Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS733542 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 14, 1903
Filing dateJul 14, 1902
Priority dateJul 14, 1902
Publication numberUS 733542 A, US 733542A, US-A-733542, US733542 A, US733542A
InventorsFrederic S Converse
Original AssigneeFrederic S Converse
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coal or wood bag.
US 733542 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

PATENTED JULY 14,1903.

F. S. CONVERSE.

COAL OR WOOD BAG.

APPLICATION ZILED JULY 14,-1902.

NO MODEL.

m: Noam; PETERS cn, wow-nun, wnwrvmon, n c.

. NiTED STATES resented Jul 14, 196%.

FREDERIC S. CONVERSE, OF LYONS, NEW YORK;

GOAL OR wooo B'AG'.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 733,542, dated July 14, 1903.

Application filed July 14, 1902. Serial No. 115,481- (No model.)

To aZZ- whom it ma concern:

Be it known that I, FREDERIC S. CONVERSE, a citizen of the United States, residing at Lyons, in the county of Wayne and State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Goal or Wood Bags, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to packing and storing vessels, and more especially to those of flexible materials, such as bags, for containing coal or other heavy granular substance; and the object of the same is to construct a very strong bag, preferably of canvas, properly reinforced and provided with the necessary handles.

To this end the invention consists in the details of construction of both the bag and the handles therefor, all as hereinafter more fully described, and shown in the drawings, wherein Figure I is a perspective view of this bag complete. Fig. II is a bottom plan view. Fig. III is a vertical section. Fig. IV is a plan view of the blank from which the bottom is made. Fig. V is a detail of one of the main handles before its application to the bag.

Referring to the drawings, 1 designates the body of this bag, which is a piece of stout canvas or the like out initially in rectangular shape and bent finally into cylindrical shape, as seen in Fig. 1, its ends being connected with each other by riveting or stitching, or both, as at 2. The upper edge of this body is turned overa rope or similar device and sewed to the body on the outside, as at 3, thereby stiffening the edge, so that the mouth 'of the bag will stand open for the reception of its contents.

The bottom 5 of this bag is initially cut in the shape of a cross, as seen in Fig. IV. Then its four ends have their flaps 50 turned in on the dotted lines, after which the ends are folded upward and riveted or stitched along their edges to each other, as seen at 6, and finally the upper edge of the rectangular bottom piece thus formed is stitched or riveted, as at 7, to the lower end of the cylindrical body-piece 1, thereby producing a bag which when filled has a body approximately round and a base approximately rectangular, especially at its bottom and about one-third of the entire height of the bag, one which will edges.

as a whole stand up alone. Reinforcing cornor-pieces 10 of about the shape shown are stitched or riveted over the corners of the bottom piece, as seen in Fig. I, and these take up the wear and form feet on which the bag may stand. I preferably provide four handles. Two of these,which I call the auxiliary handles and have numbered 12, -are riveted or stitched into the seam 7 and form handles by which the bag is usually shifted or dumped. The other two, which I call the main handles, diverge from their hand portions 13 downward into long arms 14, which are stitched or riveted throughout their length 1 to the sides of the body 1, and preferably into the seam 7, and also downward in short arms 15, which pass into the mouth of the bag and stitched or riveted therein. The blank from which these handles are formed is best seen in Fig. V. It consists of double thicknesses 14 and 14 for the longer arms, between which is located the stiffener 16, as of wire, and these thicknesses are stitched together along their It also consists of a shorter and wider piece 15, stitched along its edges for a short distance, as at 17, to that face of the longer arms which is to be downward in the finished handle. lu -making the latter the parts are assembled as above described and as shown in FigpV, the whole given quarter-twists in opposite directions at the ends of what is to form the handpiece 13, (which is curved upward slightly, as shown,) the handle placed in position, and the longer and shorter arms stitched or riveted to the outer and inner sides of the bag, respectively. The, stiffener being thus held into place not only stiffens the handle proper, as above described, but also strengthens the arms thereofiand hence stiffens the bag, whereby the use of this stiffened handle with afiexible bag possesses peculiar advantages. The shape'of the arms of these handles assists in supporting the bag in upright position, and yet prevents tearing out in case the device is lifted when it isfull of heavy substance, as coal.

It will be obvious that when not in use this bag can be folded on a vertical sectional line space, will retain little or no moisture and will dry quickly, will wear longer than many bags now on market, and is cheap in construction and durable in use. The shape of the finished bag is such that it will not only stand alone whether full or empty, but it can be stacked by reason of the fact that the bottom is smaller than the body. Said bottom and its feet will probably wear first and can readily be replaced at slight expense. The position and shape of the handles and the manner of their attachment greatly stiffen the bag and add to its life. If cloth of sufficient weight is used, one thickness thereof would answer, save possibly in the case of the handles.

It will be clear that either riveting or stitching could be used in most, if not all, the parts in this device, and hence where one is mentioned I desire to include the either.

What is claimed as new is 1. A bag of flexible material comprising a body and a bottom secured at its upper edge to the body, the bottom being of lesser dimensions in contour than the body, the body taking a cylindrical shape and the bottom a square shape when the bag is filled, for the purpose set forth.

2. A bag comprising a body, a bottom out initiallyinto the shape of a cross with its four ends turned upward and stitched together along their meeting edges, the then upper edges of these ends being stitched to the lower edge of said body, and feet over the corners of the bottom, the body taking a cylindrical shape and the bottom a square shape when the bag is filled.

3. A bag comprising a substantially cylindrical body, a bottom out initially into the shape of a cross with its four ends turned upward and stitched together along their meeting edges, the then upper edges of these ends being stitched to the lower edge of said body, and feet comprising flexible cornerpieces stitched over the corners of said bottom, for the purpose set forth.

4. A bag comprising a body portion, and a bottom portion stitched to the lower end of the body portion; combined with auxiliary handles stitched into the seam between these two portions, and main handles with their arms also stitched into said seam and stitched to the body portion and their handpieces rising above the upper edge of the latter.

5. A bag comprising a body portion, and a bottom portion stitched to the lower end of the body portion; combined with main handles whose arms diverge downward from their handpieces and are stitched to the exterior of the body portion and at their lower extremities into the seam between the body and bottom, and auxiliary handles stitched into said seam only.

6. A bag comprising a body portion, and a bottom portion stitched to the body portion; combined with main handles having stiffened handpieces rising above the upper edge of the body portion, these handles having arms depending from their handpieces and stitched upon the exterior of the body portion and into the seam between this portion and the bottom, said main handles also having other arms depending from said handpieces and sewed to the inner face of the body, and auxiliary handles stitched into said seam only;

7. A bag comprising a body, and a bottom out initially into the shape of a cross with its four ends turned upward and stitched together along their meeting edges, the then upper edges of these ends being stitched to the lower edge of said body.

8. As a new article of manufacture,- a handle for flexible bags and the like consisting of a fabric strip in two thicknesses having arms at its extremities adapted to be stitched to the body of the bag, a stiffening-piece inserted between said thicknesses, and a third and wider thickness stitched beneath said other thicknesses opposite the stifiening-pieces, as and for the purpose set forth.

9. As a new article of manufacture, a handle for flexible bags and the like, the same consisting of a long fabric strip in two thicknesses connected along their edges and adapted to be stitched to the bag except at the center of their length, a stifiener between such thicknesses, and a short piece constitutinga third thickness stitched to the lower side of the combined longer strips at their center and adapted to be stitched at its ends to the 10. As a new article of manufacture, a handle for flexible bags and the like, the same consisting of a long fabric strip in two thicknesses connected along their edges and adapted to be stitched to the bag, a stiifener between such thicknesses, and a short piece stitched for a portion of its length to the longer strips and having unstitched arms at its extremities adapted to be stitched to the bag,

11. As a new article of manufacture, a handle for flexible bags and the like, the same consisting of a long fabric strip in two thick= nesses connected along their-edges and adapted to be stitched to the exterior of the bag, a stiifener between such .thicknesses,-and ashort piece stitched for a portion of its length to the longer strips and having unstitched arms at its extremities adapted to be stitched to the interior of the bag.

12. As a new article of manufacture, a handle for flexible bags and the like, the same consisting of a long fabric strip in two thicknesses connected along their edges and adapted to be stitched .to the bag, a stifiener between such thicknesses, and a short piece stitched for a portion of its length to the longer strips and having unstitched arms at its extremities adapted to be stitched to the bag, the combined elements being given quarter-twists near the ends of said stitch-lines so as to produce handpieces between the twists, and saidhandpieces being curved upward.

13. As a new article of manufacture, a handle for flexible bags and the like, the same Ice consisting of a long fabric strip'in two thicksaid stitch-1ine so as to produce handpieces (O nesses connected along their edges and adaptbetween the twists. ed to be stitched to the exterior of the bag, a In testimony whereof I have affixed my sig stiffener between such thicknesses,andashort nature in presence of two witnesses. 5 piece stitched for a portion of its length to j the longer strips and having unstitched arms FREDERIO CONVERSE at its extremities adapted to be stitched to Witnesses: the interior of the bag, the combined elements WILFRED DOUGLAS, being given quarter-twists near the ends of l MARY E. WHIT AN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2826308 *Oct 3, 1955Mar 11, 1958Infileo IncFilter element
US3310089 *Oct 4, 1965Mar 21, 1967Max SilvermanHampers
US4081011 *Jan 17, 1977Mar 28, 1978Walter KrauseTubular container with suspension elements
US4143796 *Jul 7, 1977Mar 13, 1979Super Sack Manufacturing CorporationCollapsible receptacle for flowable materials
US4194652 *Oct 30, 1978Mar 25, 1980Super Sack Manufacturing CorporationCollapsible receptacle for flowable materials
US4224970 *Oct 18, 1978Sep 30, 1980Super Sack Manufacturing CorporationCollapsible receptacle for flowable materials
US4300608 *May 7, 1980Nov 17, 1981Bonar Industries Inc.Self-raising strap loop
US4340379 *Aug 18, 1980Jul 20, 1982Better Agricultural Goals CorporationReinforced container for bulk material
US4457456 *Jul 30, 1982Jul 3, 1984Super Sack Manufacturing CompanyCollapsible receptacle with static electric charge elimination
US4479243 *Feb 17, 1983Oct 23, 1984Super Sack Manufacturing CorporationCollapsible receptacle with prefabricated lift loops and method of making
US4499599 *Jan 3, 1983Feb 12, 1985Polett Walter JStackable flexible bulk container
US4781880 *Apr 20, 1987Nov 1, 1988Robbins Edward S IiiMethod of forming plastic ribbed enclosure
US4799521 *Nov 12, 1987Jan 24, 1989Lifestyle International, Inc.Handle for bag
US4802773 *Dec 30, 1986Feb 7, 1989Hospital For Joint Diseases Orthopedic Inst.Bag for mail and the like
US4822179 *Jan 22, 1987Apr 18, 1989Bulk Lift International IncorporatedSemi-bulk transport bags with lifting members of bag material
US4993551 *Aug 18, 1989Feb 19, 1991Lindsay Brian KTool holder for bucket
US5951799 *Apr 16, 1997Sep 14, 1999Super Sack Manufacturing Corp.Anti-microbial shoe lining and sock liner and process for manufacture of same
US6131756 *Sep 18, 1997Oct 17, 2000Converta-Vans, IncorporatedCollapsible tank for convertible freight container
US6216900Apr 5, 2000Apr 17, 2001Converta-Vans, IncorporatedCollapsible tank for convertible freight container
US6299437Apr 5, 2000Oct 9, 2001Converta-Vans, IncorporatedHeating system for collapsible tank
US6585843Dec 6, 2000Jul 1, 2003Super Sack Mfg. Corp.Anti-static, anti-corrosion, and/or anti-microbial films, fabrics, and articles
US6592702Jul 18, 2001Jul 15, 2003Super Sack Mfg. Corp.Anti-static, anti-corrosion, and/or anti-microbial films, fabrics, and articles
US6604857 *Aug 28, 2001Aug 12, 2003Nestec S.A.Container for housing product and method for making same
US6935782 *Nov 26, 2002Aug 30, 2005Natthi CholsaipantBulk bag with seamless bottom
US6966854 *Jan 8, 2003Nov 22, 2005J. Debeer & Son, Inc.Pre-manufactured traditional-style lacrosse pocket
US7070523 *Jan 26, 2005Jul 4, 2006J. Debeer & Son, Inc.Pre-manufactured traditional-style lacrosse pocket
US7217032 *Mar 18, 2003May 15, 2007Nestec S.A.Container for housing product and method for making same
US7338396Sep 8, 2005Mar 4, 2008Rawlings Sporting Goods Company, Inc.Preformed lacrosse pocket and packaging for same
US7458908Sep 24, 2007Dec 2, 2008J. Debeer & Son, Inc.Preformed lacrosse pocket and packaging for same
US7651416 *May 9, 2007Jan 26, 2010Roalie Inc.Goal tending device
US7810998 *Mar 5, 2007Oct 12, 2010Matthew WilliamsMulti-handle utility bag
US7854670Feb 12, 2008Dec 21, 2010Rawlings Sporting Goods Company, Inc.Preformed lacrosse pocket and packaging for same
US20110073506 *Sep 24, 2010Mar 31, 2011European Merchandise GroupToolbucket and a method for closing a tool bucket
US20110155526 *Dec 30, 2009Jun 30, 2011Chao Ming ChengSuitcase having protective shield
US20130188892 *Jan 25, 2012Jul 25, 2013Nike, Inc.Duffel Bag Structural Components
EP2314423A1 *Sep 28, 2009Apr 27, 2011European Merchandise GroupA tool bucket and a method for closing a tool bucket
WO2008010828A2 *Oct 20, 2006Jan 24, 2008Gift Bag Factory LlcBag and method of making the same
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationB65D88/1618