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Publication numberUS705606 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 29, 1902
Filing dateJun 15, 1893
Priority dateJun 15, 1893
Publication numberUS 705606 A, US 705606A, US-A-705606, US705606 A, US705606A
InventorsHerbert A Joslin
Original AssigneeAndrew G Paul
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Paper-drying machine.
US 705606 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

No, 705,600. I

' A. G. PAUL & H.'A.JOSLIN.

PAPER DRYING MACHINE. (Appumion ggd 'June 15, 189m' 3 Sheets-Shut I.

(No Model.)

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No. 70s-.60s. Patented July 29, |902. A. a. PAUL 0 H. A. JosLm.

PAPER DRYING MACHINE.

(Application led June 16, 1898.) (No Model.) 3 Sheets-Sheet 2.

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No. 705,606. Patented' luly 29, :902. A. G. PAUL a H. A. .msLm` PAPER ummm momma.

(Application iled June 15, 1893.)

(No Model.) 3 Sheets-Sheet 3.

WITNESSES: l VENTORS I ATTONEYSv UNITED STATES I PATENT OFFICE.

ANDREW GrPAUL AND HERBERT A. J OSLIN, OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS;

SAID .IOSLIN ASSIGNOR T O SAID PAUL.

PAPER-DRYING MACHINE.

srscrrrcarron forming part of' Letters Patent No. 705,606, dated July 2e, 1902.

Application led Tune 15, 1893. Serial No. 477,635. (No model.)

suitable way, as by steam, and in which the material to be dried is pressed against the dryingcylinders by means of a suitable ironer,

such as an endless belt of canvas or felt or other suitable material, the ironer 4being caused to move with the paper and to hold the paper in close contact with the cylinder,

thereby becoming an ironer for the paper and y preventing the air from getting in betweenl the paper and the drying cylinder and in which the material to be dried and the ironer are separated between the ,cylinders and are fed from one cylinder to another on separate feeding or supporting devices. In these drying-machines when the material being dried is brought into contact with the drying-cylinder and forced against that cylinder by the ironing-belt some of the moisture which is expelled from the material is absorbed by the ironing-belt. The ironing-belt is thus more or less wet when it passes away from the first fer cylinders. Between the successive drying-cylinders the ironing-belt is run over intermediate rollers. The paper or material to be dried is also passed over intermediate rollers upon its way from one drying-cylinder to the next drying-cylinder. These intermediate rollers have been so arranged that the rollers lfor the ironing-belt have been below the rollers for the material to be dried. In passing over these intermediate rollers on its way from one drying-cylinder to another the ironing-belthas thus been underneath the material to be dried. As a result of this arrangement the vapor which rises from the ironing-belt while it is passing over the intermediate rollers and between the cylinders rises directly up to the paper or other material which is passing over the upper rollers `and is absorbed by that material or is deposited on its surface as a coating. 'Ihisinterferes with the drying of the material, as alreadyexplained, and is apt to prevent the uniform drying of the same and may cause curlingof the material.

One object of our invention is to facilitate the drying of the ironing-belt between successive drying-cylindersthat is, during the time the drying-belt is passing from one drying-cylinder to the nextdrying-cylinder-and also to prevent any moisture that passes from the ironing-belt at this stage from coming into contact with the material to be dried.

In these machines also the vapor which rises or is driven olf` from the ironing-belt while it ispassing to or around the drying-cylinders naturally rises in the machine and is liable, therefore, to come into contact with some other portion of the ironing-belt, especially that portion which is between the intermediate rollers, and to bereabsorbed by or deposited upon the surface of the ironing-belt at that point. This retards the drying of the ironer and therefore of the paper or other material. Another object of ourinvention is to prevent this difficulty by removing such vapor or moisture, and thus preventing its reabsorption by or deposit upon any other part of the ironer.

Our invention consists, rst, of a suitable aircirculating device, such as is hereinafter described, for removing the vapor or moisture that rises from the ironing-belt while it is passing between the cylinders and for facilitating the drying of the ironing-belt during the time of its passing from one drying-cylinder to another by producing a forced circulation of air over the surface off the ironing-belt or through the ironing-belt itself, whereby the vapor or moisture that' rises from the ironing-beltwhile it is passing between the cylinders is prevented from coming into contact with the material to be dried, and the moisture is more thoroughly, if `not completely, removed from the ironing belt between successive heating cylinders, and the ironing-belt is thus more thoroughly dried before being brought again into contact with the material passing through the machine.

IOO

Our invention consists, secondly,in suitable apparatus fory removing the'vapor or moisture that rises from the ironing-belt While it is passing to or around the drying-cylinders, and thus preventing its reabsor'ption by or deposit upon some other portion of the ironing-belt.

Our invention is fully illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which-'- Figure l is a front elevation of a dryingmachine embodying our invention. Fig. 2 is a top or plan view of the same, showing the material broken away. Fig. 3 is a vertical cross-section on the line 3 3 of Fig. l. Fig. 4 is a front elevation of a drying-machine, showing a modiication of the invention. Fig. 5 is a top or plan View of thesame, showing the material broken away; and Fig. 6

shows another modification of our` invention.

Similar letters indicate similar parts in the different iigures.

Referring to the drawings, a is the frame of the machine.

b, c, CZ, and e are successive drying-cylinders, which are mounted in the machine in the usual way and are adapted to be heated by any appropriate means, as by steam. Cylinders b and e are shown only in part.

f is the paper or other material that is being dried in the machine. y

g is the ironing-belt, which is made of felt or canvas or other suitable material. It is an endless belt made and operated in the usual Way- Zz Zt are rollers for supporting the material to be dried as it passes between adjoining cylinders. t' t' are rollers for supporting the ironing-belt as it passes from one cylinder to the next cylinder. These rollers Zt Zz and are mounted in the machine by any suitable means, as by the arms j.

Zr, 7c Zt are rollers for supporting the ironingbelt on its return from the last cylinder to the first cylinder.

The parts so far enumerated are all old and their arrangement and operation are well understood, and no claim is made herein to such parts or their combination.

Underneath the ironing-belt between the rollers t' t the space is shut in by means of walls or side pieces Z Z and abottom piece m, forming a kind of box, which covers and incloses the under side of the ironing-belt Yat that place. These side and bottom pieces are preferably made of metal. They are constructed so that they come as close to the ironer and the rollers t' t' as possible without touching them. An exhaust-pipe n is connected with this box at any suitable or convenient place. In Fig. l it is shown as connected with one of these boxes at the bottom and with another box at the side. The pipe 'n is provided with an exhausting device o. The exhauster may be of any desired construction-such, for example, as an exhaustfan. The exhauster is not shown in Fig. l, but is represented-at o in Fig. 4.

When the machine is running, the ex- -hauster is put into operation, the air in the inclosed space or box formed by the parts ZZ and m is drawn out through the exhaust-pipe n, and a current of air is thus drawn through the ironer as it passes between the cylinders. Whatever moisture is given ott from theironer at this placeis sucked down into the exhaustpipe and out through the exhauster. Moreover, this forced circulation of air down through the ironer not only carries with it such moisture as would naturally escape from the ironer at that point, but removes a large Vpart of the moisture which would otherwise remain in the ironer, and thus is an efficient agent in drying the ironer on its passage between adjoining cylinders. The moisture passing off from the ironer is also prevented from coming into contact with the material that is being dried.

In place of the construction shown in Fig. 1 between the cylinders LZ and e the construction shown `in the same figure between the cylinders b and c and c and d may be employed. In this case the side pieces or walls Z Z are made to extend down until they come close to the ironer g near the bottom of the machine, as shown at p, and they are also continued around the cylinders, as shown at q. In this construction the pieces Z Zoompletely inclose the space between the ironer as it passes over the rollers t t, the cylinders, and the ironer as it returns back through the machine. An exhaust-pipe n is connected with this inclosed chamber and is provided with a suitable exhausting device. construction the moisture is not only removed, as already explained, from the ironing-belt between the rollers 7l t', but it is also removed from the ironing-belt at all points in its passage around the drying-cylinders. The moisture given off from one part of the ironing-belt is in this way prevented from being reabsorbed by or deposited upon some other portion of the same and the drying of the ironing-belt on the cylinders is expedited. Another form of our improved apparatus isl shown in Fig. 4. The ironing-belt between the rollers@l t' is covered or inclosed by a box or partition placed above the ironing-belt instead of below it. This box consists of a top piece r and side pieces s s and end pieces' t t. Theside pieces extend down close to the ironing-belt. One of the end pieces also extends down close to the ironing-belt. The other end piece extends down about half-way, thus In this IOO IIO

leaving an opening in that end of the boxor chamber for the admission of air. The exhaust-pipe n is connected with the end of this box opposite the opening. In this construction a constant circulation of airis maintained over the top of the ironing-belt, the moisture rising from the belt is drawn into the exhaustpipe, and a current of air is also circulated through the ironing-belt, thus removing the moisture more effectually. If desired, both ends of the covering-box may be extended down close to the ironing-belt, in which case all the air will be drawn through the belt.

Our improved apparatus produces a forced circulation of air through or over the surface of the ironing-belt, by means of which the moisture which would naturally rise from the 4ironing-belt is carried off without coming into contact with the material which is being dried or with any other part of the ironer itself,

and a very much greater proportion of the moisture is removed from the ironing-belt than if no forced circulation were produced, thus causing the ironing-belt to be eectually dried. i

The apparatus which we prefer to use is shown in Figs. 4. and 5 of the drawings; but other forms of apparatus can be employed. For example, the diaphragm or partition between the material to be dried and the ironing-belt could be entirely dispensed with and no inclosed box or chamber be used; but a circulation of air could be created and maintained between the material and the ironingbelt suliicient to carry off the moisture from the latter and to prevent such vapor or any material part of it from coming into contact with the material to be dried. This circulation could be produced either by a blowing` device serving to blow air between the material and the belt or by an exhausting device serving to suck air between them. Such a blowing device is shown in Fig. 6, in which w represents a jet having a long narrow mouth or aperture extending substantially all the way from one roller 7i, to the other roller 72 and n represents a pipe leading from an airpump or other device for forcing a current of air through the jet w.

The advantages secured by our invention are therefore the more thorough removal of the moisture from the ironing-belt, the preventing of the vapor from coming into contact with the material to be dried, the quicker and more economical drying of the material passing through the machine, the reduction of the number of dryingcylinders needed in the machine, the increase in the amount of material that can be dried on agiven machine in a given time, the more uniform drying of the material, the prevention of curling of the same, the prevention of the marking of the material by any drops of Water that might otherwise be deposited on the bottom of the material and might be pressed between the material and the belt, the saving of steam in the drying-cylinders, and the reduction of the steam-pressure required in the cylinders.

In the old machines the paper or other material was apt to be less thoroughly dried on its under side than on its upper side. This would result in the subsequent curling of the material. Our invention obviates this diiiculty.

Having now described our invention, what we claim as new, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is

l. In a drying-machine for drying paper or other material, in combination with revolving drying-cylinders and an ironing-belt moving with the cylinders and suitable means for supporting the material `to be dried and the ironer between the drying-cylinders so as to separate them between the cylinders, an aircirculating device for producing a circulation of air close to the ironing-belt whereby the vapor or moisture that rises from the ironingbelt while it is passing between the cylinders is prevented from coming into contact with the material to be dried and the ironing-belt is more thoroughly dried, substantially as set forth.

2. In a drying-machine for drying paper or other material, in combination with revolving drying-cylinders and an ironingsbelt mova ing with the cylinders and suitable means for supporting the material to be dried and the ironing-belt between the drying-cylinders so as to separate them between the cylinders, an exhausting device for producing a circulation of air close to the ironing-belt whereby the vapor or moisture that rises from the ironing= belt while it is passing between the cylinders is prevented from coming into contact with the material to be dried and the ironing-belt is more thoroughly dried, substantially as set forth. Y

3. In a drying-machine for drying paper or other material, in combination with revolv' ing drying-cylinders and an ironer moving with the cylinders below the material to be dried and suitable means for supporting the material to be dried and the ironer between the drying-cylinders so as to separate them be-` tween the cylinders, a box or chamber inclosing or covering the ironer between the cylinders, an exhaust-pipe leading from the box or chamber, and an exhausting device connected with the exhaust-pipe, substantially as set forth. a

4. In a drying-machine for drying paper or other material, in combination with revolving drying-cylinders and an `ironer moving `with the cylinders below the material to be dried and suitable means for supporting the material to be dried and the ironer between the drying-cylinders so as to keep them separate between the cylinders, a box or chamber inclosing or covering the ironer between and upon the cylinders, an exhaust-pipe 4leading from the box or chamber, and an exhausting device connected with the exhaust-pipe, substantially as set forth.

ANDREW G. PAUL. HERBERT A. JOSLIN.

Witnesses:

I. R. CLARK, A. E. LITTLE.

IIO

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4483083 *Aug 18, 1982Nov 20, 1984Beloit CorporationDrying and runnability for high speed paper machines
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationD21F5/02