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Publication numberUS699198 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 6, 1902
Filing dateOct 30, 1899
Priority dateOct 30, 1899
Publication numberUS 699198 A, US 699198A, US-A-699198, US699198 A, US699198A
InventorsGeorge Lispenard
Original AssigneeCharles L Curtis, George Lispenard
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bottle-stopper.
US 699198 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

No. 699 198. Patented May 6, I902.

a. LISPENARD.

BOTTLE STOPPER.

(Application filed Oct. 30, 1899.)

Witrtesss'; Inventor, 1 Geagge Ligpenard 5 %V Affornegr.

UNITED STATES PATE T OFFICE.

GEORGE LISPENARD, OF BR o r v, N W YORK, ASSIGNOR OF ONE-HALF TO CHARLESL. CURTIS, OE BROOKLYN, NEW YORK.

BOTTLE-STOPPER.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent Ne. 699,198, dated May 6, 1902.

- Application filed October 30, 1899. Serial No- 735,191. (No model.)

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, GEORGE LISPENARD, a citizen of the United States of America, and a resident of the borough. of Brooklyn, in the city of New York, county of Kings, and State of New York, have invented certain new and. useful Improvements in Bottle-Stoppers, of

To this end the mouth of the bottle is adapted to my invent-ion by providing it with an inwardly-projecting lip and by providing be-- low the lip a seat for the stopper'of'smallerdiameter than the lip, so that the stopper therefor may be smallenough to pass the lip. at the mouth. The stopper is of cork or other. compressible material and is provided with- A locking-wire formed a top of sheet metal. into a ring is fitted between the inwardlyprojecting lip and the sheet-metal top. "This wire, forming nearly a complete ring, rests. I against substantially the entire-periphery ofv the stopper and exerts auniform pressure.

around theperiphery. This uniform pressure around the periphery effectually prevents the stopper from springing away from its seat at any point, andthereby imperfectly sealing the bottle, as is the case with forms of stOpper-fastenings in which the cork is held at two or three points only. Although the wire is formed into a ring, the ends are not brought together and joined in the ring, and the ring can consequently, be readily closed smaller for insertion into and dislodgment from its locking position.-

Referring to the accompanying sheet of drawings, which formsa part of this specification, Figure l is aperspective view showing the mouth of a jar or bottle closed with ing-wire.

a stopper and locking-wire in accordance with my invention. Fig. 2 is a perspective view of one form of locking-wire. Fig. 3 is a perspective view of another form of lock- Fig. 4 is a perspective view of the Fig. 5 is a The bottle is closed by a disk 4, of cork or other suitable material, of such diameter that it will pass the lip at the mouth, but will rest upon the shoulder. The disk of cork is strengthened by a sheet-metal top 5 of the same size. The cork disk and sheet-metal top constitute the stopper .to the bottle; but it is'not essential to somefeatures of this invention that the stopper be of more than one substance,or that it beof any particular shape,

ticular way, except that when in place the top of the stopper at its edge should be slightly below the underside of the inwardly-projecting 1ip, so that the lip andthe top of the stopper form an interior annular groove. A

or thatit be seated to the bottle in any parlocking-wire 6, formed into a ring, fits partly I into the groove thus formed, the upper side of theri'ng bearing against the under side of the lip and the under side of the ring bearing against the top of the stopper.

The wire though bent into substantially a complete circle is not joined at the ends,so as to make an endless-ring, but the ends are left free,

and one end. 7 is bent away from the ring either outwardly, as shown in Figs. 1 and 2, or inwardly, as shown in Fig. 3, whereby it can be seized and the ring thereby dislodged from its locking position. The wire is formed into a circle somewhat larger than the groove, so that it will tend to expand when applied to the bottle and firmly wedge'itself into the groove. In practice-I have found that the under side of the lip may be beveled fifty degrees or even more and that the'wire may project under the lip to the extent of only a third of its diameter. With this relation the wire can be easily lifted out of the groove by the projecting end, and yet will not be dislodged by any pressure applied uniformly to the under side of the stopper, such as would arise from the expansion of'the contents of the bottle.

In the form shown in Fig.1 the bottle-mouth is notched at 8 and the outwardly-turned end of the wire is laid through the notch. The end of the wire needs to project through the notch only slightly, since by holding the bot tle in the hand and bearing down on the bottle, with the end of the wire resting on the edge of a table, the dislodgment of the wire is easily effected.

Inremoving the locking-wire to open the bottle, since the slot has afree vertical opening and the ring engages under a beveled lip, an upward pressure on the projecting end of the wires causes the adjoining end of the ring to be cammed inwardly by the bevel of the lip. The ring is then lifted spirally out of its seat and dislodged progressively around the lip of the bottle.

For convenience is assembling the parts the sheet metal disk has three tongues 9 formed on its periphery. The locking-wire may consequently be laid on the disk and the two put on the bottle at one handling.

It is obvious that a disk 5, provided with the tongues 9, may be usedin connection with the form of wire ring shown in Fig. 3 without departure from my invention.

I have illustrated my invention in a form and size especially suited to fruit-jars; but it is equally applicable to bottles the mouths of which are much smaller and which may or may not have a shoulder to support the cork.

Having described my invention and without limiting myself to the precise details set forth,what I claim as new,and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States, is-

1. The combination with a bottle provided with an inwardly-projecting beveled lip at the mouth thereof, a shoulder within thelmouth and below the lip and a notch in the bottlemouth with a free vertical opening, of a stopper seated on the shoulder, and a locking-wire ring fitted between the lip and the top of the stopper, one end of the wire forming the ring being bent outwardly and laid through the notch, whereby the end of the wire can be lifted vertically through the notch and the ring adjoining the end cammed inwardly by the bevel of the lip when the end is lifted, substantially as described.

2. The combination with a bottle provided with an inwardly-projecting beveled lip at the month thereof, a shoulder within the-mouth and below the lip and a notch in the bottlemouth with a free vertical opening, of a stopper seated on the shoulder, and a locking-wire ring fitted between the lip and the top of the stopper, one end of the wire forming the ring being bent outwardly and laid through the notch, whereby the end of the wire can be lifted vertically through the notch and the ring adjoining the end cammed inwardly by the bevel of the lip when the end is lifted, and the opposite end of the ring being separated from the body of the ring by an interval whereby the diameter of the ring may be reduced to permit its ready disengagement from its locking position, substantially as described.

3. The combination with a bottle, provided with an inwardly-projecting lip at the mouth thereof, of a stopper, composed of a sealingdisk and a superimposed metal cover-disk fitting the mouth of the bottle, the metal cover-disk having tongues projecting therefrom at intervals on its periphery, and a locking-wire ringfitted between the lip and the cover-plate of the stopper and held beneath the tongues of the latter, the ends of the wire not beingjoined into a ring, and a space being left between one end of the wire and the oppositepart of the ring, whereby the diam.- eter of the ring may be reduced to permit its ready dislodgment from its locked position, substantially as described.

Signed by me in the borough of Manhattan, New York, this 27th day of October, 1809.

GEORGE LISPENARD.

\Vitnesses:

FREDERICK RECHT, FRANK H. VILLIE.

Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationB65D39/04