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Publication numberUS700305 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 20, 1902
Filing dateNov 7, 1901
Priority dateNov 7, 1901
Publication numberUS 700305 A, US 700305A, US-A-700305, US700305 A, US700305A
InventorsRobert Cornely
Original AssigneeRobert Cornely
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Machine for fixing spangled material to textile fabrics.
US 700305 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. conNELv.

Id''lHINE-{FUR FIXING SPANGLED MATERIALTO TEXTILE FABRICS,

(Afpliction med Nov. '1, 1901.)

(No Model.)

. 2 sheets-sheet TH: N onms PErERx-co.. Pljomuun. WASHINGTON. c,

No. 7oo,3o5. Patented- May2o, |9o2.

` R. CORNYELY MACHINE Fon Flxma SPANGLED: MATERIAL Tov TEXTILE FABfRlcs.

' (Appiicatio'n md Nov. 7, 1901.) (lo Nudel.)I I v' I Z'Sheefs--Sheef 2., l

VUNITEDr 4STATES ROBERT CORNELY,

PATENT GFFIcF.l

oF PARIS, FRANCE.

MACHINE FOR FIXING SPANGLED MATERIAL TO TEXTILE FABRICS.

sFFcrFreATIoN forming part of Letters Patent 110,706,305, dated May 2o, 1902.

Application led'll'ovemher 7, 1901. Serial No. 81,468. (No model.)

To all whom t mag/concern:

Be it known that"I,RoBFFT CORNFLY, a resident of Paris,Franc`e,h'av`e invented a new and useful Machine for FiXing'S pan gled Material to Textile Fabrics, which is fully set forth in the following specification.

This invention relates tothe class of sewing or embroidering machines in which cording or analogous material is secured to fabric by means of a thread wound around said material and around the thread of stitchin g formed on the fabric. The machines heretofore devised for this purpose, althoughl adapted for securing cord and even beaded work to fabrics, cannot be successfully used with spangle-work. By'my present invention I provide a machine which may be used for successfully attaching Spangled material to fabric in the manner indicated.

The invention will be readily understood upon reference to the accompanying drawings, illustrating the preferred embodiment thereof, and wherein-h Figure l is an elevation, partly in section, of Spangled material such as may be attached to fabric by the machine of l my present invention. Fig. 2 is a top plan and Fig. 3 abottom plan view of said Spangled material. Fig. 4: is an enlarged View, partly in section, of the lower end of the nipple-tube and`as'sociated parts, showing the manner in which the same act in attaching the Spangled material to the fabric. Fig. 5 is a sectional View through the lower part, and Fig. 6 a similar view through the upper part, of the nipple-tube and associated parts. Figs. '7 to 10 are detailed views of parts hereinafter referred to.

The Spangled material is composed of sin gle round'(or otherwise shaped) dat spangles A, which are threaded on a thread b. This. thread b is secured to one or more thin cordsl d by means of a thread g,'Figs. land 3, which passes between the spangles and is wound around the thread l) and the cord d.

This kind of spangle material is produced inV ple, but also to'prevent said material from twisting and turning during its passage through said bar, so that the spangles reach the cloth exactly inthe same arrangement as they come from the spool. Leaving the needle-bar E the spangles traverse the guide a of the nipple, from which they pass to the cloth H.

The Spangled material is wound upon a bobbin M, disposed above the needle-bar E, Fig. 6, in such a manner thatl when it Apasses through the needle-bar E every spangle is directed in a downward position, as shown at Figs. 4 and 6.

The thread-carrier K winds its thread around the thread D of the seam and around the cord or cords d, which hold the spangles; but this work will only be perfect if the thread G is always passed in the space between the spangles A, Fig. 4. It is for this reason that, as above stated, the spangle material must be wound upon the bobbin M in such a manner that the spangles A must assume the inclination shown in Fig. 4 when passing through the needle-bar E, in consequence of which when they reach the cloth the spangles come in the proper position to permit the threadGrv of the thread-carrier K to pass into the space between the spangles, which would not be the case if therspangles were not presented in this manner.

In order to permit the spangles to move freely when passing from the bobbin M and through the needle-bar E and to prevent them from coming into contact with the edge of or catching said needle-bar, whichwould occasion imperfect work, a guiding cylinder or roller n is arranged in such a manner that the Spangled material is introducedat the centerof the needle-bar withouttouching the edge of the same. To assure this, the upper end-of needle-bar is funnel-shaped. In consequence of the elongated outline of a horizontal section of the spangle material the passage through theneedle-bar E must have4 a similar 'elongated shape in order to prevent turning or twisting of said material during its passage through the needle-bar. `This needle-bar has therefore in this particularfnstance an oval sectiomns shown at Fig. 10, and of course the passage through guide a ot' nipple C must have a similar section.

The needle-bar Ein the tube L, which is cylindrical, as usual, is secured by means of a sleeve m, Figs. 7, 8, and 9, which is provided with two thin and flexible legs 2. The oval needle-bar E is passed through the central opening 3 of sleeve m, and by turning the screwo the upper endl of tbe tube L, which is split at one side from opening m upward, (see dotted line, Fig. 6,) as well as the legs 2, are compressed, and the tube E is thus securely fixed in tube L.

It is evident that the invention may be used with a sewing or embroidering machine working with a threaded needle instead of a hookneedle.

l. In a sewing or embroidering machine for attaching Spangled material to fabric, the combination with stitch-forming mechanism of a passage or conduit through which the Spangled material passes to the fabric, said conduit being of elongated cross-section to prevent the Spangled material. from becoming twisted and to present the same in proper position for the binding-thread to pass between the spangles, and a thread-carrier passing a binding-thread around the Spangled material between the spangles and around the stitches formed by the stitch-forming mechanism.

In a sewing or embroidering machine for attaching Spangled material to fabrics, the combination with a hollow needle-bar through which the Spangled material is adapted to pass, aneedlc carried thereby and cooperating stitch-forming mechanism, of a hollow nipple below the needle bar through which the Spangled material passes from the needle-bar to the fabric, the passage through the needlebar and nipple being of elongated cross-sec tion to prevent the Spangled material from becoming twisted and to present the same in propel` position for the binding-thread to pass between the spangles, and a thread-carrier passing abinding-thread around the Spangled material between the spangles and around the stitches formed by the stitch-forming mechanism.

3. In a sewing or embroidering machine for attaching Spangled material to fabrics, the combination with a hollow needle-bar,a needle carried thereby and cooperating stitch-forming mechanism, of a reel above said bar ou which the span gled material is wound, a roller or pulley over which the Spangled material passes to the passage through the needle-bar which is of elongated cross-section to prevent the Spangled material from becoming twisted, and a thread-carrier passinga binding-thread around the Spangled material between the spangles and around the stitches formed by the stitching-forming mechanism.

In testimony whereof I have signed this specification in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

ROBERT CORNELY. iVitnesses:

EDWARD l. MACLEAN,

Ernonen E. LIGHT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5562057 *May 11, 1992Oct 8, 1996Lenson; HarryDish-shaped sequin application apparatus and method for shuttle embroidery machine
US7082884 *Nov 17, 2003Aug 1, 2006Tokai Kogyo Mishin Kabushiki KaishaSequin feeder
US7293512 *Aug 6, 2004Nov 13, 2007Tokai Kogyo Mishin Kabushiki KaishaSequin sewing apparatus
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationD04D1/04