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Publication numberUS718700 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 20, 1903
Filing dateMar 3, 1902
Priority dateMar 3, 1902
Publication numberUS 718700 A, US 718700A, US-A-718700, US718700 A, US718700A
InventorsCharles E Crosby, Emil C Aurin
Original AssigneeCharles E Crosby, Emil C Aurin
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Contractible core-bar.
US 718700 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

N0. 718,700. PATENTED JAN. 20,1903

c; E. CROSBY & E. c. AURIN.

GONTRAGTIBLE GORE BAR.

APPLICATION FILED MAR. s, 1902.

no MODEL. 2 SHEETS-SHEET 1.

WITNESSES: jzvaVENTgs; ow; ros- I a. flu ai,

ATTORNEY.

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No. 718,700. PATBNTE'D'JAN. 20; 190's.-

0. E. CROSBY & E. c.- AURIN.

GONTRAGTIBLE GORE BAR.

APPLICATION FILED HA3. 3, 1902.

2 SHEETS-SHEET 2."

E0 MODEL.

INVENTORIS; Giana: E C7005 ATTORNEY.

WITNESSES: v

THE NORRIS sirens co., PHQTB-UTMO.. WASHINGTON, u. c.

llNTTnn STATES PATENT OFFICE.

CHARLES E. CROSBY AND EMIL O. AURIN, OF INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA.

CONTRACTIBLE CORE-BAR.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 718,700, dated January 20, 1903.

Application filed March 3, 1902. Serial No. 96,396. (No model.)

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that we, CHARLES E. CROSBY and EMIL O. AURIN, citizens of the United States, residing at Indianapolis, in the county of Marion and State of Indiana, have inven ted new and useful Improvements in Contractible Core-Bars; and we do declare the following to be a full, clear, and exact description of the invention, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, and to the letters and figures of reference marked thereon, which form a part of this specification.

Our invention relates to core bars or barrels of the type that may be contracted dia metrically for withdrawal from the pipes or hollow cylinders in which they may have been used in casting or forming the articles, a bar being the skeleton frame of the 10am core proper against which the internal face of the pipe or article may be formed and adapted to be contracted quickly, if required, in order to permit the casting to contract while cooling.

The principal object of our invention is to generally improve core-bars of this character in the details of construction, so that they may be simple and; inexpensive in first cost, not liable to derangement in use, efficient, and economical.

Another objectv is to provide a contractible core-bar that may be adapted to be readily a1- tered or changed in diameter, so that a saving in expense may be effected in the matter of equipment of foundries; and another object'is to provide a bar of this character that may be compact and freely handled without becoming loose and detrimental to the loam core and the casting.

The invention consists of a sectional or segmental shell composed of contiguous parts having joint-faces that are in planes tangential to the periphery of the shell, means whereby a plurality of opposing segments may be caused to move toward and from the center of the bar at a greater rate of speed than the remaining segments, so that the joint-faces may continue in contact during movements, improved means whereby the segments may be operated simultaneously; and, the invention also consists in the parts and in the combination and arrangement of parts, as hereinafter particularly described and claimed.

Referring to the drawings, Figure l is a front view of the upper end of the bar as when in use, the imaginary circle indicating the usual loam coating; Fig. 2, a front view of the lower end of the bar as when contracted; Fig. 3, a central longitudinal sectional view of the bar, the middle portions of which are broken away; Figs. 4, 5, 6 and 7, detail views of detached parts; Fig. 8, a plan view of the smaller end of one of the members, which we term a spider, for operating the shell of the bar; Fig. 9, a plan view of the inner side of one'of the shell-segments; Fig. 10, a central longitudinal sectionalviewof the bar as when contracted and showing minor modifications in several features thereof, the middle parts being broken away; Fig. 11, a fragmentary view of the operating shaft or bar and other parts, showing modifications in forms; Fig. 12, a plan view of the larger end of one of the spiders; Fig. 13, a plan View of one of the webs that form connections between the operating-shaft and the shell, and Figs. 14 and 15 show the web composed of two parts.

Similar reference characters in the several figures of the drawings indicate corresponding parts.

Incarrying out our invention practically we employ an operating-shaft A, which serves also as a medium for suspending the bar in vertical positions and may also serve as the axle on which to rotate the bar in horizontal positions. This shaft may be variouslyformed and the coacting part-s adapted thereto, as illustrated in Figs. 3, 10 and 11, as will be described hereinafter, and it will be Obvious that other modifications may be suggested to the constructor.

Referring more particularly to Fig. 3 it will appear that the shaft A has a screw-thread extending substantially the whole length of the shaft, the upper end of which has an eye a, or a and the lower end of which has a squared part b for the purposes, respectively, of suspending and operating the shaft. Two or more webs, depending on the length of the bar, as B and B, substantially alike, have screw-threads in their hubs and are mounted on the shaft A, the end Web 13' having the longer hub, the end of which is suitably adapted to be held by a wrench or a lever while the shaft may be rotated. Of

course it will be clear that we may employ suitable equivalent devices in lieu of the continuous threads above referred to, whereby the webs may be moved along the shaft for contracting the shell. At suitable points on the shaft A are collars d d, correspondingin number to the webs employed, that are secured to the shaft, preferably in an adjustable manner, by set-screws, the collars being threaded in their bores to suit the shaft. Spiders C G, in suitable number, all alike, have smooth bores and are mounted rotatively on the shaft A against the collars above described, and other similar, but preferably smaller, collars e e are secured at the opposite ends of the spiders to the shaft A, so that the spiders cannot move longitudinally on the shaft. The shell comprises oppositelydisposed like main segments D and D, having joint-faces f, whose planes are oblique or inclined to the radii of the shell, substantially as shown in Fig. 2, in which imaginary lines indicate therelative position of the loam covering of the core-bar. The shell also comprises oppositely-disposed like filling-segments E and E, differing somewhat from the other segments in that they are narrower and have their joint-faces g disposed outwardly oppositely to the inwardly-disposed facesf. The narrower segments are designed to move more rapidly than the broader segments, as will be understood. Each segment has a suitable number of spreaders F F secured at the inner sides thereof, the number depending upon the length of the bar, and of suitable length to correspond with the diameter of the bar and that of the spiders, and the segments have perforations 7t and may also have reinforcingribs, as is usual in large sizes of bars. Thespreadersmaybevariously formed, those shown being ratherillustrative than arbitrary. They may be attached either integrally or detachably to the segments. The webs B B bear against the spreaders, and in some cases the webs may have rims i, so as to reach about the spiders, and also in some cases the webs may have lugsj to extend between the spreaders, so that the webs may not rotate relatively to the shell. Lugs G are secured, as by bolts 7c, tothe segments against the faces Z of the webs. Therefore the webs cannot move longitudinally of the shellindependently thereof, the spreaders and the lugs operatively connecting the webs with the shell.

The spiders C C are adapted in a suitable manner to and engage the spreaders, both for holding the shell'segments in their proper normal positions and for drawing the segments inwardly when contracting the bar. In the present case the spiders comprise hubs having smooth bores and arms 1 1 2 2 extending radially from the hub, the arms being substantially T shape in cross-section, the extremities of which are wedge-like or inclined bearing-faces Z, and the faces Z of the arms 1 1 have a greater inclination than those on the arms 2 2, as .will be observed in Figs. 8 and 12 by noting the variations from the imaginary circles.

The spreaders F are attached to the segments D and D and are alike, and the spreaders F are attached to the segments E and E and are alike and similar to the others, each having a slot corresponding to a T-shaped arm of the spider and having an inclined bearing-face m, faces 19 to engage the under sides of the T-shaped part of the arm, and an extremity face a parallel to the other faces to engage a face q of the spider-hub. The opposing spreaders F F have the faces on n p inclined more than the corresponding faces of the spreaders F F and agree with the coacting faces of the arms 1 1.

By reference to Fig. 10 it will be seen that in the construction shown the collars d and e may be dispensed with, the webs B B being provided with screw-threads in their bores, fitting to the threads on the shaft A, which, for descriptive purposes, may be supposed to be divided into sections 3 4c 5 6 of different characters. The section 3, on which is the threaded Web B and the section 4, on which is the threaded spider O, are of the same diameter, which is greater than that of the end sections 5 and 6. The section 5, on which is the threaded spider G has the thread pitch corresponding to the pitch of the thread on the section 4, and the thread pitch on the section 3 and in the web B corresponds to the thread pitch on the section 6 and in the Web B. The spreaders in this illustration extend along the segments a relatively greater distance than those in Fig. 3, whereby the rims i on the webs may be dispensed with. It will be seen also that the spider G has a hub extending beyond the end of the shell like the hub of the web B, which is an advantage in the larger sizes of bars. In Fig. 10 are shown screw-studs 1", that are secured to the shell-segments in lieu of the lugs G and may be most conveniently used in some cases as equivalents. These studs may also be inserted loosely in radial bores 5, (indicated by dotted lines,) in which case the lugsj will not be required, as will be obvious.

In Figs. l1, l4, and 15 the shaft-section 5 has a greater diameter than the section 3, in which case the web B is formed in halves, having lugs 15 and connecting-bolts in order to connect the web with the shaft on the smaller section 3. The remaining parts, not specifically mentioned as particular to Figs. 10 and 11, are substantially like the corresponding parts in the other views of the drawings.

In designing the details We may obviously adopt various equivalent devices whereby to cause the filling-segments to move more rapidly than the main segmentssuch, for instance, as cams or segments of eccentrics and the like mechanismsand the spider-arms may be slotted, while the spreaders are T shape within the scope of our invention.

IIO

In practical use the operating-shai' t is to be rotated in order to expand the shell to its normal diameter, when the loam may be applied in the usual manner. The complete core and its center or core bar may be handled and set according to the usual custom. After making the cast the shaft may be rotated in the opposite direction, which will cause the spiders to move relatively to the spreaders longitudinally of the bar and the contact-faces of the spreaders,and the T-arms will draw the segments toward the shaft, and two of the arms and spreaders having the faces inclined more than the other two, the filling-segments being connected with them, will move more rapidly than the main segments. Thus the filling-segments will move out of the path of the main segments and permil the latter to move, the joint faces of the segments having sliding contact, although such close adjustment may not be essential, provided the faces fit closely when the shell is expanded to normal size. The several forms of shafts operate alike, those with reverse threads of course accelerating the movements of the segments.

Having described our invention, what we claim as new is I 1. A contractible core bar including a threaded operating-shaft, a shell divided into segments, a plurality of spiders mounted on the shaft, means connecting the segments operatively to the spiders whereby when 'the shaft is rotated in the spiders the segments will be actuated, a plurality of threaded webs mounted on the shaft adjacent to the spiders, and operative means connecting the segments with the webs.

2. A contractible core bar including a threaded operating-shaft, a shell divided into segments provided with inclined operative faces, spiders mounted on the shaft and having inclined operative faces engaging the operative faces of the shell segments, and threaded webs mounted on the shaft adjacent to the spiders and having operative connection with the shell-segments.

3. A contractible core bar including a threaded operating-shaft, a shell divided into segments provided with spreaders having inclined operative faces differing in degrees of inclination, spiders mounted on the shaft and provided with arms having inclined operative ers being greater than that of the faces of other opposing spreaders, a plurality of spiders mounted on the shaft and provided with arms having inclined operative faces difiering in degree of inclination to correspond with the differences of inclination of the faces of the spreaders, threaded webs mounted on the thread of the shaft, devices engaging the webs whereby the Webs may be prevented from rotating relatively to the shell, and devices attached to the shell and engaging the webs and thereby holding the webs adjacent to the spreaders.

5. A contractible core-bar comprising a threaded operating-shaft, a shell divided into segments provided each with a plurality of spreaders each having opposing inclined operative faces, a plurality of spiders mounted on the shaft and provided with a plurality of arms each having opposing inclined opera tive faces, the operative faces at opposite sides of the shaft having a greater inclination than that of the operative faces at other opposite sides of the shaft, threaded webs mounted on the shaft adjacent to the spreaders, devices engaging the webs whereby the Webs may be prevented from rotating relatively to the shell, and devices attached to the shell and engaging the Webs and thereby holding the webs adjacent to the spreaders.

6. A contractible core-bar comprising an operative shaft having screw-threads of different diameters, a shell divided into segments provided with spreaders having inclined operative faces, threaded spiders mounted on the shaft and provided with arms having inclined operative faces, threaded webs mounted on the shaft adjacent to the spreader-s, and devices attached to the shell and engaging the webs and thereby holding the webs adjacent to the spreaders.

7. In a contractible core-bar, the combination of a threaded operating-shaft, a shell divided into segments having each a plurality of spreaders having inclined operative faces, a plurality of spiders mounted on the shaft and having arms on which are inclined operative faces, two of which have a greater degree of inclination than the others, the arms engaging the spreaders and adapted to contract and expand the shell, threaded webs mounted on the shaft and adjacent to the spreaders, devices engaging the Webs whereby the webs may be prevented from rotating relatively to the shell, and devices attached to the shell and engaging the webs and there by holding the webs adjacent to the spreaders.

In testimony whereof we affix our signatures in presence of two witnesses.

CHARLES E. CROSBY. EMIL o. AURIN.

Witnesses:

WM. H. PAYNE, E. T. SILVIUs.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2507577 *Aug 29, 1947May 16, 1950Northern Electric CoExpanding arbor type reel grab
US2562658 *Jan 10, 1947Jul 31, 1951Wrigley W M Jun CoExpanding hub
US3090093 *Aug 25, 1960May 21, 1963Long Leonard DApparatus for making pre-cast cored building blocks
US3244379 *Oct 21, 1963Apr 5, 1966Cellu Kote IncMandrel construction
US3358330 *Jun 2, 1964Dec 19, 1967PirelliApparatus for producing the tread band of flexible tread rings while in a plastic state
US4754543 *Sep 10, 1987Jul 5, 1988Dayco Products, Inc.Method of making expandable and collapsible mandrel
US5683057 *Aug 1, 1994Nov 4, 1997Beloit Technologies, Inc.Core chuck
WO2003040012A1 *Oct 30, 2002May 15, 2003Josef MoserDevice and method for winding protective films provided in the form of a coreless reel
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationB28B7/30