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Publication numberUS710753 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 7, 1902
Filing dateJul 30, 1902
Priority dateJul 30, 1902
Publication numberUS 710753 A, US 710753A, US-A-710753, US710753 A, US710753A
InventorsRichard B Cavanagh
Original AssigneeKempshall Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf-ball.
US 710753 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

No. 7|0,753. v Patented Oct. 7, I902.

B. B. CAVANAGH.

GOLF BALL.

(Application filed July 30, 1902.) (No Model.)

THE Norms PETERS ca mom-Una, vusumctom u c.

UNITED STATES Permit KITFICE.

RICHARD l3. CAVANAGII, OF IVASIIINGTON, DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, AS-

SIGNOR, BY MESNE ASSIGNMENTS, TO THE IIEMPSIIALL MANUFACTUR- ING COMPANY, A CORPORATION OENEIV JERSEY.

GOLF-=BALL.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 710,753, dated October '7, 1902.

Application filed July 30, 1902- Serial No. 117,607. (No model.)

T0 at whmn it may concern.-

Be it known that I, RICHARD B. CAVANAGH, a citizen of the United States, residing in Washington, in the District of Columbia, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Golf-Balls, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to golf-balls; and its object is to reduce the cost and improve the durability and other qualities of the balls.

Some of the golf-balls now in use are so lively that they meet with disfavor with many players, since it is impossible to make accurate puts and approaches. Myimproved ball combines the feature of exceedingly low price and durability and avoids the disadvantage of being too lively for a short game, while well adapted for a long flight when given a heavy blow.

In the accompanying drawings, Figure 1 shows, partly in section, one form of golf-ball made in accordance with my improvements. Fig. 2 shows tense windings of tape forming part of the filling of the ball.

For a center piece A, I preferably employ a sphere consisting of sawdust, ground cork, or other comminuted material mixed with a compound of glue or glycerin or any other This suitable viscous or colloid mixture. sphere is preferably formed under great pressure, so that the comminut ed material is compressed and the whole sphere is highly compacted. The comminuted material is indicated at A and the cement at A. The sphere A, I inclose in windings B, of tape or bands, preferably elastic and highly tensioned. For these windings rubber bands may be used, if desired. The layer B holds the sphere A under pressure and aids in the flight of the ball. To the windings I apply a coating or layer of shellac mixture 0. may be thin and owing to its adhesiveness and resiliency improves the playing qualities of the ball, besides retaining the windings B firmly in place, and thereby rendering the ball more stable under a blow;' Upon the layer O, I apply a cover E, of gutta-percha,

'of compression;

This coating or layer which adheres to the shellac mixture and preferably. holdsthe filling of the ball in a state The shellac mixture forms a reinforcement for the gutta-percha shell. If desired, the windings may be coated with shellac mixture during the winding operation so that the shellac may permeate the sphere I3, as well as forming a coat thereon.

It will be seen that the sphere A is provided with a layer B of longitudinally-tensioned windings, whereby undue disturbance of said sphere under a blow is prevented and undue distortion of the filling and cover of the ball is avoided. The comminuted material and the glue compound are sufficiently springy to enable the ball to make a long flight under a heavy blow, while the ball is comparatively dead under a light blow, thereby meeting the requirements of the game.

Variations may be resorted to within the scope of my improvements. v

Having described my invention, I claim- 1. A golf-ball comprising a sphere of compressed comminuted material, a layer of rubber thereon, a layer of shellac mixture, and a cover of'guttapereha.

2. A golf-ball comprising a sphere of comminuted material mixed with a compound of glue and glycerin, tense windings of binding material thereon, a layer of shellac mixture upon said windings, and a hardcover.

3. A golf-ball comprising a sphere of comminuted compressed cork, a layer of windings of elastic material thereon, a coating of shellac mixture, and acover of gutta-percha.

4. A golf-ball comprising a yielding sphere,

layer of tense windings of elastic material upon said sphere, a layer of shellac mixture upon said windings, and a cover of plastic material.

5. A golf-ball comprising a sphere of compressed comminuted material mixed with glue, a layer of tense elastic windings thereon, a layer of shellac mixture upon said windings, and a gutta-percha cover.

6. A golf-ball comprising a sphere of guttapercha, and a mixture of comminuted mateupon said windings, and a hard cover h0lding said members under compression.

RICHARD B. OAVANAGH.

VVit-nesses:

EDGAR M. KITCHIN, JOHN L. FLETCHER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4936587 *Dec 4, 1980Jun 26, 1990Acushnet CompanyGolf ball
US5080367 *Jun 26, 1990Jan 14, 1992Acushnet CompanyGolf ball
US6761846Dec 14, 2000Jul 13, 2004Callaway Golf CompanyMethod of making golf balls having a protrusion center
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA63B37/0097, A63B37/0003
European ClassificationA63B37/00G12D38