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Publication numberUS7358188 B2
Publication typeGrant
Application numberUS 11/362,119
Publication dateApr 15, 2008
Filing dateFeb 23, 2006
Priority dateOct 20, 2003
Fee statusPaid
Also published asUS7026243, US20050085071, US20070059930
Publication number11362119, 362119, US 7358188 B2, US 7358188B2, US-B2-7358188, US7358188 B2, US7358188B2
InventorsCem Basceri
Original AssigneeMicron Technology, Inc.
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of forming conductive metal silicides by reaction of metal with silicon
US 7358188 B2
Abstract
The invention includes methods of forming conductive metal silicides by reaction of metal with silicon. In one implementation, such a method includes providing a semiconductor substrate comprising an exposed elemental silicon containing surface. At least one of a nitride, boride, carbide, or oxide comprising layer is atomic layer deposited onto the exposed elemental silicon containing surface to a thickness no greater than 15 Angstroms. Such layer is exposed to plasma and a conductive reaction layer including at least one of an elemental metal or metal rich silicide is deposited onto the plasma exposed layer. Metal of the conductive reaction layer is reacted with elemental silicon of the substrate effective to form a conductive metal silicide comprising contact region electrically connecting the conductive reaction layer with the substrate. Other aspects and implementations are contemplated.
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Claims(48)
1. A method of forming a conductive metal silicide by reaction of metal with silicon, comprising:
providing a semiconductor substrate comprising an exposed elemental silicon-containing surface;
depositing one or more monolayers to form at least one of a nitride, boride, carbide, or oxide-comprising layer onto the exposed elemental silicon-containing surface to a thickness no greater than 15 Angstroms;
exposing the layer of thickness no greater than 15 Angstroms to plasma and depositing a conductive reaction layer comprising at least one of a first elemental metal or metal-rich silicide onto the plasma-exposed layer; and
reacting said first metal or metal-rich silicide of the conductive reaction layer with the elemental silicon of the substrate effective to form a conductive metal silicide-comprising contact region electrically connecting the conductive reaction layer with the substrate.
2. The method of claim 1, wherein the monolayer depositing is of a nitride-comprising layer.
3. The method of claim 2, wherein the nitride-comprising layer is void of Si3N4.
4. The method of claim 1, wherein the monolayer depositing is of a boride-comprising layer.
5. The method of claim 1, wherein the monolayer depositing is of a carbide-comprising layer.
6. The method of claim 1, wherein the monolayer depositing is of an oxide-comprising layer.
7. The method of claim 6, wherein the oxide-comprising layer is void of SiO2.
8. The method of claim 1, wherein the at least one of a nitride, boride, carbide, or oxide is of a second metal which is different from said first metal of the conductive reaction layer.
9. The method of claim 1, wherein the at least one of a nitride, boride, carbide, or oxide is of a second metal which is the same as said first metal of the conductive reaction layer.
10. The method of claim 1, wherein the layer of thickness no greater than 15 Angstroms is of a thickness no less than 5 Angstroms.
11. The method of claim 1, wherein the layer of thickness no greater than 15 Angstroms is of a thickness from 5 Angstroms to 10 Angstroms.
12. The method of claim 1, wherein the exposed elemental silicon-containing surface comprises polycrystalline silicon.
13. The method of claim 1, wherein the exposed elemental silicon-containing surface comprises monocrystalline silicon.
14. The method of claim 1, wherein the exposing occurs during the conductive reaction layer-depositing.
15. The method of claim 1, wherein the exposing only occurs during the conductive reaction layer-depositing.
16. The method of claim 1, wherein at least some of the exposing occurs prior to and separate from the conductive reaction layer-depositing.
17. The method of claim 16, wherein all of the exposing occurs prior to and separate from the conductive reaction layer-depositing.
18. The method of claim 1, wherein the conductive reaction layer has an outer portion that at least predominately comprises said first elemental metal.
19. The method of claim 18, wherein the conductive reaction layer outer portion consists essentially of said first elemental metal.
20. The method of claim 1, wherein the conductive reaction layer has an outer portion that at least predominately comprises said metal-rich silicide.
21. The method of claim 20, wherein the conductive reaction layer outer portion consists essentially of said metal-rich silicide.
22. The method of claim 1, wherein the reacting occurs during the conductive reaction layer-depositing.
23. The method of claim 1, wherein the reacting occurs after the conductive reaction layer-depositing.
24. The method of claim 23, wherein the reacting does not occur during the conductive reaction layer-depositing.
25. The method of claim 1, wherein the exposing and the reacting occur during the conductive reaction layer-depositing.
26. The method of claim 1, wherein the deposited layer of thickness no greater than 15 Angstroms has an as-deposited resistance greater than 1000 microohms-cm, the exposing and reacting being effective to reduce resistance of the deposited layer of thickness no greater than 15 Angstroms to less than 1000 microohms-cm.
27. The method of claim 1, wherein the layer of thickness no greater than 15 Angstroms comprises tantalum nitride.
28. The method of claim 27, wherein the conductive reaction layer comprises at least one of titanium and titanium-rich titanium silicide.
29. The method of claim 1, wherein the conductive metal silicide-comprising contact region has a thickness from 5 Angstroms to 100 Angstroms.
30. The method of claim 1, wherein the exposing, conductive reaction layer-depositing and reacting are effective to form all conductive metal silicide formed over the substrate by the reacting to have no more than 10% thickness variation as determined of a thickest portion of said conductive metal silicide formed by the reacting.
31. The method of claim 1, wherein the exposing, conductive reaction layer-depositing and reacting are effective to form all conductive metal silicide formed over the substrate by the reacting to have no more than 1% thickness variation as determined of a thickest portion of said conductive metal silicide formed by the reacting.
32. The method of claim 1, wherein the exposing, conductive reaction layer-depositing and reacting are effective to form all conductive metal silicide formed over the substrate by the reacting to have from 1% to 3% thickness variation as determined of a thickest portion of said conductive metal silicide formed by the reacting.
33. The method of claim 1, wherein the conductive reaction layer is of a thickness which is greater than that of the layer of thickness no greater than 15 Angstroms.
34. The method of claim 1, wherein the exposed elemental silicon-containing surface is received within a contact opening formed within an insulative layer.
35. A method of forming a conductive metal silicide by reaction of metal with silicon, comprising:
providing a semiconductor substrate comprising an exposed elemental silicon-containing surface;
depositing one or more monolayers to form a tantalum nitride-comprising layer onto the exposed elemental silicon-containing surface to a thickness no greater than 15 Angstroms, the deposited tantalum nitride-comprising layer having a resistance greater than 1000 microohms-cm;
exposing the tantalum nitride-comprising layer of thickness no greater than 15 Angstroms to plasma and depositing a conductive reaction layer comprising at least one of an elemental metal or metal-rich silicide onto the plasma-exposed layer; and
reacting said metal or metal-rich silicide of the conductive reaction layer with the elemental silicon of the substrate effective to form a conductive metal silicide-comprising contact region over the tantalum nitride-comprising layer which electrically connects the conductive reaction layer with the substrate; the exposing, depositing and reacting being effective to reduce resistance of the tantalum nitride-comprising layer to less than 1000 microohms-cm.
36. The method of claim 35, wherein the tantalum nitride-comprising layer as-deposited is of a thickness no less than 5 Angstroms.
37. The method of claim 35, wherein the tantalum nitride-comprising layer as-deposited is of a thickness from 5 Angstroms to 10 Angstroms.
38. The method of claim 35, wherein the exposing occurs during the conductive reaction layer-depositing.
39. The method of claim 35, wherein at least some of the exposing occurs prior to and separate from the conductive reaction layer-depositing.
40. The method of claim 35, wherein the conductive reaction layer has an outer portion that at least predominately comprises the elemental metal.
41. The method of claim 35, wherein the reacting occurs during the conductive reaction layer-depositing.
42. The method of claim 35, wherein the reacting occurs after the conductive reaction layer-depositing.
43. The method of claim 42, wherein the reacting does not occur during the conductive reaction layer-depositing.
44. The method of claim 35, wherein the exposing and the reacting occur during the conductive reaction layer-depositing.
45. The method of claim 35, wherein the exposing and reacting are effective to reduce resistance of the tantalum nitride-comprising layer to less than 800 microohms-cm.
46. The method of claim 35, wherein the exposing, conductive reaction layer-depositing and reacting are effective to form all conductive metal silicide formed over the substrate by the reacting to have no more than 10% thickness variation as determined of a thickest portion of said conductive metal silicide formed by the reacting.
47. The method of claim 35, wherein the exposing, conductive reaction layer-depositing and reacting are effective to form all conductive metal silicide formed over the substrate by the reacting to have no more than 1% thickness variation as determined of a thickest portion of said conductive metal silicide formed by the reacting.
48. The method of claim 35, wherein the exposing, conductive reaction layer-depositing and reacting are effective to form all conductive metal silicide formed over the substrate by the reacting to have from 1% to 3% thickness variation as determined of a thickest portion of said conductive metal silicide formed by the reacting.
Description
RELATED PATENT DATA

This patent resulted from a continuation application of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/689,958, filed Oct. 20, 2003 now U.S. Pat. No. 7,026,243, entitled “Methods of Forming Conductive Metal Silicides by Reaction of Metal With Silicon”, naming Cem Basceri as inventors, the disclosure of which is incorporated by reference.

TECHNICAL FIELD

This invention relates to methods of forming conductive metal silicides by reaction of metal with silicon.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Integrated circuits typically use various combinations of insulative materials, conductive materials, and semiconductive materials (including conductively doped semiconductive material). One type of conductive material which is utilized is elemental metals. In the context of this document, an “elemental metal” is defined to mean any one or more metal element(s) in element form, including any alloy of two or more metal elements. In many instances, it is desired to form a metal into electrical connection with a crystalline silicon substrate, for example conductively doped crystalline silicon. However, the physical contact of an elemental metal with a crystalline silicon substrate inherently creates undesired excessive electrical resistance between the two materials.

One common way of reducing this resistance is to form an interfacing silicide region at the junction or interface of the metal with the silicon. Thereby, a silicon-silicide-metal interfacing electrical connection is formed. One manner of forming the silicide is merely by heating the substrate with the two contacting layers to a suitable temperature for a sufficient period of time, typically in an inert atmosphere, to cause a reaction of metal and silicon to form the metal silicide. Alternately or in addition thereto, the deposition conditions for the metal material deposited over the silicon can be effectively high to impart a reaction of the depositing metal with the underlying silicon in situ during deposition. Regardless, the silicide which forms results from reaction of the metal with the underlying silicon substrate. The reaction is typically self-limiting such that further processing or exposure to temperature at some point stops resulting in silicide formation.

Integrated circuitry fabrication continues to strive to make ever denser and smaller electronic devices of the circuitry. One place where silicide contact structures are utilized is in the electrical connection of source/drain diffusion regions of field effect transistors with overlying conductive metal lines. As the device components get smaller and denser, it is highly desirable to precisely control the amount of silicide which is formed in such contacts, as well as in other devices where silicide interfaces between metal and silicon are desired to be formed. For example in some instances in present-generation processing, it is desirable to fabricate the silicide regions over the substrates to have thicknesses of from 50 Angstroms to 100 Angstroms. Further, it is expected that the thickness of silicide regions in later-generation processing will fall below 50 Angstroms. Regardless, the variation in thickness of silicide regions formed over a substrate using typical prior art processing has been found to be anywhere from 20 Angstroms to 25 Angstroms across the substrate. This variability is undesirable and constitutes a 20% to 25% thickness variation for desired 100 Angstroms thick silicide regions, and a 40% to 50% variation in thickness for desired 50 Angstroms thick silicide regions. It would be desirable to develop methods which enable tighter thickness control of silicide regions which are formed across a substrate, and particularly where the silicide regions being formed have thicknesses that are no greater than 100 Angstroms where the above problem particularly manifests.

While the invention was motivated in addressing the above described issues, it is in no way so limited. The invention is only limited by the accompanying claims as literally worded, without interpretative or other limiting reference to the specification, and in accordance with the doctrine of equivalents.

SUMMARY

The invention includes methods of forming conductive metal silicides by reaction of metal with silicon. In one implementation, such a method includes providing a semiconductor substrate comprising an exposed elemental silicon containing surface. At least one of a nitride, boride, carbide, or oxide comprising layer is atomic layer deposited onto the exposed elemental silicon containing surface to a thickness no greater than 15 Angstroms. Such layer is exposed to plasma and a conductive reaction layer comprising at least one of an elemental metal or metal rich silicide is deposited onto the plasma exposed layer. Metal of the conductive reaction layer is reacted with elemental silicon of the substrate effective to form a conductive metal silicide comprising contact region electrically connecting the conductive reaction layer with the substrate.

Other aspects and implementations are contemplated.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Preferred embodiments of the invention are described below with reference to the following accompanying drawings.

FIG. 1 is a diagrammatic sectional view of a semiconductor wafer fragment in process in accordance with an aspect of the invention.

FIG. 2 is a view of the FIG. 1 fragment at a processing step subsequent to that shown by FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a view of the FIG. 1 fragment at a processing step subsequent to that shown by FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is view of the FIG. 1 fragment at a processing step subsequent to that shown by FIG. 2.

FIG. 5 is a view of the FIG. 1 fragment at a processing step subsequent to that shown by FIG. 2.

FIG. 6 is a diagrammatic sectional view of an alternate embodiment semiconductor wafer fragment in process in accordance with an aspect of the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

This disclosure of the invention is submitted in furtherance of the constitutional purposes of the U.S. Patent Laws “to promote the progress of science and useful arts” (Article 1, Section 8).

Exemplary preferred methods of forming a conductive metal silicide by reaction of metal with silicon are described with reference to FIGS. 1-6. Referring initially to FIG. 1, a substrate fragment is indicated generally with reference numeral 10, and comprises a semiconductor substrate 12. In the context of this document, the term “semiconductor substrate” or “semiconductive substrate” is defined to mean any construction comprising semiconductive material, including, but not limited to, bulk semiconductive materials such as a semiconductive wafer (either alone or in assemblies comprising other materials thereon), and semiconductive material layers (either alone or in assemblies comprising other materials). The term “substrate” refers to any supporting structure, including, but not limited to, the semiconductive substrates described above. Accordingly, semiconductor substrate 12 might comprise various structures and/or composites and/or mixtures of insulative, conductive and semiconductive materials. Regardless in the context of the invention, semiconductor substrate 12 comprises some exposed elemental silicon containing surface 14. Such might be a substantially global surface across the entirety of the substrate being processed, or one or more isolated regions of exposed elemental silicon. For example, and by way of example only, an exposed silicon surface might constitute the outer surface of a conductive diffusion region formed of conductively doped monocrystalline or polycrystalline silicon exposed through a contact opening formed in an insulative material layer or layers. Regardless in one aspect, exposed elemental silicon containing surface 14 comprises monocrystalline silicon (including epitaxially grown silicon) and/or polycrystalline silicon. Exposed elemental silicon containing surface also or alternately might comprise silicon from a silicon-rich silicon compound.

Referring to FIG. 2, a layer 16 comprising at least one of a nitride, boride, carbide or oxide is atomic layer deposited onto exposed elemental silicon containing surface 14 to a thickness no greater than 15 Angstroms. Accordingly, layer 16 might comprise any one or combination of nitrides, borides, carbides or oxides. Atomic layer depositing (ALD) typically involves formation of successive atomic layers on a substrate. Such layers may comprise, for example, epitaxial, polycrystalline, and/or amorphous material. Described in summary, ALD includes exposing an initial substrate to a first chemical species to accomplish chemisorbtion of the species onto the substrate. Theoretically, the chemisorbtion forms a monolayer that is uniformly one atom or molecule thick on the entire exposed initial substrate. In other words, a saturated monolayer is preferably formed. Practically, chemisorbtion might not occur on all portions or completely over the desired substrate surfaces. Nevertheless, such an imperfect monolayer is still considered a monolayer. In many applications, merely a substantially saturated monolayer may be suitable. A substantially saturated monolayer is one that will still yield a deposited layer exhibiting the quality and/or properties desired for such layer.

The first species is purged from over the substrate and a second chemical species is provided to chemisorb onto the first monolayer of the first species. The second species is then purged and the steps are repeated with exposure of the second species monolayer to the first species. In some cases, the two monolayers may be of the same species. Also, a third species or more may be successively chemisorbed and purged just as described for the first and second species. Further, one or more of the first, second and third species can be mixed with inert gas to speed up pressure saturation within a reaction chamber.

Purging may involve a variety of techniques including, but not limited to, contacting the substrate and/or monolayer with a carrier gas and/or lowering pressure to below the deposition pressure to reduce the concentration of a species contacting the substrate and/or chemisorbed species. Examples of carrier gases include N2, Ar, He, Ne, Kr, Xe, etc. Purging may instead include contacting the substrate and/or monolayer with any substance that allows chemisorption byproducts to desorb and reduces the concentration of a species preparatory to introducing another species. A suitable amount of purging can be determined experimentally as known to those skilled in the art. Purging time may be successively reduced to a purge time that yields an increase in film growth rate. The increase in film growth rate might be an indication of a change to a non-ALD process regime and may be used to establish a purge time limit.

ALD is often described as a self-limiting process in that a finite number of sites exist on a substrate to which the first species may form chemical bonds. The second species might only bond to the first species and thus may also be self-limiting. Once all of the finite number of sites on a substrate are bonded with a first species, the first species will often not bond to other of the first species already bonded with the substrate. However, process conditions can be varied in ALD to promote such bonding and render ALD not self-limiting. Accordingly, ALD may also encompass a species forming other than one monolayer at a time by stacking of a species, forming a layer more than one atom or molecule thick. Further, local chemical reactions can occur during ALD (for instance, an incoming reactant molecule can displace a molecule from an existing surface rather than forming a monolayer over the surface). To the extent that such chemical reactions occur, they are generally confined within the uppermost monolayer of a surface.

Traditional ALD can occur within frequently-used ranges of temperature and pressure and according to established purging criteria to achieve the desired formation of an overall ALD layer one monolayer at a time. Even so, ALD conditions can vary greatly depending on the particular precursors, layer composition, deposition equipment, and other factors according to criteria known by those skilled in the art. Maintaining the traditional conditions of temperature, pressure, and purging minimizes unwanted reactions that may impact monolayer formation and quality of the resulting overall ALD layer. Accordingly, operating outside the traditional temperature and pressure ranges may risk formation of defective monolayers.

With respect to layer 16, exemplary preferred nitrides include tantalum nitride, titanium nitride, tungsten nitride, boron nitride, aluminum nitride, hafnium nitride, and mixtures thereof. Preferably where any nitride is present, such nitride is void of silicon nitride due to. its excessive resistivity. Exemplary preferred borides include tungsten boride, titanium boride, and mixtures thereof. Exemplary preferred carbides include tantalum carbide, titanium carbide, silicon carbide, and mixtures thereof. Exemplary preferred oxides include rhodium oxide, ruthenium oxide, iridium oxide, and mixtures thereof. Where oxide is present, such is preferably void of SiO2 due to its excessive resistance. While the disclosed invention does not preclude presence or use of silicon nitride or silicon dioxide, such are not preferred. Further preferably, exposed elemental silicon containing surface 14 is subjected to an HF dip prior to atomic layer depositing of layer 16 thereover.

ALD layer 16 preferably has a thickness which is no less than 5 Angstroms, with a more preferred thickness range being from 5 Angstroms to 10 Angstroms.

In one implementation, layer 16 as-deposited to a thickness no greater than 15 Angstroms has a resistance greater than 1000 microohms-cm.

In one exemplary preferred reduction-to-practice example, layer 16 comprises tantalum nitride, for example atomic layer deposited from precursors comprising pentakis-dimethylamido-tantalum (PDMAT) and ammonia. For example, and by way of example only, atomic layer deposition conditions include a substrate temperature of from 125° C. to 400° C., PDMAT carrier gas flow (Ar) in the range of 100 sccm to 175 sccm, and NH3 flow in the range of 1000 sccm to 1750 sccm. Exemplary preferred cycle sequences include 75 milliseconds to 2000 milliseconds of PDMAT pulse length, 250 milliseconds to 2250 milliseconds of Ar purge after each PDMAT pulse, 125 milliseconds to 2500 milliseconds of NH3 pulse length, and 500 milliseconds to 2000 milliseconds Ar purge after each NH3 pulse. A specific example, and by way of example only, is 500 millisecond PDMAT pulses, 500 millisecond Ar purges, 1000 millisecond NH3 pulses, and 500 millisecond Ar purges. Precursor carrier and NH3 flows were 100 sccm and 1000 sccm, respectively. Growth rate of approximately 0.7 Angstroms per cycle was achieved, indicating each cycle was not resulting in complete saturation. A more preferred temperature range is from 175° C. to 300° C., with 275° C. being a specific preferred example.

Referring to FIG. 3, ALD layer 16 has been exposed to plasma and a conductive reaction layer 18 comprising at least one of an elemental metal or metal rich silicide has been deposited onto plasma exposed layer 16. Metal of conductive reaction layer 18 is reacted with elemental silicon of substrate 12 effective to form a conductive metal silicide comprising contact region 20 which electrically connects conductive reaction layer 18 with substrate 12. Conductive metal silicide comprising contact region 20 preferably has a thickness from 5 Angstroms to 100 Angstroms. FIG. 3 depicts an upper un-reacted portion 22 of conductive reaction layer 18, whereby a lower portion of layer 18 has reacted to form silicide with silicon of substrate 12. In one preferred example, outer portion 22 of conductive reaction layer 18 at least predominately comprises elemental metal, and in another example consists essentially of elemental metal. In one exemplary embodiment, outer portion 22 of conductive reaction layer 18 at least predominately comprises metal rich silicide, and in another example consists essentially of metal rich silicide. By way of example only, exemplary elemental metals include titanium, nickel, ruthenium, cobalt, tungsten, iridium, molybdenum, and mixtures thereof. Exemplary metal rich silicides include metal silicides of these exemplary metals, including mixtures thereof. In one embodiment, the at least one of a nitride, boride, carbide, or oxide of layer 16 of FIG. 2 is of a metal which is different from the metal of the conductive reaction layer. In one exemplary embodiment, the at least one of the nitride, boride, carbide, or oxide of layer 16 of FIG. 2 is of a metal which is the same as the metal of the conductive reaction layer.

One exemplary preferred and reduction-to-practice material for conductive reaction layer 18 comprises at least one of titanium and titanium rich titanium silicide. Further by way of example only, titanium and titanium rich titanium silicides can be deposited utilizing halides, such as TiCl4. An exemplary preferred technique for depositing elemental titanium utilizes a capacitively coupled, single wafer processor, for example a Centura™ reactor available from Applied Materials of Santa Clara, Calif. Exemplary substrate temperature conditions during deposit of either a titanium or titanium rich metal silicide layer include from 550° C. to 700° C. An exemplary preferred pressure range is from 1 Torr to 10 Torr, with an exemplary RF applied power being from 50 Watts to 500 Watts. An exemplary flow rate of the TiCl4 is from 50 mg/min to 500 mg/min, with an exemplary additional gas flows of Ar and H2 each being from 50 sccm to 500 sccm. If a titanium rich titanium silicide is to be deposited, a suitable silane could also be flowed and/or pulsed to the deposition reactor at volumetric flow rates sufficiently spaced or suitably low to result in excess elemental titanium in the titanium silicide layer being formed. Conductive reaction layer 18 might be of the same, greater or lesser thickness as that of crystalline form layer 16, with greater thickness being preferred.

The above stated exposing of the ALD layer to plasma, the depositing of a conductive reaction layer, and the reacting to form a conductive metal silicide comprising contact region can occur separately or in various combinations. For example where a conductive reaction layer depositing is by a plasma deposition, such act of depositing with plasma can constitute some or all of the ALD layer exposing to plasma. Accordingly in such example, at least some of such ALD layer exposing to plasma occurs during the depositing of the conductive reaction layer. If there is no plasma exposure of the ALD layer prior to a plasma deposition of the conductive layer, then the exposing would only occur during a plasma deposition of the conductive reaction layer.

FIG. 4 diagrammatically depicts by the downwardly directed arrows ALD layer 16 being exposed to plasma prior to and separate of the depositing of conductive reaction layer 18 as depicted by FIG. 3. As stated above, some plasma exposure of layer 16 is contemplated in accordance with the invention. Such plasma exposure might all occur during the deposition of the conductive reaction layer, all of such exposing prior to and separate of the deposition of the conductive reaction layer, or both before and during deposition of the conductive reaction layer.

Further regarding reacting of metal of the conductive reaction layer with elemental silicon of the substrate to form a conductive metal silicide comprising contact region, such reacting might occur during the conductive reaction layer depositing, after the depositing, or both during and after the depositing. By way of example only, FIG. 5 depicts a conductive reaction layer 18 deposited over ALD layer 16 in a manner wherein negligible if any reaction to form a conductive metal silicide comprising contact region occurs. Such might result if deposition of layer 18 were conducted at suitably low temperatures to preclude appreciable reaction of metal of layer 18 with silicon of substrate 12, with or without plasma. If so and regardless, a silicidation reaction between metal of layer 18 and silicon of substrate 12 could be achieved by exposure of the substrate to a suitable temperature, for example from 400° C. to 700° C. for an exemplary time period of from 30 seconds to 5 minutes to, for example, produce the structure of FIG. 3. Regardless, it is possible that the combination of the exposing, depositing, and reacting might be effective to substantially break up and/or diffuse layer 16 relative to one or both of conductive reaction layer 18 or region 20 such that layer 16 may no longer be distinguishable or have the same boundaries as initially deposited.

Processing as described in the above exemplary preferred embodiments produces certain unexpected advantages and results. However, such advantages or results do not constitute part of the invention unless literally appearing in a particular claim under analysis. In one preferred implementation, the exposing of the ALD layer to plasma and reacting to form the conductive metal silicide comprising contact region is effective to reduce resistance of the ALD layer to have an intrinsic resistance less than 1000 microohms-cm, and more preferably to have an intrinsic resistance less than 800 microohms-cm. For example, deposition of an elemental titanium layer by PECVD as described above was discovered to reduce intrinsic resistivity of an ALD tantalum nitride film of from 5 Angstroms to 10 Angstroms in thickness to about 700 microohms-cm. This was unexpected as the as-deposited film had intrinsic resistance well in excess of 1000 microohms-cm. The mechanism for such advantageous results is not fully understood. Without being limited to any theory of invention, one possibility is tunneling or diffusion of the formed silicide material through the ALD layer of thickness no greater than 15 Angstroms. An alternate or additional theory is that the plasma attack or exposure onto the ALD layer is favorably reducing resistivity of such layer. An alternate or additional theory is that the exposure to plasma, the depositing of the conductive reaction layer, and the reacting to form metal silicide is resulting in layer 16 not being continuous, thereby enhancing conductivity (reducing resistivity). Further and regardless, some or much of layer 16 from one or more of such acts might be diffusing into and relative to silicide region 20 being formed. Regardless, in one aspect of the invention resistance is reduced to a value below 1000 microohms-cm, and more preferably to a value below 800 microohms-cm.

Another advantageous result in one implementation is that the exposing, depositing and reacting result in better control (less variation) in the thickness of the metal silicide formed by the reaction. Accordingly in one implementation, the exposing, depositing and reacting are effective to form all conductive metal silicide formed over the substrate by the reacting to have no more than 10% thickness variation as determined as the percentage of the thickness portion of the conductive metal silicide formed by the reacting. In another preferred implementation, such thickness variation is from 1% to 3%, and in another preferred embodiment to have no more than 1% of such thickness variation. In one exemplary reduction-to-practice example, a thickest deposited portion of a metal silicide formed by the reacting was to 50 Angstroms, with the thickness variation across the substrate never exceeding 0.5 Angstrom of the metal silicide formed by the reacting.

By way of example only, FIG. 6 depicts an alternate exemplary embodiment substrate fragment 10 a. Like numerals form the-first described embodiments are utilized where appropriate, with differences being indicated with the suffix “a” or with different numerals. FIG. 6 depicts insulative material 30, for example comprising borophosphosilicate glass and undoped SiO2, having been deposited over substrate 12. A contact opening 32 has been formed therethrough effective to expose some elemental silicon containing surface of substrate 12. Layer 16 b, comprising at least one of a nitride, boride, carbide, or oxide comprising layer having a thickness no greater than 15 Angstroms, has been deposited. Processing has occurred in accordance with the broadest aspects above, including any of the various preferred attributes, effective to form conductive metal silicide comprising contact region 20 a which electrically connects conductive reaction layer 18 a with substrate 12. Further processing could occur, of course, including the forming of additional layers or the removing of the depicted layers without departing form the spirit and scope of the invention.

In compliance with the statute, the invention has been described in language more or less specific as to structural and methodical features. It is to be understood, however, that the invention is not limited to the specific features shown and described, since the means herein disclosed comprise preferred forms of putting the invention into effect. The invention is, therefore, claimed in any of its forms or modifications within the proper scope of the appended claims appropriately interpreted in accordance with the doctrine of equivalents.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification438/682, 438/685, 438/649, 438/683, 257/E21.576, 257/E21.59, 438/651, 257/E21.507, 257/E21.584, 438/686
International ClassificationH01L21/768, H01L21/60, H01L21/44
Cooperative ClassificationH01L21/76895, H01L21/76823, H01L21/76846, H01L21/76843, H01L21/76897, H01L21/76867, H01L21/76825, H01L21/76849, H01L21/76826
European ClassificationH01L21/768S, H01L21/768B8D, H01L21/768B8B, H01L21/768C10, H01L21/768C3B4, H01L21/768B8P, H01L21/768C3B8, H01L21/768C3B, H01L21/768C3F
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