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Publication numberUS726062 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 21, 1903
Filing dateOct 14, 1902
Priority dateOct 14, 1902
Publication numberUS 726062 A, US 726062A, US-A-726062, US726062 A, US726062A
InventorsFrank F Honeck
Original AssigneeFrank F Honeck
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game apparatus.
US 726062 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

GAME APPARATUS. APPDIOATIOH FILED 001214. 1902.

Nb MODEL.

INNINGS O 9 e e O wh ch -oe-o (D. G). 'SECOND BASE. em em Nuke aw aw 6\O6' a 90 m mama -PARLOR Ewan THIRD BASE +9 be BASE-BALL w 9+ 9+ gme em 90,] NON /I' ON 9:

HOME BASE BLUESCOUNT I Rms COUNT I Ruu s HERE e e I RUNSHERE UNITED STATES i PATENT OFFICE.

FRANK F. I-IONEOK, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS.

'GAlVI-E APPARATU S.

srnorrrcarroiv' emits part re se Patent No. raepe'a, dated April 21, 1 903.

1 Application filed October 14,1902. Serial'No.127,264. (N0 model.)

To all whom it may concern;

Be it known that I, FRANK F. HONEOK, a citizen of the United States,and a'resident of Chicago, in the county of Cook and State of Illinois, have invented anew andlmproved Game Apparatus, of which the following is a full, clear, and exactdescription.

The object of the invention is to providea' new and improved parlor game apparatus, illustrative of the game of'base-ball, andarranged to aftord considerable amusement to the players. I

The invention consists of--novel features and parts and combinations of the same, as will be more fully described hereinafter and then pointed out in theclaims.

A practical embodiment of the'invention is represented in the accompanying drawings, forming a part ofthis specification, in which similar characters of reference indicate corresponding parts in all the views.

Figure 1 is a plan View of the improvement. Fig. 2 is a sectional side elevation ofthe same on the line 2 2 in Fig. 1, and'Fig. 3 shows perspective views of. the dice used in playing the game. I r. The improved game apparatnsis-provided with a game-board A, preferably in the form of a shallow tray and having spaced parallel.

partitions A and A to divide the tray into a ments 0 and O, of which the latter compartments are adapted to contain pegs D and D,

respectively, of which the pegs D-are of a different color from that of the pegs Dthat is, the pegs D are preferably colore'd blue and the pegs D red. These end compartments 0 and C are also to be used for throwing the dice during a game. In addition to the pegs D and Ddice E are.

used in playing 'thegame, and eachdiejs;

six-sided (see Fig.3) and has .placed on two opposite sides ciphers standing for outs, on some of the sides the numerals 1 2, and 3, standing for first, second, and third base, and on the remaining side the letters H R, which stand for home run.

In the middle compartment B is centrallycupied at thetime. The base-ball field F is so wounded by scores G, H, I, and I, of which the score G is for counting innings and is located adjacent to and above the second base, the score H'is located adjacent to and below the home base and is for counting outs, the-score l is located adjacent to the third base and is forcounting the runs of one of the players, while the score I opposite is similar to the score I and is adjacent to the first base,and is-for counting the runs of the other player.

j The score G has two rows'of recesses Gand G for the receptionofthe pegs D or D, the rows "being marked reds and blues, and the the row I are nine in number and numbered conselcutivelyfrom 1" to 9. "I and Pare adapted to receive correspond- The recesses ingly colored pegs D or D to count the runs,

' as hereinafter more fully described. middle compartment B and end'compa'rt The game can be played by two or more .persons', each person throwing the dice E until three outs are counted and marked on the score-H,--and-then the next player throws the dice and counts until again three outs are reached. After three outs are reached by a person an inning is closed, it being understoodithat nine innings constitute the game. Now when'the player'throws a die with a numeral $1, 2, or 3, up then a corresponding peg islplaced in first, second, or third base,

according to the numeral, and when the die thrown shows H R up thena peg is placed in the recess Fflindicating ahonierun. Now

if aiplayer first turns up thenum'e'ral l he places a-peg in the recess F,.a n'd if in his next play he turns up the numeral 3 he places a peg in the recess F and counts one run for the peg in the first base F and removes this pegfrom the base-ball field F. The player continues in this manner until he has scored three outs by throwing up a cipher IOO on the die E, as previously mentioned. When the player scores a home run by throwing the dice, it counts a home run for the player, also one run for as many pegs as may be at the time occupying recesses F, F and F on the bases.

The innings are scored on the score G, as previously mentioned,andthe runs are scored on the corresponding scores I or I byinserting pegs correspondingly in the recesses I and I Counting score-The score up to nine is counted in the outside row of recesses 1 For a score of ten and all amounts ending with a cipher use outside row 1 For instance, for the score ten a peg is placed in the recess I marked l and underthe cipher at the end of the row. For more than ten runs and amounts not ending with a cipher both rows 1 and I are used-that is, for counting twenty-two, for instance, it is necessary to place a peg in the recess I marked 2 and another peg in the recess in the row 1 likewise marked For indicating sixty-two it is necessary to peg the recess 1 marked with the numeral 6 and the recess 1 marked with the numeral 2. For twenty-six peg the recess 1 marked with the numeral 2 and the recess 1 marked with the numeral 6-that is to say, for all counting of more than nine the tens are counted in the outside rows 1 and the units in the inside rows 1 From the foregoing it will be seen that considerable amusement is afforded to the players, especially as the counting closely resembles that employed in the regular'game of base-ball played in the field.

Having thus described my invention, I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent 1. A game apparatus illustrative of the game of base-ball, comprising two sets of contrasting pegs, a die, a game-board having a centrally-located representation of a baseball field, provided with recesses at the bases for receiving sundry of the pegs, and scores having rows of recesses for the reception of sundry of the pegs, the scores being arranged around the said central representation, one of the scores being for counting the innings, another for counting the cuts, and the remaining ones for counting the runs of the contesting parties,each of the run-scores having two rows of consecutive numerals and a recess for each numeral, to count units and tens, as set forth.

2. A game apparatus provided with agameboard in the form of a shallow tray having spaced parallel positions, to divide the tray into a central compartment and end compartments, the end compartments being adapted for throwing the dice during a game, also for the storage of pegs used in the game, and the said central compartment having a centrally-located representation of a base-ball field, provided with recesses at the bases for the reception of pegs and scores having spaced recesses for the reception of pegs, the scores being arranged around the said central representation, one of the scores being for counting the innings, another for counting the outs,and the remaining ones for counting the runs of the contesting parties, as set forth.

3. A game apparatus to be played with dice and pegs, provided with a game-board in the form ofa hollow tray having a central compartment representing a base-ball field, and end compartments, the latter being adapted for throwing the dice during the game, and for the storage of the pegs, said central representation of the base-ball field being provided with recesses at the bases; and scores having spaced recesses for the reception of pegs, the scores being arranged around the four sides of the central portion of the board in rows parallel to said sides, one of the scores being for counting the innings, another for counting the outs, and the remaining ones for counting the runs of the contesting parties, the dice used being six-sided and each I containing the characters 0, 0, 1, 2, 3 and H R on its sides, the characters 0, 0 always being on opposite sides of a die and the pegs used being of contrasting colors.

In testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specification in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

FRANK F. IIONECK.

Witnesses:

G. W. VOORHEES, ROBERT B. BARKER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4244571 *Apr 9, 1979Jan 13, 1981Haglof Robert WBaseball game apparatus
US4634125 *Nov 21, 1984Jan 6, 1987Seklecki Sigmund FDevice and method for exchange of trading cards and dice
US6419227 *Jul 7, 2000Jul 16, 2002Thomas W. BarnhardtMethod and apparatus for playing a simulated baseball game
US7523940 *Jun 5, 2007Apr 28, 2009Ken JacobsonBaseball dice game system
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00031