Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS7274963 B2
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 10/320,044
Publication dateSep 25, 2007
Filing dateDec 16, 2002
Priority dateDec 16, 2002
Fee statusPaid
Also published asUS9289615, US9620918, US20040116976, US20080009912, US20160181754, US20170279238
Publication number10320044, 320044, US 7274963 B2, US 7274963B2, US-B2-7274963, US7274963 B2, US7274963B2
InventorsScott A. Spadgenske
Original AssigneeCardiac Pacemakers, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Interconnect for implantable medical device header
US 7274963 B2
Abstract
A modular header and method of fabricating same for making electrical connection between an array of feed-through pins extending through a wall of a hermetically sealed enclosure of an implantable medical device and lead connector receptacles within the header in which the header is fabricated using a pre-formed molded header module, together with a set or harness of interconnected flexible conductors incorporated and sealed by an overlayer of medical grade polymer material. The assembled modular header is capable of complete pretesting prior to assembly onto an implantable medical device.
Images(9)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(9)
1. A method of fabricating a modular header for providing electrical connections between an array of feed-through pins extending through a wall of a hermetically sealed enclosure of an implantable medical device and lead connector receptacles within a modular header assembled to said device comprising:
(a) providing a pre-formed molded header module having paths therein to accept and incorporate a set of flexible conductors and connector blocks associated with lead connector receptacles;
(b) providing a separate set of intermediate conjoined flexible conductors each having a free end and a fixed end, wherein the fixed ends of the flexible conductors are connected to a common element and assembling said set of conductors into said paths in said pre-formed molded header module attaching the free ends thereof to corresponding connector blocks provided in said molded header module;
(c) performing an over-molding operation to incorporate and hermetically seal said conductors into said header structure;
(d) removing said common element to provide an array of spaced connectors configured and positioned to match and mate with said array of feed-through pins when said header is assembled to a compatible corresponding hermetically sealed enclosure;
(e) assembling said header module to said hermetically sealed enclosure and connecting said flexible conductors to said feed-through pins; and
(f) backfilling any open interface volume between said header module and said hermetically sealed enclosure after connecting said flexible conductors to said feed-through pins.
2. A method of fabricating a modular header as in claim 1 including testing the integrity of the connectors traversing said header prior to assembling said header on a corresponding hermetically sealed enclosure of an implantable medical device.
3. A method of fabricating a modular header as in claim 1 wherein said flexible conductors are wrapped around said feed-through pins and welded thereto.
4. A method as in claim 1 wherein said paths in said pre-formed molded header include recessed channels.
5. A modular header for making electrical connections between an array of feed-through pins extending through a wall of a hermetically sealed enclosure of an implantable medical device and lead connector receptacles within said modular header, said device comprising:
(a) a pre-formed molded header module having paths therein to accept and incorporate a set of flexible conductors and connector blocks;
(b) a separate set of intermediate flexible conductors each having a free end assembled into said paths in said pre-formed molded header module, said free ends being attached to corresponding connector blocks located in said molded header module;
(c) a layer of over molding incorporating and sealing said conductors into said header structure; and
(d) wherein said flexible conductors each have an end opposite the free end provided with a connecting device designed to connect with a feed-through pin in a corresponding hermetically sealed medical device enclosure and wherein one or more of said flexible conductors wrap around said pre-formed molded header module.
6. A modular header as in claim 5 wherein said header includes recessed conductor channels.
7. A modular header as in claim 5 wherein said flexible conductors connect to connector receptacles located on a common side of said pre-formed molded header module.
8. A modular header as in claim 7 wherein said lead connector receptacles are arranged in a row in spaced alignment.
9. A modular header as in claim 5 wherein said header is connected with a hermetically sealed enclosure of an implantable medical device and wherein said flexible conductors match and are connected to a corresponding array of feed-through pins protruding from said enclosure wherein said connections are located in a recess provided in said modular header and wherein said recess is backfilled with a medical grade polymer.
Description
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

I. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates generally to implantable medical devices having external electrical connections and electrical feed-throughs and, more particularly, to the provision of a pre-built modular sub-assembly interconnect system for a header module such as are found in implantable pulse generators (IPG's) associated with cardiac rhythm management and other hermetically sealed implantable medical devices.

II. Related Art

Implantable medical devices of a class having electrical circuit components are well known in the medical field. These include cardiac rhythm management devices which commonly include a pacemaker unit which, in turn, includes sensing and control circuitry, together with a power supply, protectively housed in a hermetically sealed case or can in combination with one or more conductive electrical leads designed to connect to the patient's heart muscle tissue, the activity of which is to be sensed and stimulated. To maintain the integrity of the components in the sealed case, provision must be made for hermetically sealed passage of electrical conductors to the exterior for connection to the leads and ultimately to tissue of interest. This has been typically accomplished by using connector blocks and associated feed-through conductors located external to the IPG housing which, themselves, are typically placed within a sealed header structure of medical grade polymer material.

While great strides have been made in improving the sophistication of the pacemaker devices themselves, the assembly and testing of the devices has remained relatively dependent on the skill of the assembly workers. Attempts have been made in the art to simplify the assembly process and to improve the acceptance rate of completed devices which undergo rigorous testing once assembled. In U.S. Pat. No. 5,282,841, for example, a ribbon conductor set or harness is provided to facilitate connection of feed-through terminal conductors to corresponding connector blocks in the header in which the individual ribbon conductors leads can be shaped to a three-dimensional geometry for ease of assembly. The assembled or fully interconnected unit is thereafter subjected to an over molding or coating step in which an entire epoxy head is cast over the assembly to encapsulate and seal the connecting components. That system, however, still depends on the skill of workers for assembly and requires extensive over molding. Furthermore, the electrical integrity of the unit cannot be tested until it is completely assembled.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,205,358 B1 discloses a pre-formed header module in combination with a ribbon connector harness which is assembled and placed between feed-through pins on the side of the sealed enclosure and the header module and thereafter captured in an over molding or backfilling step using medical grade polymer. This system also suffers from similar drawbacks to those described above.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

By means of the present invention there is provided a module header sub-assembly for assembly to in connection with a hermetically sealed implantable medical device which solves many of the above problems and overcomes the drawbacks of previous versions of such devices. The present invention provides the desired electrical feed-through, but, unlike previous header units, the header of the present invention is a sufficiently complete sub-assembly such that it can be tested for functional integrity prior to assembly onto the hermetically sealed medical device. The present header also facilitates assembly and reduces the amount of necessary backfill.

The modular header subassembly of the present invention eliminates the routing of individual feed-through wires to the respective connector blocks by providing an array of metallic conductors incorporated into the sub-assembly itself and molding in either the primary, secondary or even a tertiary mold operation. In this manner, one end of each of the flexed conductors is connected to the appropriate connector block and the other end aligned with the remaining traces to be connected to corresponding feed-through pins in the hermetically sealed IPG unit. In this manner, an array of aligned connectors is arranged to match an array of aligned feed-through pins such that connection between them can be made through a small window readily backfilled after connecting and welding operations. This enables additional site connectors to be implemented while maintaining and actually decreasing header size when compared to conventional wire routings. The flex or trace design further allows all weld locations to be in a minimal number of weld access planes and therefore readily adaptable to process automation. Furthermore, pre-fabricated wire terminations provide repeatable attached locations on conductor sites making feasible alternate welding techniques such as programmable micro-laser welding.

The reduction of the volume required to be backfilled after welding operations also eliminates concerns with respect to the sealing integrity of the backfill which is currently dependent on the technique and skill of the operator and the subsequent inspection. The pre-fabricated wire terminations further eliminates a major manufacturing step involved in routing and backfilling of the wire channels in the header and further allows testing of the integrity of each conductor in the header prior to assembly of the header to the hermetically sealed device. Since the flex/conductor system can be an integral part of the header, mold/sealing operations requiring high pressures are now possible since the header does not have to be connected to the device prior to these primary or secondary mold/seal operations.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a schematic representation of an implantable medical device in the form of an IPG of a class suitable for including the header interconnect system of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a greatly enlarged perspective view of a primary molding of a pre-formed header module showing pre-formed patterned conductor channels and including blocks adapted to receive a corresponding connected array system or harness of flexible connectors in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view similar to that of FIG. 2 as it is being addressed and fitted with a pre-formed harness of flexible conductors in accordance with the invention;

FIG. 4 depicts the pre-formed header module of FIGS. 2 and 3 with the connector system assembled in place;

FIG. 5A is a view of the pre-formed header module of FIG. 4 after the application of a secondary overlayer of medical grade polymer;

FIG. 5B is a view similar to FIG. 5A with the header module rotated to better depict the array of connecting terminals adapted to receive the feed-through pins of a corresponding hermetically sealed device;

FIGS. 6-8 depict views of assembly steps characteristic of an alternative embodiment of an inline connector design using a side connection system in the modular header; and

FIG. 9 shows an assembled device with parts cut away exposing the connection and greatly enlarged fragment views of a typical connection mode in accordance with the assembly of the header of the invention onto the hermetically sealed implantable unit.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

It will be appreciated that the present invention enables the header to be built as a complete modular sub-assembly capable of being tested for circuit integrity prior to attachment to the feed-through pins of the hermetically sealed pacer, other IPG or other implanted unit. The present invention also greatly simplifies the connection process and reduces the amount of backfilling required to complete the header/hermetically sealed IPG assembly. While the detailed description which follows is limited to one or two embodiments, it will also be understood that these are intended as examples only and are not intended to limit the scope of the inventive concept in any manner.

FIG. 1 depicts a simplified schematic view of an implantable medical device 20 of a class suitable for utilizing the header of the present invention including a pre-formed, pre-assembled header module 22 attached to a hermetically sealed enclosure 24. A plurality of leads 26, which typically include atrial and ventricle pacing/sensing leads, for example, are connected to the header using elongated lead connectors 28 and receptacles as at 30. The leads are further connected to feed-throughs using feed-through pins extending through the hermetically sealed enclosure 24. These are beneath the backfilled surface and so are not shown in the figure.

Generally, the hermetically sealed enclosure 24 contains a power source in the form of an electrochernical cell which may be a lithium battery, control and sensing circuitry which controls the operation of the device and senses and records data according to programmed instructions which may be fixed or time-variable and microprocessor controlled. Telemetry transceiver system is provided to enable the device to communicate with an external programmer.

It will be appreciated that particular electronic features may vary considerably from device to device and the practice of the present invention is not dependent or based on any particular embodiment of such a unit, but is based on a common need for pass-through connections.

FIG. 2 is a greatly enlarged perspective view of a pre-formed molded header module 40 having a plurality of elongated external lead connector receptacles as at 42. The pre-formed primary header module is provided with a plurality of recessed conductor channels as at 44 and 46 which connect with corresponding connector blocks as at 48 and 50. The lead connector receptacles 42 also connect with corresponding connector blocks 48 and 50 through internal passages (not shown) in a well known manner.

As shown in FIG. 3, the pre-formed flex conductor system or harness 51 is provided with leads or conductors represented by even reference characters 52 through 66 configured to fit into the corresponding recessed channels 44, 46 and to have corresponding free ends designed to attach to corresponding connector block as at 48 or 50, or otherwise (not shown) each flexible connector further having a second end fixed in spaced relation along a removable common member 68 provided for production of the harness and ease of assembly onto the primary molded module 40.

FIG. 4 depicts the molded module 40 of FIGS. 2 and 3 with the flexible conductors, which may be constructed of a conducting foil, or the like, situated in place in the corresponding relevant receiving channels 44, 46. The material of the flexible conductors 52-66 is one easily deformed to fit the relevant recessed channel 44, 46 yet is sufficiently rugged to withstand the manufacture, assembly and a subsequent over-molding operation while remaining in tact. The material conductive of the traces or harness is preferably a stainless steel, but other bio-compatible materials which adapt themselves to the manufacturing and assembly steps satisfactorily in accordance with the invention may be used.

FIGS. 5A and 5B illustrate the pre-molded or primary molded header modules 40 of FIGS. 2-4 after application and routing of the conductive traces in the channels 44, 46 and connection of them to the corresponding connector blocks, some of which are illustrated at 48 and 50, and after a secondary molding or first over-molding step has been performed and the common member 68 has been removed. The over-molding layer 70 seals the conductors within the modular header exposing only the external connection sites as at 42, 48 and 50 and an array of terminal spade connectors 72 adapted to be connected to corresponding feed-through pin 74 shown in FIG. 9. As shown particularly in the enlarged fragment views of FIG. 9, the spade connectors 72 can readily and automatically be crimped about feed-through pins 74 and the connection welded as at 76.

FIGS. 6-8 depict an alternative embodiment utilizing an inline external connector configuration including a pre-molded header module 80 having an array of inline external connection openings as at 82 adapted to receive external leads (not shown) in the usual well known manner. An array of possible side co-planar terminals or block connection sites as at 84 are provided and these are addressed by a pre-formed flex conductor system or harness 86 containing an array of leads or traces as at 88 not unlike those previously discussed and connected for manufacturing and assembly purposes by one or more stabilizing members as at 90, as shown in FIG. 7. In FIG. 7, the free ends of the traces 88 are shown in place on the side of module 80 and connected to the sites 84. Here, as in the case of the embodiment earlier described, connection is readily achieved by an assembler. These traces also are provided with spade connectors 72.

FIG. 8 depicts the modular header 80 after the application of an overlayer 92 of medical grade polymer on the connection side which seals in the conductors 88 leaving only the array of terminal spade connectors 72 conveniently configured in an inline arrangement corresponding feed-through terminal pins 74 as depicted in FIG. 9 in the manner previously described.

Note that the remaining recess volume 75 in FIGS. 5A and 5B and 94 in FIG. 8 is quite small in relation to the size of the header module 40 or 80 such that the amount of backfilling after final connection to fill out and streamline the structure remains relatively minor.

The embodiments, once assembled, can easily be tested as by plugging the header module into a test stand and attaching any desired external leads. The use of the harness in combination with predetermined separate paths for the conductors precludes shorts and eliminates the need for using insulated conductors.

This invention has been described herein in considerable detail in order to comply with the patent statutes and to provide those skilled in the art with the information needed to apply the novel principles and to construct and use such specialized components as are required. However, it is to be understood that the invention can be carried out by specifically different equipment and devices, and that various modifications, both as to the equipment and operating procedures, can be accomplished without departing from the scope of the invention itself.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4262673 *Oct 11, 1979Apr 21, 1981Mieczyslaw MirowskiFluid tight coupling for electrode lead
US5067903Nov 20, 1989Nov 26, 1991Siemens-Pacesetter, Inc.Ribbon conductor set and method
US5070605 *Jan 24, 1990Dec 10, 1991Medtronic, Inc.Method for making an in-line pacemaker connector system
US5235742Jun 24, 1991Aug 17, 1993Siemens Pacesetter, Inc.Method of making an implantable device
US5282841 *Oct 14, 1992Feb 1, 1994Siemens Pacesetter, Inc.Implantable stimulation device and method of making same
US5336246 *Jun 23, 1993Aug 9, 1994Telectronics Pacing Systems, Inc.Lead connector assembly for medical device and method of assembly
US5456698Nov 23, 1993Oct 10, 1995Medtronic, Inc.Pacemaker
US5535097Nov 23, 1993Jul 9, 1996Medtronic, Inc.Implantable medical device including a first enclosure portion having a feedthrough in a second interior surface
US5851221Aug 1, 1997Dec 22, 1998Medtronic Inc.Attachment apparatus and method for an implantable medical device
US5899930Sep 29, 1997May 4, 1999Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc.Triple port and quadruple port in-line header designs
US5906634Aug 8, 1997May 25, 1999Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc.Implantable device having a quick connect mechanism for leads
US6205358Sep 23, 1998Mar 20, 2001Medtronic, Inc.Method of making ultrasonically welded, staked of swaged components in an implantable medical device
US6792312 *Sep 6, 2001Sep 14, 2004Medtronic, Inc.Connector module having internal weld plates
US6884122 *Oct 25, 2001Apr 26, 2005Medtronic, Inc.Lead frame and strip molding for contact connectors in implantable medical devices
US20020107555 *Feb 6, 2002Aug 8, 2002Robert RusinOne piece header assembly over molded to an implantable medical device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7803014Mar 30, 2006Sep 28, 2010Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc.Implantable medical device assembly and manufacturing method
US7930032 *Jul 20, 2007Apr 19, 2011Biotronic CRM Patent AGElectrical feedthrough
US8075346Sep 28, 2010Dec 13, 2011Medtronic, Inc.Implantable medical device headers that facilitate device and lead configuration variants
US8095217 *Apr 15, 2009Jan 10, 2012Biotronik Crm Patent AgTerminal housing for an electromedical implant
US8096838Mar 4, 2010Jan 17, 2012Bal Seal Engineering, Inc.Header assembly for implantable medical devices
US8160707 *Jan 30, 2006Apr 17, 2012Medtronic, Inc.Method and apparatus for minimizing EMI coupling in a feedthrough array having at least one unfiltered feedthrough
US8326425 *Mar 30, 2006Dec 4, 2012Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc.Feedthrough connector for implantable device
US8494636Dec 20, 2012Jul 23, 2013Greatbatch Ltd.Feed-through connector assembly for implantable pulse generator and method of use
US8530066Dec 17, 2008Sep 10, 2013Biotronik Crm Patent AgFeedthrough for battery, method for manufacturing same and the battery
US8548601Sep 15, 2008Oct 1, 2013Boston Scientific Neuromodulation CorporationLead connection system for an implantable electrical stimulation system and methods for making and using the systems
US8666510Sep 6, 2013Mar 4, 2014Boston Scientific Neuromodulation CorporationLead connection system for an implantable electrical stimulation system and methods for making and using the systems
US8712527Sep 28, 2010Apr 29, 2014Medtronic, Inc.Implantable medical devices including elongated conductor bodies that facilitate device and lead configuration variants
US8738141Apr 7, 2011May 27, 2014Greatbatch, Ltd.Contact assembly for implantable pulse generator and method of use
US8742268Jan 30, 2012Jun 3, 2014Heraeus Precious Metals Gmbh & Co. KgHead part for an implantable medical device
US8825162Jan 30, 2012Sep 2, 2014Heraeus Precious Metals Gmbh & Co. KgCeramic bushing with inductive filter
US8894914Jan 30, 2012Nov 25, 2014Heraeus Precious Metals Gmbh & Co.Method for the manufacture of a cermet-containing bushing
US8989872Nov 14, 2012Mar 24, 2015Medtronic, Inc.Implantable medical device header
US9032614Jan 30, 2012May 19, 2015Heraeus Precious Metals Gmbh & Co. KgMethod for manufacturing an electrical bushing for an implantable medical device
US9040819Jan 30, 2012May 26, 2015Heraeus Precious Metals Gmbh & Co. KgImplantable device having an integrated ceramic bushing
US9048608Jan 30, 2012Jun 2, 2015Heraeus Precious Metals Gmbh & Co. KgMethod for the manufacture of a cermet-containing bushing for an implantable medical device
US9072909Dec 18, 2013Jul 7, 2015Medtronic, Inc.Implantable medical electrical lead connectors, assemblies thereof, and methods of manufacture
US9088093Jun 2, 2014Jul 21, 2015Heraeus Precious Metals Gmbh & Co. KgHead part for an implantable medical device
US9101776Mar 5, 2014Aug 11, 2015Medtronic, Inc.Implantable medical electrical lead connector assemblies and methods of manufacture
US9126053Jan 30, 2012Sep 8, 2015Heraeus Precious Metals Gmbh & Co. KgElectrical bushing with cermet-containing connecting element for an active implantable medical device
US9138586Jan 27, 2012Sep 22, 2015Greatbatch Ltd.Contact block using spherical electrical contacts for electrically contacting implantable leads
US9289615Sep 24, 2007Mar 22, 2016Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc.Interconnect for implantable medical device header
US9306318Jan 30, 2012Apr 5, 2016Heraeus Deutschland GmbH & Co. KGCeramic bushing with filter
US9345185Nov 14, 2012May 17, 2016Medtronic, Inc.Implantable medical device header
US9345894Feb 26, 2014May 24, 2016Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc.Connector blocks for a header of an implantable device
US9403022Jan 29, 2010Aug 2, 2016Medtronic, Inc.Header assembly for implantable medical device
US9403023Aug 7, 2013Aug 2, 2016Heraeus Deutschland GmbH & Co. KGMethod of forming feedthrough with integrated brazeless ferrule
US9431801May 24, 2013Aug 30, 2016Heraeus Deutschland GmbH & Co. KGMethod of coupling a feedthrough assembly for an implantable medical device
US9478959Mar 14, 2013Oct 25, 2016Heraeus Deutschland GmbH & Co. KGLaser welding a feedthrough
US9492666May 1, 2014Nov 15, 2016Nuvectra CorporationContact assembly for implantable pulse generator and method of use
US9504840Jan 9, 2015Nov 29, 2016Heraeus Deutschland GmbH & Co. KGMethod of forming a cermet-containing bushing for an implantable medical device having a connecting layer
US9504841Dec 12, 2013Nov 29, 2016Heraeus Deutschland GmbH & Co. KGDirect integration of feedthrough to implantable medical device housing with ultrasonic welding
US9509272Sep 2, 2014Nov 29, 2016Heraeus Deutschland GmbH & Co. KGCeramic bushing with filter
US9552899Jun 3, 2015Jan 24, 2017Heraeus Deutschland GmbH & Co. KGCeramic bushing for an implantable medical device
US9610451Dec 12, 2013Apr 4, 2017Heraeus Deutschland GmbH & Co. KGDirect integration of feedthrough to implantable medical device housing using a gold alloy
US9610452Dec 12, 2013Apr 4, 2017Heraeus Deutschland GmbH & Co. KGDirect integration of feedthrough to implantable medical device housing by sintering
US9620918Mar 2, 2016Apr 11, 2017Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc.Interconnect for implantable medical device header
US9653893Jan 8, 2016May 16, 2017Heraeus Deutschland GmbH & Co. KGCeramic feedthrough brazed to an implantable medical device housing
US9724527Sep 26, 2014Aug 8, 2017Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc.Color coded header bore identification using multiple images and lens arrangement
US20050201039 *Apr 25, 2005Sep 15, 2005Stevenson Robert A.Inductor capacitor EMI filter for human implant applications
US20070179554 *Jan 30, 2006Aug 2, 2007Lyer Rajesh VMethod and apparatus for minimizing EMI coupling in a feedthrough array having at least one unfiltered feedthrough
US20070232119 *Mar 30, 2006Oct 4, 2007Sprain Jason WImplantable medical device assembly and manufacturing method
US20070239222 *Mar 30, 2006Oct 11, 2007Sprain Jason WFeedthrough connector for implantable device
US20080009912 *Sep 24, 2007Jan 10, 2008Cardiac Pacemakers, Inc.Interconnect for implantable medical device header
US20080060844 *Jul 20, 2007Mar 13, 2008Teske JosefElectrical feedthrough
US20090181289 *Dec 17, 2008Jul 16, 2009Tim TraulsenFeedthrough for battery, method for manufacturing same and the battery
US20090270961 *Apr 15, 2009Oct 29, 2009Ruschel MarinaTerminal housing for an electromedical implant
US20100070012 *Sep 15, 2008Mar 18, 2010Boston Scientific Neuromodulation CorporationLead connection system for an implantable electrical stimulation system and methods for making and using the systems
US20100233896 *Mar 4, 2010Sep 16, 2010Farshid DilmaghanianHeader assembly for implantable medical devices
US20100285697 *Jul 21, 2010Nov 11, 2010Medtronic, Inc.Connector assembly for an implantable medical device and process for making
US20110104955 *Sep 28, 2010May 5, 2011Seeley Dale FImplantable medical device headers that facilitate device and lead configuration variants
US20110106189 *Sep 28, 2010May 5, 2011Seeley Dale FImplantable medical devices including elongated conductor bodies that facilitate device and lead configuration variants
US20110190833 *Jan 29, 2010Aug 4, 2011Medtronic, Inc.Header assembly for implantable medical device
DE102011009855A1Jan 31, 2011Aug 2, 2012Heraeus Precious Metals Gmbh & Co. KgKeramikdurchführung mit induktivem Filter
DE102011009856A1Jan 31, 2011Aug 2, 2012W.C. Heraeus GmbhElektrische Durchführung und Verfahren zur Herstellung einer cermethaltigen Durchführung für eine medizinisch implantierbare Vorrichtung
DE102011009857A1Jan 31, 2011Aug 2, 2012Heraeus Precious Metals Gmbh & Co. KgElektrische Durchführung mit cermethaltigem Verbindungselement für eine aktive, implantierbare, medizinische Vorrichtung
DE102011009858A1Jan 31, 2011Aug 2, 2012Heraeus Precious Metals Gmbh & Co. KgCermethaltige Durchführung für eine medizinisch inplantierbare Vorrichtung mit Verbindungsschicht
DE102011009859A1Jan 31, 2011Aug 2, 2012Heraeus Precious Metals Gmbh & Co. KgKeramikdurchführung mit Filter
DE102011009860A1Jan 31, 2011Aug 2, 2012Heraeus Precious Metals Gmbh & Co. KgImplantierbare Vorrichtung mit integrierter Keramikdurchführung
DE102011009861A1Jan 31, 2011Aug 2, 2012Heraeus Precious Metals Gmbh & Co. KgVerfahren zur Herstellung einer cermethaltigen Durchführung
DE102011009862A1Jan 31, 2011Aug 2, 2012Heraeus Precious Metals Gmbh & Co. KgCermethaltige Durchführung mit Halteelement für eine medizinisch implantierbare Vorrichtung
DE102011009863A1Jan 31, 2011Aug 2, 2012Heraeus Precious Metals Gmbh & Co. KgKeramikdurchführung mit Leitungselementen hoher Leitfähigkeit
DE102011009865A1Jan 31, 2011Aug 2, 2012Heraeus Precious Metals Gmbh & Co. KgKopfteil für eine medizinisch implantierbare Vorrichtung
DE102011009866A1Jan 31, 2011Aug 2, 2012Heraeus Precious Metals Gmbh & Co. KgDirekt aufbringbare elektrische Durchführung
DE102011009867A1Jan 31, 2011Aug 2, 2012Heraeus Precious Metals Gmbh & Co. KgKeramikdurchführung für eine medizinisch implantierbare Vorrichtung
EP3228354A1Apr 7, 2016Oct 11, 2017Heraeus Deutschland GmbH & Co. KGFeedthrough with a cermet conductor and a method of connecting a wire to a feedthrough
Classifications
U.S. Classification607/36, 439/909, 607/37
International ClassificationA61N1/375, A61N1/372
Cooperative ClassificationH01R43/005, H01R43/16, H01R43/18, A61N1/3752, A61N1/3754, Y10S439/909, H01R13/504
European ClassificationA61N1/375A
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Dec 15, 2002ASAssignment
Owner name: CARDIAC PACEMAKERS, INC., MINNESOTA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:SPADGENSKE, SCOTT A.;REEL/FRAME:013585/0501
Effective date: 20021205
Mar 4, 2008CCCertificate of correction
Feb 24, 2011FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
Mar 11, 2015FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 8