Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS733152 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 7, 1903
Filing dateAug 30, 1902
Priority dateAug 30, 1902
Publication numberUS 733152 A, US 733152A, US-A-733152, US733152 A, US733152A
InventorsMurdoch Chisholm
Original AssigneeMurdoch Chisholm
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Empyema drainage device.
US 733152 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

No. 733,152. PATENTED JULY '7, 1903. M. GHISHOLM. EMPYEMA DRAINAGE DEVICE.

APPLICATION FILED AUG. so, 1902.

No MODEL Kaella/.4.1-

we mams Pneus cu. Pumnumo, wAsmNswr.: c:4 cv

No. realta Patented July 7, 1903.

PATENT OFFICE.

MURDOCH CHISHOLM, OF HALIFAX, CANADA.

MPYEMA DRAINAGE DEVICE.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 733,152, dated July 7, 1903.

Application filed August 30, 1902. Serial No. 121,591. (No model.)

To @ZZ whom t may concern.-

Beit known that I, MURDocH CHIsHoLM, a citizen of Canada, residing at Halifax, in the Province of Nova Scotia and Dominion of Canada, have invented new and useful Improvements in Empyelna Drainage Devices, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to empyema drainage devices-z'. e., devices for draining pus, ttc., from cavities of the body; and it has for its general object to provide a drainage device calculated to permit the free escape of air, pus, ttc., from between the lung and chestwall of a patient and, when required, preclude the entry of air, this with a view of enabling the lung to quickly expand, so that the cavity between it and the chest-wall disappears.

XVith the foregoing in mind the invention will be fully understood from the following description and claims when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which- Figure l is a perspective View of a device constituting one embodiment of my invention; Fig. 2, a view, partly in plan and partly in section, of the same with the soft-rubber disk in position; Fig. 3, an elevation of the outer end of the device; Fig. 4, an enlarged detail section taken in the plane indicated by the broken line 4L a of Fig. 2; Fig. 5, a diametrical section of a device constituting a modification of the invention; and Fig. 6, a view similar to Fig. l, illustrating the device as it appears when the valve is omitted.

Referring by letter to the said drawings,and more particularly to Figs. l to t thereof, A is a tube of metal or other suitable material having a flange or enlargement a at its outer end; B, a iiexible tube of rubber or other suitable material secured on the end of tube A; C, a non-return valve arranged to permit the free escape ot' air, pus, rbc., from the body of a patient and preclude the entry of air, and D a guard arranged over the valve and having for its purpose to prevent the dressings on a patient from interfering with the free operation of the valve or in the absence of a valve (see Fig. 6) from choking the tube. The valve is preferably a strip of oiled silk connected at one end by a drop of collodion or other adhesive to the outer' side of the iiange a, and its free portion is arranged over the outer end of the tube and between the same and the cross-bar of the guard D,as best shown in Fig. l. The said guard D is formed integral with the flange a or connected at its ends to the same, as desired.

As will be readily appreciated, a valve constructed and arranged in the manner described is extremely sensitive, and consequently may when it is protected by the guard D be depended upon to permitthe free escape of air, pus, rbc., from between the lung and chest-Wall of a patient and yet elfectually prevent the entry of air. It will also be observed that the said valve is adapted to be readily removed from the device and as readily reapplied thereto when desired.

In the practical use of my improved device the tube is placed in an incision in the chestwall of the patient, when the liexible or soft port-ion B thereof will serve to receive the air, pus, dsc., from the cavity between the lung and chest-wall, and this without liability of the lung being irritated or injured. At each exhalation or cough of the patient air and discharges will be forced through the tube and past the valve; but at the commencement of each inhalation the valve will seat tightly over the outer end of the tube, and thereby preclude thepassage of air to the cavity between the lung and the chest-Wall. The guard in the absence of the valve (see Fig. 6) is of importance in preventing the dressings from choking up the tube by forming a space around its outer end to receive the solid parts of the discharges and to increase the internal area of the surrounding dressings for absorption. In virtue of this the lung is permitted to quickly expand, so that the space between it and the chest-wall .disappears and the cure of the patient is pro- ICO u ucsb..."

the patient. The said disk E is by preference removably arranged on the tube A, this in order that gauze may be used around the tube for several days after the tube is placed in the chest, and then if the lung fails to expand the disk E may be arranged on the tube A and used instead of the gauze.

In the modified construction shown in Fig. 5 a flexible rubber tube B" is formed integral with a tlange a', and a guard D', having a nipple A", which enters the tube B, is suitably secured to the outer side of the ange. The valve C of this modified construction is suitably connected to the outer side of the flange a. and its free portion is disposed between the outer end of the tube and the cross-bar of the guard D in the manner and for the purpose before described.

It is obvious that when desired the valve may be omitted from the modified construction, as well as from the construction shown in Figs. l to 4.

I haveentered into a detailed description of the construction and relative arrangement of the parts embraced in the present and preferred embodiment of my invention in order to impart a full, clear, and exact understanding of the same. I do not desire, however, to be understood as confining myself to such specific construction and relative arrangement of parts, as such changes or modifications may be made in practice as fairly fall within the scope of my claims. p

Having described my invention, what I claim, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, 1s-

1. An empyema drainage-tube having a flange at its outer end, a flexible portion of rubber or other soft material at its inner end, a

a soft-rubber disk of larger diameter than the flange, arranged at the inner side of the iiange, and having an aperture snugly receiving the tube.

3. An empyema drainage-tube, open at its opposite ends, and having one end adapted to be inserted in the body, and also having an inwardly-seating valve at its opposite end, and an exterior guard arranged over said end and valve.

4. An empyenia drainage-tube having a liange at its outer end, a valve-guard on the outer side of the iiange, and a cl'ack, non-, return valve connected 'at one end to the iange, and having its free portion disposed between the outer end of the tube and the guard.

5. An empyema drainageftube, open at its opposite ends, and having one en d adapted to be inserted in the body, and also having a non return valve arranged to seat toward the latter end. Y

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand in presence of two subscribing witnesses.

MURDOCH CHISI-IOLM.

Witnesses:

W. MCLAUCHLAN, J. J. MCLAUGHLIN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2687731 *Aug 29, 1951Aug 31, 1954Fanelly Frank FCatheter valve
US3788327 *Mar 30, 1971Jan 29, 1974Donowitz HSurgical implant device
US4153058 *Jul 5, 1977May 8, 1979Nehme Alexander EPleural decompression catheter
US4402681 *Sep 10, 1981Sep 6, 1983Haas Joseph SArtificial implant valve for the regulation of intraocular pressure
US4465062 *May 14, 1982Aug 14, 1984Gina VersaggiNoninvasive seal for a sucking chest wound
US5702414 *Sep 5, 1996Dec 30, 1997Optonol LtdMethod of implanting an intraocular implant
US5968058 *Jul 14, 1997Oct 19, 1999Optonol Ltd.Device for and method of implanting an intraocular implant
US6203513Nov 20, 1997Mar 20, 2001Optonol Ltd.Flow regulating implant, method of manufacture, and delivery device
US6468283Aug 26, 1999Oct 22, 2002Optonol, Ltd.Method of regulating pressure with an intraocular implant
US6510600Dec 4, 2000Jan 28, 2003Optonol, Ltd.Method for manufacturing a flow regulating implant
US6558342Jun 2, 1999May 6, 2003Optonol Ltd.Flow control device, introducer and method of implanting
US6726664Aug 6, 2001Apr 27, 2004Optonol Ltd.Flow control device, introducer and method of implanting
US7252086 *May 24, 2004Aug 7, 2007Cordis CorporationLung reduction system
US7377278May 24, 2004May 27, 2008Portaero, Inc.Intra-thoracic collateral ventilation bypass system and method
US7398782Nov 19, 2004Jul 15, 2008Portaero, Inc.Method for pulmonary drug delivery
US7406963Jan 17, 2006Aug 5, 2008Portaero, Inc.Variable resistance pulmonary ventilation bypass valve and method
US7426929May 12, 2004Sep 23, 2008Portaero, Inc.Intra/extra-thoracic collateral ventilation bypass system and method
US7481816Oct 27, 2003Jan 27, 2009Optonol Ltd.Intraocular implant, delivery device, and method of implantation
US7533667May 20, 2004May 19, 2009Portaero, Inc.Methods and devices to assist pulmonary decompression
US7670310Dec 7, 2007Mar 2, 2010Optonol LtdFlow regulating implants
US7682332Jun 30, 2004Mar 23, 2010Portaero, Inc.Methods to accelerate wound healing in thoracic anastomosis applications
US7686013Feb 12, 2008Mar 30, 2010Portaero, Inc.Variable resistance pulmonary ventilation bypass valve
US7726305Feb 12, 2008Jun 1, 2010Portaero, Inc.Variable resistance pulmonary ventilation bypass valve
US7753052Feb 6, 2008Jul 13, 2010Portaero, Inc.Intra-thoracic collateral ventilation bypass system
US7789083Jan 31, 2008Sep 7, 2010Portaero, Inc.Intra/extra thoracic system for ameliorating a symptom of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
US7811274 *Apr 27, 2004Oct 12, 2010Portaero, Inc.Method for treating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
US7824366Dec 10, 2004Nov 2, 2010Portaero, Inc.Collateral ventilation device with chest tube/evacuation features and method
US7828789Apr 7, 2008Nov 9, 2010Portaero, Inc.Device and method for creating a localized pleurodesis and treating a lung through the localized pleurodesis
US7862531Jun 25, 2004Jan 4, 2011Optonol Ltd.Flow regulating implants
US7896008 *Aug 6, 2007Mar 1, 2011Portaero, Inc.Lung reduction system
US7909803Feb 18, 2009Mar 22, 2011Portaero, Inc.Enhanced pneumostoma management device and methods for treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
US7927324Feb 18, 2009Apr 19, 2011Portaero, Inc.Aspirator and method for pneumostoma management
US7931641Feb 21, 2008Apr 26, 2011Portaero, Inc.Visceral pleura ring connector
US8021320Feb 18, 2009Sep 20, 2011Portaero, Inc.Self-sealing device and method for delivery of a therapeutic agent through a pneumostoma
US8029492Apr 7, 2008Oct 4, 2011Portaero, Inc.Method for treating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
US8034016Dec 7, 2007Oct 11, 2011Optonol, Ltd.Flow regulating implants and methods of implanting
US8062315 *Feb 12, 2008Nov 22, 2011Portaero, Inc.Variable parietal/visceral pleural coupling
US8104474Aug 23, 2005Jan 31, 2012Portaero, Inc.Collateral ventilation bypass system with retention features
US8109896Feb 11, 2008Feb 7, 2012Optonol Ltd.Devices and methods for opening fluid passageways
US8163034Feb 21, 2008Apr 24, 2012Portaero, Inc.Methods and devices to create a chemically and/or mechanically localized pleurodesis
US8220460Nov 19, 2004Jul 17, 2012Portaero, Inc.Evacuation device and method for creating a localized pleurodesis
US8231581Jan 25, 2011Jul 31, 2012Portaero, Inc.Enhanced pneumostoma management device and methods for treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
US8252003Feb 18, 2009Aug 28, 2012Portaero, Inc.Surgical instruments for creating a pneumostoma and treating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
US8313454Mar 26, 2010Nov 20, 2012Optonol Ltd.Fluid drainage device, delivery device, and associated methods of use and manufacture
US8323230Jan 20, 2010Dec 4, 2012Portaero, Inc.Methods and devices to accelerate wound healing in thoracic anastomosis applications
US8336540Feb 12, 2009Dec 25, 2012Portaero, Inc.Pneumostoma management device and method for treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
US8347880Feb 18, 2009Jan 8, 2013Potaero, Inc.Pneumostoma management system with secretion management features for treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
US8347881Jan 8, 2010Jan 8, 2013Portaero, Inc.Pneumostoma management device with integrated patency sensor and method
US8348906Feb 18, 2009Jan 8, 2013Portaero, Inc.Aspirator for pneumostoma management
US8365722Feb 18, 2009Feb 5, 2013Portaero, Inc.Multi-layer pneumostoma management system and methods for treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
US8430094Feb 18, 2009Apr 30, 2013Portaero, Inc.Flexible pneumostoma management system and methods for treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
US8453637Feb 18, 2009Jun 4, 2013Portaero, Inc.Pneumostoma management system for treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
US8453638Feb 18, 2009Jun 4, 2013Portaero, Inc.One-piece pneumostoma management system and methods for treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
US8464708Feb 18, 2009Jun 18, 2013Portaero, Inc.Pneumostoma management system having a cosmetic and/or protective cover
US8474449Feb 18, 2009Jul 2, 2013Portaero, Inc.Variable length pneumostoma management system for treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
US8475389Jun 8, 2010Jul 2, 2013Portaero, Inc.Methods and devices for assessment of pneumostoma function
US8486086Nov 7, 2011Jul 16, 2013Optonol, LtdFlow regulating implant, method of manufacture, and delivery device
US8491602Feb 18, 2009Jul 23, 2013Portaero, Inc.Single-phase surgical procedure for creating a pneumostoma to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
US8506577Jul 6, 2012Aug 13, 2013Portaero, Inc.Two-phase surgical procedure for creating a pneumostoma to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
US8518053Feb 11, 2010Aug 27, 2013Portaero, Inc.Surgical instruments for creating a pneumostoma and treating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationA61M39/24