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Publication numberUS731215 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 16, 1903
Filing dateMay 9, 1902
Priority dateMay 9, 1902
Publication numberUS 731215 A, US 731215A, US-A-731215, US731215 A, US731215A
InventorsThomas S Patterson
Original AssigneeThomas S Patterson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Centrifugal separator.
US 731215 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

No. 731,215. PATENTED JUNE 16, 1903. T. s. PATTERSON. GENTRIFUGAL SEPARATOR.

APPLICATION FILED MAY 9. 1902. RENEWED MAY 6, 1903.

N0 MODEL.

I I "as iaz 55 i a2 I it] v .21 we a0 .22 .21 1 w" 25" .28 19- 33 20'v UNITED STATES I Patented June 16, 1903. PATENT OFFICE.

THOMAS S. PATTERSON, OF FLUSHING, NEW YORK.

CENTRIFUGAL SEPARATOR.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 731,215, dated June 16, 1903. Application filed May 9, 1902. Renewed May 6, 1903. Serial No. 155,944. (No model.)

To all z'vhom it may concern.-

Be it known that I, THOMAS S. PATTERSON, of Flushing, county of Queens, New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Centrifugal Separators, of which the following is a clear, full, and exact description.

This invention refers to a centrifugal separator designed to throw off the liquid matter contained in fibrousmaterial or extract the oils from greasy fabrics, and is adapted especially for those materials containing liquids that become more liquescent on the application of heat, whereby the extraction becomes easier. I

This machine is constructed more particularly for the extraction of greases or oil from waste or light materials in which the rotating separator is driven by steam, the exhaust being adapted to heat the material to be deprived of the oil or grease, making the grease more easy to throw off.

A further object is to provide a separator that is cheaply and simply constructed and in which the revolving sustaining parts are well lubricated by a portion of the oil extracted and a machine in which no packingis necessary.

With these ends in view I have devised the construction described hereinafter and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in

Figure 1 is a central vertical section of the machine. Fig. 2 is-asection on line2 in Fig. 1, and Fig. 3 is a detail view of jet and blades of a turbine used to revolve the extractor.

In the views, 10 is a standard of suitable shape provided in the bottom with a disk 11,

screwed therein, and anotherdisk 12, both 22 are secured to the disk 21 to receive the impact of the steam from a jet 23, and a curved set of blades 24 are arranged on the outside of said driving-blades, extending to the peripheral flange 25 and, being covered witha plate 26, form the chambers 27, (shown more particularly in Fig. 2,) the plate 26 being removed in this figure. A perforation 28 leads from each of these chambers 27 into the dome 29, which is secured to the plate 21 and revolves therewith and has a series of blades 30, adapted to draw and force the contents of the dome toward the outlet-pipe 31. Outside the dome and secured to the periphery of the revolving portion is a screen 32, supported in any suitable manner, butillustrated as being sustained by the standards 33 and a ring 34. This screen and the dome form the chamber for receiving the fibrous materials from which the liquid matter is to be extracted. Acasing 35 on the table portion 18 serves to receive the oil thrown off by the rotation of the screen, and a pipe. 36 carries off the oil or grease so received.

When the machine is operated, the jet 23 ejects a stream that, striking the blades 22, (see Fig. 3,) causes the plate 21 and the parts supported thereon to revolve and the blades 24 acting to propel the steam thrown back by the blades 22 through the compartment 27 and perforation 28 into the dome 29, which is heated by said steam. A set of blades 30 act to keep the steam in circulation through the dome and passes it to and through the outlet-pipe 31. It will thus be evident that any material of an oily nature or a fibrous greasy mass-as, for instance, oil soaked Wastethat is introduced into the chamber formed by the dome 29 and the screen 32 is heated, making the oil more liquescent, and the revolving of the holder centrifugally separates it from the waste, and, the casing 35 receiving it, it flows to the flat table portion 18. A duct 19 serves to lead the oil to the moving parts of the machine, insuring, their lubrication, and the pipe 36 being raised so as to place its inlet higher than the duct 19 the machine is lubricated before the surplus flows off through the pipe 36. This construction of the separator needs no packingand is economical in its Working, the steam supplying the motive power and also serving to heat the dome to assist in the liquescence of the oil or grease, and thereby hasten and fa cilitate its extraction.

The exact construction as shown of the supporting structure is not essential, as any suitable construction would suffice. Likewise any desirable mesh of screen may be em- -ploycd from a wire to a cloth strip to filter or .chamberarranged within the drum so as to heat the contents thereof, said chamber being constructed to receive the exhaust-steam.

2. A centrifugal separator comprising a steam-driven drum, said drum containing a heatingcham ber to receivethe exhaust-steam, and blades in said chamber to eject the steam.

3. A centrifugal separator comprising a steam-driven turbine, a drum supported and carried by the turbine, and an inclosed heating-chamber Within the drum receiving the exhaust from the turbine.

4. A centrifugal separator comprising a steam-driven turbine, a drum supported on and carried by the turbine, a heating-chamber within the drum said chamber receiving the exhaust from the turbine, and means in the chamber for ejecting the steam.

5. A centrifugal separator comprising a steam-driven turbine supporting a perforated drum, said drum containing a heating-chainber to receive the exhaust-steam, and ducts leading from the spaces between the turbineblades to said chamber.

(5. A centrifugal separator comprising a steam-driven turbine, supporting a perforated drum, said drum containing a heating-chamber to receive the exhaust-steam, and ducts leading from the spaces between the turbineblades to said chamber, and blades in said chamber to eject the steam.

7. A centrifugal separator comprising a standard, acasing thereon, a revolving steamturbinein said casing supporting a perforated drum, said drum containing a heating-chamber to receive the exhaust-steam, an outletpipe for said casing, and an outlet-pipe for said chamber.

8. A centrifugal separator comprising a standard, a casing thereon, a revolving steamturbine supporting a perforated drum, said drum containinga heating-chamber, a series of blades in said chamber, and an outlet for said casing.

9. A centrifugal separator comprising a standard, a casing thereon, a revolving steamdriven turbine supporting a perforated drum, ducts communicating from the space adjacent to each blade to a heating-chamber in said drum.

10. A centrifugal separator comprising a standard, a casing thereon, a revolving steamdriven turbine supporting a perforated drum, a duct communicating from the space adjacent to each blade of said turbine to a heating-chamber in said drum to eject the steam. 11. A centrifugal separator comprising a standard, a casing thereon, a supporting-bearing in said standard to receivea removable shaft revolving with a steam-turbine, a perforated drum on said turbine, a duct communicating from said turbine toa beating-chamber in said drum, and an outlet-pipe for said casin 12. A centrifugal separator comprising a standard, a casing thereon, asu pporting-bearing in said standard to receive a movable shaft, said shaft revolving with a steam-turbine, a set of auxiliary blades to convey the steam to a heating-chamber through perforations in said turbine, a perforated drum inclosing said chamber, blades in said chamber to eject the steam therefrom, and an outletpipe from said casin 13. A centrifugal separator comprising a steam-driven turbine supporting a drum, a stationary casing around said drum, lubricating-ducts communicating from said casing to the bearings of the machine, and an outlet-pipe leading from said casing with its inlet end above the lubricating-ducts to insure the lubrication of the machine.

14. A centrifugal separator comprising a steam-driven turbine supporting a drum, a heating-chamber in said drum to receive the exhaust-steam, -a casing around said drum, lubricating-ducts to convey the extracted materials to the bearings of the machine, and an outlet-pipe leading from said casing with its inlet end above said lubricating-ducts to insure the lubrication of the machine.

In testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specification in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

THOMAS S. PATTERSON.

In presence of W. B. HUTCHINSON, JOHN CAROLAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2878992 *Dec 28, 1956Mar 24, 1959Beckman Instruments IncCentrifuge apparatus and rotor therefor
US2898842 *Nov 5, 1953Aug 11, 1959Knapp Monarch CoAutomatic coffee maker for instant coffee
US6238330Jul 21, 2000May 29, 2001The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford Junior UniversityMicrocentrifuge
US6241650 *Feb 16, 2000Jun 5, 2001JouanCentifuge with pneumatic drive and filtration of the atmosphere of its chamber
US6273848Oct 21, 1998Aug 14, 2001The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford Junior UniversityMethod for simultaneous centrifugation of samples
US6334841 *Feb 29, 2000Jan 1, 2002JouanCentrifuge with Ranque vortex tube cooling
US6387031Jan 28, 2000May 14, 2002Genomic Instrumentation Services, Inc.Array centrifuge
US6652136Mar 26, 2001Nov 25, 2003The Board Of Trustees Of The Leland Stanford Junior UniversityMethod of simultaneous mixing of samples
US6929596 *Feb 7, 2003Aug 16, 2005Fleetguard, Inc.Centrifuge with separate hero turbine
US20040157719 *Feb 7, 2003Aug 12, 2004Amirkhanian Hendrik N.Centrifuge with separate hero turbine
WO1999012651A1 *Sep 11, 1998Mar 18, 1999Univ Leland Stanford JuniorFlow-through microcentrifuge
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA01J9/04, F28D1/024, Y10S494/901, Y10S165/072