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Publication numberUS7323838 B2
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 11/472,481
Publication dateJan 29, 2008
Filing dateJun 22, 2006
Priority dateJul 15, 2005
Fee statusPaid
Also published asDE102006031402A1, US20070013339
Publication number11472481, 472481, US 7323838 B2, US 7323838B2, US-B2-7323838, US7323838 B2, US7323838B2
InventorsWen-Chuan Ma, Yen-Hung Chen, Po-Tsun Kuo, Chun-Lung Chiu, Wen-Shi Huang
Original AssigneeDelta Electronics, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Motor control method and device thereof
US 7323838 B2
Abstract
A motor control method and device. The motor control device includes a programmable integrated circuit (IC) receiving a phase signal, the phase of which is consistent with the rotation phase of a coil of the motor. The programmable IC generates a duty-cycle signal in accordance with the period of the phase signal. The duty-cycle signal comprises a rising segment and a falling segment and when the phase signal changes phase, the duty cycle represented by the duty-cycle signal is a first duty cycle, allowing the input power of the motor remain at a minimum. The duty-cycle signal is input to the coil, controlling the coil on and off and, thereby rotating the motor.
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Claims(31)
1. A motor control method utilizing a programmable integrated circuit (IC) to control a motor, comprising:
receiving a phase signal generated in accordance with the rotation phase of a coil of the motor;
generating a duty-cycle signal in accordance with the period of the phase signal, wherein when the phase signal is changed, the value of the duty-cycle signal is a first duty cycle allowing the input power of the motor remain at a minimum.
2. The motor control method of claim 1, wherein the duty-cycle signal comprises a second duty cycle which is the duty cycle of the duty-cycle signal when the input power of the motor is the maximum, wherein the first duty cycle is between the second duty cycle and 0% and when the duty-cycle signal approaches 100%, the input power of the motor exceeds that when the duty cycle signal approaches 0%.
3. The motor control method of claim 1, wherein the duty-cycle signal comprises a second duty cycle which is the duty cycle of the duty-cycle signal when the input power of the motor is the maximum, wherein the first duty cycle is between the second duty cycle and 100%, and when the duty cycle signal approaches 100%, the input power of the motor is less than that when the duty cycle signal approaches 0%.
4. The motor control method of claim 1, wherein the phase of the phase signal leads, lags behind or is consistent with the rotation phase of the coil.
5. The motor control method of claim 1, wherein a Hall element is disposed between the programmable IC and the motor for receiving a feedback signal from the motor to generate the phase signal to the programmable IC.
6. The motor control method of claim 1, wherein the phase signal is input externally.
7. The motor control method of claim 1, wherein the duty-cycle signal comprises a rising segment and a falling segment, and both the value of the starting point of the rising segment and the value of the terminal point of the falling segment are the first duty cycle.
8. The motor control method of claim 7, wherein the duty-cycle signal is triangle wave, trapezoidal wave or sinusoidal wave.
9. The motor control method of claim 8, wherein the duty-cycle signal comprises a second duty cycle, a turning point between the rising and falling segments, and allows the input power of the motor remain at the maximum.
10. The motor control method of claim 9, wherein the second duty cycle is adjustable wherein increasing the second duty cycle increases the speed of the motor and decreasing the second duty cycle decreases the speed of the motor.
11. The motor control method of claim 10, wherein modulating the second duty cycle changes the intervals of the rising and falling segments.
12. The motor control method of claim 9, wherein when the phase signal is changed, the duty-cycle signal holds for an interval before the rising segment and holds for the interval after the falling segment.
13. The motor control method of claim 8, wherein an adjustment is added to the slope of the rising segment of the duty-cycle signal or the falling segment of the duty-cycle signal.
14. The motor control method of claim 12, wherein the turning point of the duty-cycle signal is advanced or delayed.
15. The motor control method of claim 9, wherein when the duty-cycle signal is a trapezoidal wave, the duty-cycle signal holds after increasing to a second duty cycle and then starts to decrease, wherein the second duty cycle is the duty cycle, allowing the input power of the motor remain at the maximum.
16. The motor control method of claim 15, wherein decreasing the holding time of the duty-cycle signal at the second duty cycle increases the holding time of the duty-cycle signal after the rising and falling segments.
17. The motor control method of claim 8, wherein when the duty-cycle signal is a sinusoidal wave, the duty-cycle signal subtracts a shift, generating different slopes and duty cycles.
18. The motor control method of claim 1, wherein the duty-cycle signal is a stepping wave, wherein the duty cycle within any time interval of the duty-cycle signal is fixed.
19. The motor control method of claim 1, wherein the duty-cycle signal is a non-regular wave.
20. A motor control device for driving a motor, comprising:
a programmable integrated circuit (IC) receiving a phase signal generated when a coil of the motor rotates, and generating a duty-cycle signal to control rotation of the coil;
wherein when the phase signal is changed, the value of the duty-cycle signal is a first duty cycle, allowing the input power of the motor remain at a minimum.
21. The motor control device of claim 20, wherein the duty-cycle signal comprises a second duty cycle, wherein the first duty cycle is between the second duty cycle and 0%, and when the duty cycle signal approaches 100%, the input power of the motor exceeds that when the duty cycle signal approaches 0%.
22. The motor control device of claim 20, wherein the duty-cycle signal comprises a second duty cycle, wherein the first duty cycle is between the second duty cycle and 100%, and when the duty cycle signal approaches 100%, the input power of the motor is less than that when the duty cycle signal approaches 0%.
23. The motor control device of claim 20, wherein the duty-cycle signal comprises a rising segment and a falling segment, and both the values of the starting point of the rising segment and the terminal point of the falling segment are the first duty cycle.
24. The motor control device of claim 20, wherein the duty-cycle signal is triangle wave, trapezoidal wave, sinusoidal wave or non-regular wave.
25. The motor control device of claim 20, wherein the duty-cycle signal is a stepping wave, wherein the duty cycle within any time interval of the duty-cycle signal is fixed.
26. The motor control device of claim 20, wherein a coil switching circuit is disposed between the motor control device and the motor, inputting the duty-cycle signal to the coil accordingly, allowing the coil to switch current direction, thereby driving the motor.
27. The motor control device of claim 26, wherein the coil switching circuit is in full bridge mode or half bridge mode.
28. The motor control device of claim 20, wherein a Hall element is disposed between the motor control device and the motor for receiving a feedback signal from the motor to generate the phase signal to the programmable IC.
29. The motor control device of claim 28, wherein a pulse width modulation (PWM) signal generator is coupled to the motor control device for generating a PWM signal to the programmable IC, allowing the programmable IC to generate the duty-cycle signal in accordance with the PWM signal and the phase signal.
30. The motor control device of claim 29, wherein a detector is coupled to the motor control device for detecting a temperature to generate a comparative signal to the programmable IC, wherein the programmable IC generates the duty-cycle signal in accordance with the phase signal, the PWM signal and the comparative signal.
31. The motor control device of claim 20, further comprising a driving circuit, wherein the programmable IC inputs the duty-cycle signal to the motor via the driving circuit.
Description
BACKGROUND

The invention relates to a motor control method and device thereof, and more specifically to a motor control method and device utilizing a programmable integrated circuit (IC) to reduce noise and current pulses.

Current motor control techniques have reached maturity as a technology. Circuits exist which control motor startup and change and limit motor speed, as well as other functions.

A conventional motor control device comprises a pulse width modulation generator, a driving circuit, a Hall element and a coil switching circuit. The driving circuit receives a pulse width modulation (PWM) signal from the pulse width modulation generator and generates a driving signal to the coil switching circuit. When receiving the driving signal, the coil switching circuit outputs the driving signal to a coil of a motor accordingly and thereby switches the current directions in two neighboring phases of the coil, maintaining rotation of the motor.

The Hall element coupled between the motor and driving circuit detects the signal generated by the motor, generating a phase signal to the driving circuit. As shown in FIG. 1A, the phase signal PPULSE may be a square wave. Since the duty cycle D % set by the duty-cycle signal PDUTY of conventional driving circuits is fixed as shown in FIG. 1B, the pulse width modulation (PWM) signal PPWM switches between ON and OFF states as shown in FIG. 1C when the phase signal changes phase. Loud noise and current pulses typically occur when the current direction changes, particularly when used as a fan motor, limiting applicability thereof.

SUMMARY

To solve the above problems, the invention provides a motor control method, wherein when the phase signal changes phase, the duty cycle of the PWM signal is adjusted to a first duty cycle in which the input power of the motor is minimum, slowing when changing phase, reducing noise generated by the motor and current pulses.

A motor control device is provided. The motor control device drives a motor and comprises a programmable IC receiving a phase signal having the same phase as the rotation phase of a coil of the motor. The programmable IC generates a duty-cycle signal in accordance with the period of the phase signal, wherein the value of the duty-cycle signal is a first duty cycle when the phase signal changes phase and the input power of the motor is the minimum at the same time. This reduces speed when changing phase, reducing noise generated by the motor and current pulses.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The invention will be described by way of exemplary embodiments, but not limitations, illustrated in the accompanying drawings in which like references denote similar elements, and in which:

FIG. 1A is a waveform diagram of a phase signal feedback by a motor.

FIG. 1B is a waveform diagram of a conventional duty-cycle signal with fixed duty cycle.

FIG. 1C is a waveform diagram of a PWM signal corresponding to the duty-cycle signal shown in FIG. 1B.

FIG. 2 is a flow diagram of a motor control method of the invention.

FIG. 3A is a waveform diagram of a phase signal feedback by a motor.

FIG. 3B is a waveform diagram of a duty-cycle signal according to a first embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 3C is a waveform diagram of a PWM signal corresponding to the duty-cycle signal of FIG. 3B.

FIG. 4A is a waveform diagram of a phase signal feedback by a motor.

FIG. 4B is a waveform diagram of a duty-cycle signal according to a second embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 4C is a waveform diagram of a PWM signal corresponding to the duty-cycle signal of FIG. 4B.

FIG. 5A is a waveform diagram of a phase signal fed back by a motor.

FIG. 5B is a waveform diagram of a duty-cycle signal according to a third embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 5C is a waveform diagram of a PWM signal corresponding to the duty-cycle signal of FIG. 5B.

FIG. 6A is a waveform diagram of a phase signal fed back by a motor.

FIG. 6B is a waveform diagram of a duty-cycle signal according to a fourth embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 7A is a waveform diagram of a phase signal fed back by a motor.

FIG. 7B is a waveform diagram of a duty-cycle signal according to a fifth embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 8A is a waveform diagram of a phase signal fed back by a motor.

FIG. BB is a waveform diagram of a duty-cycle signal according to a sixth embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 9A is a waveform diagram of a phase signal fed back by a motor.

FIG. 9B is a waveform diagram of a duty-cycle signal according to a seventh embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 10A is a waveform diagram of a phase signal fed back by a motor.

FIG. 10B is a waveform diagram of a duty-cycle signal according to a eighth embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 11A is a waveform diagram of a phase signal fed back by a motor.

FIG. 11B is a waveform diagram of a duty-cycle signal according to a ninth embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 12A is a waveform diagram of a phase signal fed back k by a motor.

FIG. 12B is a waveform diagram of a duty-cycle signal according to a tenth embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 13A is a waveform diagram of a phase signal fed back by a motor.

FIG. 13B is a waveform diagram of a duty-cycle signal according to a eleventh embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 14A is a waveform diagram of a phase signal fed back by a motor.

FIG. 14B is a waveform diagram of a duty-cycle signal according to a twelfth embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 15A is a waveform diagram of a phase signal fed back by a motor.

FIG. 15B is a waveform diagram of a duty-cycle signal according to a thirteenth embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 16A is a waveform diagram of a phase signal fed back by a motor.

FIG. 16B is a waveform diagram of a duty-cycle signal according to a fourteenth embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 17A is a waveform diagram of a phase signal fed back by a motor.

FIG. 17B is a waveform diagram of a duty-cycle signal according to a fifteenth embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 18A is a waveform diagram of a phase signal fed back by a motor.

FIG. 18B is a waveform diagram of a duty-cycle signal according to a sixteenth embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 19 shows the first hardware circuit utilizing the motor control device of the invention.

FIG. 20 shows the second hardware circuit utilizing the motor control device of the invention.

FIG. 21 shows the third hardware circuit utilizing the motor control device of the invention.

FIG. 22 shows the fourth hardware circuit utilizing the motor control device of the invention.

FIG. 23 shows the fifth hardware circuit utilizing the motor control device of the invention.

FIG. 24 shows the sixth hardware circuit utilizing the motor control device of the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The invention utilizes a programmable integrated circuit (IC) to control a motor which may be a DC brushless motor or a DC brush motor. With reference to FIG. 2, the motor control method according to an embodiment of the invention comprises in step S1, receiving a phase signal generated by a Hall element coupled between the programmable IC and the motor. The phase of the phase signal is consistent with the rotation phase of a coil of the motor but may be phase lead or phase lag. Moreover, users may input the phase signal externally in accordance with the design necessity.

In step S2, the programmable IC generates a corresponding duty-cycle signal in accordance with the period of the phase signal, wherein the value of the duty-cycle signal when the phase signal changes phase is a first duty cycle, allowing the input power of the motor to be a minimum.

In step S3, the duty-cycle signal is input to a coil of the motor to switch the coil.

Embodiments of the invention are further described in the following.

FIGS. 3A, 3B and 3C show a first embodiment of the invention, wherein FIG. 3A shows the half period of a phase signal PPULSE, FIG. 3B is the waveform diagram of a duty-cycle signal PDUTY, and FIG. 3C is the waveform diagram of a pulse width modulation (PWM) signal PPWM corresponding to the duty-cycle signal shown in FIG. 3B. The duty-cycle signal PDUTY in this embodiment is a triangle wave, wherein the duty cycle it represents increases from a first duty cycle D0 which is any value between 0%100%, to a second duty cycle D1 which is any value between D0100% and set according to the maximum input power of the motor, and then decreases from the second duty cycle D1 to the first duty cycle D0. It is noted that the slope value of the rising segment of the duty-signal PDUTY is the same as that of the falling segment of the duty-signal PDUTY.

As shown in FIG. 3C, the PWM signal PPWM corresponding to the half period of the phase signal PPULSE is divided into time intervals T1, T2 . . . , Tn−1, Tn, Tn+1, . . . , T2n−and T2n, and the intervals of each time interval for ON and OFF sates are Ta and Tb respectively. The relation between Ta and Tb is represented by the following formulae:
T a,1 <T a,2 < . . . <T a,n−1 <T a,n >T a,n+1 > . . . >T a,2n−1 >T a,2n  1.
T b,1 >T b,2 > . . . >T b,n−1 >T b,n <T b,n+1 < . . . <T b,2n−1 <T b,2n  2.

Wherein turning on time near the timing at which the phase signal changes phase is shorter. Moreover, when the phase signal PPULSE changes phase, the value of the duty-cycle signal PDUTY is the first duty cycle D0; that is the power input to the coil is at a minimum or even zero when the phase signal PPULSE changes phase, allowing the motor to rotate at a low speed or rotate because of inertia when changing direction. Consequently, noise and current pulses generated due to counter-electromotive force and motor torque are reduced.

FIGS. 4A, 4B and 4C show a second embodiment of the invention, wherein the duty-cycle signal PDUTY is a trapezoid wave and the duty cycle it represents increases from the first duty cycle D0 (any value between 0%100%) to the second duty cycle D1 (a value between D0 and 100%); after holding at the second duty cycle D1 for an interval, it decreases from the second duty cycle D1 to the first duty cycle D0. It is noted that the slope value of the rising segment of the duty-signal PDUTY is the same as that of the falling segment of the duty-signal PDUTY.

As shown in FIG. 4C, the PWM signal PPWM corresponding to the half period of the phase signal PPULSE is divided into time intervals T1, T2 . . . , Tn−1, Tn, Tn+1, . . . , T2n−and T2n, with intervals of each for ON and OFF sates are Ta and Tb respectively. The relation between Ta and Tb is represented by the following formulae:
T a,1 <T a,2 < . . . <T a,n−1 <T a,n >T a,n+1 > . . . >T a,2n−1 >T a,2n  1.
T b,1 >T b,2 > . . . >T b,n−1 >T b,n <T b,n+1 < . . . <T b,2n−1 <T b,2n  2.

Unlike the first embodiment, the slope value of the duty-cycle signal PDUTY is greater and its duty cycle holds at the second duty cycle D1 for an interval. Such difference can be utilized for different motor rotation control. Still, here, the duty cycle represented by the duty-cycle signal PDUTY is the first duty cycle D0 when the phase signal changes phase, reducing noise and current pulses generated due to counter-electromotive force and motor torque.

FIGS. 5A, 5B and 5C show a third embodiment of the invention, wherein the duty-cycle signal PDUTY is a sinusoidal wave, and the duty cycle it represents increases from the first duty cycle D0 (any value between 0%100%) to the second duty cycle D1 (a value between D0 and 100%) and then decreases from the second duty cycle D1 to the first duty cycle D0. It is noted that the radian of the increasing curve is the same as that of the decreasing curve.

As shown in FIG. 5C, the PWM signal PPWM corresponding to the half period of the phase signal PPULSE is divided into T1, T2 . . . , Tn−1, Tn, Tn+1, . . . , T2n−and T2n, with intervals of each for ON and OFF sates are Ta and Tb respectively. The relation between Ta and Tb is represented by the following formulae:
T a,1 <T a,2 < . . . <T a,n−1 <T a,n >T a,n+1 > . . . >T a,2n−1 >T a,2n  1.
T b,1 >T b,2 > . . . >T b,n−1 >T b,n <T b,n+1 < . . . <T b,2n−1 <T b,2n  1.

Unlike the previous embodiments, the duty cycle signal PDUTY is non-linear. Such difference can also be utilized in different motor rotation controls. Still, here, the duty cycle represented by the duty-cycle signal PDUTY is the first duty cycle D0 when the phase signal changes phase, reducing noise and current pulses generated due to counter-electromotive force and motor torque.

The first duty cycle D0 of the first to three embodiments which allows input power of the motor to be a minimum is a value between 0% and the second duty cycle D1. The speed of the motor increases when the duty-cycle signal approaches 100% from 0%. Conversely, the speed of the motor may decrease when the duty-cycle signal approaches 100% from 0%. Such modifications are familiar for those skilled in the art, and therefore are not further described.

FIGS. 6A and 6B a fourth embodiment of the invention, wherein the duty-cycle signal PDUTY is a triangle wave. Unlike the first embodiment, after holding at the first duty cycle D0 for an interval Td, the duty cycle represented by the duty-cycle signal PDUTY increases to the second duty cycle D1, and then decreases from the second duty cycle D1 to the first duty cycle D0 and holds for the interval Td.

It is noted that the slope value of the duty cycle signal PDUTY from D0 to D1 and D1 to D0 is the same and is represented by the following formula:
m=(D 1 −D 0)/(T a/2−T d);

wherein Ta is the half period of the phase signal PPULSE, Td is a constant between 0 to Ta/2, and the first duty cycle D0 and second duty cycle D1 are fixed values between 0%100% and D1>D0.

In this embodiment, when the phase signal PPULSE changes phase, the duty cycle signal PDUTY is delayed for the interval of two Td, ensuring noise and current pulses are not generated due to counter-electromotive force and motor torque, thus obtaining better performance.

FIGS. 7A and 7B show a fifth embodiment of the invention, wherein the duty-cycle signal PDUTY is a triangle wave. Unlike the fourth embodiment, the slope value m1 of the rising segment of the duty-cycle signal PDUTY is different from the slope value m2 of the falling segment of the duty-cycle signal PDUTY, wherein the slope values m1 and m2 can be obtained by the following formula:
m=(D 1 −D 0)/(T a/2−T d) and m 2 is m 1 plus an adjustment;

wherein Ta is the half period of the phase signal PPULSE, Td is a constant between 0 to Ta/2, and the first duty cycle D0 and second duty cycle D1 are fixed values between 0%100% and D1>D0.

In this embodiment, the slope value of the duty-cycle signal PDUTY is adjusted for different motors. Also, it is noted that the slope value m1 is not limited to exceeding the slope value m2. However, when the phase signal PPULSE changes phase, the duty cycle represented by the duty-cycle signal PDUTY is the first duty cycle D0, ensuring noise and current pulses are not generated due to counter-electromotive force and motor torque.

FIGS. 8A and 8B show a sixth embodiment of the invention, wherein the duty-cycle signal PDUTY is a trapezoidal wave. Unlike the second embodiment, the duty-cycle signal PDUTY holds at the first duty cycle D0 for an interval Td, and increases to the second duty cycle D1. It then decreases from the second duty cycle D1 to the first duty cycle D0 and holds for an interval.

It is noted that the slope value of the rising segment of the duty-signal PDUTY equals that of the falling segment of the duty-signal PDUTY, and is represented by the following formula:
m=(D 1 −D 0)/(T a/2−T d −T c);

wherein Ta is the half period of the phase signal PPULSE, Td is a constant between 0 and Ta/2, and the first duty cycle D0 and second duty cycle D1 are fixed values between 0%100% and D1>D0.

In this embodiment, when the duty-cycle signal PDUTY holds when reaching the second duty cycle D1 and the programmable IC determines if an interval Ta/2 has passed; if so, this interval is defined as interval Tc and the duty-cycle signal PDUTY holds for another interval Tc. The duty-cycle signal PDUTY then decreases from the second duty cycle D1 to the first duty cycle D0.

Such design can be utilized for motor speed control different from that in the second embodiment. However, when the phase signal PPULSE changes phase, the duty cycle must be decreased to the first duty cycle D0, ensuring the performance control.

FIGS. 9A and 9B show a seventh embodiment of the invention, wherein the duty-cycle signal PDUTY is a triangle wave. Unlike the fourth embodiment, the turning point of the duty-cycle signal PDUTY is at a medium speed duty cycle Dn which is a value between the first and second duty cycles D0 and D1. The slope value m can be represented by the following formula:
m=(D n −D 0)/(T a/2−T d);

wherein Ta is the half period of the phase signal PPULSE, Td is a constant between 0 and Ta/2, and the first duty cycle D0 and duty cycle Dn are fixed values between 0%100% and Dn>D0.

This duty cycle design can be utilized for motor speed control unlike that in the fourth embodiment. However, when the phase signal PPULSE changes phase, the duty cycle duty cycle must be decreased to the first duty cycle D0, ensuring the performance control.

FIGS. 10A and 10B show an eighth embodiment of the invention, wherein the duty-cycle signal PDUTY is a trapezoidal wave. Unlike the sixth embodiment, the programmable IC determines if the interval Ta/2−Te passes at a timing point. If so, the interval from where the duty cycle presented by the duty-cycle signal PDUTY reaches the second duty cycle D1 to the timing point is defined as interval Tc, wherein Te is defined by the programmable IC. Thus, the slope value of the duty-cycle signal PDUTY which increases from first duty cycle D0 to the second duty cycle D1 can be represented by the following formula:
m=(D 1 −D 0)/(T a/2−T d −T c −T e);

wherein Ta is the half period of the phase signal PPULSE, Td is a constant between 0 and Ta/2, and the first duty cycle D0 and second duty cycle D1 are fixed values between 0%100% and D1>D0.

In this embodiment, the slope value of the duty cycle represented by the duty-cycle signal PDUTY which decreases from the second duty cycle D1 to the first duty cycle D0 equals that of the duty cycle represented by the duty-cycle signal PDUTY which increases from the first duty cycle D0 to the second duty cycle D1.

Further, when reaching the second duty cycle D1 from the first duty cycle D0, the duty-cycle signal PDUTY holds for an interval Tc. The programmable IC determines if the holding time reaches Tc; if so, the duty-cycle signal PDUTY proceeds to hold for another interval Tc. The duty-cycle signal PDUTY then decreases from the second duty cycle D1 to the first duty cycle D0.

This embodiment reduces the interval that the duty-cycle signal PDUTY holds at the second duty cycle D1 but increases the holding time at the first duty cycle D0. This design can be utilized for motor speed control unlike that in the sixth embodiment. However, when the phase signal PPULSE changes phase, the duty-cycle signal PDUTY must be decreased to the first duty cycle D0, ensuring the performance control.

FIGS. 11A and 11B show a ninth embodiment of the invention, wherein the duty-cycle signal PDUTY is a triangle wave. Unlike the seventh embodiment, the turning point of the duty-cycle signal PDUTY is advanced for an interval Te defined by the programmable IC. Thus the slope value of the duty-cycle signal PDUTY, which increases from the first duty cycle D0 to a medium speed duty cycle Dn can be represented by the following formula:
m=(D n −D 0)/(T a/2−T d −T e);

wherein Ta is the half period of the phase signal PPULSE, Td is a constant between 0 and Ta/2, and the first duty cycle D0 and duty cycle Dn are fixed values between 0%100% and Dn>D0.

It is noted that the slope value of the duty-cycle signal PDUTY which decreases from the duty cycle Dn to the first duty cycle D0 equals that of the duty-cycle signal PDUTY which increases from the first duty cycle D0 to the duty cycle Dn.

In this embodiment, the turning point of the duty-cycle signal PDUTY is advanced so that the interval that the duty-cycle signal PDUTY holds at the first duty cycle D0 after decreasing exceeds that before increasing. This design can be utilized for motor speed control unlike that in the seventh embodiment. However, when the phase signal PPULSE changes phase, the duty-cycle signal PDUTY must be decreased to the first duty cycle D0, ensuring the performance control.

FIGS. 12A and 12B show a tenth embodiment of the invention, wherein the duty-cycle signal PDUTY is a trapezoidal wave. Unlike the eighth embodiment, the programmable IC herein determines if the interval Ta/2+Te passes. If so, the duty-cycle signal PDUTY holds for an interval Tc and then decreases to the first duty cycle D0, wherein Te is an interval defined by the programmable IC. Thus, the slope value of the duty-cycle signal PDUTY which increases from first duty cycle D0 to the second duty cycle D1 is represented by the following formula:
m=(D 1 −D 0)/(T a/2−T d−(T c −T e);

wherein Ta is the half period of the phase signal PPULSE, Td is a constant between 0 and Ta/2, and the first duty cycle D0 and second duty cycle D1 are fixed values between 0%100% and D1>D0.

In this embodiment, the slope value of the duty-cycle signal PDUTY which decreases from the second duty cycle D1 to the first duty cycle D0 equals that of the duty-cycle signal PDUTY which increases from the first duty cycle D0 to the second duty cycle D1.

This embodiment reduces the holding time of the duty-cycle signal PDUTY at the second duty cycle D1 but increases the holding time at the first duty cycle D0. This design can be utilized for motor speed control unlike that in the eighth embodiment. However, when the phase signal PPULSE changes phase, the duty-cycle signal PDUTY must be decreased to the first duty cycle D0, ensuring the performance control.

FIGS. 13A and 13B show a eleventh embodiment of the invention, wherein the duty-cycle signal PDUTY is a triangle wave. Unlike the ninth embodiment, the turning point of the duty-cycle signal PDUTY lags for an interval Te, defined by the programmable IC. Thus the slope value of the duty-cycle signal PDUTY which increases from the first duty cycle D0 to a medium speed duty cycle Dn can be represented by the following formula:
m=(D n −D 0)/(T a/2−T d +T e);

wherein Ta is the half period of the phase signal PPULSE, Td is a constant between 0 and Ta/2, and the first duty cycle D0 and duty cycle Dn are fixed values between 0%100% and Dn>D0.

It is noted that the slope value of the duty-cycle signal PDUTY which decreases from the duty cycle Dn to the first duty cycle D0 equals that of the duty-cycle signal PDUTY which increases from the first duty cycle D0 to the duty cycle Dn.

The control method of this embodiment makes the holding time of the first duty cycle D0 before increasing more than the holding time of the first duty cycle D0 after decreasing by delaying an interval Te. This design can be utilized for motor speed control unlike that in the ninth embodiment. However, when the phase signal PPULSE changes phase, the duty-cycle signal PDUTY must be decreased to the first duty cycle D0, ensuring the performance control.

FIGS. 14A and 14B show a twelfth embodiment of the invention, wherein the duty-cycle signal PDUTY is a sinusoidal wave. Unlike the third embodiment, the duty-cycle signal PDUTY holds at the first duty cycle D0 for an interval Td and increases to the second duty cycle D1 and then decreases to the first duty cycle D0. It is noted that after decreasing from the second duty cycle D1 to the first duty cycle D0, the duty-cycle signal PDUTY holds for an interval Td before increasing to the second duty cycle D1 again.

It is noted that in this embodiment, the slope value of the duty-cycle signal PDUTY which increases from the first duty cycle D0 to the second duty cycle D1 and that of the duty-cycle signal PDUTY which decreases from the second duty cycle D1 to the first duty cycle D0 are different with respect to a plurality of time intervals. It is assumed that there are a plurality of time intervals T1, T2, . . . , Tn and a plurality of corresponding slope values m1, m2, . . . , Mn which can be represented by the following formula:
m=(D 1 −D 0)*{sin[(π/2)*(k/n)]};

wherein k=1, 2, 3, . . . n, Td is a constant between 0 and Ta/2, and the first duty cycle D0 and duty cycle Dn are fixed values between 0%100% and Dn>D0.

This embodiment can be utilized for motor speed control unlike that in the third embodiment. However, when the phase signal PPULSE changes phase, the duty cycle signal PDUTY is delayed for the interval of two Td, ensuring noise and current pulses are not generated due to counter-electromotive force and motor torque, thus obtaining the same performance as the third embodiment.

FIGS. 15A and 15B show a thirteenth embodiment of the invention, wherein the duty-cycle signal PDUTY is a sinusoidal wave. Unlike the twelfth embodiment, the duty-cycle signal PDUTY shifts for a shift Ddiff in the second changing direction point of the phase signal PPULSE. In this way, the programmable IC can determine the value of the shift Ddiff, adjusting the slope of the duty-cycle signal PDUTY and the duty cycle it represents.

The slope value of the duty-cycle signal PDUTY in this embodiment can be calculated by the following formula:
m k=(D n −D 0)*{sin[(π/2)*(k/n)]};

wherein k=1, 2, 3, . . . n, Td is a constant between 0 and Ta/2, and the duty cycle D0 is a fixed value between 0%100% and D0<Dn. The duty cycle Ddiff is a fixed value between 0%100%.

This embodiment can be utilized for motor speed control unlike that in the twelfth embodiment. However, when the phase signal PPULSE changes phase, it must be ensured that noise and current pulses are not generated due to counter-electromotive force and motor torque, thus obtaining the same performance of the twelfth embodiment.

FIGS. 16A and 16B show a fourteenth embodiment of the invention, wherein the duty-cycle signal PDUTY is a step wave. Unlike the twelfth embodiment, the duty-cycle signal PDUTY within a certain time interval (T1, T2, . . . , Tn) is fixed (Da1, Da2 . . . , Dan). Such method can be utilized for motor speed control unlike that in the twelfth embodiment. However, when the phase signal PPULSE changes phase, the duty-cycle signal PDUTY must be decreased to the first duty cycle D0, ensuring the performance control.

FIGS. 17A and 17B show a fifteenth embodiment of the invention, wherein the duty-cycle signal PDUTY here is a non-regular wave. This control method can be utilized for motor speed control unlike that in the previous embodiments. However, when the phase signal PPULSE changes phase, the duty-cycle signal PDUTY must be decreased to the first duty cycle D0, ensuring the control performance.

FIGS. 18A and 18B show a sixteenth embodiment of the invention, wherein the duty-cycle signal PDUTY is a trapezoidal wave. Unlike the sixth embodiment, the coefficients herein are adjustable. In this embodiment, the second duty cycle D1 is adjusted between D0100%, and intervals Ta and Tb are changed. It is noted that increasing the second duty cycle D1 increases the speed and decreases the interval Ta; conversely, decreasing the second duty cycle D1 decreases the speed and increases the interval Ta. Further, the ratio between Tb and Ta is usually fixed, i.e. M=Tb/Ta and M is fixed, thus, Tb changes in accordance with Ta.

Moreover, the ratio M can be adjusted in accordance with design necessity, obtaining different duty cycle signals PDUTY. For example, if the ratio M is , i.e. Tb is half Ta, the duty cycle signal PDUTY is a triangle wave and the motor rotates at a lowest speed. If the ratio M is 0, i.e. Tb is zero, the duty cycle signal PDUTY is a square wave as in FIG. 18A and the motor rotates at a high speed. However, in this case, the duty-cycle signal PDUTY may not be decreased to the first duty cycle D0, when the phase signal PPULSE changes phase. In practice, the ratio M is not zero but usually a value between 0, allowing the duty cycle signal PDUTY to rise and fall and equals the first duty cycle D0 when changing direction.

The described motor control method can be utilized in the following hardware circuits.

FIG. 19 shows a first hardware circuit utilizing the motor control device of the invention, wherein a programmable IC is built in a motor control device 10. The motor control device 10 receives a phase signal PPULSE generated by a Hall element 20, a comparative signal PCOM generated by a detector 30 after detecting temperature, and a pulse width modulation (PWM) signal PPWM generated by a PWM generator 40. The programmable IC is capable of adjusting the duty cycle of the PWM signal PPWM, generating a duty-cycle signal PDUTY to a full bridge coil switching circuit 50 which inputs the duty-cycle signal PDUTY to a coil 60 of a motor (not shown) accordingly, allowing the coil 60 to switch current directions in two neighboring phases, maintaining rotation of the motor.

FIG. 20 shows a second hardware circuit utilizing the motor control device of the invention, wherein the connection between the motor control device 10 and the coil switching circuit 50 is different from that of the first embodiment. However, it still can obtain similar performance, and thus is not described further.

FIG. 21 shows a third hardware circuit utilizing the motor control device of the invention, wherein, unlike the first embodiment, the motor control device 10 connects to a half bridge coil switching circuit 50. This design still can obtain similar performance, and thus is not described further.

FIG. 22 shows a fourth hardware circuit utilizing the motor control device of the invention, wherein unlike the first embodiment, there is no Hall element 20; conversely, the coil switching circuit 50 feeds a phase signal PPULSE directly back to the motor control device 10. This design still can obtain similar performance, and thus is not described further.

FIG. 23 shows a fifth hardware circuit utilizing the motor control device of the invention, wherein unlike previous embodiments, the motor control device 10 comprises a driving circuit 11 and a programmable IC 12. The programmable IC 12 receives the phase signal PPULSE from the Hall element 20, the comparative signal PCOM from the detector 30 and a PWM signal PPWM, generating the duty-cycle signal PDUTY to the driving circuit 11 to control the coil switching circuit 50.

FIG. 24 shows a sixth hardware circuit utilizing the motor control device of the invention, wherein unlike described embodiments, the motor control device 10 of this embodiment connects to a plurality of fans 70 with motors. Since noise generated in a single motor is reduced, this advantage is more obvious in the fans 70.

While the invention has been described by way of example and in terms of preferred embodiment, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited thereto. On the contrary, it is intended to cover various modifications and similar arrangements as would be apparent to those skilled in the art. Therefore, the scope of the appended claims should be accorded the broadest interpretation so as to encompass all such modifications and similar arrangements.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US8970153 *Mar 13, 2013Mar 3, 2015Samsung Electro-Mechanics Co., Ltd.Apparatus and method for controlling speed of motor
US20140062369 *Mar 13, 2013Mar 6, 2014Samsung Electro-Mechanics Co. Ltd.Apparatus and method for controlling speed of motor
Classifications
U.S. Classification318/268, 315/247, 388/811, 318/603, 318/400.01, 318/599
International ClassificationH02P7/00
Cooperative ClassificationH02P6/085, H02P2209/07, H02P7/29
European ClassificationH02P6/08B, H02P7/29
Legal Events
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Year of fee payment: 4
Jun 22, 2006ASAssignment
Owner name: DELTA ELECTRONICS INC., TAIWAN
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:MA, WEN-CHUAN;CHEN, YEN-HUNG;KUO, PO-TSUN;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:018010/0312;SIGNING DATES FROM 20051124 TO 20051130