapted to all the requirements of the game.

Certain features of my present improvements may be used in forming balls for other games-such, for instance, as the game of golf, particularly the feature of interlocking the hard shell with a soft spherical backing. Other compounds of pyroxylin may be substituted for celluloid. The shell and the rubher are interfeltedthat is, so intimately forced together by pressure and heat as to interlock.

Having described my invention, I claim- 1. A playing-ball, comprising an inner and an outer sphere, whereof one has integral hobs which penetrate the other.

ICO

'2. A playing-ball, comprising an inner and an outer sphere, one of said spheres being harder than the other, and one of said spheres having integral hobs which penetrate the other.

3. A playing-ball, comprising, an inner and outer sphere whereof one is harder than the other, said harder sphere having hobs which penetrate the softer sphere.

4. A playing-ball, comprising inner and outer spheres, said outer sphere having inwardly-protruding integral hobs which penetrate the inner sphere.

5. A playingball, comprising inner and outer spheres, whereof one has integral hobs and the other has corresponding pits, said hobs extending into said pits and locking the spheres together.

6. A playing-ball, comprising an inner soft sphere provided with pits, and an outer hard sphere provided with hobs which engage said pits.

7. A playing ball, comprising an inner sphere of rubber and an outer sphere of celluloid, one of said spheres having hobs and the other of said spheres having pits engaged by said hobs.

8. A playing-ball, comprising an inner rubber sphere having pits and an outer celluloid sphere having hobs which project into said pits.

9. A playing-ball, having a hard core, a sphere upon said core, and a shell upon said sphere, one of said sphere and shell elements having integral hobs which penetrate the other of said elements.

10. A playing-ball, comprising a hard core, a soft sphere thereon provided with pits and a hard shell upon said sphere, said shell having integral hobs which enter said pits.

11. A playing-ball, comprising a hollow metal sphere, a rubber envelop thereon, provided with pits and a celluloid shell upon said envelop, said shell having hobs which enter said pits.

12. A playing-ball, comprising a hard core, a soft envelop thereon and a hard shell interlocking with said envelop.

13. A playing-ball comprising a hard core, a soft-rubber envelop thereon and a celluloid shell interlocking with said envelop.

14. Aplaying-ball, comprising an inner soft sphere provided with pits, and an outer hard sphere compressed thereon and provided with hobs which engage said pits.

15. A playing-ball, comprising an inner sphere of rubber and an outer sphere of celluloid compressed thereon, one of said spheres having hobs and the other of said spheres having pitsengaged by said hobs.

16. A playing-ball, comprising an inner rubber sphere having pits andan outer celluloid sphere compressed thereon and having hobs which project into said pits.

17. A playing-ball, having a hard core, a soft sphere upon said core, and a hard shell compressed upon said sphere, one of said sphere and shell elements having hobs which penetrate the other of said elements.

18. A playing-ball, comprising a hard core, a soft sphere thereon provided with pits and a hard shell compressed upon said sphere, said shell having hobs which enter said pits.

19. A playing ball, comprising a hollow metal sphere, a rubber envelop thereon, provided with pits and a celluloid shell upon said envelop and holding the same under compression, said shell having hobs which enter said pits.

20. A playing-ball, comprising a hard core, a soft envelop thereon and a hard shell interlocking with said envelop and holding it under compression.

21. A playing-ball, comprising a hard core, a soft-rubber envelop thereon and a celluloid shell interlocking with said envelop and holding the same under compression.

22. In a playing-ball, an indented springy sphere and a hard shell interfelted with and maintaining said sphere under compression.

23. In a playing-ball, a rubber sphere uniformly rugged throughout its surface and a hard envelop interfelted with and maintaining said sphere under compression.

24. In a playing-ball, a resilient sphere uniformly rugged throughout its surface and a pyroxylin -composition envelop interfelted with and maintaining said sphere under compression.

25. In a playing-ball, a resilient sphere uniformly rugged throughout its surface and a celluloid envelop interfelted with and maintaining said sphere under compression.

26. In a playing-ball, a springy sphere and a hard shell thereon said sphere and shell being interlocked.

27. In a playing-ball, a hard core, a hard shell and a cushion held under compression between said core and shell and interlocked with the latter.

28. In a playing-ball, a hard hollow core, a hard shell, and a cushion held under compression between said core and shell and interlocked with the latter.

29. In a playing-ball, the combination of a metallic core, a celluloid shell, and a resilient cushion held under compression between said core and shell and interlocking with the latter.

ELEAZER KEMPSI-IALL. lVitnesses:

B. O. STIOKNEY, JOHN O. SEIFERT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4116439 *Sep 30, 1976Sep 26, 1978C.F.F. Inc.Pool ball
US5882567 *Feb 16, 1996Mar 16, 1999Acushnet CompanyMethod of making a golf ball having multiple layers
US6103166 *Jan 12, 1998Aug 15, 2000Acushnet CompanyAdhesion of interfaces, forming texture patterns, cores with profiles and applying a covering
US6120393 *Feb 11, 1999Sep 19, 2000Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc.A cover comprising a high acid ionomer resin including a copolymer of >16% by weight of an alpha, beta-unsaturated carboxylic acid and an alpha olefin, of which about 10-90% of the carboxyl groups of the copolymer are neutralized
US6142887 *Feb 20, 1998Nov 7, 2000Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc.A golf ball comprising a core, a spherical mantle comprising a polymeric material and a reinforcing material dispersed therein, and a polymeric outer cover disposed about and adjacent to the mantle
US6155935 *Apr 20, 1999Dec 5, 2000Bridgestone Sports Co., Ltd.Golf ball
US6193618Feb 11, 1999Feb 27, 2001Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc.Low spin golf ball comprising a mantle with a cellular or liquid core
US6244977Nov 12, 1997Jun 12, 2001Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc.Comprising a spherical metal mantle of steel, titanium, chromium, nickel, and alloys thereof; a polymeric outer cover of lower acid ionomer, thermoplastic elastomer, and thermosettable polymer; and cellular core of polyolefin
US6293877Dec 29, 1998Sep 25, 2001Acushnet CompanyGolf ball
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US6432000Mar 13, 2000Aug 13, 2002Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc.Multilayer golf ball with filled inner layer having dual core, liquid core, or wound core
US6435985Nov 9, 2000Aug 20, 2002Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc.Low spin golf ball comprising a mantle with a cellular or liquid core
US6485378Nov 23, 1999Nov 26, 2002Acushnet CompanyGolf ball
US6561927Nov 9, 2000May 13, 2003Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc.Improved two-piece; soft core and a hard cover from blends of one or more specific hard, high stiffness ionomers
US6595874Mar 29, 2001Jul 22, 2003Acushnet CompanySelectively weighted golf ball
US6612939Sep 14, 2000Sep 2, 2003The Top Flite Golf CompanyGolf ball comprising a metal, ceramic, or composite mantle or inner layer
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US6663509Aug 13, 2002Dec 16, 2003Callaway Golf CompanyMultilayer golf ball with filled inner layer having dual core, liquid core, or wound core
US6749789Jul 25, 2000Jun 15, 2004Acushnet CompanyMethod of forming a multilayer golf ball with a thin thermoset outer layer
US6812317Feb 5, 2001Nov 2, 2004Acushnet CompanyLower compression; greater resilience
US6929567Apr 16, 2003Aug 16, 2005Acushnet CompanySelectively weighted golf ball
US7211007Apr 7, 2005May 1, 2007Acushnet CompanyGolf ball having visible non-spherical insert
US7314587Apr 19, 2004Jan 1, 2008Acushnet Companycore, interior covering, exterior covering; variations in hardness; gelation, molding, curing
US7435192Mar 26, 2007Oct 14, 2008Acushnet CompanyGolf ball having visible non-spherical insert
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA63B37/00, A63B37/0097
European ClassificationA63B37/00G12D38