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Publication numberUS718745 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 20, 1903
Filing dateJan 8, 1902
Priority dateJan 8, 1902
Publication numberUS 718745 A, US 718745A, US-A-718745, US718745 A, US718745A
InventorsWilliam E Winant
Original AssigneeWilliam E Winant
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Conveyer.
US 718745 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

PATBNTBD JAN. zo, 1903.

W. E. WINAN T. CONVEYBR. APPLIoATroN FILED un. s

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PATENTED JAN. 20, 190...

W. E. WINANT.

CONVEYER.

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PATENT'ED JAN. 2o, 1903.

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PATBNTED JAN. 20, 1903. W. E. WINANT.

CONVEYER.

Arrnloulon FILED un. s, 19042.

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N. 718,745. PATENTBD JAN. 20, '1903.

` W. E. WINANT.

GONVEYER.

APPLXOLTION FILED JAN. 8, 1902. v I0 HODEL. 6 SHEETS- SHEET 6.

UNITED STATES anni arenas PATENT OFFICE.

CONVEYER.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters PatentNo. 718,745, dated January 20, 1903.

Application liled January 8, 1902. Serielle. 88.876. 'No model.)v

5 proveniente in Conveyers; and I hereby declare that the following is a full, clear, and exact description thereof, reference bein ghad to the accompanying drawings, which form part of this specification.

:e This invention is an improvement in conveyers, and has especial reference to devices for transporting ammunition from the magazine-to the guns or`to the several decks on which guns are located when used on war- 15 ,ships or from the magazines to the guns of forts. It isyespecially designed for use on warships wherein, the. magazines are located in the hold at the ends of the vessel, while the guus are located several decks above and in 'zo some cases a hundred, feet away from the magazine. The conveyer is intended to transport all kinds of ammunition from the magazine to the gun direct, and any ammunition that isnot required at the guns passes on and 25 is returned to and automatically delivered in the magazine.

The objects of the present invention are, first, to provide a conveyer by which ammunition is kept constantly going to and by the 3e gnu-station, and if not desired at the gun is.

immediately returned to the magazine and by which ammunition can be supplied to one gun or a plurality of guns at the maximum rate at which the guns can be fired; second,l 35 to provide a conveyor by which all kinds of ammunition can be conveyed from the magazine to the gun direct Without manhandling in transit and which automatically picks up all kinds of ammunition placed on the loader 4o in the magazine and automatically conveys it to the gun-station, the receipt of ammunition at the gun-station being controlled solely by the gun captain; third, to provide a couveyer which after it has carried ammunition 43 to the gun, if it is not desired at the gun,

'will return it to and antomaticallydeliver it inthe magazine and by which unused or drill ammunition may be returned from the gun or main deck of a vessel to and automatically 5o delivered in the magazine; fourth, to provide novel receiving or unloading devices for re- Amoving ortaking the ammunition fromthc conveyer while-it is in"n motion and-:wlmi while in motion will safely deliver ammu tion ou a. recei Jing-table at the gun with( having to be slowed down or stopped. Th1 several objects arc practically attaixed in 1 present invention; --fan'd the.accompanyl drawings illustrate-fone YformA and arr-an; ment of ammunition conveyer embodyi my invention as applied to a war vessel, a l will describe the invention as illustrai therein, referring tothe claims following 1 description for a summary of the varii novel features andcmbinations,ofgpa upon which I desire protection, 'for althoi l consider the conveyor@ pwn in ,thedri ings the bestand most" practical formi: known to me it will ,obvious that ,nis changes can be made inthe mechanical c struction and arrangement of parts entr within the scope of my present inventi which I do not consider restricted to the 1 ticular embodiment and application ther illustrated in the said drawingsf.

In the drawings, Figure 1 is a longitudi sectional elevation of a portion of a war-sl showing one of myfammiinition conveg therein. Fig. ais'a-,plan view of Fig. 1v

Vthe main deck removed,A `Fig. 3 is an enlar side elevation ofthe portion of the conve apparatus within thenia'gaziri e.V Figgdtii enlarged plan of thel loading and' unload apparatus in the magazines Fig.: 5-is`-an larged plan 'viewof the ,conyeyerpropell mechanism. figa L16 fisglan i .enlarged s through the cnveyerpparatus in the sec gun-station. Fig? is a plan view'of 'so in of the conveyor as is shown in Fig. 6. Fig. au enlarged plan view of one of the carri Fig. 9, a transverse section therethrough, Fig. 10 an end view thereof. Figs. 11 au are detail top and end views of the unloaj tripping mechanism. Fig. 13 is a detail t of one of the carrier-chains. V designates part of th'e hull of a war sel, having an upper or mainde'ck V', a; deck V", below which is a protective decla under which are the boiler-room Vf, lc bunkers V 5 V6, dynamo-rooms V7, and m` zines, one, V, being shown. The partie arrangement of these compartments wil course vary with the character and buil the vessel, and have simply chosen this 'naast mlar build of vessel to illustrate one pracl the chains pass u toand over pulleysI I on a :ai application of the invention. Between shaft I', journal in the up rend of casing el decks V' V* are a number of gnu inclorcs or stations, Nos. '1, 2, and 3, arranged substantially horizontal series, and in each ation is located a gun, to which ammunition to be supplied from the magazine V', and r simplicity of explanation it is assumed lat each gun is of same size and uses the me kind and quantity of ammunition. Guniclosu re No. 1 is located vertically above .the`

lagazine, sqthat ammunition can be taken 'om the magazine through a vertical trunk into inclosure No. l, within which,above ne upper end of trunk c, is conveyer-head asing B, which should be made of stout metal a able of withstanding severe blows and hocks without injury to or derangement of he conveyertherein. In the other inclosures, los. 2 and 3, similar conveyer-headcasings B are formed. Each conveyer-head casng has an opening b in one side for the deivery of ammunition,and m'ay have an openng in its opposite side for the loading of amnunition onto the conveyer, as hereinafter sxplained. The casings B B' are connected n' communicate through a horizontal trunk u', formed just below the gun-deck VV, and :asings B' B are similarlyconnected by a like trunk v below the gun-deck Y. From the last inclosnre, No. 3, a vertical conveyertrunk v leads downward to and below the protective deck V, where it connects withihe aft end of a horizontal trunk v, that leads forward through and.above the boiler and dynamo rooms to the upper end of the magazine V. The trunks v v 1J v Iv and casngs B B' B* together form a continuous but tortuous conveyer trunk or passage leading from the magazine successively to the several gunstations 4and back to the magazine, and through this passage an endless ammunitionconveyeris traveled, said conveyor being conatrncted and arranged as follows:

In a chamber V below the magazine are a pair of suitably-spaced sprocketqzears C C, eyed on a shaft C', journaled in a frame C, fixed to the lower platform of .the magazine, these gears being driven by power applied to shaft C', as hereinafter explained. Under these sprockets run endless roller sprocketchains D D, which pass from sprockets C to and under grooved pulleys E E, mounted on a shaft E', supported in vertically-adjustable bearings E, suitably supported or suspended within the chamber V, said tlcally below the trunk v, so that the sprocketchains can pass up vertically through said trunk to and over similar F, mounted on a shaft F', casing B. From pulleys F the chains descend pulleys being vergrooved pulleys F` 'onrnaled in the to and under grooved pulleys G on a shaft G', journaled in the forward end of trunk 'u' just chains pass back to and under sprocket below casing B, and from pulleys G the wheels H H on a shaft H', jou'rnaled in the rear end of trunk v' just below casing B'. Thence B', thence down to and un er pulley .I on a shaft J', iournaled below casing B 'in the forward end of trunk n. thence back to and under sprocket-wheel K n shaftVX', journaled in the aft end of trunk v, thence u and over pulleys L on a shaft L', jonrnaled n the npr end of casing B. Thence the chains downthrough trunk c to and under pnl eys M on shaft M', journaled in the Vaft end of trunk v. Then the chains lead forward over pulleys N N on a shaft N', journaled transversely of the trunk n, and onto and over pulleys -O O on `a shaft O' in the magazine V above the driving-sprockets C, from which the chains paas back tosald sprocket. Thus the chains make a complete circuit from the magazine to and throughpach casing B B' B in the several gun-inclosures and back to the magazine, Itraveling a tortuous but endless path. These chains may be of kind. I preferably employ what are known as the Jeffrey patent roller link-chains, the links of which are .provided with rollers which relieve the chain of much friction. The horizontal leads of the' chains within the trunks v', i?, and v may be supported by horizontal angle irons or ways spectively, these portions of the conveyor when loaded carriers are passing thereby.

Between the opposite chains D D at uniform distances apart are hu'ug the ammunition-carriers Q Q, which are preferably open at top and one side, and bottoms are composed of a series of equidistant fingers Q', which are preferably slightly concaved, as shown, so as to prevent shells or powder-tanks slipping from the carriers en -foute The any suitable.

P P' I, reas shown, to prevent sagging of backs and ends of these carriers may be stamped' from'sheetfsteelin one piece Q', and

the lingers maybe separately formed and at-j.

the back of cartachedto the lower edge of rier, as shown. In order to aus nd the carriers pivotally from the chains D, seine of the links of the latter are 'provided with inwardly-projecting horizontell-dispoeed lugs or pintles d, rovided with en rged heads or flanges d'. bearings q, which are secured to the ends of the carriers, so that the carriers are thus freely suspended from and between chains D D and at the same time form a bond between the chains. The sprockets C .C being fast on same shaft and being the propelling means for the chains the latter are kept and moved in unison, so that the carriers always hsng freely therebetween and always maintain the same position, the bearings q being so located on the ends of the carriers that the latter will by gravity maintain their horizontal position loaded or unloaded. The pintles d are long enough to clear the flanges on the pulleys, and in passing the pulleys F I L N O the carriers pass between the pulleys,

but over their shafts. To prevent accidental Ilo These heads are fitted in split tipping of the carriers Q in the vertical trunks v 11, the carriers have vertically grooved guides q' attached to their ends in front of the bearings q ahd vertical lips q attached totheir ends in rear of the bearings. The guides q are adapted to engage vertical guiderails R in thetrunk v and casings B B' B2 as the carriers pass upwardly therein, and lips q are adapted to engage vertical grooved guides R' in the casings B B' B, trunk v, and magazine as the carriers descend therein, as shown. In the horizontal portions o[ the several trunks the bottoms of the carriers run so near the bottoms of the trunks that accidental tipping is impossible.

I prefer to employ electricity as the motive power for operating the conveyer, but do not limit myself thereto. As shown, a gear C, keyed on shaft C', meshes with a pinion Cs on a counter-shaft C, on which is keyed a large gear C7, meshing with and driven by a small pinion C8 on 'the armature-shaft of an electric motor C, which is connected with the generating apparatus on the ship, suitable controlling apparatus being provided for regulating the speed of the motor and for changing its speed, if desired. Such apparatns being commonly known and forming no part of the present invention, I deem it unnecessary to explain or illustrate it herein. The motor should be of suiicent power to propel the conveyer loaded at any desired predetermined rate of speed with certainty and uniformity.

The conveyer is always loaded on the ascending side and is unloaded on the descending side, and the preferred means for loading and unloading the conveyer are as follows: The loading-table S is located in the magazine V8 beside the vertical run of the conveyer therethrough. The end of this table next the conveyer is provided with eyes s, through which passes a rock-shaft s', and on this shaft are fixed a series of fingers S', which when lowered into a horizontal position extend into the pathof the conveyer and will come intel-mediate the fingers Q' on the carriers Q, the fingers of the carriers passing .between the fingers on the loading-table, as'shown in Fig. 4. When not loading, the shaft s' can be turned, so as to raise fingers S' into a vertical position out of the way of the carriers. When a shell T or a powder-tank t is placed on the table and shoved onto the fingers S', the latter being lowered, as shown in Fig. 3, the ii'rst ammunition-carrier that passes the loading-table will liftthe shell or tank therefrom and carry it upward and into the several gun-stations until it is taken from the carrier, and if not taken therefrom it will be brought back into the magazine and there be removed from the carrier by the unloading device in the magazine, which consists of an inclined table U, having a series of fingers U' attached to one end next the conveyer and adapted to come intermediate the fingers Q' of the carriers as the latter descend, so that the shell or tank on the carrier will remain suspended on the fingers U' while the uuloaded carrier passes onward. The unloader U and -tingers U' are preferably set at a sufficient angle to cause the shell or tank to slide down out of the way of the next earrier; .but in practice there should be crews of men stationed at the loading and unloading tables to supply ammunition to the former and remove any ammunition delivered to the latter to prevent choking up of the unloading-table.

.In action or at drill the ammunition would be taken from the carrier at some one of the gun-stations, as desired. For this purpose each casing B B' B2 is provided with an ammunition taker or receiver, consistiugof a table W, preferably slightly inclined and 1ocated adjacent to the opening b in the casing, and to the inner end of the table is pivoted a horizontal shaft W,on which vare fixed a series of fingers W', adapted to come intermediate the fingers Q' on the carriersQ when the shaft W2 is rocked so as to throw fingers W into the casing, as shown in Figs. 1 and 5. The shaft W2 is providedwith an operating-handle W", carrying a weight W, by which the shaft will be normally held with fingers W' ont of operative position. When the gun captain desires ammunition, he raises lever W, throwing fingers W' into the path of the carriers Q (see Fig. 6) and holds the lever until the next descending carrier passes, leaving its burden upon ngers W', which are then thrown upward and outward, discharging the ammunition onto the table W. Thus the gun captain can take ammunition as often as he needs it. The shaft W2 is automatically rocked to throw the fingers W'out of the casing each time a load is received on the fingersW', as follows, (see Figs. 11 and 12 :l On the inside of each casing B B' Bz just below opening b is journaled a rock-shaft w, having on its inner end a crank-arm w', car rying at its free end a roller w, adapted ta bear against the under side of one of the iinI gers W and loosely confined thereto by i guard-loop w', as shown in Fig. 12. On the other end of shaft w is keyed a segment wl which meshes with a similar segment'w or the end of a trip-lever w", pivoted at w ant projecting inwardly close beside the run o: the adjacent chain D. (See Figs. 12 and 6.1 When the fingers W are thrown'inward inti receiving position, crank w' is depressed rocking shaft w and throwing lever w nl into the position shown in Fig. 12, where i will be engaged by a trip-roller dl5 on a pin d on one of the links of the adjacent chain D such a trip-roller being attached to the chair adjacent to every carrier Q and in such posi tion that just after auch carrier has passei below the fingers W', leaving its burdel thereon, roller d5 strikes trip-lever wi, de presses the latter, thereby rocking shaft t and throwing arm w upward, lifting finger W' out of the way of the next carrier into th the magazine or position shown in dotted lines, Fig. 12, and weight W holding them thus until the guncaptain throws them inward again by hand, as above described. To prevent the ammu nition ilying off the carriers at the forward turns o! the conveyor, guards Y Y may be placed at proper points in the trunk and casings, as shown in Fig. 1. The speed of the conveyer in action should be such that the maximum number of pieces of ammunition at which the gun can be tired per minute should be constantly passing the several ammunition-receivers in the respective gunstations, thereby allowing each gun captain to take off ammunition as required, the ammunition that is not taken passing on and being retnrned to and automatically delivered in the magazine. In practice the charges of powder and shell should be loaded alternately on the conveyor, so that the captains can get the-de sired supply of ammunition.

The conveyer may be utilized for loading striking down the ammunition by providing loading-tables at any suitable points in the ascending trunks. Such tables X are shown inconnection with casings B B'. These tables X X constitute the doors or closures for openings b' in the sides of the casings when not in use and are hinged to the casings at the lower edges of the openings. When opened and dropped to a horizontal position, as shown in Fig. 5, they are supported by legs X. At the lower or inner end of table X is pivoted a short plate X', which when the carriers Q pass (ascending) will be lifted out of the way by the rear side of the carriers, as indicated in dotted lines in Fig. 6. Opposite the plate X' are a series of ngers pivoted on brackets attached to division-plates BB or other suitable supports within the casings B B'. The iingers a: when raised to vertical position, as shown in dotted lines in Fig. 6, arel out of the way and may be held by-catches as* and areso held during the operation of the apparatus for carrying ammunition to the gun-stations. If, however, it is desired to strike down or return ammunition to the magazine, the doors X are opened and lingers a: lowered, as shown in full lines in Fig. 6. The lingers :n in this position (like fingers S', T', and W) will lie or pass between the fingers Q of the carriers. The ammunition can then be shoved onto fingers a: and will be lifted therefrom by the next ascending carrier Q and taken on and back to the magazine.

From the foregoing description it will be clear that by my improved apparatus am munition can be conveyed from the magazine to one or more gnn-stations successively and can be taken therefrom at the will of the guncaptains, or if not taken thereform the ammunition will be returned to the magazine; also, that the apparatus can be utilized for loading the magazine or for returning to the magazine any unused ammunition in the sevt eral stations, that the only man-handling of the ammunition required is that of placingit upon the loading-fingers or removing it from the unloading-tables, that the device is quite com pact and greatly economizes space, which is most important in vessels, and that its speed can be easily regulated by varying the current applied to the motor. The shafts of sprockets C, H, and K may be provided with cranks or other suitable means for turning them by hand-power, so that in cases of emergency or any breakage of the mechanical motlg.; the conveyers can be propelled by manual While I have described the carriers as provided with load-supporting lingers at bottom, it is obvious that they might accurately be described as having open slots in their bottoms through which the loading and unloading ngers or devices can pass, the eect and operation being identical in either event.

The invention, while designed and primarily intended for use as au ammunition hoist or conveyer, may obviously be usefully employed and readily adapted for handling other material, and therefore I do not restrict myself to the'specic combinations and features of construction and particular application or utilization of the invention herein shown and described, nor do I restrict myself to the employment of electricity as the motive power for the conveyer.

Having thus described my invention,what I therefore claim as new, and desire to secure by Letters Patent thereon, is-

1. The combination of a magazine, two or more gun-stations above the same arranged in substantially horizontal series and endless chains leading from the magazine to the several gun-stations, pulleys for carrying and guiding said chains, and means for propelling them; a series of carriers suspended from and between the chains so as to maintain a horizontal position, saidcarriers having a series ofload-carrying 'ngers forming their bottoms; `with means for loading the carriers within the magazine, and means for taking the loads from the carriers in each of the gunstations, said means comprising tln gers adapte'd to be thrown into the path of the carriers and to take the load therefrom as the latter descend, substantially as described.

2. The combination in an ammunition-carrier, of endless chains leadingfrom the magazine to and through the several gun-stations and return, and means for causing said chains to make bends or loops in the gun-stations, and a series of carriers suspended by and between the chains; with means for loading the carriers within the magazine, and ammunitiontakers in the gun-stations, adapted to be thrown into the path of the carriers at the descending side of the bends, and means for throwing the takers out of the way when the carriers have passed, substantially as described.

3. The combination in an ammunition-carrier, of endless chains leading from the maga IOC 'nexus zine to and through the several gun-stations and return, means for causing said chains to make vertical bends or loops in the gunsta tions, and a series of carriers suspended by and between the chains, said carriers being open at one side, and having their bottoms formed by transverse iingers; with menus for loading the carriers within the magazine, and ,the ammunition-takers in the gun-stations, comprising fingers adapted to be thrown into the path of the carriers at the descending side of the bends, and means for throwing the iingers out of the way when the carriers have passed, substantially as and for the purpose described. A

4. The combination of atraveling-con veyer carrier having an open side, and a series of transversel y-disposed loadfsupportin g fingers for its bottom; with load receiving or taking fingers normally outside the path of the carrier, and manually-controlled means for moving said fingers into the path of the carrier, a rock-shaft having a crank-arm underlying the fingers, and a trip-lever and connections for operating the rock-shaft, and a trip-lug moving with the carrier adapted to engage said lever when the taking-iingers-have received the load from the carrier, substantially as described.

5. The combination of a traveling-conveyer carrier having an open side and a series of transversely-disposed load-supporting ngers for its bottom; with a load receiver or taker, comprising a table, a series of fingers hinged thereto normally outside the path of the carrier, and manually-controlled means for moving said fingers into the path of the carrier, a rock-shaft beside the taker having a cran karm underlying the fingers, and a trip-lever and connections for operating therock-shaft, and a trip-lug moving with the carrier adapted to engage said lever when the taking-fingers have received the load from the carrier, substantially as described.v

6. The combination of an endless conveyer, the carrier pivotally hung thereon, having an open front and a series of transversely-disposed ngers forming its bottom, and a loadreceiver, comprising a table, a rock shaft journaled thereon, aseries of fingers fixed on said shaft, adapted when the shaft is rocked in one position to enter the path of the carrier and to pass between the carrier-tingers and take the load therefrom, and a weighted lever for rocking said shaft and holding the taking-fingers normally out of operative position; with a rock-.shaft beside the receiver, a segment thereon, a toothed trip-lever engaging the segment, and a crank-arm on said rock-shaft for throwing the receiving-fingers out of the path of the carrier when they have taken a load, and a trip-lug on the chain for operating said trip-lever, all substantially as and for the purpose set forth.

7. An endless ammunition-conveyer comprising two parallel endless chains, and a series of gravitating carriers pivotally connected to and suspended between said chains and constantly maintaining by gravity a horizontal position both on the ascending and descending runs of the carrier; said carriers being closed on one side and both ends, open on the other side and having transverse iingers attached to the side forming its bottom, with means for loading the carriers while they are moving vertically upward and for unloading them while they are moving verically downward, substantially as described. 8. In a conveyer, a carrier open at one side and having load-sustaining fingers attached to the closed side and forming its bottom, and

means for moving said carrier in an endless path; with an unloading device beside *the downward run of the conveyer and normally outof the path of the carrier, said device having fingers adapted to come between the fingers of the carrier and take the load therel from while the carrier is descending, and man ually-operated means for throwing said un loading device into the path of the carriers.

9. The combination of an endless conveyerl a series of carriers pivotall y suspended there from provided with loadsustaining fingers, z set of fingers whereby the' carriers may b1 loaded during their upward movements, anc' a set of fingers beside the descending run o: the conveyer, for unloading .the carriers dur ing their downward movements with manu ally-operated means for th rowing said un loading-ngers into the path of the carrien and automatically-operated means for throw ing them out of the path of the carriers afte receiving a load therefrom, substantially a described.

l0. In a conveyer, the combination of a pai of parallel endless chains, carriers pivot ally suspended therefrom and therebetweei adapted to constantly maintain a horizonte position, each carrier being open, at one sid and havin'g parallel load-supporting finger attached to its other side and forming its bot tom with an unloading device having finger adapted to project between .the chains ani into the pathof the carriers and come intel mediate the iingers thereon, substantallya described. I

11. In a conveyer, the combination of a pai of parallel endless chains, carriers suspende therebetween and therefrom and constantl maintaininga horizontal position on both th vertical and horizontal runs of the chain: each carrier being open on one side and hat 'ing a series of parallel load-supporting iii gers attached to its other side and projectin transversely of the carrier to form its bottoxr with a loading device, and an unloading d1 vice, each having a series of fingers adapte to project between the chains into the pat of the carrier and come intermediate the fix gers thereon, substantially as described.

12. In an ammunition-conveyer, the con bination of the magazine, theparallel endlei chains passingtherethrough, and carriers pi' otallysuspended from and between said chair Wren'. uw -f i each being open at its front side and closed at rear and both ends and having aseries of parallel load-sustaining fingers projecting from the rear side thereof; with a loading device and an unloading device in the magazine, each device having a series of ilngers adapted to project between the chains into the path of the carriers and to come intermediate the fingers thereon, so that the carriers can take ammunition from the loader while they ascend, and deliver ammunition to the unloader while theydescend,substantiallyasdescribed.

13. The combination of a series of stations, and an endless conveyor leading successively to the several stations; anda series of carriers on said conveyer each carrier being open at its front side, and closed at its rear side, a series of forwardly-projectingload-sustaining fingers attached to said rear side with an unloading device in each station located normally outside the path of the conveyer, and manually-controlled means for throwing the unloading device in any station into the path of the conveyer whereby loads may be taken from the conveyer in any station at the will of the operator therein, substantially as described.

14. In an ammunition-conveyer, the combination' of a magazine, a series ofl gun-stations, and an endless conveyer leading from the magazine to the several stations and return, and a series of carriers on said conveyer each carrier being open at its front side, and closed at its rear side, a series of forwardly-projecting load-sustaining ngers attached to said rear side; with means for loading the conveyer-carriers in the magazine, and an unloading device in each station located normally outside the path of the conveyer, and manually controlled means for throwing the unloading device in any station into the path of the conveyor.

15. In an ammunition-conveyor, the combination of a magazine, a gun-station, endless chains leading from the magazine to the-stef tion and back to the magazine, and carriers pvotally suspended between the chains open at front side and closed on both ends and rear side having load-supporting lingers projeeting from the rear side and forming the carrier-bottom; with an unloading-table in the gun-station having tilting 'lingers normally standing outside the path of the carriers and manually-controlled means for tilting the lingers into the path of the carriers to take ammunition therefrom, substantially as described.

.16. The combination of a magazine, a series of gun-stations, an endless conveyer composed of parallel chains leading from the magazine successively to the several stations and back to the magazine, said conveyer making loops or bends in each station, and carriers pivotally suspended between the chains having load-supporting fingers at bottom; with an unloading-table in each gun-station having hinged iingers adapted to be tilted to a position intermediate the lingers on the carriers and manually-operated means for throwing the fingers into operative position, substantially as described.

17. The combination of a magazine, aseries of gun-statins, an endless conve-yer leading from the magazine to the several gun-stations and making a bend in each station, and carriers on the conveyor pivotally suspended so asto'constantly maintain a horizontal position; with an unloading device in each guntation standing normally out of the path of the carriers, and manually-controlled means `for moving the unloading device in any gunstation into the path of the carriers to take ammunition therefrom at the will oi.' the gun captain. substantially as described.

18. The combination of a magazine, aseries of gun-stations above the same and endless chains leading from the magazine to the several gun-stations, pulleys for carrying and guiding said chains both on the vertical and horizontal runs of the conveyor, means for propelling the chains, and a series of carriers suspended from and between the chains so as to constantly maintain a horizontal position on the vertical and horizontal runs of ithe chains; each carrier being open at its front side and closed at the rear side and having a series of transversely-arranged ugers attached to the rear side with manually-controlled means for taking the loads from the carriers in any one of the gun-stations as desired by the gun captain therein, substantallly as described.

'19. In an ammunition-conveyer, the com bination of a vertical trunk, an endless conveyer passing therethrough provided with carriers, an opening at the outer side of the trunk and a loading device hinged to the inner side of the trunk opposite said opening onto which loads may be placed when striking down ammunition, substantially as described.

20. The combination with a conveyor-carrier, having one side open and load-supporting ngers attached-to its solid side, and s. loading-table at the outer side of the conveyer-passage; with a series of loading-iingers hinged to the side ot the conveyer-passage'opposite the loadingtable onto which ngers loads may be placed when striking down ammunition substantially as described.

21. The combination of the endless conveyer and carriers thereon each open at one side and provided with load-sustaining -ngers attached to its single side and forming of the couveyer-casing adjacent to the open sides of the carriers, at the ascending side of the conveyer, said loader having a series of lingers adapted to come between the fingers of the carriers and permit the latter to take loads therefrom as they ascend, substantially as and for the purpose described.

22. In an amnxunition-conveyer, the comits bottom; with a loader attached to the side Ilo bination of the endless conveyer leading from the magazine to the gun-station, and makin! a bendjn auch station, ammunition-carriers on said conveyer open at one side and providmwith parallel load-sustaining fingers at- .tached to its solid side and projecting therefrom, and a loading-table at the ascending side of the bend; with ammunirionsupport ing fingers attached to the inner side of the conveyer casing or trunk, opposite the loading-table, arid adapted to pass between the fingers of the carriers as the latter ascend whereby the carriers are enabled to take leads from the fingers, substantially as set forth.

23. In'a loading apparatus, the combination of an endless conveyer, a series of carriers pivotally suspended therefrom so as tp constantly maintain a horizontal position, a loading-table at the ascending.r side of the con veyer, a movable carrier-loader within the conveyer-casing, at the ascending side thereof, and opposite the table onto which loads are placed preparatory to being removed by the carriers, the loads being taken from the loader by the carriers as they ascend and 'neme taken upwardly and then down to the discharging-point, substantially as described.

24. In an ammunition-conveyer, the com bination of an endless conveyor, carriers snspended therefrom to maintain a horizontal position, said carrier being open on its front side and closed at rear side and having a seriesof load-sustainingfingersprojecting from its rear side; with aioadng-table located at the ascending side of the conveyer and provided with a seri of movable fingers adapted to project int the path of the carriers as they ascend and to support loads to he remove by the carriers, said fingers being movable out of the path of the carriers when it is not desired to load them substantially as and for the purpose described.

In testimony that I claim the foregoing as my own I affix my signature in presence of two witnesses.

WILLIAM E. WINANT.

Witnesses:

AUTEUR E. DowaLL, JAMES R. MANSFIELD.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3656636 *Nov 24, 1969Apr 18, 1972Product Design CorpSystem and apparatus for automatically collecting, sorting and distributing articles from one or more locations to one or more locations
US6997666 *Feb 1, 2002Feb 14, 2006American Greetings CorporationAutomated cart unloading/conveyor system
US7708135 *Oct 25, 2007May 4, 2010Restaurant Technology, Inc.Food transport system and method
CN101873983BOct 23, 2008Apr 3, 2013餐饮技术公司Food transport system and method
EP2214988A1 *Oct 23, 2008Aug 11, 2010Restaurant Technology, Inc.Food transport system and method
WO2009054998A1Oct 23, 2008Apr 30, 2009Restaurant TechnologyFood transport system and method
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationB63B27/22