Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS716724 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 23, 1902
Filing dateAug 5, 1902
Priority dateAug 5, 1902
Publication numberUS 716724 A, US 716724A, US-A-716724, US716724 A, US716724A
InventorsValdemar F Laessoe, Luther D Lovekin
Original AssigneeValdemar F Laessoe, Luther D Lovekin
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Oil-burner.
US 716724 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y Patented Dec. 23, i902. V. F. LSSOE L. D. LUVEKIN.

2 Sheets-Sheet l.

i fno. 7:6324.

vUIL BURNER.

(Application tiled Aug. 46, 1902.) (no model \m. nml

no. 716,724. l Patented nec. 23, wuz..

v; r. LAssoE a L. n.5Lovl-z'm; v

DILBUBNEB.

- (Application med Aug, 5, 1902.)

(Nn Model.)

A 2 Sheets-Sheet 2.

k .mi

wrTm-issss.-

la m .4 www? mfw f, am@ U2.

- Nrrn Sterns VALDEMAR F. LssoE, or New YORK, N. Y., AND LUTHER D. LovEKiN, or

ARDMORE', PENNSYLVANIA.

OIL-BURNER.

SPECIFICATION forming lof Letters Patent .'N'o. 716,724, dated December 23, 1902.

' apprennent August 5, 1902.

To all whom it may concern: l

Be itknown that we, VALDEMAR F. LSSOE, of the city, county, `and State of ANew York, and LUTHER D. LOVEKIN, of Ardmore, Montgomery county, State of Pennsylvania, have invented an Improvement in OilBurners, of which the following is a specification;

Our inven tion has reference to oil-burners and it consists ofcertain improvements which are fully set forth in the following specification and shown inthe accompanying draw! ings, which form a part thereof.

The object of our invention is to provide av simple and durable constructionof burner which has capacity for spraying the oil tobe burned by forcing it through a nozzle in a thin sheet or film in a confined chamber and subdividing it by a series of transversely-acting currents of air under pressure, preferably in diagonal directions, which are forced through the chamber soas to produce a spiral or gyrating motionto the finely-divided oil and air beyond the end of the burner and where the mixture is burned. 4

The burner herein described is especially adapted for use in the system of burning oil as fuel set out in our application, Serial Nol 117,673, filed July 30, 1902, a reference to which application will show the manner of supplying the burner with oil and spraying air under pressure, as well as the additional air at lower pressure for combustion purposes, said application clearly illustrating the manner in which we have commercially applied our invention.

In carrying out ourinvention, forming subject-matter of the present application, we employ an air-tube having its rear end provided with an air-inlet and its forward end with spraying-bushings or transverse plates, one of which has a central aperture for receiving theoil-nozzle and both of which have a series of surrounding spraying-apertures between which the oil is forced in a film and through which the air is forced under. pressure and carry the oil with it, said apertures being preferably arranged on an incline or spiral, so as to impart a spiral or` gyratory motion to the air and oil, and' with said air-tube we 5o combine a central oil-tube having its rear end furnished with a connection for oil audits Serial No. 118,469. (No model.)

forward end with a nozzle fitting the inner bushing, so as to discharge into the chamber between the bushings, and a regulating and spraying rod adjust-ably secured in the oiltube for regulating the character of oil film or spray delivered from the nozzle.

Our invention also comprehends details of construction which, together with the above features, will be better understood by refer- -6o 'section of the same on line e z, and Fig. 7 is ya sectional elevation ofthe forward end of a 7o `modification of the burner.

2 is the air-tube of the burner,through which the air is forced, preferably at about one and one-half pounds pressure. The air is supplied to the tube by an inlet 3 and is dis- 75 charged at the forward end through apertures '6 in bushings 4L and di, screwed into theend Vof the tube.

The inner of these bushings et is recessed on its front surface, preferably in a conical form, and the outer of the bushings 8o 4 is screwed into the inner bushing and has its rear face made conical, as at 2l. In this manner a space or chamber 2O is formed between the two bushings, into which oil is forced from the nozzle 9. The outer bushing has its front surface recessed, as at 19, and through this the apertures 6a extend, preferably on an incline toward the axis of the burner and also in a spiral direction, as shown in Fig. 3. The inner bushing 4: has its aper- 9o tures 6 also preferably inclined and spirally arranged, so as to come into direct alinement with the apertures 6, as shown in Fig. l. In this manner the iilm of oil, which is spread by impinging upon the conical surface vof the bushing 4a, is struck by the jets of air passing from the tube 2 through the apertures 6 and forced through the apertures 6Zt in a iinelysubdivided condition. As the. sprayed oil leaves the burner it has a rotary or gyrating roo motion, and this further aids in subdivision and proper admixture of the oil with air.

The oil-nozzle 9 fits into the tapered central aperture 7 of the bushing 4 and has its orifice 14 immediately above the apex of the conical surface of the bushing 4a. The nozzle makes a tight joint with the bushing 4, so as not to allow the oil to escape back into the tube 2. The nozzle is fitted on its interior with a star-frame 10, which is clamped in position upon a shoulder by the oil-pipe S when screwed in place. The rear end of the oilpipe is secured to an L-head 11, into which the oil is fed under about fifteen pounds pressure by a pipe 12. Extending through the head 11 and the pipe 8 is a valve-rod 13, the end of which is tapered to form a throttlingvalve, With the nozzle 9 to regulate the extent of the orifice 14 for the escape of oil. By adjusting the rod 13 the supply of the oil to the chamber 2O may be varied. The rod 13 is made adjustable by having its rear end screw-` threaded, as at 16, and working in the head l1. The extreme rearend of the rod passes through a stuffing-box 15 on the head and is provided with a hand-wheel 17, by which to rotate it for adjustment purposes.

When the oil is forced in the chamber 2O under about fifteen pounds pressure, it is spread and brought to a condition of a very thin film. This is rapidly dissipated into a fine spray by the action of the series of spiral air-jets from the apertures 6 and 6a, which not only produce the subdivision, but also give to the mixture of air and oil a gyratory motion, as aforesaid, which is important in that it produces the better subdivision, a most intimate admixture with the combustion-air supplied to the furnace from around the burner,land a constantly-shifting flame which secures uniform distribution of the heat within the furnace.

In use the burner fits into the usual furnace or fire-box, the fiange 1S on the burner-tube acting as a support and means for securing it in place upon the projecting front of the furnace.

If from any cause the air-pressure at the pipe 3 should be lowered or temporarily shut off, there would be liability of the oil passing from the chamber 2O through the orifice 6 into the air-tube. Under such conditions the oil is run off by jet-cock 22, it being prevented from passing farther back in the airpipe 3 by the annular wall 23. This wall, as shown, is arranged to the rear of the fiange 18 and while shallow enough to collect the oil is not sufficiently high to materially` obstruct the air.

The bushings are conveniently made as .-shown, as they may be accurately made and easily replaced, if injured. XVe, however, do not restrict ourselves in using the term bushings to any special details, but only with the understanding that these parts fill up the front end of the burner, so as to form a transverse closure therefor, with the exception of the spraying-apertures formed in them.

In the modification of our invention shown in Fig. 7 the bushings have straight holes 6C and 6"', respectively, the holes 6C being parallel to the air-tube 2, and the apertures 6e being inwardly directed, but not spirally arranged. In this case itis preferable that the apertures 6c shall be larger than the apertures 6e to insure a greater force being given to the oil and air in passing through the apertures 6e.

1f desired, the apertures 6 and '6n of the structure shown in Fig. 1 need not be spirally arranged; but we prefer that they shall be so formed.

Vhile we prefer the construction shown, the details may be modified without departing from the spirit of the invention.

Having now described our invention, what we claim as new, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is-

1. In an oil-burner, the combination of an air-tube having its front end closed bya transverse structure having a shallow oil-chamber formed by front and rear walls arranged close together and provided With a circular series of apertures through each of the walls whereby air may be forced from the air-tube through said apertures and oil-chamber, and means for spraying oil under pressure against one of the walls of the oil-chamber whereby it is mechanically subdivided and directed outward toward the apertures so as to meet and be taken up by the air passing through said apertures.

2. In an oil-burner, the combination of an air-tube havingits front end closed by a transverse structure having an oil-chamber and a series of apertures extending through the front'and rear walls of the chamber and spirally arranged, an oil-nozzle opening into the chamber through the rear wall thereof and centrally with respect to the apertures, a Valve rod for controlling the oil passing through the nozzle into the chamber, and a pipe for supplying oil under pressure to the nozzle.

3. In an oil-burner, the combination of the airtube havingits front end closed bya transverse structure havingan oil-chamber formed with a conical internal surface facing rearward and a series of apertures extending through the front and rear Walls of the chamber, an oil-nozzle opening into the chamber through the rear wall thereof and directed toward the apex of the conical surface, a valve rod for controlling the oil passing through the nozzle into the chamber, and a pipe for supplying oil under pressure to the nozzle.

4. In an oil-burner, the combination of the air-tube having its frontend closed bya transverse structure having an oil-chamber formed with a conical internal surface facing rearward and a series of apertures extending through the front and rear walls of the chamber and spirally arranged, an oil-nozzle opening into the chamber through the rear wall thereof and centrally with respect to the ap- ICO IIO

ertures and directed toward the apex of the conical surface, a valve-rod for controlling the oil passing through the nozzle into the chamber, and a pipe for supplying oil under pressure to the nozzle.

ertures whereby the oil is spread in the chamy ber into a thin film and then atoxnized by airjets forced through the apertures.

6. In an oil-burner, the combination of an air-tube, a bushing structure tted into the front end of the air-tube and consisting of a front and back portion forming a shallow oilchamber between them and having a series of inwardly-directed apertures through the front and rear Walls and opening at the front intb a recessed portion so that the several jets may directly impinge upon each other, and an oil-spraying nozzle provided With'a valve feeding oil as a spray under pressure into the chamber whereby the oil is spread in the chamber into a thin film and then atomized by air-jets forced through the apertures.

7. In an oil-burner, the combination of an air-tube, a bushing structure tted into the front end of the air-tube and consisting of a front and back portion forming a shallow oilohainber between them and having a series of spirally-arranged apertures through the front and rear Walls arranged in a circle, and an oil-nozzle for feeding oil under pressure into the chamber arranged centrally with respect to the apertures vvherebj7 the oil is spread in the chamber into a thin lm and then atomized by air-jets forced through the apertures.

8,. In an oil-burner, the combination of an air-tube having an atomizing-chamber at its front end provided with a series of apertures opening through the chamber from the inside of the air-tube to the outside of the atomizing-chamber, au oil-nozzle opening into the rear part of the atomizing-chamber and centrally disposed relating to the series of apertures, an oil-pipe extending through the airtube for supplying oil under pressure to the nozzle, and an adjustable valve-rod extending to the atomizing-chamber for controlling the iiow of oil through the nozzle.

9. In an oil-burner, the combination of an air-tube having an atomizing-chamber at its front end provided with a series of apertures opening through the chamber from the inside ot the air-tube to the'outside of the atomizing-chamber and further having the rear part of the said air tube provided With an inwardly-projecting flan ge to prevent backward ioW of oil in the tube, a petcock to draw oft' the oil collected in the air-tube, an oil-nozzle opening into the rear part ot the atomizingchamber, an oil-pipe extending through the air-tube for supplying oil under pressure to the nozzle, and an adjustable valve-rod for controlling the tlow of oil through the nozzle.

10. In an oil-burner, the combination of an air-tube having an atomizing-chamber at its front end provided with a series of spirallyarranged apertures opening through the chamber from the inside of the air-tube to the outside of the atomizing-chamber the inside apertures being in spiral alinelnent with the out-side apertures, an oil-nozzle opening into the rear part of the atomizing-chamber, an

`oil-pipe'extending through the air-tube for supplying oil underpressure to the nozzle, and an adjustable valve-rod for controlling the ow of oil through the nozzle.

11. In an oil-burner, the combination of the air-tube, a bushing et fitting the front end thereof and having a central opening 7 and a series of apertures 6 arranged about the central aperture, a second bushing La secured in the bushing 4 and having a rear conical Wall 2l and a series of apertures 6 adapted to be in alinement with the apertures 6 the said bushings forming a shallow oil-chan1ber20between them, an oil-nozzle 9 fitting' the central opening 7 of the bushing 4, and a valve-rod 13 for the nozzle.

In testimony of Which invention We have hereunto set our hands.

VALDEMAR F. LSSOE. LUTHER I). LOVEKIN.

' Vllitnesses:

R. M. HUNTER, R. M. KELLY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2419365 *Jun 8, 1944Apr 22, 1947Theodore NagelMethod of atomizing liquids
US2511755 *Jul 1, 1947Jun 13, 1950Hauck Mfg CoAtomizing burner for fluid fuels
US2571921 *Jun 2, 1948Oct 16, 1951Robert MorrisAtomizer of single piece construction
US2577437 *Sep 16, 1949Dec 4, 1951Stringer Orval AInner wall fogging gun
US3067785 *Sep 23, 1959Dec 11, 1962Meyer Geo J Mfg CoCan filling head
US3092332 *Apr 4, 1958Jun 4, 1963Wickes CorpAtomizing fuel burner construction
US3747860 *Oct 26, 1971Jul 24, 1973Shell Oil CoAtomizer for liquid fuel
US4141505 *Jun 7, 1976Feb 27, 1979Reich Richard BHeavy fuel oil nozzle
US4828181 *Nov 25, 1987May 9, 1989Fluidics Instruments B.V.Air-pressure-atomizer
US5372312 *Aug 23, 1993Dec 13, 1994Spraying Systems Co.Air atomizing spray nozzle assembly with angled discharge orifices
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationB05B1/28