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Publication numberUS704838 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 15, 1902
Filing dateMay 3, 1902
Priority dateMay 3, 1902
Publication numberUS 704838 A, US 704838A, US-A-704838, US704838 A, US704838A
InventorsEleazer Kempshall
Original AssigneeEleazer Kempshall
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Playing-ball.
US 704838 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

(No Model.)

E. KEM PSHALLL PLAYING BALL.

(Applieation' filed May 3, 1902.|

Patented July I5, 1902 Witnesses:

. In ventbr: I ELea/zef KemfS/Iai4 his dittarmey V UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

ELEAZER KEMPSHALL, OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS.

PLAYING-BALL.

$PECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 704,838, dated July 15,1902.

' Application filed May3,1902. $erialhlm105fl28 (Nomodeh) To all whom, it may concern:

Be it known that I, ELEAZER KEMPSHALL, a citizen of the United States, residing in Boston, in the county of Suffolk and State of Massachusetts, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Playing-Balls, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to playing-balls, the object being to provide a ball of improved construction and quality'especially adapted for use in the game of golf.

According to my present improvements the core is in the form of a stiff hollow body,which I usually make of metal, but which in some cases may be made of other materials, and which is incased within a hard and stiff, but springy shell, so that said shell is elastically supported.

In the drawings accompanying and form iug part of this specificatiomFigure 1 illustrates a complete ball, partly broken away, to disclose the construction. Fig. 2 is a view of separated hemispherical metallic core-segments, showing the barbs thereon. Fig. 3 illustrates a preferred method of manufacturing the balls. Fig. etis a fragmentary detail showing the lap-joint of the core-segments.

Similar characters of reference designate like parts in the figures;

A hollow stiff center piece A, preferably of springy metal, is formed, preferably, of hemi-' spherical segments, (designated in Fig. 2 by B and 0, respectively.) Distributed over the outer surface of these segments are struck up barbs or tongues 2, which penetrate and clench together the plastic shell-segments D and Dwhen the components of the ball are assembled. By striking up the material of the center piece A to form the tongues 2 I form openings 8 through said center piece, whereby the resilience thereof is modified and somewhat increased, and these openings also form outlets into or through which some portion of the plastic material of theshell is forced when the latter is pressed into shape. The extent towhich the shell material will flow into or through the openings 3 will depend upon the consistency of the shell and the size and number of the openings.

The tongues 2 of the core are struck up, so that they will point toward each other from each pole of the sphere-that is to'say, they will point away from the poles of sphere and toward the equator thereof, as clearly illustraied in Figs. 2, 3, and 4. By this arrangement the shell-segmentsD D are not only more permanently anchored to the core, but are less liable to separate at their welded edges.

In the present instance the core-segment O is provided at the edge thereof with a reduced circumferential portion or shoulder E, which registers with the circumferential edge of the corresponding hemispherical segment 13, thereby forming a reinforced or lapjoiut F. I y "The outer shell is preferably made of celluloid and consists of hemispherical segments D and D, compacted and preferably welded together upon the inner springy shell. Preferably each of the shells is thin, and the outer is softer and materially thicker than the inner, as well'as having a springy quality. The parts are preferably assembled between heating-dies G and H, which are brought together with great force, so as to efiect the weld. By reason of the pressure portions of the plastic celluloid are caused to protrude into the openings 3 in the inner shell and may form keys 4 on the interior of the latter. The tongues br barbs 2 penetrate and clench the celluloid segments together, the barbs upon one of the hemispheres pointing toward those of the other, so that it becomes impossible to separate the segments.

It will be seen that myinvention is also of value in caseswhere the segments are intended to be held together bycement without welding, in which event the edges of the segments D and D will be kept pressed together by the oppositely-pointing tongues 2, which are embedded into the material of the shell while the latter is in a plastic condition,

and also by the shell being anchored to the core.

.It is to be understood that the extent to which the shell material will flow into or through the perforation of the hollow core will depend, of course, upon the consistency of the material of the shell and the size and number of the perforations.

It is tobe-understood that While the core in this application is shown as made of hemispherical segments of metal with struck-up tongues or fins, and which is provided with openings to receive the surplus material of the shell when the latter is compressed upon the core'a continuous integral hard material shell which is provided with distributed perforations and projecting anchoring devices of any form for the purpose specified may be employed within the scope and spirit of this invention.

The herein-described process is made the subject-matterofmy pending application,No. 104,318, filed April 23, 1902.

Having described my invention, I claim- 1. A hollow playin g-ball consisting entirely of two thin shells, whereof the inner shell is of hard, springy material, and the outer is thicker than the inner and consists of hard, plastic material; said inner shell having perforations through which the material of the outer shell protrudes.

2. A playing-ball consisting entirely of a thin, springy perforated metal shell, and a thicker shell thereon formed of hard springy plastic material.

3. A playing-ball consisting entirely of a thin, springy perforated metal shell, and a thicker shell thereon formed of hard springy plastic material, the material of said outer shell protruding into said perforations.

4. A hollow playing-ball consisting wholly of two thin shells, whereof the inner is thin- 7. A playing-ball comprising a complete shell having perforations and a shell thereon consisting of segments of plastic material welded together at their edges; portions of the plastic material entering said perforations and locking said shells together, and thereby preventing rupture of said plastic shell at the weld.

8. A playing-ball comprising a shell having barbs and a shell formed of joined segments of plastic material said barbs being embedded in said plastic material and preventing separation of said segments.

9. A playing-ball comprising a thin metal shell having barbs and a shell formed of welded segments of plastic material; said barbs being embedded in said plastic material and preventing separation of said segments.

10. A playing-ball comprising a thin metal shell having barbs, and a shell formed of joined segments of celluloid; said barbs being embedded in said celluloid and preventing separation of said segments.

11. A playing-ball comprising a thin perforated metal shell having barbs and a shell formed of welded segments of plastic material; said barbs being embedded in said plas- ,tic material and preventing separation of

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US6120393 *Feb 11, 1999Sep 19, 2000Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc.A cover comprising a high acid ionomer resin including a copolymer of >16% by weight of an alpha, beta-unsaturated carboxylic acid and an alpha olefin, of which about 10-90% of the carboxyl groups of the copolymer are neutralized
US6142887 *Feb 20, 1998Nov 7, 2000Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc.A golf ball comprising a core, a spherical mantle comprising a polymeric material and a reinforcing material dispersed therein, and a polymeric outer cover disposed about and adjacent to the mantle
US6193618Feb 11, 1999Feb 27, 2001Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc.Low spin golf ball comprising a mantle with a cellular or liquid core
US6244977Nov 12, 1997Jun 12, 2001Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc.Comprising a spherical metal mantle of steel, titanium, chromium, nickel, and alloys thereof; a polymeric outer cover of lower acid ionomer, thermoplastic elastomer, and thermosettable polymer; and cellular core of polyolefin
US6293877Dec 29, 1998Sep 25, 2001Acushnet CompanyGolf ball
US6309312Nov 7, 1997Oct 30, 2001Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc.Golf ball comprising a metal mantle having a hollow interior
US6432000Mar 13, 2000Aug 13, 2002Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc.Multilayer golf ball with filled inner layer having dual core, liquid core, or wound core
US6435985Nov 9, 2000Aug 20, 2002Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc.Low spin golf ball comprising a mantle with a cellular or liquid core
US6485378Nov 23, 1999Nov 26, 2002Acushnet CompanyGolf ball
US6500076May 1, 2001Dec 31, 2002Acushnet CompanyWound golf balls with high specific gravity centers
US6561927Nov 9, 2000May 13, 2003Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc.Improved two-piece; soft core and a hard cover from blends of one or more specific hard, high stiffness ionomers
US6595874Mar 29, 2001Jul 22, 2003Acushnet CompanySelectively weighted golf ball
US6612939Sep 14, 2000Sep 2, 2003The Top Flite Golf CompanyGolf ball comprising a metal, ceramic, or composite mantle or inner layer
US6638184Aug 20, 2001Oct 28, 2003The Top-Flite Golf CompanyThree piece golf ball with a metal center
US6663509Aug 13, 2002Dec 16, 2003Callaway Golf CompanyMultilayer golf ball with filled inner layer having dual core, liquid core, or wound core
US6893361Mar 12, 2003May 17, 2005Acushnet CompanyMultilayer golf ball with hoop-stress layer
US6929567Apr 16, 2003Aug 16, 2005Acushnet CompanySelectively weighted golf ball
US6986717Sep 30, 2002Jan 17, 2006Acushnet CompanyWound golf balls with high specific gravity centers
US7211007Apr 7, 2005May 1, 2007Acushnet CompanyGolf ball having visible non-spherical insert
US7435192Mar 26, 2007Oct 14, 2008Acushnet CompanyGolf ball having visible non-spherical insert
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA63B37/0003, A63B37/0097
European ClassificationA63B37/00G12D38