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Publication numberUS715185 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 2, 1902
Filing dateApr 19, 1902
Priority dateApr 19, 1902
Publication numberUS 715185 A, US 715185A, US-A-715185, US715185 A, US715185A
InventorsDwight M Warner
Original AssigneeDwight M Warner
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Brick-drying shed.
US 715185 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Patented Dec. 2, I902.

D. M. WARNER.

BRICK DRYING SHED.

(Application filed Apr. 19, 1902.1

(No Medal.)

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UNITED STATES PATENT OFFrcn.

DWIGHT M. WARNER, OF SPARTA, MICHIGAN.

BRICK-DRYING SHED.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 715,185, dated December 2, 1902. Y

' Application filed April 19, 1902. Serial No. 103,785. (No model.) 7

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, DWIGHT M. WARNER,

a citizen of the United States, residing at Sparta, in the county of Kent and State of' Michigan, have invented new and useful 1m provement-s in Brick-Drying Sheds, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates 'to improvements in. brick-drying sheds for brick-yards, and more Hitherto it has been found difficult to erect a suitable and satisfactory shed which shall be strong enough to withstand the effects of storms and high winds, simple and cheaply constructed, and one wherein the brick will be thoroughly and entirely sheltered from rain and other destroying influences. vention fills all these requirements and aitords absolute protection for the new brick against storms, high winds, be. It can be cheaply and easily constructed and forms when completed a strong firmly-bracedstructure, beneath which the bricks may be rapidly dried in the outside air ready for the kilns. It is intended to cover the entire brick-yard or the space wherein the bricks are covered to protect them or uncovered to permit the sun and wind to dry them in a remarkably short space of time considering the area inclosed,

and when uncovered a perfect ventilation is permitted.

My invention consists of a skeleton framework for roofs extending over the entire space in which the bricks are to be dried, this framework so braced as to remain unaffected by 'strong winds or storms.

My invention also consists in a skeleton- My in-' shed provided with means whereby the flext ble covering may be protected when rolled up. My invention further consists in means in connection with the flexible covering whereby the covering may quickly be extended over the skeleton framework or as quickly rolled up to uncover the bricks and permit them to be dried.

4 My invention also consists in certain other details of construction and combinations of parts,which willbe more fully described hereinafter and particularlyset forth in the flexible covering when it has been rolled up.

My invention is constructed as follows:

Rows of posts 1 1, of any suitable height, are firmly embedded in the earth, the posts being spaced apart from each other a sufficient distance to afford stability. Three rows of posts 1 1 are shown in the drawings, which are sufficient to fully illustrate the invention. These rows are placed apart from one another for a suitable distance, and between these rows are placed the supporting means for the pallet-boards, on which are placedthe bricks as they, come from the machine. These supports for the pallet-boards consist of rowsof posts connected with one another by means of strips secured to the posts at their upper ends. The outside strips 2 2 of the series of supports may be secured to the posts 1 1, as shown; but my invention does not relate to this construction, and hence it is thought that further description is unnecessary. The posts 1 1 inclose the area desired for the drying-yard. Plates or stringers 3 3 connect the posts 1 1 at their upper ends, to which the plates or stringers are secured in any approved manner. Rafters 4t 4, inclining to ward each other at any desirable pitch, extend from" the posts 1 1, to which they are secured, toward the central point between two rows of posts, at which central point they are united in the usual manner to a horizontallyextending ridge-pole or to one another, as the roll-roof AL case may be. These rafters span the space inclosed'between the two rows of posts. It will be noticed that from the central row of posts 1 1 extend rafters in opposite directions. This not only serves to economize material, but also looks the sheds or framework together, enabling it to withstand shocks and affording a more solid structure than if the two roofs were separately supported. Extending down a short distance from the peak or ridge of the framework is a short or quarter roof 5, permanently secured to the rafters 4 4, of short boards or any other desirable material. This roof I will call the ridge-cap. Heavy wires or metallic rods or strips of timber 6 6 run parallel with and a short distance below each rafter. At their lower ends the wires are passed through and are secured to the posts 1 l and at their upper ends to the rafter opposite the one beneath which they extend. Any suitable tightening means may be seen red to the wires at their lower ends 011 the opposite side of the posts 1 1, whereby they are kept taut. A heavy wire or rod 7 extends parallel with the peak of the roof and at right angles to the wires 6 6. This wire 'Zislocated beneath the ridge-cap 5 and is secured tightly to the lower surfaces of the rafters. At either end it is provided with a suitable means for tighteningittokeepittaut. Thiswireextends theentire length of the shed and is fastened to each rafter by means of a staple preferably. This construction completes the framework. The flexible covering therefor consists of a This roll-roof is secured at its upper edge to the wire 7, extending longitudinally of the structure, by means of rings or gronietsS 8, secured to the edge of the rollcoveriug. The material composing this rollroof is of canvas in'thc present instance; but it: is obvious that any other suitable flexible material would be just as efficient. The canvas is sewed or otherwise secured together in sections, whereby when one section is irreparably injured a new section can be substituted therefor without the necessityof substituting an entirely new covering. A wide herb is formed at the opposite end of the can; vas, and in this hem orloop is placed a pipe length comprising a plurality of sections secured to one another by means of unions or other desirable means. This pipe is secured iri'any desired manner to the canvas to prevent it from turning in the hem. It will be evident thata rod, a shaft, a pole, or any similar form of device might be used in place of the pipe; but I prefer the latter for the reason that I obtain the desired size with the minimum of weight thereby. The roof, and

pipe extend the entire lengthof the structure, and each end of thepipe, which extends for a short distance beyond the side edges of the canvas, is provided with a square surface either directly upon the pipe or by means of plugs 8 8, secured'in the projecting ends of the pipe. These squared ends are adapted to receive crank-handles 9 9, with which to roll upor un'roll the canvas roofing. The canvas roll-roof is located, as seen, between the wires 6 6 and the rafters 4 4, which serve to guide it in its movements. This covering is thus thoroughly under control and cannot be injured or destroyed by wind or storm, on account of the fact that it is efficiently held between the wires 6 6 and the rafters 4 4 and can Withstand a very great pressure of wind. The shaft 7 is adapted to be turned by the cranks 9 9 at either end of the structure,

whereby to cover or uncover the space inclosed.

Pivotally located near the upper ends of the outside rafters 44, at the peak of the roof, are latches 10 10 in the form of hooks, which are adapted to retain'the canvas when rolled up beneath the ridgecap 5 where it is protected.

Two men only are required to uncover the structures,,one at each end to manipulate the crank-arms 9 9, and when it is desired to cover the structures all that is necessary is to raise the latches, whereupon the weight of theroofing will cause it to roll down between the wires 66 and the rafters 4 4, unrolling as it descends.

This construction described permits of the new brick and tilingbeingquickly covered to protect them from storms, winds, &G., and quickly and easily uncovered to expose them to the action of the sun and light airs.

It is evident that many changes might be made in the form and arrangement of the parts described without departing from. the spirit and scope of myinvention, and ,hence I do not wish to limit myself to the exact construction set forth. Therefore,

Having thus fully described-my invention, what I claim as new, anddesire to; secure. by Letters Patent, is

1. A brick-dryingshedcomprisinga skeleton framework, a ridge-cap locatedthereon, guidingand supportingmeans secured to and beneath the framework, a flexible covering securedbeneath the ridge-cap, the covering adaptedto extend over the entire space inclosed. by the framework and be supported upon and. guided by the aforesaid means.

2. A structure of the character described consisting of a skeleton framework, a ridgecap on the framework, guidingmeanslocated directly beneath and, connected with the framework, a covering, secured beneaththe ridge-cap and adapted to be guided in its movements by the guiding means, the cover ing capable of extending over. the. entire framework andmeans for retainingthe covering beneath the ridge-cap, when out of use against gravitation.

3. A structure of the. character described, comprising a skeleton framework, a ridgecapon the framework, aroll-covering secured beneath the ridge-cap andframework, rods located beneath the framework and roll-cov- 'ering, the roll-covering adapted to rest upon and be guided bythe rods, and means-where by to roll up the covering.

4. A structure ofthe character described comprising a framework, a ridge-cap on the framework, a roll-covering secured at one end beneath the ridge-cap, guiding-rods secured to and extending beneath the framework, the roll-covering adapted to rest upon and be guided by the rods, the covering adapted to extend over the entire surface inclosed by the framework, and independent pivoted means for retaining the covering in its rolled-up position when desired.

5. A structure of the character described, comprising a framework, a ridge-cap secured on the framework, "a rod extending longitudinally of and secured to the framework, a flexible covering, one end of which is secured to the rod, guiding means secured to the framework and extending thereunder, the flexible covering resting upon and guided by the guiding means, and means for rolling up the flexible covering.

6. A structure of the character described comprising a framework, a ridge-cap on the framework, a flexible covering extending over the space inclosed by the framework, the covering secured at one end beneath the top roof, guiding means secured to and extending beneath the framework, a shaft secured to the opposite end of the covering, the covering adapted to be supported on the guiding-rods and below the framework when in an ex tended position and means for rolling up the covering from its extended position.

7. A structure of the character described, comprising rafters, supporting means located at their lower ends, a ridge-cap secured to the rafters, a flexible covering one end of which is secured beneath the ridge-cap, a shaft attached to the opposite end of the flexible covering, guiding means secured to and beneath the rafters and to the supporting means, the flexible covering resting on and guided and contained between the guiding means and rafters, means on the shaft whereby to roll up the flexible covering and a pivoted latch for retaining the covering in its rolled position beneath the ridge-cap.

8. A structure of the characterdescribed, comprising a plurality of suitably-supported rafters, a ridgecap formed thereupon, a rod extending approximately the entire length of the structure, a flexible covering, one edge of which is secured to the rod, a shaft secured to the opposite edge of the covering, the covering adapted to extend under the rafters, cranks on the ends of the shaft,guiding means located beneath the rafters between which guiding means and the rafters the covering is supported and independent pivoted latches for retaining. the covering while in its rolled position beneath the ridge-cap.

9. A structure of the character described comprisinga plurality of rows of posts, plates connecting-the posts, rafters supported on the posts, each of the posts in one row adapted to support a plurality of rafters, a ridge-cap on the upper ends of the rafters, the ridgecap binding the rafters together, a flexible covering secured beneath the ridge-cap, guiding means beneath the rafters between which latter and the guiding means the flexible covering is contained and means for raising and lowering the flexible covering.

10. A brick-drying shed comprising a skeleton framework, a ridge cap located on the framework, guide-rods secured to and beneath the framework, a gravitating covering for the space inclosed by the framework, the covering supported upon and guided by the rods, independent pivoted latches secured to the framework for retaining the covering beneath the ridge-cap when not in use, and means secured to the latches to operate them from the ground either singly or simultaneously to release the covering and permit it to automatically cover the space inclosed by the framework.

11. A brick-drying shed comprising framework, rods located beneath and parallel with the framework, the ends of the rods secured to opposite portions thereof, and a flexible covering located in the space between the rods and the framework, the flexible covering supported and guided by the rods, means for retaining the covering in small compass, the covering when extended adapted to protect the space inclosed by the shed.

12. Abrick-dryingshed comprisingaframe work, a ridge-cap thereon, rods located beneath and secured to the framework, a rollcovering for each side of the framework, the covering supported and guided by the rods and located between the rods and framework, independent pivoted latches for retaining the covering in a rolled-up position, means secured to the latches for releasing the covering, and means secured to the free end of the covering to cause it to automatically spread over the space inclosed by the framework.

In testimony whereof I have signed this specification in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

DWIGHT M. WARNER.

Witnesses:

A. B. CHENEY, CHAS. H. Looms.

IIO

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2639550 *Sep 20, 1947May 26, 1953Arthur G MckeeApparatus for growing tender plants
US3203143 *Aug 14, 1962Aug 31, 1965Swenson Oscar JAutomobile shelter
US4858395 *Aug 5, 1988Aug 22, 1989Mcquirk KyleFire protection for structures
US5311710 *Mar 11, 1992May 17, 1994Eaton Jay SPortable curing cell
US5373861 *Sep 29, 1992Dec 20, 1994Eaton; Jay S.System and method for casing tobacco
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationE04H15/18