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Publication numberUS730781 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 9, 1903
Filing dateJun 15, 1901
Priority dateJun 15, 1901
Publication numberUS 730781 A, US 730781A, US-A-730781, US730781 A, US730781A
InventorsGeorge W Mitchell
Original AssigneeGeorge W Mitchell
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Device for removing shingles from roofs or clapboards from walls.
US 730781 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

.No. 730,781. PATENTBL JUNE 9, 1908. L

v G. W. MITCHELL. V DEVICE FOR REMOVING SHINGLES PROM ROOPS 0R GLAPBOARDS PROM WALLS.

APPLICATION rum) JUN-E 15, 100;.

N0 MODEL.

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UNITED STATES Patented June 9, 1903.

PATENT GFFIQ GEORGE W. MITCHELL, OF NEW DOROHESTER, MASSACHUSETTS.

DEVICE FOR REMOVING SHINGLES FROM ROOFS OR CLAPBOARDS FROM WALLS.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 730,781, dated June 9, 1903.

Application filed June 15, 1901.

To all whom, it may concern.-

Be it known that I, GEORGE WASHINGTON MITCHELL, of New Dorchester, in the county of Suffolk and State of Massachusetts, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Devices for Removing Shingles from a Roof or Clapboards from a fall, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to a convenient device or tool for removing. shingles from a roof or clapboards from a wall for purpose of repair or replacement should such have become rotten or defective.

My device allows the shingles or clapboards to be removed singly without disturbing the adjacent shingles or clapboards.

Figure 1 is a side elevation of my device. Fig. 2 is a plan View of the same; and Fig. 3 is a perspective view of the same on a somewhat larger scale and broken away in the center.

In the accompanying drawings the letter A designates the tool, having a fiat head A and a shank or handle 13, provided with an enlarged head 0 for purpose of use with a hammer or mallet to drive the tool forwardly and having a right angular extension D for driving in the opposite direction.

E is a toothed edge having forwardly-projecting teeth e in the plane of the head A. F is a central opening in said head and provided at its forward edge with rearwardly and downwardly or outwardly projecting teeth G.

H H are notches at the side of the head.

For purpose of removing shingles having the exposed part thereof still firm or good the toothed edge E is applied to the shingle, and the tool being held at a proper angle the use of the hammer or mallet will remove the shingle or clapboard intact. If, however, the exposed part of the shingle or clapboard is rotted, so as not to admit of a proper engagement of the teeth 6 therewith, or if in the attempt to remove the shingle as above outlined the projecting or exposed part has become broken oif, leaving a part or parts there- Serial No- 64,697. (No model.)

of concealed beneath the adjacent shingles, then the fiat head of the tool is forced between the shingles or clapboards, and upon withdrawal by exerting force upon extension D the backwardly-projecting teeth G will become embedded in the stump of the shingle and will remove the same with the tool. Again, it may happen that there will be a nail or nails impossible to reach from the surface, being concealed by adjacent shingles or clapboards and interfering with the withdrawal of the old or insertion of the new shingle or clapboard. These nails are especially difficult to remove when near the edge of the shingle, in which case the teeth D would not remove such nails. The notches H at the side of my tool ofier, however, convenient means for engagement with such nails when the tool is withdrawn after having been driven in between shingles or clapboards. Further Withdrawal will extract the nail or break or cut the same.

I claim- 1. A device for removing shingles from a roof, having the fiat head provided with forwardly-projecting teeth in the plane of said head, said head having an opening therein, and rearwardly and outwardly projecting teeth at one side of said opening, substan tially as specified. I

2. A device for removing shingles from a roof, having the flat head provided with forwardly-projecting teeth in the plane thereof, and rearwardly and outwardly projecting teeth, substantially as specified.

3. A wedge or chisel bar adapted to be driven between shingles or clapboards, and having backwardly and outwardly projecting teeth on one face thereof adapted to withdraw theshingle, substantially as specified.

In testimony whereof I have affixed my signature in presence of two witnesses.

GEORGE W. MITCHELL.

Witnesses:

DAVID C. WILLIAMS, FRANK S. YOUNG.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2498458 *Jul 18, 1946Feb 21, 1950Stanley SchworkRipper tool
US2576262 *Mar 28, 1949Nov 27, 1951Morehead Joseph SPatch inserting tool
US2670535 *May 26, 1950Mar 2, 1954Ogden John FMuffler and tail pipe tool
US3074694 *Feb 24, 1961Jan 22, 1963Erickson Jr CarlRoof-nail spud
US5577711 *Apr 26, 1995Nov 26, 1996Shine; WilliamFlashing removal tool
US5836222 *Oct 9, 1996Nov 17, 1998Harpell; WilliamShingle removing tool
US6029545 *Aug 3, 1998Feb 29, 2000Harpell; WilliamRoofing tool
US7360473 *Feb 24, 2007Apr 22, 2008Terrill HoltShingle removal tool
US20060037199 *Aug 20, 2004Feb 23, 2006Alpert Alexander GFastener ripper
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationE04D15/003