Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS7283762 B2
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 11/000,258
Publication dateOct 16, 2007
Filing dateNov 30, 2004
Priority dateNov 30, 2004
Fee statusPaid
Also published asUS20060115288
Publication number000258, 11000258, US 7283762 B2, US 7283762B2, US-B2-7283762, US7283762 B2, US7283762B2
InventorsBryan J. Roof
Original AssigneeXerox Corporation
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Glossing system for use in a printing architecture
US 7283762 B2
Abstract
In a tightly integrated parallel printing architecture having at least a first print engine and a second print engine, the first print engine and a second print engine includes a first fuser system having a first fusing member for fusing marking particles on the substrate and second fuser system having a second fusing member for fusing marking particles on the substrate, including: a calibration system for maintaining uniform gloss characteristics between printed images generated by the first fusing system and the second fusing system, the calibration system including sensor for sensing a gloss value indicative of the gloss of the fused marking particles on the substrate.
Images(5)
Previous page
Next page
Claims(14)
1. A printing architecture comprising:
at least a first print engine and a second print engine and transport assemblies which convey substrate outputs of the first and second print engines to a common finisher assembly, the first print engine including a first fuser system having a first fusing member for fusing marking particles on a substrate and the second print engine including a second fuser system having a second fusing member for fusing marking particles on the substrate, the printing architecture having a sensor system, comprising:
a calibration system for maintaining uniform gloss characteristics between printed images generated by the first fusing system and the second fusing system, said calibration system including a sensor for sensing a gloss value indicative of the gloss of the fused marking particles on the substrate outputs of the first and second print engines; and
a controller for adjusting the gloss level of said first and second fusing members to maintain a uniform gloss characteristic between said first and second fusing members, the controller adjusting a temperature level of said first and second fusing members in response to the sensed gloss values.
2. The printing architecture of claim 1, further comprising a gloss patch generator for generating a gloss patch on the substrate.
3. The printing architecture of claim 2, wherein said sensor is in communication with said controller and generates a control signal if detected gloss levels on said gloss patch are beyond a predefined target value.
4. The printing architecture of claim 1, wherein said controller includes means for correlating fuser adjustment values to detected gloss level.
5. The printing architecture of claim 4, wherein said correlating means includes a look-up table.
6. The printing architecture of claim 5, wherein said look-up table includes values predetermined based on a given substrate attribute.
7. The printing architecture of claim 1, wherein said sensor is in communication with said controller and generates a control signal if a detected gloss level on said fuser member is beyond a predefined target value.
8. The printing architecture of claim 1, wherein said sensor includes an optical sensor for sensing a fuser gloss value of residue marking particles on a surface of a fuser member.
9. The printing architecture of claim 1, wherein said calibration system includes an optical sensor for sensing a fuser gloss value of residue marking particles on a surface of the fuser member and a sensor for sensing a substrate gloss value of marking particles fused on a surface of the substrate.
10. The printing architecture of claim 1, wherein said calibration system has an optional first mode of operation wherein said calibration system adjusts the gloss levels of said first and second fusing systems based upon the fuser gloss value of residue marking particles on the surface of the fuser member during a warm up routine.
11. The printing architecture of claim 10, wherein said calibration system has an optional second mode of operation wherein said calibration system adjusts the gloss levels of said first and second fusing systems based upon the substrate gloss value of marking particles fused on the surface of the substrate during a printing mode.
12. The printing architecture of claim 1, wherein said calibration system includes a scheduling system for periodically polling the gloss performance of either said first or said second fuser system by enabling at least one of sensing the substrate gloss and sensing the fuser member gloss.
13. The printing architecture of claim 1, wherein said sensor senses a fuser gloss value of a surface of one of said first and second fuser members.
14. A printing architecture comprising:
a first print engine including a first fuser system having a first fusing member for fusing marking particles on a substrate;
a second print engine including a second fuser system having a second fusing member for fusing marking particles on the substrate; and
a sensor system, comprising:
a calibration system for maintaining uniform gloss characteristics between printed images generated by the first fusing system and the second fusing system, said calibration system including a sensor for sensing a gloss value of the surface of each fusing member, the calibration system correlating the gloss value of the surface of the fusing member to a gloss level of the printed image on the substrate, and
a controller for adjusting an operating temperature of the first and second fusing systems based on the sensed gloss values to maintain a uniform gloss characteristic between said first and second fusing systems.
Description
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

Reference is made to commonly-assigned copending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/953,953, filed Sep. 29, 2004, entitled “Customized Set Point Control For Output Stability”, by David G. Anderson et al., copending U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/631,918, filed concurrently herewith, entitled “Printing System With Multiple Operations for Final Appearance and Permanence”, by David G. Anderson et al., copending U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/631,921, filed concurrently herewith, entitled “Printing System With Multiple Operations for Final Appearance and Permanence”, by David G. Anderson et al., copending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/000,158, filed concurrently herewith, entitled “Glossing System For Use In A Printing System”, by Bryan J. Roof, copending U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/631,651, filed concurrently herewith, entitled “Tightly Integrated Parallel Printing Architecture Making Use of Combined Color and Monochrome Engines”, by David G. Anderson et al., copending U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/631,656, filed concurrently herewith, entitled “Multi-Purpose Media Transport Having Integral Image Quality Sensing Capability”, by Steven R. Moore, copending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/999,450, filed concurrently herewith, entitled “Addressable Fusing For An Integrated Printing System”, by Robert M. Lofthus, et al.; and copending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/000,168, filed concurrently herewith, entitled “Addressable Fusing and Heating Methods and Apparatus”, by Robert M. Lofthus et al., the disclosure(s) of which are incorporated herein.

BACKGROUND

This invention relates generally to a tightly integrated parallel printing architecture containing at least a first print engine and a second print engine and more particularly concerns calibration system for maintaining uniform gloss characteristics between printed images generated by the first print engine and the second print engine.

In the office equipment industry, different customers have different requirements as to their business relationship with the manufacturer of the equipment or other service provider. For various reasons, some customers may wish to own their equipment, such as copiers and printers, outright, and take full responsibility for maintaining and servicing the equipment. At the other extreme, some customers may wish to have a “hands off” approach to their equipment, wherein the equipment is leased, and the manufacturer or service provider takes the entire responsibility of keeping the equipment maintained. In such a “hands off” situation, the customer may not even want to know the details about when the equipment is being serviced, and further it is likely that the manufacturer or service provider will want to know fairly far in advance when maintenance is necessary for the equipment, so as to minimize “down time.” Other business relationships between the “owning” and “leasing” extremes may be imagined, such as a customer owning the equipment but engaging the manufacturer or service provider to maintain the equipment on a renewable contract basis.

A common trend in the maintenance of office equipment, particularly copiers and printers, is to organize the machine on a modular basis, wherein certain distinct subsystems of a machine are bundled together into modules which can be readily removed from machines and replaced with new modules of the same type. A modular design facilitates a great flexibility in the business relationship with the customer. By providing subsystems in discrete modules, visits from a service representative can be made very short, since all the representative has to do is remove and replace a defective module. Actual repair of the module takes place away at the service provider's premises. Further, some customers may wish to have the ability to buy modules “off the shelf,” such as from an office supply store. Indeed, it is possible that a customer may lease the machine and wish to buy a succession of modules as needed.

In order to facilitate a customer demand for even higher productivity and speed has been required of these image recording apparatuses. However, the respective systems have their own speed limits and if an attempt is made to provide higher speeds, numerous problems will occur and/or larger and more bulky apparatuses must be used to meet the higher speed demands. The larger and bulkier apparatuses, i.e. high speed printers, typically represent a very expensive and perhaps uneconomical apparatus. The expense of these apparatuses along with their inherent complexity can only be justified by the small percentage of extremely high volume printing customers. Therefore the utilization of plurality of print engine modules (IMEs) to provide higher printing speeds are highly desirable, such a system is disclosed in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/924,459 entitled “PARALLEL PRINTING ARCHITECTURE CONSISTING OF CONTAINERIZED IMAGE MARKING ENGINE MODULES”.

In (tightly integrated parallel printing), machines have multiple fusers in a system so the generally low reliability of color fusers is a major concern for such systems. A second important consideration for these systems is gloss uniformity from fuser to fuser. Due to the tolerances in manufacturing, fuser conditions and components, deviation in gloss from marking engine to marking engine vary thereby providing a system to accomplish uniform gloss in a parallel printing system is an acute need.

SUMMARY

The present invention addresses the problems noted above by providing a tightly integrated parallel printing architecture having at least a first print engine and a second print engine, the first print engine and a second print engine includes a first fuser system having a first fusing member for fusing marking particles on the substrate and second fuser system having a second fusing member for fusing marking particles on the substrate, the tightly integrated parallel printing architecture having a sensor system, comprising: a calibration system for maintaining uniform gloss characteristics between printed images generated by the first fusing system and the second fusing system, said calibration system including sensor for sensing a gloss value indicative of the gloss of the fused marking particles on the substrate.

In one aspect, in a printing architecture having at least a first print engine and a second print engine, the first print engine and a second print engine including a first fuser system having a first fusing member for fusing marking particles on the substrate and second fuser system having a second fusing member for fusing marking particles on the substrate, a method for maintaining uniform gloss characteristics between printed images generated by the first fusing system and the second fusing system is provided. The method includes sensing a gloss value indicative of the gloss of the fused marking particles on the substrate and calibrating the first fusing system and the second fusing system so that the gloss of the fused marking particles on the substrates exiting the first fusing system and the second fusing system are within a predefined value,

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a simplified partially-elevational, partially-schematic view of an image marking engine in which two or more engine employed with the principles of the present invention.

FIGS. 2 and 3 are sectional views showing an arrangement of image marking engines according to one possible embodiment that can be employed with the principles of the present invention.

FIG. 4 illustrates a schematic of an appearance employed with the present invention.

FIG. 5 illustrates an example of data curve which can be used to maintain proper functioning of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

FIG. 1 is a simplified partially-elevational, partially-schematic view of an electrophotographic printing apparatus in this case a combination digital copier/printer, in which many of the aspects of the present invention can be embodied. (As used in the claims herein, a “printing apparatus” or “image marking engine” (IME) can apply to any machine that outputs prints in whatever manner, such as a light-lens copier, digital printer, facsimile, or multifunction device, and can create images electrostatographically, by ink-jet, hot-melt, or by any other method.)

The one portions of hardware in the machine include a “xerographic module” or IME indicated as 1. As is familiar in the art of electrostatographic printing, there is contained within xerographic module 1 many of the essential hardware elements required to create desired images electrophotographically. The images are created on the surface of a rotating photoreceptor 2. Disposed at various points around the circumference of photoreceptor 2 are xerographic subsystems which include a cleaning device generally indicated as 3, a charging corotron 4 or equivalent device, a exposure station 8, a developer unit 5, a transfer corotron 6 and a fuser 7. Of course, in any particular embodiment of an electrophotographic printer, there may be variations on this general outline, such as additional corotrons, or cleaning devices, or, in the case of a color printer, multiple developer units. Xerographic subsystems are controlled by a CPU which adjusts various xerographic parameters. For example Developed Mass Area (DMA); transfer currents, fuser temperature to produce a high quality prints.

With particular reference to developer unit 5, as is familiar in the art, the unit 5 generally comprises a housing in which a supply of developer (which typically contain toner particles plus carrier particles) which can be supplied to an electrostatic latent image created on the surface of photoreceptor 14 or other charge receptor. Developer unit 5 may be made integral with or separable from xerographic module 1; and in a color-capable embodiment of the invention, there would be provided multiple developer units 5, each unit developing the photoreceptor 2 with a different primary-color toner.

FIG. 2 shows a schematic view of a printing system comprising a plurality of marking engines, as shown in FIG. 1, associated for tightly integrated parallel printing of documents within the system. Each marking engine can receive image data, which can include pixels, in the form of digital image signals for processing from the computer network by way of a suitable communication channel, such as a telephone line, computer cable, ISDN line, etc. Typically, computer networks include clients who generate jobs, wherein each job includes the image data in the form of a plurality of electronic pages and a set of processing instructions. In turn, each job is converted into a representation written in a page description language (PDL) such as PostScript RTM. containing the image data. Where the PDL of the incoming image data is different from the PDL used by the digital printing system, a suitable conversion unit converts the incoming PDL to the PDL used by the digital printing system. The suitable conversion unit may be located in an interface unit in the controller. Other remote sources of image data such as a floppy disk, hard disk, storage medium, scanner, etc. may be envisioned.

For on-site image input, an operator may use the scanner to scan documents, which provides digital image data including pixels to the interface unit. Whether digital image data is received from scanner or computer network, the interface unit processes the digital image data in the form required to carry out each programmed job. The interface unit is preferably part of the digital printing system. However, the computer network or the scanner may share the function of converting the digital image data into a form, which can be unutilized by the digital printing system 10.

More particularly, printing system 10 is illustrated as including primary elements comprising a first marking engine 12, a second marking engine 14, a finisher assembly 16. Connecting these three elements are three transport assemblies 18, 24 and 20. The document outputs of the first marking engine 12 can be directed either up and over the second marking engine 14 through horizontal by-pass path 24 and then to the finisher 16. Alternatively, where a document is to be duplex printed, the first vertical transport 18 can transport a document to the second marking engine 14 for duplex printing. The details of practicing parallel simplex printing and duplex printing through tandemly arranged marking engines are known and can be generally appreciated with reference to the foregoing cited U.S. Pat. No. 5,568,246. In order to maximize marking paper handling reliability and to simplify system jam clearance, the marking engines are often run in a simplex mode. The sheets exit the marking engine image-side up so they must be inverted before compiling in the finisher 16. Control station 30 allows an operator to selectively control the details of a desired print job.

The marking engines 12, 14 shown in FIG. 2 are conventional in this general illustration and include a plurality of document feeder trays 32 for holding different sizes of documents that can receive print markings by the marking engine portion 34. Each document feeder tray may include document substrates having different attributes such as roughness, coats, weights and etc. The documents are transported to the marking engine portion along a highway path 36 which is common to a plurality of the trays 32. It is to be appreciated that any document or media transport path within any of the alternative embodiments outside of the image transfer zone of the marking engine should be considered a high speed highway of document transports. By “highway” path portions is meant those document transport paths where the document is transported at a relatively high speed. For example, in a parallel printing system the sheets are transported through the marking engines at an optimum velocity, but in order to merge the sheets from two or more marking engines together without overlapping them, the sheets must be accelerated up to a higher velocity. A similar situation occurs when providing a stream of blank media to two or more marking engines. The velocity of the highways is therefore generally higher than the velocity used in the marking engines. A plurality of nip drive rollers associated with process direction drive motors (not shown), position sensors (not shown) and their associated control assemblies (belts, guide rods, frames, etc., also not shown) cause the transport of documents through the system at the selected highway speed. Documents printed by the marking engine generally must be transported at a slower speed than the highway through the image transfer zone of the marking engine. The image transfer zone can be considered to be that portion of the marking engine 34 in which some portion of the sheet is in the process of having an image transferred to it and in some marking engines, fused. Each marking engine 12, 14 is shown to include an inverter assembly 50 conventionally known as useful for duplex printing of a document by the same engine. More particularly, after one side of a document is printed, it is transported to the inverter assembly 50 where it is inverted and then communicated back to the image transfer zone by duplex path 52.

With reference to FIG. 3, another tightly integrated parallel printing system architecture is illustrated, particularly showing alternative dispositions of inverter assemblies as velocity buffers between high speed highways and the marking engines. In this system, the inverters could also optionally include registration capability. In the architecture of FIG. 3, four marking engines 100, 102, 104, and 108 are shown interposed between a feeder module 110 and a finishing module 112. The marking engines can be different types of marking engines, i.e., black only, custom color or color, for high speed parallel printing of documents being transported through the system. Each marking engine has a first inverter assembly 120 adjacent an entrance to the marking engine 100 and an exit inverter assembly 122 adjacent an exit of the marking engine. As noted above, as the document is being processed for image transfer through the marking engine 100, the document is transported at a relatively slower speed, herein referred to as engine marking speed. However, when outside of the marking engine 100, the document can be transported through the interconnecting high speed highways at a relatively higher speed. In inverter assembly 120 a document exiting the highways 126 at a highway speed can be slowed down before entering marking engine 100 by decoupling the document at the inverter from the highways 126 and by receiving the document at one speed into the inverter assembly, adjusting the reversing process direction motor speed to the slower marking engine speed and then transporting the document at slower speed to the marking engine 100. Additionally, if a document has been printed in marking engine 100, it exits the marking engine at the marking engine speed and can be received in the exit inverter assembly 122 at the marking engine speed, decoupled from the marking engine and transported for re-entering the high speed highway at the highway speed. Alternatively, it is within the scope of the subject embodiments to provide additional paper paths 130 to bypass the input or exit inverter assemblies. Additionally, as noted above, any one of the inverter assemblies shown in any of the architectures could also be used to register the document in skew or in a lateral direction.

Now referring to FIG. 4, each IME includes a fuser system 7 which includes a fusing member 510, that contacts the topmost layer of marking particles on the substrate and a pressure roll 512. A heating element 511 is disposed with the fusing member 510. A gloss calibration system 520 is provided for monitoring gloss levels of each fuser system so that gloss levels from each fuser system are within a predefined target value thereby maintaining uniform gloss characteristics between printed images generated by all IMEs. The gloss calibration system includes an appearance controller 522 for controlling the gloss output levels of each fuser system; and appearance sensors, such as a fuser gloss sensor 524 and a substrate gloss sensor 526 (FIG. 1), for detecting gloss levels of printed images generated by all IMEs. The appearance sensor 524, 526 communicates with the appearance controller 522 that generates a control signal if detected gloss levels are beyond the predefined target value. These sensors provide real-time measurements to the gloss calibration system 520, which makes adjustments to the various fuser systems 7 in order to keep final appearance within a predefined target value.

Referring back to FIG. 1, the substrate sensors 526 monitor the gloss of the substrates exiting the fuser system and feedback the gloss value back to the gloss calibration system 520. This data is used to adjust the parameters of the fuser system 7 such as fuser temperature, fuser speed, and nip pressure between the fusing member 510 and pressure roll 512. Preferably, in operation a gloss test patch is generated by a patch generator which can be an exposure station that records a control patch on the imaging surface which is developed by the development station 5 or the patch generator can be a separate unit 528. Then the test patch is fused and is measured by the substrate sensor 526. The substrate sensor 526 can be a full width array sensor which measures the patch across the entire width of the substrate.

The gloss calibration system includes a lookup table for storing adjustment parameters values for adjusting the gloss output of the fusing member. The adjustment parameters may also take into account particular substrate attributes for example basis weights, textures, coatings of the substrate and sent the appropriate a adjustment value for the particular substrate attribute. The values contained in the lookup table are predetermined through a series of optimization tests for each substrate, i.e., the values producing a particular set points of gloss for a given substrate attribute may be experimentally predetermined. The lookup tables may be embodied by a ROM including substrate attribute information, for example. The memory locations of the ROM are addressed based on the substrate attribute selected. In addition, the gloss calibration system also examines the delta in measured gloss between each fuser system wherein optimally the delta should be zero.

As illustrated in FIG. 4, appearance sensor can also be sensor that monitors the gloss on the fusing member also this sensor can be used equally suited with gloss rolls as described in co-pending applications D/20031867 and D/20031867Q which are hereby incorporated by reference. The sensor is comprised of an emitter and a receiver. While the fusing member is rotating, the sensor slowly scans from one end of the gloss roll to the other end. This could be accomplished during warm-up time. Many types of methods could be employed to transport the sensor from one end of the roll to the other. Alternately, a full width sensor can be used to scan the entire length of the fusing member. As illustrated in FIG. 4, the sensor housing has bearings that are attached to a pair of slide rails. A timing belt that is fixed to the sensor housing and moved via a stepper motor could control the position of the sensor.

When the emitter is activated at an incident angle to the fusing member, some of the light would be reflected to the receiver and some would be dispersed. Applicant has found that the level of dispersion depends on the changing surface characteristics of the fusing member due to heating the fusing member. For example, in a fusing member having a surface layer composed of VITON® and TEFLON®, etc. the reflective properties change while heated and this change can be equated to gloss levels on the substrate being fused. In addition thereto additional materials can be applied to the surface of the roller as an indicator for gloss change. When gloss balancing two or more fusing members, one is looking for a change in the analog signal coming from the receiver. If the output from one fusing member is substantially less than nominal, the temperature of the roll with less gloss can be raised. The amount to raise the temperature by is determined by cross referencing the gloss value from the low gloss roll to the nominal value and then using a lookup table or equation to modify the temperature as determined by the latitude space for that type of fuser.

Referring to FIG. 5, the gloss data shown is a curve that was generated during development and represents the nominal gloss versus temperature curve for the xerographic printing machine as illustrated in FIG. 1. In the tandem printing system configuration (FIG. 2) are two fuser systems, one in each individual marking engine. If one fuser system 7 is performing above the nominal gloss value for the given settings, its temperature can be lowered. Conversely if the other fuser system is determined by the curve itself. If one knows the equation of the curve in the general vicinity one is interested in, then one can also determine its derivative. Once the derivative, (or equation of the slope) is determined, the delta between the fuser systems actual position and the nominal curve can be used in conjunction with the slope to solve for the required temperature change to bring the fuser systems back to the nominal condition. This entire process could be done during warm up. Also the nip pressure can be adjusted between the fusing member 510 and pressure roll 512 to change the gloss value and also the speed in which the substrate moves through the nip.

Also this sensing system can be used to detect defects in the fuser systems. In this case as the sensor observes an area of less reflectivity, the output voltage would be lower, thereby indicating a defect. Once the defect has been identified and located and the defect position mapped, the scheduler is informed of the defect. In the case of a tightly integrated parallel printing machine, where there are multiple individual marking engines and therefore multiple fusers in the same overall machine, if the incoming job has a need for high gloss in the affected area, the scheduler sends the job to another fuser system in the parallel printing machine. A warning is sent to the user or to service that it is time to replace the roll soon.

The calibration system has an optional first mode of operation wherein the calibration system adjust the gloss levels of each fusing system based upon the fuser gloss value on the surface of the fuser member during a warm up routine. The first mode of operation is particularly useful because it gives an indication of the gloss characteristics across the entire fusing member. Also, the calibration system has an optional second mode of operation wherein the calibration system adjust the gloss levels of each fusing system based upon the substrate gloss value of marking particles fused on a surface of the substrate during a printing mode. The second mode of operation is particularly useful because it gives an indication of the gloss characteristics of fusing member in real-time. The calibration system includes a scheduling system for periodically polling the gloss performance of each fuser system by enabling sensing of the fusing member gloss and/or sensing of the gloss on the substrates.

In recapitulation there has been provided a sensor system for detecting gloss levels of a printed image on a substrate generated by a print engine, including a fixing member for fixing marking particles on the substrate, an optical sensor for sensing a gloss value of the surface of the fixing member; and controller for correlating the gloss value of the surface of the fixing member to a gloss value of the printed image on the substrate. In one embodiment, the sensor includes an optical sensor for sensing a fuser gloss value of residue marking particles on a surface of a fuser member.

Other embodiments and modifications of the present invention may occur to those skilled in the art subsequent to a review of the information presented herein; these embodiments and modifications, as well as equivalents thereof, are also included within the scope of this invention.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4579446Jun 30, 1983Apr 1, 1986Canon Kabushiki KaishaBoth-side recording system
US4587532Apr 26, 1984May 6, 1986Canon Kabushiki KaishaRecording apparatus producing multiple copies simultaneously
US4836119Mar 21, 1988Jun 6, 1989The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc.Sperical ball positioning apparatus for seamed limp material article assembly system
US5004222Jun 12, 1989Apr 2, 1991Fuji Xerox Co., Ltd.Apparatus for changing the direction of conveying paper
US5008713Jun 8, 1990Apr 16, 1991Canon Kabushiki KaishaSheet conveying apparatus and sheet conveying method
US5080340Jan 2, 1991Jan 14, 1992Eastman Kodak CompanyModular finisher for a reproduction apparatus
US5095342Sep 28, 1990Mar 10, 1992Xerox CorporationMethods for sheet scheduling in an imaging system having an endless duplex paper path loop
US5155558Sep 19, 1990Oct 13, 1992E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyMethod and apparatus for analyzing the appearance features of a surface
US5159395Aug 29, 1991Oct 27, 1992Xerox CorporationMethod of scheduling copy sheets in a dual mode duplex printing system
US5208640Nov 8, 1990May 4, 1993Fuji Xerox Co., Ltd.Image recording apparatus
US5272511Apr 30, 1992Dec 21, 1993Xerox CorporationSheet inserter and methods of inserting sheets into a continuous stream of sheets
US5326093May 24, 1993Jul 5, 1994Xerox CorporationUniversal interface module interconnecting various copiers and printers with various sheet output processors
US5435544Feb 16, 1994Jul 25, 1995Xerox CorporationPrinter mailbox system signaling overdue removals of print jobs from mailbox bins
US5473419Nov 8, 1993Dec 5, 1995Eastman Kodak CompanyImage forming apparatus having a duplex path with an inverter
US5489969Mar 27, 1995Feb 6, 1996Xerox CorporationIn a printing system
US5497218 *Aug 24, 1994Mar 5, 1996Xerox CorporationMethod of controlling the surface temperature of a heated fuser member
US5504568Apr 21, 1995Apr 2, 1996Xerox CorporationPrint sequence scheduling system for duplex printing apparatus
US5525031Feb 18, 1994Jun 11, 1996Xerox CorporationAutomated print jobs distribution system for shared user centralized printer
US5557367Mar 27, 1995Sep 17, 1996Xerox CorporationMethod and apparatus for optimizing scheduling in imaging devices
US5568246 *Sep 29, 1995Oct 22, 1996Xerox CorporationHigh productivity dual engine simplex and duplex printing system using a reversible duplex path
US5570172Jan 18, 1995Oct 29, 1996Xerox CorporationTwo up high speed printing system
US5596416Jan 13, 1994Jan 21, 1997T/R SystemsMultiple printer module electrophotographic printing device
US5629762Jun 7, 1995May 13, 1997Eastman Kodak CompanyImage forming apparatus having a duplex path and/or an inverter
US5710968Aug 28, 1995Jan 20, 1998Xerox CorporationPrinting apparatus
US5778377Nov 4, 1994Jul 7, 1998International Business Machines CorporationTable driven graphical user interface
US5884910Aug 18, 1997Mar 23, 1999Xerox CorporationEvenly retractable and self-leveling nips sheets ejection system
US5995721Jun 16, 1997Nov 30, 1999Xerox CorporationDistributed printing system
US6059284Jan 21, 1997May 9, 2000Xerox CorporationProcess, lateral and skew sheet positioning apparatus and method
US6097500Jan 12, 1998Aug 1, 2000Xerox CorporationOperation scheduling system for a digital printing apparatus, where new constraints can be added
US6101345Mar 12, 1998Aug 8, 2000Agfa-GevaertMethod for gloss control in an electrographic apparatus
US6125248Jul 26, 1999Sep 26, 2000Xerox CorporationElectrostatographic reproduction machine including a plurality of selectable fusing assemblies
US6241242Oct 12, 1999Jun 5, 2001Hewlett-Packard CompanyDeskew of print media
US6297886Jun 5, 1996Oct 2, 2001John S. CornellTandem printer printing apparatus
US6337958 *Sep 5, 2000Jan 8, 2002International Business Machines CorporationMatching the printing characteristics between two engines of a duplex print system
US6341773Jun 8, 2000Jan 29, 2002Tecnau S.R.L.Dynamic sequencer for sheets of printed paper
US6384918Mar 23, 2000May 7, 2002Xerox CorporationSpectrophotometer for color printer color control with displacement insensitive optics
US6438336Feb 2, 2001Aug 20, 2002Hewlett-Packard CompanyMethod and apparatus for varying gloss level for individual elements printed on a single page
US6450711Dec 5, 2000Sep 17, 2002Xerox CorporationHigh speed printer with dual alternate sheet inverters
US6476376Jan 16, 2002Nov 5, 2002Xerox CorporationTwo dimensional object position sensor
US6476923Dec 20, 1996Nov 5, 2002John S. CornellTandem printer printing apparatus
US6493098Apr 2, 1997Dec 10, 2002John S. CornellDesk-top printer and related method for two-sided printing
US6537910Oct 27, 2000Mar 25, 2003Micron Technology, Inc.Forming metal silicide resistant to subsequent thermal processing
US6550762Dec 5, 2000Apr 22, 2003Xerox CorporationHigh speed printer with dual alternate sheet inverters
US6554276Mar 30, 2001Apr 29, 2003Xerox CorporationFlexible sheet reversion using an omni-directional transport system
US6577925Nov 24, 1999Jun 10, 2003Xerox CorporationApparatus and method of distributed object handling
US6607320Mar 30, 2001Aug 19, 2003Xerox CorporationMobius combination of reversion and return path in a paper transport system
US6608988Oct 18, 2001Aug 19, 2003Xerox CorporationConstant inverter speed timing method and apparatus for duplex sheets in a tandem printer
US6612566Jan 13, 2003Sep 2, 2003Xerox CorporationHigh speed printer with dual alternate sheet inverters
US6612571Dec 6, 2001Sep 2, 2003Xerox CorporationSheet conveying device having multiple outputs
US6621576May 22, 2001Sep 16, 2003Xerox CorporationColor imager bar based spectrophotometer for color printer color control system
US6633382May 22, 2001Oct 14, 2003Xerox CorporationAngular, azimuthal and displacement insensitive spectrophotometer for color printer color control systems
US6639669Sep 10, 2001Oct 28, 2003Xerox CorporationDiagnostics for color printer on-line spectrophotometer control system
US6654136Feb 22, 1999Nov 25, 2003Canon Kabushiki KaishaPrinting with a plurality of printers
US6819906Aug 29, 2003Nov 16, 2004Xerox CorporationPrinter output sets compiler to stacker system
US6925283Dec 2, 2004Aug 2, 2005Xerox CorporationHigh print rate merging and finishing system for printing
US6950615 *Nov 20, 2003Sep 27, 2005Eastman Kodak CompanyProcedure and device for adjusting gloss in print material
US6959165Dec 2, 2004Oct 25, 2005Xerox CorporationHigh print rate merging and finishing system for printing
US7046364 *Mar 14, 2003May 16, 2006Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.Method and apparatus for matching gloss levels of printed and unprinted regions of a media substrate
US20010021027Mar 9, 2001Sep 13, 2001Hiroshi UenoPrinting system and printing method
US20020078012May 16, 2001Jun 20, 2002Xerox CorporationDatabase method and structure for a finishing system
US20020103559Jan 29, 2001Aug 1, 2002Xerox CorporationSystems and methods for optimizing a production facility
US20030077095Oct 18, 2001Apr 24, 2003Conrow Brian R.Constant inverter speed timing strategy for duplex sheets in a tandem printer
US20040057741Sep 23, 2003Mar 25, 2004Fuji Xerox Co., Ltd.Fixing device, fixing method and image forming apparatus
US20040085561Oct 30, 2002May 6, 2004Xerox CorporationPlanning and scheduling reconfigurable systems with regular and diagnostic jobs
US20040085562Oct 30, 2002May 6, 2004Xerox Corporation.Planning and scheduling reconfigurable systems with alternative capabilities
US20040088207Oct 30, 2002May 6, 2004Xerox CorporationPlanning and scheduling reconfigurable systems around off-line resources
US20040141764Jul 23, 2003Jul 22, 2004Nexpress Solutions LlcGloss/density measurement device with feedback to control gloss and density of images produced by an electrographic reproduction apparatus
US20040150156Feb 4, 2003Aug 5, 2004Palo Alto Research Center, Incorporated.Frameless media path modules
US20040150158Feb 4, 2003Aug 5, 2004Palo Alto Research Center IncorporatedMedia path modules
US20040153983Feb 3, 2003Aug 5, 2004Mcmillan Kenneth L.Method and system for design verification using proof-partitioning
US20040216002Apr 28, 2003Oct 28, 2004Palo Alto Research Center, Incorporated.Planning and scheduling for failure recovery system and method
US20040225391Apr 28, 2003Nov 11, 2004Palo Alto Research Center IncorporatedMonitoring and reporting incremental job status system and method
US20040225394Apr 28, 2003Nov 11, 2004Palo Alto Research Center, Incorporated.Predictive and preemptive planning and scheduling for different jop priorities system and method
US20040247365Jun 3, 2004Dec 9, 2004Xerox CorporationUniversal flexible plural printer to plural finisher sheet integration system
JP2003140415A Title not available
JP2003156969A Title not available
JP2004226484A Title not available
JP2004226826A Title not available
JPH05333643A Title not available
Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1Desmond Fretz, "Cluster Printing Solution Announced", Today at Xerox (TAX), No. 1129, Aug. 3, 2001.
2Morgan, P.F., "Integration of Black Only and Color Printers", Xerox Disclosure Journal, vol. 16, No. 6, Nov./Dec. 1991, pp. 381-383.
3U.S. Appl. No. 10/,953,953, filed Sep. 29, 2004, Radulski et al.
4U.S. Appl. No. 10/761,522, filed Jan. 21, 2004, Mandel et al.
5U.S. Appl. No. 10/785,211, filed Feb. 24, 2004, Lofthus et al.
6U.S. Appl. No. 10/881,619, filed Jun. 30, 2004, Bobrow.
7U.S. Appl. No. 10/917,676, filed Aug. 13, 2004, Lofthus et al.
8U.S. Appl. No. 10/917,768, filed Aug. 13, 2004, Lofthus et al.
9U.S. Appl. No. 10/924,106, filed Aug. 23, 2004, Lofthus et al.
10U.S. Appl. No. 10/924,113, filed Aug. 23, 2004, deJong et al.
11U.S. Appl. No. 10/924,458, filed Aug. 23, 2004, Lofthus et al.
12U.S. Appl. No. 10/924,459, filed Aug. 23, 2004, Mandel et al.
13U.S. Appl. No. 10/933,556, filed Sep. 3, 2004, Spencer et al.
14U.S. Appl. No. 10/999,326, filed Nov. 30, 2004, Grace et al.
15U.S. Appl. No. 10/999,450, filed Nov. 30, 2004, Lofthus et al.
16U.S. Appl. No. 11/000,158, filed Nov. 30, 2004, Roof.
17U.S. Appl. No. 11/000,168, filed Nov. 30, 2004, Biegelsen et al.
18U.S. Appl. No. 11/000,258, filed Nov. 30, 2004, Roof.
19U.S. Appl. No. 11/051,817, filed Feb. 4, 2005, Moore et al.
20U.S. Appl. No. 11/069,020, filed Feb. 28, 2005, Lofthus et al.
21U.S. Appl. No. 11/070,681, filed Mar. 2, 2005, Viturro et al.
22U.S. Appl. No. 11/081,473, filed Mar. 16, 2005, Moore.
23U.S. Appl. No. 11/084,280, filed Mar. 18, 2005, Mizes.
24U.S. Appl. No. 11/089,854, filed Mar. 25, 2005, Clark et al.
25U.S. Appl. No. 11/090,498, filed Mar. 25, 2005, Clark.
26U.S. Appl. No. 11/090,502, filed Mar. 25, 2005, Mongeon.
27U.S. Appl. No. 11/093,229, filed Mar. 29, 2005, Julien.
28U.S. Appl. No. 11/094,864, filed Mar. 31, 2005, de Jong et al.
29U.S. Appl. No. 11/094,998, filed Mar. 31, 2005, Moore et al.
30U.S. Appl. No. 11/095,378, filed Mar. 31, 2005, Moore et al.
31U.S. Appl. No. 11/095,872, filed Mar. 31, 2005, Julien et al.
32U.S. Appl. No. 11/102,332, filed Apr. 8, 2005, Hindi et al.
33U.S. Appl. No. 11/102,355, filed Apr. 8, 2005, Fromherz et al.
34U.S. Appl. No. 11/102,899, filed Apr. 8, 2005, Crawford et al.
35U.S. Appl. No. 11/102,910, filed Apr. 8, 2005, Crawford et al.
36U.S. Appl. No. 11/109,558, filed Apr. 19, 2005, Furst et al.
37U.S. Appl. No. 11/109,566, filed Apr. 19, 2005, Mandel et al.
38U.S. Appl. No. 11/109,996, filed Apr. 20, 2005, Mongeon et al.
39U.S. Appl. No. 11/115,766, filed Apr. 27, 2005, Grace.
40U.S. Appl. No. 11/122,420, filed May 25, 2005, Richards.
41U.S. Appl. No. 11/136,959, filed May 25, 2005, German et al.
42U.S. Appl. No. 11/137,251, filed May 25, 2005, Lofthus et al.
43U.S. Appl. No. 11/137,273, filed May 25, 2005, Anderson et al.
44U.S. Appl. No. 11/137,634, filed May 25, 2005, Lofthus et al.
45U.S. Appl. No. 11/143,818, filed Jun. 2, 2005, Dalal et al.
46U.S. Appl. No. 11/146,665, filed Jun. 7, 2005, Mongeon.
47U.S. Appl. No. 11/152,275, filed Jun. 14, 2005, Roof et al.
48U.S. Appl. No. 11/156,778, filed Jun. 20, 2005, Swift.
49U.S. Appl. No. 11/157,598, filed Jun. 21, 2005, Frankel.
50U.S. Appl. No. 11/166,299, filed Jun. 24, 2005, Moore.
51U.S. Appl. No. 11/166,460, filed Jun. 24, 2005, Roof et al.
52U.S. Appl. No. 11/166,581, filed Jun. 24, 2005, Lang et al.
53U.S. Appl. No. 11/170,845, filed Jun. 30, 2005, Sampath et al.
54U.S. Appl. No. 11/170,873, filed Jun. 30, 2005, Klassen.
55U.S. Appl. No. 11/170,975, filed Jun. 30, 2005, Klassen.
56U.S. Appl. No. 11/189,371, filed Jul. 26, 2005, Moore et al.
57U.S. Appl. No. 11/208,871, filed Aug. 22, 2005, Dalal et al.
58U.S. Appl. No. 11/212,367, filed Aug. 26, 2005, Anderson et al.
59U.S. Appl. No. 11/215,791, filed Aug. 30, 2005, Hamby et al.
60U.S. Appl. No. 11/222,260, filed Sep. 8, 2005, Goodman et al.
61U.S. Appl. No. 11/234,468, filed Sep. 23, 2005, Hamby et al.
62U.S. Appl. No. 11/234,553, filed Sep. 23, 2005, Mongeon.
63U.S. Appl. No. 11/235,979, filed Sep. 27, 2005, Anderson et al.
64U.S. Appl. No. 11/236,099, filed Sep. 27, 2005, Anderson et al.
65U.S. Appl. No. 11/247,778, filed Oct. 11, 2005, Radulski et al.
66U.S. Appl. No. 11/248,044, filed Oct. 12, 2005, Spencer et al.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7912391 *Mar 28, 2006Mar 22, 2011Canon Kabushiki KaishaImage-heating device with a first heating member and an adjustable second heating member
US7995225Jun 7, 2010Aug 9, 2011Xerox CorporationScheduling system
US8267498Jun 1, 2010Sep 18, 2012Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P.Methods, apparatus and articles of manufacture to control gloss quality
Classifications
U.S. Classification399/67, 399/69
International ClassificationG03G15/20
Cooperative ClassificationG03G15/2003, G03G2215/00426
European ClassificationG03G15/20H
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Feb 22, 2011FPAYFee payment
Year of fee payment: 4
Jun 30, 2005ASAssignment
Owner name: JP MORGAN CHASE BANK, TEXAS
Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:XEROX CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:016761/0158
Effective date: 20030625
Owner name: JP MORGAN CHASE BANK,TEXAS
Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:XEROX CORPORATION;US-ASSIGNMENT DATABASE UPDATED:20100302;REEL/FRAME:16761/158
Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:XEROX CORPORATION;US-ASSIGNMENT DATABASE UPDATED:20100316;REEL/FRAME:16761/158
Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:XEROX CORPORATION;US-ASSIGNMENT DATABASE UPDATED:20100330;REEL/FRAME:16761/158
Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:XEROX CORPORATION;US-ASSIGNMENT DATABASE UPDATED:20100406;REEL/FRAME:16761/158
Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:XEROX CORPORATION;US-ASSIGNMENT DATABASE UPDATED:20100413;REEL/FRAME:16761/158
Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:XEROX CORPORATION;US-ASSIGNMENT DATABASE UPDATED:20100427;REEL/FRAME:16761/158
Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:XEROX CORPORATION;US-ASSIGNMENT DATABASE UPDATED:20100511;REEL/FRAME:16761/158
Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:XEROX CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:16761/158
Nov 30, 2004ASAssignment
Owner name: XEROX CORPORATION, CONNECTICUT
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:ROOF, BRYAN J.;REEL/FRAME:016042/0118
Effective date: 20041025